RCI | English : Reports

By RCI | English

To discover, understand and put Canadian realities into perspective.

  1. 1.
    Joe Norton, a no-nonsense down-to-earth Indigenous leader, is dead at 70
    10:10
  2. 2.
    Tension as migrants mass at Greek border
    7:23
  3. 3.
    Federal politician takes the gun licence course
    8:39
  4. 4.
    Burkina Faso faces ‘astounding’ displacement crisis: report
    12:54
  5. 5.
    Officials say 63 Canadians among those killed in Tehran plane crash
    1:15
  6. 6.
    Refugee advocacy group sounds the alarm on crisis in Mali
    24:05
  7. 7.
    Canadian charity teams up with egg farmers to care for African orphans
    21:41
  8. 8.
    Conservation group exposes widespread seafood fraud in Canada
    7:18
  1. 9.
    Kremlin disinformation campaigns could target Canada’s federal election: expert
    1:05
  2. 10.
    Meet the trailblazing female Canadian general bound for Iraq
    17:45
  3. 11.
    Canadian woman makes NATO maritime history
    19:43
  4. 12.
    Manhunt for fugitive teens shifts to another isolated Manitoba community
    1:50
  5. 13.
    Canada ratifies UN agreement to deny safe haven to illegal fishing vessels
    6:10
  6. 14.
    Best defence against Russian interference is free press, says NATO head
    5:47
  7. 15.
    Canada adds 2 far-right groups to its terror list
    7:00
  8. 16.
    Washington and Tehran at impasse as Trump threatens Iran with ‘obliteration’
    10:41
  9. 17.
    Rights group welcomes Canada’s new guidelines to support human rights defenders
    6:25
  10. 18.
    ‘Cold, dark and dangerous’ but the Arctic and space bring out the best in humanity: study
    9:51
  11. 19.
    Ocean warming may reduce sea life by 17%, study finds
    8:13
  12. 20.
    Rights groups sound alarm over ‘neglected’ Cameroon crisis
    9:57
  13. 21.
    Trudeau accepts the finding of genocide in deaths and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls
    13:07
  14. 22.
    Permafrost degradation spreads in High Arctic
    7:56
  15. 23.
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau exonerates Chief Poundmaker, apologizes for conviction
    17:00
  16. 24.
    Arctic underwater forests set to expand with rapid warming
    13:18
  17. 25.
    UN agency asks for international support to fight Ebola
    14:08
  18. 26.
    Canadians strongly support nature conservation: poll
    4:42
  19. 27.
    Alberta to repeal carbon tax and press on pipelines, says incoming premier
    2:09
  20. 28.
    Alberta elects United Conservative Party government
    1:20
  21. 29.
    New superbug yeast infection puzzles and worries researchers
    17:13
  22. 30.
    Humanitarian groups urge Canadians to donate to Cyclone Idai relief fund
    7:48
  23. 31.
    Canadian jihadists are distinct from other Islamist radicals, study finds
    9:43
  24. 32.
    Conservation group calls for more research into effects of Nunavut mine shipping noise on narwhal
    5:30
  25. 33.
    Canada ‘very concerned’ about foreign meddling, says Chrystia Freeland
    1:53
  26. 34.
    Former justice minister ejected out of Liberal caucus as new documents poke holes in her story
    1:34
  27. 35.
    ‘We’re up here!’ says Nunavut premier as territory celebrates 20th anniversary
    8:14
  28. 36.
    White supremacism and Islamophobia are ‘gravest threats,’ Freeland tells UN
    3:23
  29. 37.
    Chinese officials pressured Canadian university to cancel event with Uighur activist
    6:20
  30. 38.
    Canada grants asylum to one of Edward Snowden’s ‘angels’
    0:45
  31. 39.
    Sting performs for Oshawa GM workers facing layoffs
    4:27
  32. 40.
    Canada pledges $53M for those affected by Venezuela crisis
    5:29
  33. 41.
    Most Canadians dissatisfied with Trudeau’s handling of row with China: poll
    11:47
  34. 42.
    Liberals deny overpaying for Trans Mountain pipeline project
    2:23
  35. 43.
    Ottawa unveils new measures to combat election interference
    7:10
  36. 44.
    Canadian police charge youth with terror-related offence
    3:33
  37. 45.
    U.S. study gives Canada top points for attracting highly skilled immigrants
    6:28
  38. 46.
    Huawei executive has strong defence to fight extradition to U.S., says envoy
    1:31
  39. 47.
    Canada’s new food guide stresses importance of eating plant-based foods
    3:17
  40. 48.
    Trudeau urges Liberals to campaign on ‘hopeful’ vision of Canada
    1:24
  41. 49.
    Canadian missing in Burkina Faso is still alive, says Trudeau
    0:39
  42. 50.
    Canadian frigate heading home after 6-month deployment
    13:18

Listen to RCI | English : Reports now.

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\n

Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde described Norton as “a dominant force in First Nations leadership for more than three decades” as well as a wonderful friend and mentor in a tweet on Saturday.

\n

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also tweeted his consoldenes, writing that Norton was a “passionate advocate for his community and served with distinction.” 

\n

For three decades, Grand Chief Joseph Norton was a passionate advocate for his community and served with distinction. He leaves behind a remarkable legacy – and my thoughts are with his family, friends, and entire community as they mourn his passing.

\n

— Justin Trudeau (@JustinTrudeau) August 15, 2020

\n

\n

Former Quebec native affairs minister Geoffrey Kelley remembered Norton as a very determined–but fair–leader.

\n

“Joe Norton defined Mohawk pride,” Kelley told the Montreal Gazette in an interview..

\n

“He was someone who stood up for his community, his people, his nation. He was a man who gave almost his whole life to leadership in his community, and he made a great contribution to Kahnawake and to Indigenous rights and Indigenous causes right across Canada. He was an extraordinary individual.”

\n

Norton first gained public attention as a key Mohawk negotiator during the 1990 Oka Crisis--a 78-day standoff between Quebec Mohawks and Canadian soldiers over the proposed expansion of a golf course near the town of Oka. 

\n

(In 2002, Norton was honoured with a National Aboriginal Achievement Award (now known as Indspire) for Public Service in 2002, for his role as a key negotiator in the Oka crisis.) 

\n

He later negotiated agreements with Quebec government ensuring more power.

\n
\"\"

Members of the Quebec government and Native leaders talk to the media in Quebec City regarding a preliminary agreement to remove the barricade at Oka. on Aug. 2, 1990. From left are Lauwrence Cantoreille, Joe Norton, Mohawk chief of Kahnawaka, John Ciaccia, minister of Native Affairs, Quebec premier Robert Bourassa and Konrad Sioui, of the Assembly of First Nations. (Clement Allard/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

\n

This past February, Norton spoke out against a court order to dismantle a railway blockade in the community, which had been erected in support of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, saying Quebec provincial police and the police service operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway had no place in the community.

\n

A long-time ironworker, a former star lacrosse player and a fluent speaker of Kanien’kéha, Norton was first elected to the Mohawk Council of Kahnawake in 1978 and became grand chief in 1982, serving until his retirement in 2004.

\n

He returned to politics in 2015 and was elected leader once again.

\n
\"\"

Joseph Norton at a press conference in Ottawa last February. (Reuters/Patrick Doyle)

\n

In June he went on leave following a medical procedure to install a pacemaker, but was expected to return.

\n

“He had few health issues,” said Joe Delaronde, the council’s spokesperson.

\n

“He had a pacemaker put in a little while back but he was fine. He was participating in our council meeting this Monday.” 

\n

In May 2019, I spoke to Norton after he returned from a three-day meeting in Winnipeg to discuss a proposed federal settlement for survivors of Indian Day Schools.

\n

Here is that interview.

