Rethink Talks

Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University

From pandemics to production supply chains: how do we make sense of the complex world we live in? Every month, we bring together the best thinkers and practitioners within resilience thinking and sustainability science, to discuss how we can achieve a sustainable planet that enables well-being for all. Rethink talks provides you with the latest science on global development. Subscribe to our podcast by searching for “Rethink Talks” on Spotify or any of the major podcast platforms. Read more: www.rethink.earth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rethink Talks trailer
Trailer 1 min 18 sec

All Episodes

The sixth IPCC report sent a clear message: we are one minute to midnight and the rate and scale of action that is required is immense. However, all too often, the solutions presented are top-down and framed in an outdated North-South perspective. We need voices from the climate change frontline to not only be rightfully acknowledged and valued, but to be learned from as climate adaptation experts.In this episode, Ameil Harikishun, policy officer for the Global Resilience Partnership, talks to Harini Nagendra, director of Research Center and head of Center for Climate Change and Sustainability, both at the Azim Premji University in India. And Saleemul Huq, director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh and Professor at the Independent University Bangladesh. With decades of experience combined, they share their insights on locally led adaption and what is needed for it to work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 12

30 min 30 sec

No matter where in the world you live, your life is affected by the ocean. But many of our oceans are sick, and have been so for a while. So what’s keeping them from bouncing back to full health? Well, it’s partly down to not agreeing on what a healthy ocean actually looks like that makes it hard to settle on the best course of action. But things might be about to change, albeit slowly.New science-based tools like the Ocean Health Index offer comprehensive assessments of the social, economic, and environmental conditions of an ocean.In this episode, Susa Niiranen talks to Ben Halpern the creator of the Ocean Health Index, and Thorsten Blenckner, a researcher at the Stockholm Resilience Centre who with his team has developed a spin-off called the Baltic Health Index.Together, they explore what it takes to restore an ocean to good health, and to what extent these new assessments can help us reach our goals.More information, including links to mentioned publications: www.rethink.earth/making-our-oceans-healthy-again/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 31

30 min 29 sec

How did we get to where we are today and what will it take to move away from it? In this episode, Owen Gaffney talks to Carl Folke, a co-founder of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and one of the most cited scientists in the world across all disciplines. He is also the director of the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and has received numerous awards and recognitions over the years.Folke has spearheaded the modern thinking around social-ecological systems and how we must stop considering nature and the environment as something separate from society. He has previously said that he is "embarrassed as a human that we have in two generations created mindsets where we consider ourselves independent of the biosphere".Now, luckily, he says, we are rapidly gaining that perspective again.In this special edition of Rethink Talks, Carl Folke reflects on his own career path, resilience thinking, and why it's important to not be constrained by a certain theory or method when trying to solve a challenge. He also provides a unique glimpse into the launch of the Stockholm Resilience Centre.Read more: https://rethink.earth/carl-folke-on-resilience-the-biosphere-and-the-future-of-our-planet See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 17

44 min 7 sec

The age of humans is messing things up in many different ways. Not only is human pressure on the environment changing the earth system in unprecedented ways, trust in science is faltering while media and journalism remains fragmented. The consequence is a siloed world at a time when trust and collaboration is sorely needed. Science communication requires creativity, joy, perseverance, the courage to try something new and, actively finding ways to work around the weaknesses in the system.In this episode, Andrew Merrie talks to Maddie Stone, a freelance science journalist and previously the managing editor of the Gizmodo Earther ‘Nature for Nerds’ blog. Her work has appeared in outlets such as Vice, National Geographic, Grist, the Washington Post, The Atlantic and more. Andrew also talks to Owen Gaffney, a sustainability communicator and strategist for organizations such as the Stockholm Resilience Centre, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and the Global Commons Alliance. Together they ask, how can we share and explain science in a world beset by fast change and a lack of trust? And can science fiction help?More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/communicating-science-in-the-age-of-the-anthropocene/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 3

27 min 9 sec

The ocean has gone from infinite, wild and thriving to finite, fragile and full of garbage. It feeds us, generates most of the air we breathe, helps to regulate our climate, provides treatments for disease and represents a new economic frontier. But we have limited time to get people to pay attention, anticipate change, prepare for surprise and act for a more sustainable ocean future. This is why the UN has introduced the Decade of Ocean science for a ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity to strengthen the management of our ocean.But will it actually work?In this episode, Andrew Merrie talks to Helen Ågren, Ambassador for the Ocean for the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Guillermo Ortuño Crespo, a researcher at the Stockholm Resilience Centre and one the leaders behind the UN Ocean Decade Early Career Ocean Professional Initiative.More information, including links to the mentioned material: https://rethink.earth/he-ocean-science-decade See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 19