\n

With files from CBC News (Jennifer Yoon), The Canadian Press

","id":"1phRr2lPArts6FmQ3RokoA","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Joe Norton, a no-nonsense down-to-earth Indigenous leader, is dead at 70","release_date":"2020-08-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1phRr2lPArts6FmQ3RokoA"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4e069d56753d5b676edd1473879d0a76132e43d6","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Turkey has said it can no longer support the mass influx of migrants from Syria and elsewhere. It says it will no longer keep them from attempting to cross into Greece and Bulgaria as they seek to head into European Union countries. Paul Heinbecker is the Deputy Chair of the The World Refugee Council, and a former Canadian Ambassador to the UN, and Germany. ListenEN_Interview_3-20200305-WIE30 As the mass at border crossings with Greece, or attempt to cross the Aegean to Greek islands, the Greek forces are attempting to keep them out. The Deputy Chair of the The World Refugee Council, and a former Canadian Ambassador to the UN, and Germany (CBC) Tear gas and piano wire use is prevalent, with heavily armed police and military standing at border points, while patrol vessels forcibly turn back rafts and boats attempting to cross the sea. Greek patrols were forcing rafts and boats back from attempts to cross the Aegean from Turkey. In some cases warning shots were fired into the water in front of the rafts. (CBC) Heinbecker says Turkey seems to have a legitimate position as he says the EU has not lived up to agreements with Turkey for funding and resettlement to help that country deal with the almost 4 million migrants now there. Turkey has been housing almost 4 million migrants, many of whom want to head to the EU countries, and have begun camping out at the borders with Greece and Bulgaria, hoping for a chance to cross (CBC) Turkey had also wanted to set up a safe zone in Syria where people fleeing the civil war there could go, but Heinbecker says, NATO and the EU seemed not particularly interested. Greece has moved police and fully armed military into position along its borders to prevent migrants from crossing. (CBC) Turkey is now reported to have sent 1,000 armed police to the border to stop Greece from forcing the migrants back into Turkey. Athens says it has prevented as many as 35,000 from crossing in the past five days and is said to be preparing to deport hundreds of other who have managed to slip across. The two countries have a long history of belligerence and so tensions are rising. Additional information Al Jazeera: Mar 5/20: Turkish police bolster Greek border to stop migrants' return BBC: Mar 3/20: EU chief says Greece is Europe's shield in migrant crisis Thomson-Reuters (via CBC) Mar 4/20: Greek and Turkish police fire tear gas as migrants try to cross into Greece Associated Press (via CBC) Mar 3.20: Greece PM rips Turkey as thousands of migrants seek entry into Europe","duration_ms":443400,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1rJ3Fw7j13R4Tzj8yIMi18"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1rJ3Fw7j13R4Tzj8yIMi18","html_description":"Turkey has said it can no longer support the mass influx of migrants from Syria and elsewhere.\n\nIt says it will no longer keep them from attempting to cross into Greece and Bulgaria as they seek to head into European Union countries.\n\nPaul Heinbecker is the Deputy Chair of the The World Refugee Council, and a former Canadian Ambassador to the UN, and Germany.\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20200305-WIE30\n\nAs the mass at border crossings with Greece, or attempt to cross the Aegean to Greek islands, the Greek forces are attempting to keep them out.\n\nThe Deputy Chair of the The World Refugee Council, and a former Canadian Ambassador to the UN, and Germany (CBC)\n\nTear gas and piano wire use is prevalent, with heavily armed police and military standing at border points, while patrol vessels forcibly turn back rafts and boats attempting to cross the sea.\n\nGreek patrols were forcing rafts and boats back from attempts to cross the Aegean from Turkey. In some cases warning shots were fired into the water in front of the rafts. (CBC)\n\nHeinbecker says Turkey seems to have a legitimate position as he says the EU has not lived up to agreements with Turkey for funding and resettlement to help that country deal with the almost 4 million migrants now there.\n\nTurkey has been housing almost 4 million migrants, many of whom want to head to the EU countries, and have begun camping out at the borders with Greece and Bulgaria, hoping for a chance to cross (CBC)\n\nTurkey had also wanted to set up a safe zone in Syria where people fleeing the civil war there could go, but Heinbecker says, NATO and the EU seemed not particularly interested.\n\nGreece has moved police and fully armed military into position along its borders to prevent migrants from crossing. (CBC)\n\nTurkey is now reported to have sent 1,000 armed police to the border to stop Greece from forcing the migrants back into Turkey. Athens says it has prevented as many as 35,000 from crossing in the past five days and is said to be preparing to deport hundreds of other who have managed to slip across.\n\nThe two countries have a long history of belligerence and so tensions are rising.\n\nAdditional information\n\n \tAl Jazeera: Mar 5/20: Turkish police bolster Greek border to stop migrants' return\n \tBBC: Mar 3/20: EU chief says Greece is Europe's shield in migrant crisis\n \tThomson-Reuters (via CBC) Mar 4/20: Greek and Turkish police fire tear gas as migrants try to cross into Greece\n \tAssociated Press (via CBC) Mar 3.20: Greece PM rips Turkey as thousands of migrants seek entry into Europe","id":"1rJ3Fw7j13R4Tzj8yIMi18","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Tension as migrants mass at Greek border","release_date":"2020-03-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1rJ3Fw7j13R4Tzj8yIMi18"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8c500a9aa96bfde369c3c005e3f1ae030523fa55","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"In Canada where the often bitterly heated debate about firearms has been raging on and off for decades, a federal politician decided he needed to be informed by fact, not opinion. Tako Van Popta is the Conservative Member of Parliament for the riding of Langley-Aldergrove in British Columbia ListenEN_Interview_1-20200303-WIE10 Van Popta says he had never held a firearm before taking the required course (and other processes) to obtain a “possession and acquisition licence” (PAL) for firearms. This also includes paying fees of course, along with written spousal approval and other references, police background check, and daily scrutiny. Interestingly, legal gun owners are the only segment of society subject to daily police checks. MP for Langley-Aldergrove in British Columbia, Tako Van Popta was challenged by constituents to learn the facts of gun ownership in Canada. Here he takes the instruction course required as a part of the long and somewhat expensive process to obtain a gun licence (supplied) As a politician who would be involved in debates on the subject, he admitted he knew almost nothing about firearms. He was challenged by constituents to learn first hand and realised that to better understand the situation he would take the mandatory ownership and owners course. He says he doubts many of the politicians who debated and voted on gun laws like C-71 actually know about the extent and restrictions of current gun laws in Canada. Hunters and target shooters say they are \"easy targets\" for increased restrictions and mandatory gun buybacks as they are the ones who obey laws. One expert says the government plan for  (mandatory) buyback of semi-auto rifles will cost billions, not the half million the government claims. Van Popta says that money should be spent on the \"real problems\" of underfunded social programmes and fighting criminal gangs and gun smugglers instead. (CCFR) Van Popta also expressed dismay at the Liberal government proposal to create a mandatory buyback of semi-auto rifles through a possible ‘order in council’ which would avoid a debate in Parliament. He also believes the vast sums spent on such a programme will not make Canada safer, and that the money should instead be spent on policies he says would target the real problem of gangs and illegal gun smuggling. After taking the course, he is very doubtful he would become a hunter or even buy a firearm, but may accept invitations for target shooting. Van Popta also says it would be a good idea if other politicians informed themselves first hand of Canada’s firearms laws and requirements before taking a position and creating laws which could negatively affect over 2 million legal owners, and the tens of thousands of employees at small businesses throughout the country serving hunters and sport shooters. Additional information-sources Fraser Institute: G Mauser;  Jan21.20: Trudeau government’s ‘buy back’ gun program likely a multi-billion boondoggle Ottawa Citizen: Mar 2/20: S. Yogarnetnam:Proactive policing, not gun buybacks or CCTV cameras: Ottawa Police Service iPolitics: T. Naumetz: Feb 4/20: Liberal Red Flag plan panned by gun safety advocate and firearm lobby leader Open Parliament: debates on C-71 Poly Remembers: gun control lobby website Canadian Firearms Safety Course (mandatory)","duration_ms":519984,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/54c2fQwM64LYAttuPN0SIh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/54c2fQwM64LYAttuPN0SIh","html_description":"In Canada where the often bitterly heated debate about firearms has been raging on and off for decades, a federal politician decided he needed to be informed by fact, not opinion.\n\nTako Van Popta is the Conservative Member of Parliament for the riding of Langley-Aldergrove in British Columbia\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20200303-WIE10\n\nVan Popta says he had never held a firearm before taking the required course (and other processes) to obtain a “possession and acquisition licence” (PAL) for firearms.\n\nThis also includes paying fees of course, along with written spousal approval and other references, police background check, and daily scrutiny. Interestingly, legal gun owners are the only segment of society subject to daily police checks.\n\nMP for Langley-Aldergrove in British Columbia, Tako Van Popta was challenged by constituents to learn the facts of gun ownership in Canada. Here he takes the instruction course required as a part of the long and somewhat expensive process to obtain a gun licence (supplied)\n\nAs a politician who would be involved in debates on the subject, he admitted he knew almost nothing about firearms. He was challenged by constituents to learn first hand and realised that to better understand the situation he would take the mandatory ownership and owners course.\n\nHe says he doubts many of the politicians who debated and voted on gun laws like C-71 actually know about the extent and restrictions of current gun laws in Canada.\n\nHunters and target shooters say they are \"easy targets\" for increased restrictions and mandatory gun buybacks as they are the ones who obey laws. One expert says the government plan for  (mandatory) buyback of semi-auto rifles will cost billions, not the half million the government claims. Van Popta says that money should be spent on the \"real problems\" of underfunded social programmes and fighting criminal gangs and gun smugglers instead. (CCFR)\n\nVan Popta also expressed dismay at the Liberal government proposal to create a mandatory buyback of semi-auto rifles through a possible ‘order in council’ which would avoid a debate in Parliament.\n\nHe also believes the vast sums spent on such a programme will not make Canada safer, and that the money should instead be spent on policies he says would target the real problem of gangs and illegal gun smuggling.\n\nAfter taking the course, he is very doubtful he would become a hunter or even buy a firearm, but may accept invitations for target shooting. Van Popta also says it would be a good idea if other politicians informed themselves first hand of Canada’s firearms laws and requirements before taking a position and creating laws which could negatively affect over 2 million legal owners, and the tens of thousands of employees at small businesses throughout the country serving hunters and sport shooters.\n\nAdditional information-sources\n\n \tFraser Institute: G Mauser;  Jan21.20: Trudeau government’s ‘buy back’ gun program likely a multi-billion boondoggle\n \tOttawa Citizen: Mar 2/20: S. Yogarnetnam:Proactive policing, not gun buybacks or CCTV cameras: Ottawa Police Service\n \tiPolitics: T. 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Burkina Faso has emerged as the latest epicentre of a conflict that has already consumed much of neighbouring Mali and Niger in Africa’s troubled Sahel region, said Alexandra Lamarche, a Canadian humanitarian worker who authored the report for Refugees International. And the speed at which the situation in Burkina Faso has deteriorated has caught the country’s government, the international community and aid groups off guard, Lamarche told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from Washington, D.C. “I was in Burkina in the Fall and they estimated that by the end of the year there’d be about 330,000 internally displaced and instead by Dec. 31 they had reached numbers of 530,000 and now we’re at 613,000,” Lamarche she added. (click to listen to the podcast interview with Alexandra Lamarche) ListenEN_Report_3-20200211-WRE30 The numbers are expected to climb even higher, she added. “NGOs are estimating that there might be closer to 900,000 by April but I would be shocked if numbers weren’t actually higher than that,” Lamarche said. Astounding levels of violence Source: “Humanitarian Response Plan 2020: Burkina Faso,” OCHA, (January 2020), https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/sites/www.humanitarianresponse.info/files/documents/files/hrp_2020-bfa-fr_abridged-web.pdf The level of violence and the rapid increase in the number of internally displaced people are “astounding,” especially since Burkina Faso was once known for its relative stability and harmony across ethnic, religious, and linguistic lines, she said. Intercommunal tensions are on the rise, and the country is grappling with its first major humanitarian crisis in recent history, Lamarche said. UN food assistance agency warns of escalating crisis in Burkina Faso Canadian gold mine hit by deadly attack in Burkina Faso won’t reopen in 2019 And increasingly the country’s civilian population is caught in the crossfire as \"a motley assortment\" of armed groups – jihadist insurgents, criminal elements and local self-defence militias set up to protect rural communities – have plunged the country into violence, Lamarche said. Grappling to provide services and security A Burkina Faso soldier patrols at a district that welcomes Internally Displaced People (IDP) from northern Burkina Faso, in Dori on Feb. 3, 2020. (Olympia De Maismont/AFP via Getty Images) For its part, the government of Burkina Faso is struggling to meet the needs of its population and to provide basic security in large parts of the country, she said. Meanwhile, aid groups are scrambling to mount an effective response to the crisis, Lamarche said. Aid groups are hampered by a lack of funding and government policies that prevent them from providing humanitarian assistance to some of the most vulnerable populations who live in huge swaths of Burkina Faso controlled by various insurgent groups, Lamarche said. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) currently estimates that $295 million US ($392 million Cdn) will be required in 2020 to provide humanitarian assistance to those in need, the report said. International donors, including Canada, will need to quickly ramp up funding to “nip this in the bud” and stop the instability in Burkina Faso from spreading to neighbouring countries, Lamarche said. “We’re seeing increasing violence by the Togo border, it’s only a matter of time before it goes into Togo,” Lamarche said. “And a lot of these countries, like Burkina Faso, have never witnessed this type of violence, they are ill-equipped to be responding to these types of needs.”","duration_ms":774360,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3WIGKtw3OMRqrv3jOhYvfE"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3WIGKtw3OMRqrv3jOhYvfE","html_description":"Burkina Faso is facing one of the world’s fastest growing displacement crises threatening to engulf the entire West African country and spill over into neighbouring Ghana, Benin, Togo, and Cote d’Ivoire, warns a report by the U.S.-based NGO Refugees International.\n\nBurkina Faso has emerged as the latest epicentre of a conflict that has already consumed much of neighbouring Mali and Niger in Africa’s troubled Sahel region, said Alexandra Lamarche, a Canadian humanitarian worker who authored the report for Refugees International.\n\nAnd the speed at which the situation in Burkina Faso has deteriorated has caught the country’s government, the international community and aid groups off guard, Lamarche told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from Washington, D.C.\n\n“I was in Burkina in the Fall and they estimated that by the end of the year there’d be about 330,000 internally displaced and instead by Dec. 31 they had reached numbers of 530,000 and now we’re at 613,000,” Lamarche she added.\n\n(click to listen to the podcast interview with Alexandra Lamarche)\n\nListenEN_Report_3-20200211-WRE30\n\nThe numbers are expected to climb even higher, she added.\n\n“NGOs are estimating that there might be closer to 900,000 by April but I would be shocked if numbers weren’t actually higher than that,” Lamarche said.\nAstounding levels of violence\nSource: “Humanitarian Response Plan 2020: Burkina Faso,” OCHA, (January 2020), https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/sites/www.humanitarianresponse.info/files/documents/files/hrp_2020-bfa-fr_abridged-web.pdf\n\nThe level of violence and the rapid increase in the number of internally displaced people are “astounding,” especially since Burkina Faso was once known for its relative stability and harmony across ethnic, religious, and linguistic lines, she said.\n\nIntercommunal tensions are on the rise, and the country is grappling with its first major humanitarian crisis in recent history, Lamarche said.\n\n \tUN food assistance agency warns of escalating crisis in Burkina Faso\n \tCanadian gold mine hit by deadly attack in Burkina Faso won’t reopen in 2019\n\nAnd increasingly the country’s civilian population is caught in the crossfire as \"a motley assortment\" of armed groups – jihadist insurgents, criminal elements and local self-defence militias set up to protect rural communities – have plunged the country into violence, Lamarche said.\nGrappling to provide services and security\nA Burkina Faso soldier patrols at a district that welcomes Internally Displaced People (IDP) from northern Burkina Faso, in Dori on Feb. 3, 2020. (Olympia De Maismont/AFP via Getty Images)\n\nFor its part, the government of Burkina Faso is struggling to meet the needs of its population and to provide basic security in large parts of the country, she said.\n\nMeanwhile, aid groups are scrambling to mount an effective response to the crisis, Lamarche said.\n\nAid groups are hampered by a lack of funding and government policies that prevent them from providing humanitarian assistance to some of the most vulnerable populations who live in huge swaths of Burkina Faso controlled by various insurgent groups, Lamarche said.\n\nThe Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) currently estimates that $295 million US ($392 million Cdn) will be required in 2020 to provide humanitarian assistance to those in need, the report said.\n\nInternational donors, including Canada, will need to quickly ramp up funding to “nip this in the bud” and stop the instability in Burkina Faso from spreading to neighbouring countries, Lamarche said.\n\n“We’re seeing increasing violence by the Togo border, it’s only a matter of time before it goes into Togo,” Lamarche said. “And a lot of these countries, like Burkina Faso, have never witnessed this type of violence, they are ill-equipped to be responding to these types of needs.”","id":"3WIGKtw3OMRqrv3jOhYvfE","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Burkina Faso faces ‘astounding’ displacement crisis: report","release_date":"2020-02-11","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3WIGKtw3OMRqrv3jOhYvfE"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5f1061c209602fa88a9a35da7ea7542bb6333920","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Ukraine's foreign minister says 63 Canadians were among the 176 people killed when a Ukraine International Airlines passenger plane crashed just minutes after taking off from Tehran's Imam Khomeini International Airport on Wednesday. Flight PS752 was en route to Kyiv when it went down. Ukrainian authorities initially said it appeared mechanical failure was the cause of the crash but later said nothing could be ruled out. Former pilot and former Transportation Safety Board of Canada crash investigator Larry Vance spoke with CBC News' Suhana Meharchand about the range of possibilities investigators will be looking at to try to figure out why the plane lost its signal after climbing to about 8,000 feet before crashing. ListenEN_Interview_4-20200108-WIE40 The three-and-a-half-year-old Boeing 737-800 crashed just hours after Iran launched a ballistic missile attack on Iraqi military bases, housing U.S. soldiers. Airlines from around the world, including Air Canada, rerouted flights from the area pending further investigations into what happened, Evin Arsalani and her one-year-old daughter, Kurdia, were among those killed when Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 crashed near Tehran Wednesday morning. (Evin Arsalani/Facebook) In a statement offering his condolences, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada will ensure the crash is \"thoroughly investigated.\" In addition to the 63 Canadians, there were 82 Iranians, 11 Ukrainian passengers and crew, 10 Swedes, four Afghans, three Germans and three Britons on board. There were no survivors. A close friend confirmed to CBC News this to be University of Toronto student Mojtaba Abbasnezhad, a victim of Wednesday's crash. (Mojtaba Abbasnezhad/Facebook) Canadian Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said he had been in touch with the Ukraine government, tweeting, \"Our hearts are with the loved ones of the victims.\" Payman Paseyan, a member of the Iranian-Canadian community in Edmonton, said multiple people from the city were on the plane, including many international students. Meanwhile, CBC News reports that a family of three, a University of Toronto student, and a Greater Toronto Area dentist are among the 63 Canadians who lost their lives. With files from CBC, CP, AP, Reuters","duration_ms":75288,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3T7SK529leSXxzfGT5Obx6"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3T7SK529leSXxzfGT5Obx6","html_description":"Ukraine's foreign minister says 63 Canadians were among the 176 people killed when a Ukraine International Airlines passenger plane crashed just minutes after taking off from Tehran's Imam Khomeini International Airport on Wednesday.\n\nFlight PS752 was en route to Kyiv when it went down.\n\n\n\nUkrainian authorities initially said it appeared mechanical failure was the cause of the crash but later said nothing could be ruled out.\n\nFormer pilot and former Transportation Safety Board of Canada crash investigator Larry Vance spoke with CBC News' Suhana Meharchand about the range of possibilities investigators will be looking at to try to figure out why the plane lost its signal after climbing to about 8,000 feet before crashing.\n\nListenEN_Interview_4-20200108-WIE40\n\nThe three-and-a-half-year-old Boeing 737-800 crashed just hours after Iran launched a ballistic missile attack on Iraqi military bases, housing U.S. soldiers.\n\nAirlines from around the world, including Air Canada, rerouted flights from the area pending further investigations into what happened,\n\nEvin Arsalani and her one-year-old daughter, Kurdia, were among those killed when Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 crashed near Tehran Wednesday morning. (Evin Arsalani/Facebook)\n\nIn a statement offering his condolences, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada will ensure the crash is \"thoroughly investigated.\"\n\nIn addition to the 63 Canadians, there were 82 Iranians, 11 Ukrainian passengers and crew, 10 Swedes, four Afghans, three Germans and three Britons on board.\n\nThere were no survivors.\n\nA close friend confirmed to CBC News this to be University of Toronto student Mojtaba Abbasnezhad, a victim of Wednesday's crash. (Mojtaba Abbasnezhad/Facebook)\n\nCanadian Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said he had been in touch with the Ukraine government, tweeting, \"Our hearts are with the loved ones of the victims.\"\n\nPayman Paseyan, a member of the Iranian-Canadian community in Edmonton, said multiple people from the city were on the plane, including many international students.\n\nMeanwhile, CBC News reports that a family of three, a University of Toronto student, and a Greater Toronto Area dentist are among the 63 Canadians who lost their lives.\n\nWith files from CBC, CP, AP, Reuters","id":"3T7SK529leSXxzfGT5Obx6","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Officials say 63 Canadians among those killed in Tehran plane crash","release_date":"2020-01-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3T7SK529leSXxzfGT5Obx6"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4e70ac8f53bb78d286f0a382babf071f8004c9fd","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Mali is on a perilous course, says Alexandra Lamarche. Nearly eight years after the onset of crisis in the West African country, the international community remains heavily focused on stabilization and counterterrorism, with little to show for its efforts, says the Canadian humanitarian worker. In fact, the humanitarian situation in parts of the country seems to be getting worse, says Lamarche, who travelled to Mali in September on a fact-finding mission for Refugees International. In the last three years, the number of Malians displaced from their homes has more than quadrupled, and conflict and displacement is increasingly spreading to previously stable areas of the country, Lamarche says. Humanitarian organizations are struggling to effectively provide for the 3.2 million Malians in need of assistance this year alone, and aid efforts are hindered by underfunding and a complex security environment, Lamarche says. Refugees International published her report Mali’s Humanitarian Crisis: Overmilitarized and Overshadowed, last week. Radio Canada International had a chance to speak with Lamarche for a podcast episode discussing her report and its recommendations for improving the humanitarian situation in Mali, addressing root causes of the conflict, which has now spilled to neighbouring Niger and Burkina Faso, and implementing the terms of the country’s peace agreement. (click to listen to the podcast interview with Alexandra Lamarche) ListenEN_Clip_3-20191217-WME30","duration_ms":1445232,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4axP2AV0ZXmvbdzoH67erN"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4axP2AV0ZXmvbdzoH67erN","html_description":"Mali is on a perilous course, says Alexandra Lamarche.\n\nNearly eight years after the onset of crisis in the West African country, the international community remains heavily focused on stabilization and counterterrorism, with little to show for its efforts, says the Canadian humanitarian worker.\n\nIn fact, the humanitarian situation in parts of the country seems to be getting worse, says Lamarche, who travelled to Mali in September on a fact-finding mission for Refugees International.\n\nIn the last three years, the number of Malians displaced from their homes has more than quadrupled, and conflict and displacement is increasingly spreading to previously stable areas of the country, Lamarche says.\n\nHumanitarian organizations are struggling to effectively provide for the 3.2 million Malians in need of assistance this year alone, and aid efforts are hindered by underfunding and a complex security environment, Lamarche says.