27 min 48 sec

In 2009, 28 internationally renowned scientists identified nine processes that regulate the stability and resilience of the entire planet. Provided we stay within these boundaries, humanity can continue to develop and thrive for generations to come. Since its launch the planetary boundaries framework has generated enormous interest within science, policy, and practice. But what does it take to communicate such important knowledge about how our planet works? On June 4th, Netflix launched a documentary on the planetary boundaries, based on the recently released book, Breaking Boundaries. How can films and books like these explain complex scientific findings to a wide and diverse audience? How do we tell a compelling story without compromising scientific integrity? In this episode, Amanda Wood from the Stockholm Resilience Centre talks to Jon Clay, producer of the Breaking Boundaries documentary, and Owen Gaffney, head of international Media and Policy at the Stockholm Resilience Centre and co-author of the Breaking boundaries book. Together they discuss the next frontier in filmmaking and scientific communication. More information: https://rethink.earth/communicating-the-complex-science-behind-the-planetary-boundaries/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 5

28 min 21 sec

From pandemics to production supply chains: how do we make sense of the complex world we live in? Every month, we bring together the best thinkers and practitioners within resilience thinking and sustainability science, to discuss how we can achieve a sustainable §planet that enables well-being for all. Rethink talks provides you with the latest science on global development. Subscribe to our podcast by searching for “Rethink Talks” on Spotify or any of the major podcast platforms, or head over to our website, www.rethink.earth. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 1

1 min 18 sec

Despite the world entering the last decade to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) biodiversity and ecosystem services remain chronically undervalued and largely missing. As the world is entering the last decade to meet the goals, a change in thinking and approach is needed.In this episode Stockholm Resilience Centre's Albert Norström talks to Liz Selig, deputy director at the Center for Ocean Solutions at Stanford University, and Belinda Reyers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University and the Future Africa Campus at University of Pretoria in South Africa.They warn that unless action is taken, progress toward the goals is in jeopardy. So the question remains: how can we better capture the role of biodiversity for sustainable development?More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/1-in-the-sdgs-where-have-biodiversity-and-ecosystem-services-gone/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 22

27 min 43 sec

Within calls for transformation, there seems to be a hunger - a hunger to slow down, spend time healing, and to feel more connected; to ourselves, to each other, and to the ecosystems we are a part of.But how can that happen? And can we create that kind of healing at scales large enough that it will contribute to the kinds of transformations that may create a different kind of future.In this episode, Stockholm Resilience Centre's Michele-Lee Moore talks to two experts on what it takes to step away from the status quo and established modes of thinking.Dr. Vanessa Andreotti is an expert on race, inequality, and education and focuses on collective processes for both healing and re-thinking how we create alternative futures, and Dr Per Espen Stoknes, is a psychologist and expert on scenarios and sustainable economics.Together they unravel some of the obstacles that exist for transformation to really happen. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 8

35 min 21 sec

Every year since 1990, the United Nations Development Programme has published the Human Development Report. The report has increasingly emphasised the links between the environment and human development, and today, on its 30th anniversary, it shows more than ever the importance of a stable climate and resilient ecosystems.In this episode, Fredrik Moberg talks to Pedro Conceição, lead author of the Human Development Report, and Belinda Reyers, senior advisor at the Stockholm Resilience Centre.Together they discuss questions like: In the age of the Anthropocene, why is the Human Development Report still such an important report? And how can resilience thinking contribute to new global development strategies?More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/the-2020-human-development-report/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2020

25 min 6 sec

Science and industry have much to gain from working more closely together. But their methods and expectations can sometimes feel worlds apart. What makes them so different and what is needed to create more successful collaborations?In this episode Lisen Schultz, deputy director of transdisciplinarity at the Stockholm Resilience Centre talks to colleague Henrik Österblom and Darian McBain, director for corporate affairs and sustainability at Thai Union, the world’s largest canned tuna producer. Together they share thoughts and experiences on how it is working together to make the world’s largest seafood companies more sustainable.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/what-it-takes-to-make-science-and-business-connect/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2020

26 min 28 sec

Right now, the very idea of imagining the future might feel strange when the world is changing in ways we barely even understand. In this episode, we ask, is a safe and just future for all still possible? And what will it take to imagine and enact these kinds of futures? Host Andrew Merrie is joined by two people who spend much of their time thinking about this: Garry Peterson from the Stockholm Resilience Centre and Laura Pereira from the Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development at Utrecht University.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/after-covid-19-imagining-a-safe-and-just-future-for-all/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 2020