\n\nRefugees International published her report Mali’s Humanitarian Crisis: Overmilitarized and Overshadowed, last week.\n\nRadio Canada International had a chance to speak with Lamarche for a podcast episode discussing her report and its recommendations for improving the humanitarian situation in Mali, addressing root causes of the conflict, which has now spilled to neighbouring Niger and Burkina Faso, and implementing the terms of the country’s peace agreement.\n\n(click to listen to the podcast interview with Alexandra Lamarche)\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20191217-WME30","id":"4axP2AV0ZXmvbdzoH67erN","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Refugee advocacy group sounds the alarm on crisis in Mali","release_date":"2019-12-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4axP2AV0ZXmvbdzoH67erN"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/66bef72eb0efbc04eef668995eff87ea792942fb","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Janine and Ian Maxwell want your money. Not all of it… But as much as you can spare to help them care for more than 250 orphans and abandoned babies at their orphanage in Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland) and the 2,500-acre farm that produces food for a network of 30 churches and schools in the tiny Southern African kingdom. In their quest to feed their orphans, the Maxwell’s and their Heart for Africa charity have partnered with Egg Farmers of Canada, which manages Canada’s egg supply and represents egg producers. Tim Lambert, CEO of Egg Farmers of Canada, said he was so impressed by the story of the Canadian couple, their work with orphans and their Project Canaan Farm when he first heard it several years ago that he decided to visit them in Swaziland, as the country was known before it changed its name to Eswatini in 2018. Canadian egg farmers help feed Swaziland orphans “We were amazed at what they had already achieved with their 2,500-acre farm, with the orphanage for children and also with community feeding programs,” Lambert said in a phone interview from Ottawa, where he was hosting the Maxwells, who are in Canada as part of their month-long fundraising tour of North America. “Malnutrition in the country is a huge problem, the country has been devastated by HIV/AIDS and within that they’ve lost a generation of adults,” Lambert said. “So there is, if you can believe it, a half a million orphans and vulnerable children in the country, that’s more than half of the population of the entire nation.” (click to listen to the full interview with Tim Lambert, Janine and Ian Maxwell) ListenEN_Interview_3-20191107-WIE30 The partnership between Egg Farmers of Canada and Heart for Africa was announced in late 2014 and since then Canadian egg farmers have helped locals build an entire egg farm from the ground up, Lambert said. The farm now has 5,000 hens in two houses, offers fresh eggs to thousands of people in the community and is providing a locally produced protein that’s essential for human growth and development, Lambert said. The Egg Farmers of Canada also got help from other industry partners, such as Sanovo, a Danish company that donated equipment to hard cook and chill the eggs, and the Saskatchewan Eggs Producers donated a delivery truck for the operation, Lambert said. Lifesaving protein https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AuOhVNZHuw “We’re able to distribute over 4,000 eggs every day and to date we’ve distributed over five million eggs,” Lambert said. The eggs are distributed in some of the most remote subsistence farming communities in Eswatini, said Janine Maxwell, who grew up in Northern Ontario. “We have been in a drought for the last two-and-a-half years and we still don’t know whether the rains are coming so they haven’t even been able to plant their maze crops, which is their staple, for the last few years,” Maxwell said. “We had already been running this feeding program with these 30 partners and feeding local children but we’re seeing more and more children coming into the program because there is no food at home, and there is no food in the schools.” Each child gets a hard-boiled egg along with their nutritious MannaPack meals provided by the U.S. charity Feed My Starving Children, she said. “That protein is so important for their brain development, for their body development,” Maxwell said. 'I knew I couldn't go back to my life leisure and pleasure' https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=8MuEzmmhM1E Maxwell said she was heartbroken hearing the stories of orphaned children during her travels through Africa. A former marketing executive, she travelled to Africa in “search for the meaning of life” after witnessing the 9/11 attacks during a business trip to New York that eventually led her and her husband, Ian, to re-evaluate their lives’ priorities. “That search took me to Africa and I fell in love with the people,","duration_ms":1301904,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/63LyZPhJF6Vw0S1qcagapA"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/63LyZPhJF6Vw0S1qcagapA","html_description":"Janine and Ian Maxwell want your money.\n\nNot all of it… But as much as you can spare to help them care for more than 250 orphans and abandoned babies at their orphanage in Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland) and the 2,500-acre farm that produces food for a network of 30 churches and schools in the tiny Southern African kingdom.\n\nIn their quest to feed their orphans, the Maxwell’s and their Heart for Africa charity have partnered with Egg Farmers of Canada, which manages Canada’s egg supply and represents egg producers.\n\nTim Lambert, CEO of Egg Farmers of Canada, said he was so impressed by the story of the Canadian couple, their work with orphans and their Project Canaan Farm when he first heard it several years ago that he decided to visit them in Swaziland, as the country was known before it changed its name to Eswatini in 2018.\n\n \tCanadian egg farmers help feed Swaziland orphans\n\n“We were amazed at what they had already achieved with their 2,500-acre farm, with the orphanage for children and also with community feeding programs,” Lambert said in a phone interview from Ottawa, where he was hosting the Maxwells, who are in Canada as part of their month-long fundraising tour of North America.\n\n“Malnutrition in the country is a huge problem, the country has been devastated by HIV/AIDS and within that they’ve lost a generation of adults,” Lambert said. “So there is, if you can believe it, a half a million orphans and vulnerable children in the country, that’s more than half of the population of the entire nation.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Tim Lambert, Janine and Ian Maxwell)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20191107-WIE30\n\nThe partnership between Egg Farmers of Canada and Heart for Africa was announced in late 2014 and since then Canadian egg farmers have helped locals build an entire egg farm from the ground up, Lambert said.\n\nThe farm now has 5,000 hens in two houses, offers fresh eggs to thousands of people in the community and is providing a locally produced protein that’s essential for human growth and development, Lambert said.\n\nThe Egg Farmers of Canada also got help from other industry partners, such as Sanovo, a Danish company that donated equipment to hard cook and chill the eggs, and the Saskatchewan Eggs Producers donated a delivery truck for the operation, Lambert said.\nLifesaving protein\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AuOhVNZHuw\n\n“We’re able to distribute over 4,000 eggs every day and to date we’ve distributed over five million eggs,” Lambert said.\n\nThe eggs are distributed in some of the most remote subsistence farming communities in Eswatini, said Janine Maxwell, who grew up in Northern Ontario.\n\n“We have been in a drought for the last two-and-a-half years and we still don’t know whether the rains are coming so they haven’t even been able to plant their maze crops, which is their staple, for the last few years,” Maxwell said.\n\n“We had already been running this feeding program with these 30 partners and feeding local children but we’re seeing more and more children coming into the program because there is no food at home, and there is no food in the schools.”\n\nEach child gets a hard-boiled egg along with their nutritious MannaPack meals provided by the U.S. charity Feed My Starving Children, she said.\n\n“That protein is so important for their brain development, for their body development,” Maxwell said.\n'I knew I couldn't go back to my life leisure and pleasure'\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=8MuEzmmhM1E\n\nMaxwell said she was heartbroken hearing the stories of orphaned children during her travels through Africa. A former marketing executive, she travelled to Africa in “search for the meaning of life” after witnessing the 9/11 attacks during a business trip to New York that eventually led her and her husband, Ian, to re-evaluate their lives’ priorities.\n\n“That search took me to Africa and I fell in love with the people,","id":"63LyZPhJF6Vw0S1qcagapA","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian charity teams up with egg farmers to care for African orphans","release_date":"2019-11-07","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:63LyZPhJF6Vw0S1qcagapA"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/62e261e10e3921bd1bcc6567a8cee5ff1e9960e5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A Canadian ocean conservation group is renewing its calls on the federal government to clamp down on seafood mislabelling, saying its latest investigation provides mounting evidence of a widespread and unchecked seafood fraud problem in Canada. Oceana Canada says DNA testing of seafood samples from retailers across Montreal revealed that Canada’s second largest city has one of the highest rates of mislabelling found in testing across the country. The testing showed that 61 per cent of 90 seafood samples from 50 grocery stores and restaurants in Montreal were either a substituted species or didn’t meet the labelling requirements set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Oceana Canada said Wednesday. The testing in Montreal conducted by Oceana Canada’s investigators in July is part of a national, multi-year investigation of seafood fraud and mislabelling at grocery stores and restaurants in Canada. Nationally Oceana Canada’s investigation has shown that almost half of 472 samples – 47 per cent – collected in six Canadian cities from 2017-2019 were mislabelled. Seafood mislabelled along supply chains, say researchers The conservation group also carried out tests in Victoria, (67 per cent mislabelled), Toronto (59 per cent mislabelled) and Ottawa, (46 per cent mislabelled), Halifax, (38 per cent mislabelled) and Vancouver (26 per cent mislabelled). A health concern Josh Laughren, executive director at Oceana Canada, said the investigation found farmed fish served up as wild caught, cheaper species substituted for more expensive ones and fish banned in many countries because of health risks masquerading as another species. When one fish species is substituted for another, or incorrect information is provided, consumers are put at risk of exposure to parasites, allergens, contaminants, aquaculture drugs and pesticides used in industrial farming operations, or natural toxins found in certain species, Laughren said. “When you go to a sushi restaurant and get white tuna or butterfish, very often what you’re getting is actually a fish called escolar, which is charmingly nicknamed ‘the laxative of the sea,’ which is probably all I need to say and is banned for sale in some of the countries,” Laughren said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. “Yellowtail, one of my favourites, is often actually Japanese amberjack, a much cheaper fish that contains a natural toxin known as ciguatera, which can cause long-term neurological symptoms.” (click to listen to the full interview with Josh Laughren) ListenEN_Clip_3-20191016-WME30 A pathway for the seafood black market A customer looks at the seafood counter at a Metro store Monday, Apr. 15, 2019 in Ste-Therese, Que., north of Montreal. Conservation group Oceana Canada is calling on the federal government to institute a traceability system to follow seafood from boats to Canadian stores and restaurants. (Ryan Remiorz/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Seafood fraud also provides a pathway for illegally caught fish to enter the market. In addition, when a cheaper, more abundant fish is mislabelled as a more expensive, less abundant one, it can give consumers a perception that the population is healthier than it actually is, Laughren said. This undermines efforts to stop overfishing, manage fisheries responsibly and protect areas and animals in need of conservation, the conservation group added. Canada ratifies UN agreement to deny safe haven to illegal fishing vessels “We know from some recent studies that illegal fishing that happens has really poor labour standards, including child labour and almost slave labour,” Laughren said. “So for your wallet, for your health and for our oceans it’s a very bad practice.” The solution to this problem is implementing boat-to-plate traceability and comprehensive labelling in Canadian seafood supply chains, Laughren said. Follow the EU example ","duration_ms":438048,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6bJ9jzqcHfY1ARBcR7GrBZ"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6bJ9jzqcHfY1ARBcR7GrBZ","html_description":"A Canadian ocean conservation group is renewing its calls on the federal government to clamp down on seafood mislabelling, saying its latest investigation provides mounting evidence of a widespread and unchecked seafood fraud problem in Canada.\n\nOceana Canada says DNA testing of seafood samples from retailers across Montreal revealed that Canada’s second largest city has one of the highest rates of mislabelling found in testing across the country.\n\nThe testing showed that 61 per cent of 90 seafood samples from 50 grocery stores and restaurants in Montreal were either a substituted species or didn’t meet the labelling requirements set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Oceana Canada said Wednesday.\n\nThe testing in Montreal conducted by Oceana Canada’s investigators in July is part of a national, multi-year investigation of seafood fraud and mislabelling at grocery stores and restaurants in Canada.\n\nNationally Oceana Canada’s investigation has shown that almost half of 472 samples – 47 per cent – collected in six Canadian cities from 2017-2019 were mislabelled.\n\n \tSeafood mislabelled along supply chains, say researchers\n\nThe conservation group also carried out tests in Victoria, (67 per cent mislabelled), Toronto (59 per cent mislabelled) and Ottawa, (46 per cent mislabelled), Halifax, (38 per cent mislabelled) and Vancouver (26 per cent mislabelled).\nA health concern\nJosh Laughren, executive director at Oceana Canada, said the investigation found farmed fish served up as wild caught, cheaper species substituted for more expensive ones and fish banned in many countries because of health risks masquerading as another species.\n\nWhen one fish species is substituted for another, or incorrect information is provided, consumers are put at risk of exposure to parasites, allergens, contaminants, aquaculture drugs and pesticides used in industrial farming operations, or natural toxins found in certain species, Laughren said.\n\n“When you go to a sushi restaurant and get white tuna or butterfish, very often what you’re getting is actually a fish called escolar, which is charmingly nicknamed ‘the laxative of the sea,’ which is probably all I need to say and is banned for sale in some of the countries,” Laughren said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International.\n\n“Yellowtail, one of my favourites, is often actually Japanese amberjack, a much cheaper fish that contains a natural toxin known as ciguatera, which can cause long-term neurological symptoms.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Josh Laughren)\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20191016-WME30\nA pathway for the seafood black market\nA customer looks at the seafood counter at a Metro store Monday, Apr. 15, 2019 in Ste-Therese, Que., north of Montreal. Conservation group Oceana Canada is calling on the federal government to institute a traceability system to follow seafood from boats to Canadian stores and restaurants. (Ryan Remiorz/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nSeafood fraud also provides a pathway for illegally caught fish to enter the market. In addition, when a cheaper, more abundant fish is mislabelled as a more expensive, less abundant one, it can give consumers a perception that the population is healthier than it actually is, Laughren said.\n\nThis undermines efforts to stop overfishing, manage fisheries responsibly and protect areas and animals in need of conservation, the conservation group added.\n\n \tCanada ratifies UN agreement to deny safe haven to illegal fishing vessels\n\n“We know from some recent studies that illegal fishing that happens has really poor labour standards, including child labour and almost slave labour,” Laughren said. “So for your wallet, for your health and for our oceans it’s a very bad practice.”\n\nThe solution to this problem is implementing boat-to-plate traceability and comprehensive labelling in Canadian seafood supply chains, Laughren said.\nFollow the EU example\n","id":"6bJ9jzqcHfY1ARBcR7GrBZ","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Conservation group exposes widespread seafood fraud in Canada","release_date":"2019-10-16","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6bJ9jzqcHfY1ARBcR7GrBZ"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8523d491229dc1eb3b29c3a527c427e4d18a826c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"As the federal election campaign picks up steam, federal officials should be ready to counter possible Russian disinformation campaigns targeting Canadians, says a Russian expert. Sergey Sukhankin, a senior fellow with the Jamestown Foundation, a U.S. think-tank, who is teaching at the Concordia University of Edmonton, says Russian and Canadian interests collide in the Arctic, in Ukraine and in the Baltic states, making Canada a likely target for Russian disinformation operations. “Perceived as one of Russia’s chief adversaries in the Arctic region, Canada is a prime target in the information wars, with Russia potentially even meddling in the October 2019 federal election,” Sukhankin writes in a new University of Calgary study. “Ottawa should be ready for a new surge in cyberattacks, disinformation and propaganda levelled against Canada in the near future.” However, Sukhankin said he doesn’t expect the Russian disinformation campaign targeting Canada to be as powerful and far reaching as the Kremlin’s campaigns in Ukraine or the three Baltic states, the United States and the European Union. Building on Soviet experience U.S. President Ronald Reagan, right, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev exchange pens during the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty signing ceremony in the White House on Dec. 8, 1987. (Bob Daugherty/AP Photo/ file) To understand the Kremlin’s 21st century disinformation campaigns, one has to look back to the campaigns waged by the Soviet Union, Sukhankin said in an interview with Radio Canada International. “In many ways Russia’s current disinformation campaign against Western countries, including Canada, of course, derives its origins from the Soviet period,” Sukhankin said. (click to listen to the full interview with Sergey Sukhankin) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190912-WIE30 The Soviets used a number of tools that included disinformation, fake stories, release of the kompromat (compromising materials), and a host of other measures, Sukhankin said. “What is totally different today, what differs Russian disinformation from the Soviet one is that Russia has been able to get rid of this ideological surcharge, which has made Russian propaganda much more flexible and appealing to various sides of respective societies where Russia tries to channel its disinformation,” he said. “This at the same time makes Russian disinformation much more dangerous and a much more far-reaching phenomenon than it used to be before 1991.” Canada is seen by the Kremlin as one of the most russophobic countries, Sukhankin said. “This is quite explicitly visible in various reports, various papers that are issued by Russia’s pro-Kremlin information outlets such as RT, Sputnik, that portray Canada as Russia’s – I wouldn’t say archenemy – but a country that has been progressively anti-Russian and russophobic since at least 2014,” Sukhankin said. In the eyes of the Kremlin, Ottawa’s full and unconditional support for Ukraine following Russia’s annexation of Crimea has transformed Canada from an ordinary Western adversary into a country that is part of the vanguard of anti-Russian forces in the West, Sukhankin said. Waging information warfare at home and abroad Russian President Vladimir speaks during his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP Photo) It’s very important to distinguish critical reporting of Western policies and actions in the Russian media from outright disinformation, but often there is only a faint line separating the two, Sukhankin added. “What Russian disinformation is it usually has a piece of truth, a tiny, tiny piece of truth at its kernel,” Sukhankin said. “And then this piece of truth gets layered with several layers of facts that are either misconstrued deliberately or unintentionally and the final product that the audience receives is a peculiar combination is something that is party true but at the end o...","duration_ms":65332,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/259YxEMMxFmvIWfmcAVE9Z"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/259YxEMMxFmvIWfmcAVE9Z","html_description":"As the federal election campaign picks up steam, federal officials should be ready to counter possible Russian disinformation campaigns targeting Canadians, says a Russian expert.\n\nSergey Sukhankin, a senior fellow with the Jamestown Foundation, a U.S. think-tank, who is teaching at the Concordia University of Edmonton, says Russian and Canadian interests collide in the Arctic, in Ukraine and in the Baltic states, making Canada a likely target for Russian disinformation operations.\n\n“Perceived as one of Russia’s chief adversaries in the Arctic region, Canada is a prime target in the information wars, with Russia potentially even meddling in the October 2019 federal election,” Sukhankin writes in a new University of Calgary study.\n\n“Ottawa should be ready for a new surge in cyberattacks, disinformation and propaganda levelled against Canada in the near future.”\n\nHowever, Sukhankin said he doesn’t expect the Russian disinformation campaign targeting Canada to be as powerful and far reaching as the Kremlin’s campaigns in Ukraine or the three Baltic states, the United States and the European Union.\nBuilding on Soviet experience\nU.S. President Ronald Reagan, right, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev exchange pens during the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty signing ceremony in the White House on Dec. 8, 1987. (Bob Daugherty/AP Photo/ file)\n\nTo understand the Kremlin’s 21st century disinformation campaigns, one has to look back to the campaigns waged by the Soviet Union, Sukhankin said in an interview with Radio Canada International.\n\n“In many ways Russia’s current disinformation campaign against Western countries, including Canada, of course, derives its origins from the Soviet period,” Sukhankin said.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Sergey Sukhankin)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190912-WIE30\n\nThe Soviets used a number of tools that included disinformation, fake stories, release of the kompromat (compromising materials), and a host of other measures, Sukhankin said.\n\n“What is totally different today, what differs Russian disinformation from the Soviet one is that Russia has been able to get rid of this ideological surcharge, which has made Russian propaganda much more flexible and appealing to various sides of respective societies where Russia tries to channel its disinformation,” he said.\n\n“This at the same time makes Russian disinformation much more dangerous and a much more far-reaching phenomenon than it used to be before 1991.”\n\nCanada is seen by the Kremlin as one of the most russophobic countries, Sukhankin said.\n\n“This is quite explicitly visible in various reports, various papers that are issued by Russia’s pro-Kremlin information outlets such as RT, Sputnik, that portray Canada as Russia’s – I wouldn’t say archenemy – but a country that has been progressively anti-Russian and russophobic since at least 2014,” Sukhankin said.\n\nIn the eyes of the Kremlin, Ottawa’s full and unconditional support for Ukraine following Russia’s annexation of Crimea has transformed Canada from an ordinary Western adversary into a country that is part of the vanguard of anti-Russian forces in the West, Sukhankin said.\nWaging information warfare at home and abroad\nRussian President Vladimir speaks during his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP Photo)\n\nIt’s very important to distinguish critical reporting of Western policies and actions in the Russian media from outright disinformation, but often there is only a faint line separating the two, Sukhankin added.\n\n“What Russian disinformation is it usually has a piece of truth, a tiny, tiny piece of truth at its kernel,” Sukhankin said. “And then this piece of truth gets layered with several layers of facts that are either misconstrued deliberately or unintentionally and the final product that the audience receives is a peculiar combination is something that is party true but at the end o...","id":"259YxEMMxFmvIWfmcAVE9Z","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Kremlin disinformation campaigns could target Canada’s federal election: expert","release_date":"2019-09-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:259YxEMMxFmvIWfmcAVE9Z"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/71ab5ba072c515e5d3d140a76035ce12274c5e80","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"In 1986, Jennie Carignan was a bored teenager looking to do something challenging with her life. So she decided to join the Canadian Armed Forces and enroll at the Royal Military College of Canada. She was among the first women to enter the Combat Engineer trade after all military occupations were opened to women in 1989. Today, Maj.-Gen. Carignan is one of the highest-ranking women in the Canadian military and is the first and only woman from a combat arms trade to rise to the rank of general. And in June of this year, Carignan who commanded 5 Combat Engineer Regiment and led a task force of engineers in Kandahar in 2009-2010 at the height of the Taliban insurgency in the restive Afghan province, smashed through another glass ceiling. She was appointed to lead the NATO mission in Iraq and promoted to the rank of major-general. “For me it’s a great honour and a privilege to be able to go out and do this,” Carignan told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from Kingston, where she’s undergoing training ahead of deploying to Iraq this fall. “That’s why we join the military.” (click to listen to the full interview with Maj.-Gen. Jennie Carignan) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190827-WIE30 Tough-as-nails Lt.