27 min 54 sec

Economies around the world have been shaken by the COVID-19 pandemic and revealed serious vulnerabilities and weaknesses. What can we learn from today’s crisis to build more resilience into our systems?In this episode, host Robert Blasiak talks to Lisen Schultz from the Stockholm Resilience Centre, and Sturla Henriksen, Special Advisor to the United Nations Global Compact, the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative.More info: https://rethink.earth/building-business-resilience-what-has-covid-19-taught-us/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 2020

29 min 51 sec

Covid-19 has brought the modern world to its knees. How did we get to this point? This episode of Rethink Talk takes a deep dive into what the coronavirus pandemic says about our world and the change it may go on to trigger.Host Louise Hård Af Segerstad talks to three experts on change and transformation: Marten Scheffer from Wageningen University, Lauren Hermanus, an expert in sustainable development in practice in South Africa, and Michele-Lee Moore from the Stockholm Resilience Centre.Read more: www.rethink.earth/crisis-and-renewal-what-covid-19-says-about-our-world See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 2020

27 min 34 sec

COVID-19 has forced governments to take unprecedented steps to recover their economies. At the same time, some parts of the private sector warn they may have to park long-term climate ambitions just to keep their heads above water. This has potentially devastating consequences for sustainability efforts. So how can stimulus packages and investments promote short-term economic recovery without compromising long-term decarbonization and sustainability goals?In this episode, Beatrice Crona, deputy science director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and executive director of the Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere programme at The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, talks to Maria Håkansson, CEO of Swedfund, the Swedish Government's Development Finance Institution and Therese Lindahl, director of the Behavior, Economics and Nature Programme at the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/building-back-better See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 2020

24 min 12 sec

COVID-19 is a devastating example of a crisis which ripples through regions and countries, affecting pretty much all aspects of our lives. Although impacts of the pandemic have hit some communities harder than others, especially in the global south, we are seeing signs of resilience emerging from many affected communities.This episode takes a closer look at some of these communities and how they have responded to this crisis. What can we learn from them and how can we build social resilience for similar events in the future?Albert Norström from Stockholm Resilience Centre and the Global Resilience Partnership unpacks these questions with colleague Cibele Queiroz and Rafael Calderon-Contreras from the Metropolitan Autonomous University in Mexico.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/social-resilience-during-times-of-crisis/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 2020

32 min 8 sec

The corona virus has been described as the biggest challenge the world has faced since World War II. Yet while all eyes are on this devastating pandemic, the Amazon forest is burning to the point of becoming a planetary emergency. This episode looks at deforestation and the looming risk of large-scale destruction in the Amazon and elsewhere – something we know is also linked to the spread of infectious disease from animals to humans. How worried should we be? And what can we do about it?In this episode, Fredrik Moberg unpacks these questions with Ana Paula Aguiar from the Brazilian Institute for Space Research and David Armstrong McKay from Stockholm Resilience Centre.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/while-all-eyes-are-on-covid-19-the-amazon-forest-is-burning/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 2020

31 min 20 sec

Digital technologies have created an information deluge. It is impossible to keep up with the flood. But digital technologies have also changed the flow of information in the world; the old gatekeepers like the media are now bypassed. What does this mean during a crisis when we need to make rapid decisions under uncertainty and we need to act collectively? In this episode media strategist Owen Gaffney speaks to Kate Starbird, an associate professor at the University of Washington and expert on the use of communications technologies in times crisis. Owen also talks to Victor Galaz, associate professor and deputy director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University who studies the spread of disinformation online.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/sense-making-in-crisis/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 2020

32 min 30 sec

When you think about the corona virus currently sweeping the globe, chances are that ‘food’ is not the first thing that comes to mind. Yet food has amplified the devastating effects caused by COVID-19 and exposed vulnerabilities across our food system. This episode asks: how exactly is food related to the pandemic? And how can we redesign our food systems in a way that helps us avoid similar crises in the future? In this episode Amanda Wood talks to Jess Fanzo from the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, and Line Gordon from the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University. Both researchers are experts on global food systems and the links between people, the environment and food.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/the-role-of-food-in-the-pandemic/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 2020

32 min

We are in the midst of a devastating pandemic. The coronavirus that leads to covid-19 is known to be a zoonotic disease - a virus that has spilled over from non-human animals to humans, and then rapidly moved across the world with devastating impacts on human health, economies and social stability.How strong is the connection between environmental change and diseases such as coronaviruses connection, can we really blame bats, and what does the future of disease risks look like? In this episode, Victor Galaz talks to Kate Jones from University College London and Peter Søgaard Jørgensen from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Stockholm Resilience Centre. Both researchers are experts on the links between ecology, disease and global change.More information, including links to mentioned publications: https://rethink.earth/pandemics-health-and-global-change-how-are-they-connected/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 2020

33 min 31 sec