-Col. Jennie Carignan, commanding officer of the Engineer Regiment of Canada's Task Force Kandahar, speaks to area resident Yar Mohammad about a retaining wall project near his village along the Tarnak River in the Dand Distrct of Kandahar province on August 12, 2010. Carignan figures she covered 10,000 km of bomb-riddled, dusty roads in Afghanistan as a combat engineer. (Dene Moore/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Carignan, who will be taking over from another Canadian, Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, will command about 580 NATO trainers on the ground in Iraq, including the Canadian contingent of about 250 personnel. Carignan, who currently commands the 2nd Canadian Division and Joint Task Force East in her native province of Quebec, said she never thought that she’d be making Canadian and NATO military history. “I’ve basically done things one day at a time, going after one challenge at a time, making sure that I did the best I can,” the mother of four said. Carignan’s experience as a frontline commander in Afghanistan and a former chief of staff of the army, and a reputation of a tough-as-nails leader will come in very handy in Iraq. The NATO Mission Iraq (NMI) is a non-combat training and capacity-building mission aimed at building up Iraqi national forces to prevent the re-emergence of groups such as ISIS or al-Qaeda. The trainers focus on educating Iraqi military instructors, who in turn train their own forces in bomb disposal, armoured vehicle maintenance, civilian-military planning and medical care. The alliance also advises the Iraqi defence ministry on institutional reform. Canada maintains a separate contingent of special forces troops in northern Iraq, who advise and assist local security forces in counter-terrorism operations against pockets of Islamic State extremists. While they've been defeated on the battlefield, Islamic State is still conducting a guerrilla-style campaign of terror and hit-and-run attacks. Carignan said she’s been doing a lot of studying to learn about Iraq’s history and culture, and the region’s complex political context. 'We need female and male warriors' Brig.-Gen. Jennie Carignan speaks with Ukrainian soldiers being trained by members of the Canadian Armed Forces as part of Operation UNIFIER in Ukraine. (2nd Canadian Division) Despite the challenges the Canadian military has faced in integrating women and stamping out sexual misconduct in the ranks, Carignan said her experience has convinced her of the advantages of gender-integrated fighting forces. “We need female and male warriors, we need female and male peacekeepers, we need male and female in everything we do,” Carignan said. “And I think the proof is in the pudding basically.","duration_ms":1065979,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2VDSiaM9YiyPDHVlKfndb3"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2VDSiaM9YiyPDHVlKfndb3","html_description":"In 1986, Jennie Carignan was a bored teenager looking to do something challenging with her life.\n\nSo she decided to join the Canadian Armed Forces and enroll at the Royal Military College of Canada. She was among the first women to enter the Combat Engineer trade after all military occupations were opened to women in 1989.\n\nToday, Maj.-Gen. Carignan is one of the highest-ranking women in the Canadian military and is the first and only woman from a combat arms trade to rise to the rank of general.\n\nAnd in June of this year, Carignan who commanded 5 Combat Engineer Regiment and led a task force of engineers in Kandahar in 2009-2010 at the height of the Taliban insurgency in the restive Afghan province, smashed through another glass ceiling.\n\nShe was appointed to lead the NATO mission in Iraq and promoted to the rank of major-general.\n\n“For me it’s a great honour and a privilege to be able to go out and do this,” Carignan told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from Kingston, where she’s undergoing training ahead of deploying to Iraq this fall.\n\n“That’s why we join the military.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Maj.-Gen. Jennie Carignan)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190827-WIE30\nTough-as-nails\nLt.-Col. Jennie Carignan, commanding officer of the Engineer Regiment of Canada's Task Force Kandahar, speaks to area resident Yar Mohammad about a retaining wall project near his village along the Tarnak River in the Dand Distrct of Kandahar province on August 12, 2010. Carignan figures she covered 10,000 km of bomb-riddled, dusty roads in Afghanistan as a combat engineer. (Dene Moore/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nCarignan, who will be taking over from another Canadian, Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, will command about 580 NATO trainers on the ground in Iraq, including the Canadian contingent of about 250 personnel.\n\nCarignan, who currently commands the 2nd Canadian Division and Joint Task Force East in her native province of Quebec, said she never thought that she’d be making Canadian and NATO military history.\n\n“I’ve basically done things one day at a time, going after one challenge at a time, making sure that I did the best I can,” the mother of four said.\n\nCarignan’s experience as a frontline commander in Afghanistan and a former chief of staff of the army, and a reputation of a tough-as-nails leader will come in very handy in Iraq.\n\nThe NATO Mission Iraq (NMI) is a non-combat training and capacity-building mission aimed at building up Iraqi national forces to prevent the re-emergence of groups such as ISIS or al-Qaeda.\n\nThe trainers focus on educating Iraqi military instructors, who in turn train their own forces in bomb disposal, armoured vehicle maintenance, civilian-military planning and medical care.\n\nThe alliance also advises the Iraqi defence ministry on institutional reform.\n\nCanada maintains a separate contingent of special forces troops in northern Iraq, who advise and assist local security forces in counter-terrorism operations against pockets of Islamic State extremists. While they've been defeated on the battlefield, Islamic State is still conducting a guerrilla-style campaign of terror and hit-and-run attacks.\n\nCarignan said she’s been doing a lot of studying to learn about Iraq’s history and culture, and the region’s complex political context.\n'We need female and male warriors'\nBrig.-Gen. Jennie Carignan speaks with Ukrainian soldiers being trained by members of the Canadian Armed Forces as part of Operation UNIFIER in Ukraine. (2nd Canadian Division)\n\nDespite the challenges the Canadian military has faced in integrating women and stamping out sexual misconduct in the ranks, Carignan said her experience has convinced her of the advantages of gender-integrated fighting forces.\n\n“We need female and male warriors, we need female and male peacekeepers, we need male and female in everything we do,” Carignan said. “And I think the proof is in the pudding basically.","id":"2VDSiaM9YiyPDHVlKfndb3","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Meet the trailblazing female Canadian general bound for Iraq","release_date":"2019-08-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2VDSiaM9YiyPDHVlKfndb3"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/d750c149025f3da186d37bee8979caeebc5149aa","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A female Royal Canadian Navy officer has made NATO maritime history by becoming the first woman to command a multinational naval task force in one of the alliance’s most sensitive areas of maritime operations. Commodore Josée Kurtz has assumed the command of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2), one of the alliance’s four maritime groups, whose primary area of operations extends to the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. The eastern Mediterranean off the coast of Syria and the Black Sea, off the coast of Ukraine and Russian-annexed Crimea, are some of the alliance’s most complex areas of maritime operations where NATO warships come into close proximity with the Russian navy in what are essentially conflict zones. “These four groups provide capability, show presence and demonstrate NATO alliance solidarity and strength in various theatres of operations,” Kurtz said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International on board her flagship, Canadian frigate HMCS Halifax, off the coast of northern Spain. (click to listen to the full interview with Commodore Josée Kurtz) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190731-WIE30 But these groups can be fairly mobile, Kurtz said, pointing out that HMCS Halifax is presently off the coast of Spain heading to Portugal before making their way back to the Mediterranean and the Black Sea and then back to the Atlantic later this year. “We can be supplementing other standing groups in other areas if that’s where the capability is required,” she said. “It speaks to the agility and the flexibility of those standing groups.” Exercising with allies and partners Members of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2, and naval vessels from NATO partners Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine, sail in formation while conducting Maritime Security Awareness (MSA) in the Black Sea during Exercise SEA BREEZE 2019, on July 11, 2019. (MCpl Manuela Berger/Formation Imaging Services Halifax) Kurtz assumed command of SNMG2 during a ceremony in Souda Bay, Greece, on June 15, while Canadian frigate HMCS Toronto, which became her first flagship, had already been at sea for five months. Shortly after, the NATO task force led by the Canadian frigate sailed the Black Sea, with British destroyer HMS Duncan, Romanian frigate ROS Regele Ferdinand, and Turkish frigate TCG Turgutreis. NATO has three allies – Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania – and two partners – Ukraine and Georgia that share the Black Sea with Russia, Kurtz said. “It makes sense that we show a presence in that area same as we do in other areas where we have NATO allies,” Kurtz said. NATO’s Arctic dilemma: Two visions of the Arctic collide as NATO and Russia flex muscles The task force participated in two exercises in the Black Sea, she said. The first one was a joint Ukraine-U.S. exercise off the coast of Ukraine dubbed Sea Breeze 19. The Canadian frigate sailed to the Ukrainian port city of Odessa to take part in that exercise, Kurtz said. Leading Seaman Lyra Michelle Mazerolle a Steward onboard HMCS Halifax participates in a boarding party training exercise during Operation REASSURANCE, in the Atlantic Ocean on July 21, 2019. (Cpl. Braden Trudeau/Formation Imaging Services) Following the conclusion of that exercise, SNMG2 headed southwest to Bulgaria to participate in the Bulgarian-led exercise Breeze 19, Kurtz said. “By participating in those two exercises both with programs in port and a program at sea, by the same token we were able to demonstrate a significant NATO presence in the Black Sea area,” she said. Throughout all that time, the NATO force was shadowed by the Russian navy, Kurtz said. “From a NATO perspective we exercised freedom of navigation, conducted our exercises in the international waters of the Black Sea and we also conducted some exercise serials and activities within the territorial waters of our allies who have had invited us to participate in those exercises,” Kurtz said. 'Active and very obvious' ","duration_ms":1183582,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6akcQ1NTsQ4BenyrpvRhAn"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6akcQ1NTsQ4BenyrpvRhAn","html_description":"A female Royal Canadian Navy officer has made NATO maritime history by becoming the first woman to command a multinational naval task force in one of the alliance’s most sensitive areas of maritime operations.\n\nCommodore Josée Kurtz has assumed the command of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2), one of the alliance’s four maritime groups, whose primary area of operations extends to the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.\n\nThe eastern Mediterranean off the coast of Syria and the Black Sea, off the coast of Ukraine and Russian-annexed Crimea, are some of the alliance’s most complex areas of maritime operations where NATO warships come into close proximity with the Russian navy in what are essentially conflict zones.\n\n“These four groups provide capability, show presence and demonstrate NATO alliance solidarity and strength in various theatres of operations,” Kurtz said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International on board her flagship, Canadian frigate HMCS Halifax, off the coast of northern Spain.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Commodore Josée Kurtz)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190731-WIE30\n\nBut these groups can be fairly mobile, Kurtz said, pointing out that HMCS Halifax is presently off the coast of Spain heading to Portugal before making their way back to the Mediterranean and the Black Sea and then back to the Atlantic later this year.\n\n“We can be supplementing other standing groups in other areas if that’s where the capability is required,” she said. “It speaks to the agility and the flexibility of those standing groups.”\nExercising with allies and partners\nMembers of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2, and naval vessels from NATO partners Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine, sail in formation while conducting Maritime Security Awareness (MSA) in the Black Sea during Exercise SEA BREEZE 2019, on July 11, 2019. (MCpl Manuela Berger/Formation Imaging Services Halifax)\n\nKurtz assumed command of SNMG2 during a ceremony in Souda Bay, Greece, on June 15, while Canadian frigate HMCS Toronto, which became her first flagship, had already been at sea for five months.\n\nShortly after, the NATO task force led by the Canadian frigate sailed the Black Sea, with British destroyer HMS Duncan, Romanian frigate ROS Regele Ferdinand, and Turkish frigate TCG Turgutreis.\n\nNATO has three allies – Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania – and two partners – Ukraine and Georgia that share the Black Sea with Russia, Kurtz said.\n\n“It makes sense that we show a presence in that area same as we do in other areas where we have NATO allies,” Kurtz said.\n\n \tNATO’s Arctic dilemma: Two visions of the Arctic collide as NATO and Russia flex muscles\n\nThe task force participated in two exercises in the Black Sea, she said.\n\nThe first one was a joint Ukraine-U.S. exercise off the coast of Ukraine dubbed Sea Breeze 19.\n\nThe Canadian frigate sailed to the Ukrainian port city of Odessa to take part in that exercise, Kurtz said.\n\nLeading Seaman Lyra Michelle Mazerolle a Steward onboard HMCS Halifax participates in a boarding party training exercise during Operation REASSURANCE, in the Atlantic Ocean on July 21, 2019. (Cpl. Braden Trudeau/Formation Imaging Services)\n\nFollowing the conclusion of that exercise, SNMG2 headed southwest to Bulgaria to participate in the Bulgarian-led exercise Breeze 19, Kurtz said.\n\n“By participating in those two exercises both with programs in port and a program at sea, by the same token we were able to demonstrate a significant NATO presence in the Black Sea area,” she said.\n\nThroughout all that time, the NATO force was shadowed by the Russian navy, Kurtz said.\n\n“From a NATO perspective we exercised freedom of navigation, conducted our exercises in the international waters of the Black Sea and we also conducted some exercise serials and activities within the territorial waters of our allies who have had invited us to participate in those exercises,” Kurtz said.\n'Active and very obvious'\n","id":"6akcQ1NTsQ4BenyrpvRhAn","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian woman makes NATO maritime history","release_date":"2019-07-31","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6akcQ1NTsQ4BenyrpvRhAn"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/05cb09d9ffb61c18d9a79876918d22102e2b4895","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Heavily armed police officers are combing through the bush and swamps surrounding the remote Indigenous community of York Landing in northern Manitoba, following a reported sighting of two teenage murder suspects who have been on the run for nearly two weeks. Officers with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Canada’s national police force, are responding to a tip that two men fitting the descriptions of Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19 were spotted Sunday afternoon around 5 p.m. local time in the small Cree community, about 90 kilometres southwest of Gillam, Manitoba, which was the focus of a massive manhunt for the last week. EN_Interview_3-20190729-WIE30 “Based on the information received, the RCMP immediately deployed multiple resources to the community, including the Emergency Response Team, police dog services, containment team members, major crime services and air services assets,” RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Julie Courchaine told reporters Monday. “Officers searched the York Landing area throughout the night and continue their efforts today.” The Royal Canadian Air Force is also assisting today with the search, she added. “Officers on the ground have not made contact with the individuals, as such, the RCMP is not yet in a position to confirm that these are the wanted suspects,” Courchaine said. Police officers do door-to-door searches in York Landing, Man. (Gilbert Rowan/CBC) It is critical that residents of York Landing remain vigilant and stay indoors as much as possible with their doors locked, and to report anything suspicious by calling their local police immediately, RCMP officials tweeted Monday. Schmegelsky and McLeod have been charged with second degree murder of Leonard Dyck, 64, and are suspected of gunning down two tourists, Australian Lucas Fowler, 23, and his American girlfriend Chynna Deese, 24, in Northern British Columbia. The couple’s bodies were discovered on July 15 about 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs, a popular tourist destination in the far north of the province. Dyck’s body was found July 19 at a highway pullout about two kilometres from a burned-out camper truck, discovered the same day, near the community of Dease Lake, B.C.  Police say the pair then stole a car and drove nearly 3,000 kilometres east before ditching their getaway car in the bush near Gillam. It’s unclear how the two suspects got from Gillam to York Landing. Manhunt for fugitive teens moves to wilderness of northern Manitoba The manhunt switched to York Landing Sunday afternoon after a member of Bear Clan patrol group, an Indigenous neighbourhood protection group, spotting what he believed to be the men near the landfill and water-treatment plant in York Landing. Travis Bighetty told CBC News he and his partner spotted two \"tall, slender individuals\" moving very quickly — possibly spooked by the sound of their truck. \"They fit the description of what was given in the RCMP report,\" Bighetty said. \"It didn't click right away, it took a few moments.\" Police have asked the public not to disclose on social media where their officers were located. With files from CBC News","duration_ms":110263,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2MRCNUIdAj27wDOUCyPcJN"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2MRCNUIdAj27wDOUCyPcJN","html_description":"Heavily armed police officers are combing through the bush and swamps surrounding the remote Indigenous community of York Landing in northern Manitoba, following a reported sighting of two teenage murder suspects who have been on the run for nearly two weeks.\n\nOfficers with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Canada’s national police force, are responding to a tip that two men fitting the descriptions of Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19 were spotted Sunday afternoon around 5 p.m. local time in the small Cree community, about 90 kilometres southwest of Gillam, Manitoba, which was the focus of a massive manhunt for the last week.\n\nEN_Interview_3-20190729-WIE30\n\n“Based on the information received, the RCMP immediately deployed multiple resources to the community, including the Emergency Response Team, police dog services, containment team members, major crime services and air services assets,” RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Julie Courchaine told reporters Monday.\n\n“Officers searched the York Landing area throughout the night and continue their efforts today.”\n\nThe Royal Canadian Air Force is also assisting today with the search, she added.\n\n“Officers on the ground have not made contact with the individuals, as such, the RCMP is not yet in a position to confirm that these are the wanted suspects,” Courchaine said.\n\nPolice officers do door-to-door searches in York Landing, Man. (Gilbert Rowan/CBC)\n\nIt is critical that residents of York Landing remain vigilant and stay indoors as much as possible with their doors locked, and to report anything suspicious by calling their local police immediately, RCMP officials tweeted Monday.\n\nSchmegelsky and McLeod have been charged with second degree murder of Leonard Dyck, 64, and are suspected of gunning down two tourists, Australian Lucas Fowler, 23, and his American girlfriend Chynna Deese, 24, in Northern British Columbia.\n\nThe couple’s bodies were discovered on July 15 about 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs, a popular tourist destination in the far north of the province.\n\nDyck’s body was found July 19 at a highway pullout about two kilometres from a burned-out camper truck, discovered the same day, near the community of Dease Lake, B.C.\n\n\n\nPolice say the pair then stole a car and drove nearly 3,000 kilometres east before ditching their getaway car in the bush near Gillam.\n\nIt’s unclear how the two suspects got from Gillam to York Landing.\n\n \tManhunt for fugitive teens moves to wilderness of northern Manitoba\n\nThe manhunt switched to York Landing Sunday afternoon after a member of Bear Clan patrol group, an Indigenous neighbourhood protection group, spotting what he believed to be the men near the landfill and water-treatment plant in York Landing.\n\nTravis Bighetty told CBC News he and his partner spotted two \"tall, slender individuals\" moving very quickly — possibly spooked by the sound of their truck.\n\n\"They fit the description of what was given in the RCMP report,\" Bighetty said. \"It didn't click right away, it took a few moments.\"\n\nPolice have asked the public not to disclose on social media where their officers were located.\n\nWith files from CBC News","id":"2MRCNUIdAj27wDOUCyPcJN","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Manhunt for fugitive teens shifts to another isolated Manitoba community","release_date":"2019-07-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2MRCNUIdAj27wDOUCyPcJN"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b5190fee3a390c319ec4a8d24ca6d645764a4a2c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada has become the latest country to ratify a UN treaty that seeks to combat the global illegal fishing industry by denying port access to fishing vessels engaged in the multibillion illicit trade, federal officials announced Friday. The Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, known as PSMA, enters into force in Canada as of July 20, Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson and his parliamentary secretary, Sean Casey, announced Friday. United Nations experts estimate that one in every five fish caught around world every year, about 26 million tonnes of fish, comes from illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, valued at $10 - $23 billion US annually. “It’s an indicator that we’re part of an international effort to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, which it really is a scourge on our economy,” said Casey in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. “And it’s a scourge on many of the species that are being fished.” EN_Interview_3-20190719-WIE30Under the terms of the agreement, federal officials are granted additional powers to deny port entry and use of port services for vessels carrying illegally harvested fish, Casey said. It also allows for sharing of information between states and sets inspection priorities and guidelines for training inspectors, he added. The PSMA, signed under the auspices of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2009, entered into force internationally in June 2016. Canada ratifies international moratorium on commercial fishing in the High Arctic Ottawa takes aim at illegal fishing and discarded fishing gear According to FAO, the goal of the agreement is to “prevent, deter and eliminate IUU fishing by preventing vessels engaged in IUU fishing from using ports and landing their catches.” The agreement reduces the incentive of such vessels to continue to operate while it also blocks fishery products derived from IUU fishing from reaching national and international markets, the UN agency says. Canada initially signed the agreement in 2010 but it wasn’t until 2015 that the Parliament passed the PMSA Implementation Act, which included various amendments to the federal fisheries legislation, the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act (CFPA), to align it with the PSMA, Casey said. Josh Laughren, executive director of conservation group Oceana Canada, welcomed the news of ratification. \"Illegal fishing is a serious problem, it's like organized crime, it's a multi-multi-billion dollar industry that both harms ecosystems and depletes resources, hurts honest fishermen and it's a threat to global food security,\" Laughren told Radio Canada International in a phone interview. \"This one important way, a tool that we have to crack down on illegal fishing.\" Laughren said he also wants to see Canada's continued support for new technologies designed to track fishing vessels globally, such as Global Fishing Watch. New tool to track illegal fishing, foster sustainability \"And then if we can match that with things like boat-to-plate traceability, those are the key pillars to help track and crack down and force an end to illegal fishing,\" Laughren said.","duration_ms":370364,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/10bpd3aocInpd0b4Yx9c0x"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/10bpd3aocInpd0b4Yx9c0x","html_description":"Canada has become the latest country to ratify a UN treaty that seeks to combat the global illegal fishing industry by denying port access to fishing vessels engaged in the multibillion illicit trade, federal officials announced Friday.\n\nThe Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, known as PSMA, enters into force in Canada as of July 20, Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson and his parliamentary secretary, Sean Casey, announced Friday.\n\nUnited Nations experts estimate that one in every five fish caught around world every year, about 26 million tonnes of fish, comes from illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, valued at $10 - $23 billion US annually.\n\n“It’s an indicator that we’re part of an international effort to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, which it really is a scourge on our economy,” said Casey in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. “And it’s a scourge on many of the species that are being fished.”\n\nEN_Interview_3-20190719-WIE30Under the terms of the agreement, federal officials are granted additional powers to deny port entry and use of port services for vessels carrying illegally harvested fish, Casey said.\n\nIt also allows for sharing of information between states and sets inspection priorities and guidelines for training inspectors, he added.\n\nThe PSMA, signed under the auspices of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2009, entered into force internationally in June 2016.\n\n \tCanada ratifies international moratorium on commercial fishing in the High Arctic\n \tOttawa takes aim at illegal fishing and discarded fishing gear\n\nAccording to FAO, the goal of the agreement is to “prevent, deter and eliminate IUU fishing by preventing vessels engaged in IUU fishing from using ports and landing their catches.”\n\nThe agreement reduces the incentive of such vessels to continue to operate while it also blocks fishery products derived from IUU fishing from reaching national and international markets, the UN agency says.\n\nCanada initially signed the agreement in 2010 but it wasn’t until 2015 that the Parliament passed the PMSA Implementation Act, which included various amendments to the federal fisheries legislation, the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act (CFPA), to align it with the PSMA, Casey said.\n\nJosh Laughren, executive director of conservation group Oceana Canada, welcomed the news of ratification.\n\n\"Illegal fishing is a serious problem, it's like organized crime, it's a multi-multi-billion dollar industry that both harms ecosystems and depletes resources, hurts honest fishermen and it's a threat to global food security,\" Laughren told Radio Canada International in a phone interview. \"This one important way, a tool that we have to crack down on illegal fishing.\"\n\nLaughren said he also wants to see Canada's continued support for new technologies designed to track fishing vessels globally, such as Global Fishing Watch.\n\n \tNew tool to track illegal fishing, foster sustainability\n\n\"And then if we can match that with things like boat-to-plate traceability, those are the key pillars to help track and crack down and force an end to illegal fishing,\" Laughren said.","id":"10bpd3aocInpd0b4Yx9c0x","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada ratifies UN agreement to deny safe haven to illegal fishing vessels","release_date":"2019-07-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:10bpd3aocInpd0b4Yx9c0x"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/774db776329cf7b04afd431ed843d2a1de438028","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"While NATO allies have beefed up their cyber defences, the best guaranty of safeguarding Canada’s upcoming federal elections against possible Russian interference is the country’s free and independent press, the alliance’s Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said Monday. Speaking to reporters at a Canadian military base near Ottawa, Stoltenberg said NATO has created a centre of excellence in Estonia where in April it conducted the world’s largest cyber security exercise designed to not only learn how to protect the alliance’s cyber infrastructure but also safeguard against interference with democratic institutions. NATO could invoke collective defence if attacked in cyberspace, Stoltenberg warns NATO wants to keep the Arctic an area of low tensions, Stoltenberg The best defence against Russian disinformation campaigns is having a free and independent press that can understand and uncover attempts to spread fake news, Stoltenberg said at a joint press conference with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the Canadian Forces Base in Petawawa. EN_Interview_3-20190715-WIE30“What we need is critical journalists, who ask difficult questions, who check their sources, and that’s the best way to be able to protect the free and open democratic processes,” Stoltenberg said when asked what NATO can do to assist Canada in safeguarding its federal election in October against Russian interference. “The best response to propaganda is not propaganda but the best response to propaganda is the truth, and free and independent press is an extremely important part of that,” he added. Stoltenberg also praised Canada for boosting its defence spending, for its role in leading the NATO battle group in Latvia and the alliance’s non-combat mission in Iraq, which will be led by a female general for the first time. Secretary General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Jens Stoltenberg inspects the troops at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ont. on Monday, July 15, 2019, as he is joined by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) will continue commanding a NATO training mission in Iraq until November 2020 to help build sustainable defence and security institutions, the Liberal government announced in June. Canada was originally intended to end its leadership role in the non-combat advisory and training mission this fall. Brig.-Gen. Jennie Carignan, who will be promoted to the rank of Major-General, becoming the highest ranking woman in combat arms trade, will take command of the mission from Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin this autumn. Canada extends and boosts its contribution to NATO mission in Latvia Canada to head new NATO mission in Iraq Canada and several other NATO nations are facing pressure from the Trump administration to increase defence spending to reach the goal of 2 per cent of defence expenditures as share of the GDP. Trudeau said Canada has boosted its defence spending by nearly 70 per cent over the last four years. Despite increases in defence spending by the Liberal government, Canada’s 2019 defence expenditures were projected to be about 1.27 per cent of its GDP, according to the latest statistics compiled by NATO. Canada also falls significantly short of another key NATO yardstick when it comes to how much money from its defence budget goes to acquiring new equipment. In 2019, Canada was projected to spend 11.2 per cent of its defence budget on new equipment compared to the NATO goal of 20 per cent.","duration_ms":347272,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2IfysuT6PVhHP3fiiUexmk"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2IfysuT6PVhHP3fiiUexmk","html_description":"While NATO allies have beefed up their cyber defences, the best guaranty of safeguarding Canada’s upcoming federal elections against possible Russian interference is the country’s free and independent press, the alliance’s Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said Monday.\n\nSpeaking to reporters at a Canadian military base near Ottawa, Stoltenberg said NATO has created a centre of excellence in Estonia where in April it conducted the world’s largest cyber security exercise designed to not only learn how to protect the alliance’s cyber infrastructure but also safeguard against interference with democratic institutions.\n\n \tNATO could invoke collective defence if attacked in cyberspace, Stoltenberg warns\n \tNATO wants to keep the Arctic an area of low tensions, Stoltenberg\n\nThe best defence against Russian disinformation campaigns is having a free and independent press that can understand and uncover attempts to spread fake news, Stoltenberg said at a joint press conference with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the Canadian Forces Base in Petawawa.\n\nEN_Interview_3-20190715-WIE30“What we need is critical journalists, who ask difficult questions, who check their sources, and that’s the best way to be able to protect the free and open democratic processes,” Stoltenberg said when asked what NATO can do to assist Canada in safeguarding its federal election in October against Russian interference.\n\n“The best response to propaganda is not propaganda but the best response to propaganda is the truth, and free and independent press is an extremely important part of that,” he added.\n\nStoltenberg also praised Canada for boosting its defence spending, for its role in leading the NATO battle group in Latvia and the alliance’s non-combat mission in Iraq, which will be led by a female general for the first time.\n\nSecretary General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Jens Stoltenberg inspects the troops at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ont. on Monday, July 15, 2019, as he is joined by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) will continue commanding a NATO training mission in Iraq until November 2020 to help build sustainable defence and security institutions, the Liberal government announced in June. Canada was originally intended to end its leadership role in the non-combat advisory and training mission this fall.\n\nBrig.-Gen. Jennie Carignan, who will be promoted to the rank of Major-General, becoming the highest ranking woman in combat arms trade, will take command of the mission from Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin this autumn.\n\n \tCanada extends and boosts its contribution to NATO mission in Latvia\n \tCanada to head new NATO mission in Iraq\n\nCanada and several other NATO nations are facing pressure from the Trump administration to increase defence spending to reach the goal of 2 per cent of defence expenditures as share of the GDP.\n\nTrudeau said Canada has boosted its defence spending by nearly 70 per cent over the last four years.\n\nDespite increases in defence spending by the Liberal government, Canada’s 2019 defence expenditures were projected to be about 1.27 per cent of its GDP, according to the latest statistics compiled by NATO.\n\nCanada also falls significantly short of another key NATO yardstick when it comes to how much money from its defence budget goes to acquiring new equipment. In 2019, Canada was projected to spend 11.2 per cent of its defence budget on new equipment compared to the NATO goal of 20 per cent.","id":"2IfysuT6PVhHP3fiiUexmk","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Best defence against Russian interference is free press, says NATO head","release_date":"2019-07-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2IfysuT6PVhHP3fiiUexmk"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e694638a822eb6b667ced1ab410b2253227b649e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has added two international neo-Nazi groups to Canada's list of outlawed terrorist organizations as part of new measures to combat online hate, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale announced Wednesday. Blood & Honour and Combat 18, which have a presence in Canada, are the first far-right extremism groups to be included on Ottawa's terror list, Goodale said. “This is an important step in Canada’s efforts to combat violent extremism in all forms,” Goodale said at a news conference in Regina, Saskatchewan. “It will help facilitate the laying of terrorism charges against perpetrators and supporters of terrorism and it will also help block the flow of financial resources to terrorist groups when such groups use Canada’s financial system.” EN_Interview_3-20190626-WIE30 According to the government list of terrorist entities, Blood & Honour (B&H) is an international neo-Nazi network whose ideology is derived from the National Socialist doctrine of Nazi Germany. While B&H mostly deals with propaganda, notably by organizing concerts to galvanize supporters and recruit new ones, Combat 18 (C18) represents the armed wing of the movement and has conducted attacks, including bombings and murder, in North America and across Europe. The number 18 in the group's name stands for Adolf Hitler and corresponds to the numerical position of the letters \"A\" and \"H\" in the alphabet. In January 2012, four B&H members in Tampa, Florida, were convicted of the 1998 murder of two homeless men who were killed because the group considered them “inferior,” according to the federal list. In February 2012, members of B&H and C18 firebombed a building occupied mostly by Romani families, including children, in Aš, Czech Republic. B&H was founded in the United Kingdom in 1987 and grew during the 1990s, establishing branches throughout Europe by the end of the decade. B&H established a fully-fledged Canadian operation in 2010. Three other groups linked to the Iranian regime — Al-Ashtar Brigades (AAB), Fatemiyoun Division (FD) and Harakat al-Sabireen (HaS) — also have been added to the list. Goodale also announced $1 million in funding for a United Nations initiative called Tech Against Terrorism, which helps the global information technology industry tackle terrorist exploitation of its tech and supports smaller companies in protecting their users and reputations. The money will be used to create a digital repository that will notify smaller social media and Internet companies when new terrorist content is detected to help them in quickly removing it, Goodale said. With files from CBC News","duration_ms":420493,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/03tHRSgzdY9t07MTYhYTGI"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/03tHRSgzdY9t07MTYhYTGI","html_description":"The Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has added two international neo-Nazi groups to Canada's list of outlawed terrorist organizations as part of new measures to combat online hate, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale announced Wednesday.\n\nBlood & Honour and Combat 18, which have a presence in Canada, are the first far-right extremism groups to be included on Ottawa's terror list, Goodale said.\n\n“This is an important step in Canada’s efforts to combat violent extremism in all forms,” Goodale said at a news conference in Regina, Saskatchewan.\n\n“It will help facilitate the laying of terrorism charges against perpetrators and supporters of terrorism and it will also help block the flow of financial resources to terrorist groups when such groups use Canada’s financial system.”\n\nEN_Interview_3-20190626-WIE30\n\nAccording to the government list of terrorist entities, Blood & Honour (B&H) is an international neo-Nazi network whose ideology is derived from the National Socialist doctrine of Nazi Germany.\n\nWhile B&H mostly deals with propaganda, notably by organizing concerts to galvanize supporters and recruit new ones, Combat 18 (C18) represents the armed wing of the movement and has conducted attacks, including bombings and murder, in North America and across Europe.\n\nThe number 18 in the group's name stands for Adolf Hitler and corresponds to the numerical position of the letters \"A\" and \"H\" in the alphabet.\n\nIn January 2012, four B&H members in Tampa, Florida, were convicted of the 1998 murder of two homeless men who were killed because the group considered them “inferior,” according to the federal list.\n\nIn February 2012, members of B&H and C18 firebombed a building occupied mostly by Romani families, including children, in Aš, Czech Republic.\n\nB&H was founded in the United Kingdom in 1987 and grew during the 1990s, establishing branches throughout Europe by the end of the decade.\n\nB&H established a fully-fledged Canadian operation in 2010.\n\nThree other groups linked to the Iranian regime — Al-Ashtar Brigades (AAB), Fatemiyoun Division (FD) and Harakat al-Sabireen (HaS) — also have been added to the list.\n\nGoodale also announced $1 million in funding for a United Nations initiative called Tech Against Terrorism, which helps the global information technology industry tackle terrorist exploitation of its tech and supports smaller companies in protecting their users and reputations.\n\nThe money will be used to create a digital repository that will notify smaller social media and Internet companies when new terrorist content is detected to help them in quickly removing it, Goodale said.\n\nWith files from CBC News","id":"03tHRSgzdY9t07MTYhYTGI","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada adds 2 far-right groups to its terror list","release_date":"2019-06-26","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:03tHRSgzdY9t07MTYhYTGI"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/05164d2cbec075361eeb24d177664f28ddb094a7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Washington and Tehran have reached a dangerous impasse as U.S. President Donald Trump threatened on Tuesday to obliterate parts of Iran if it attacked “anything American,” with Iranian officials calling White House actions “mentally retarded,” says a Canadian expert on Middle East politics. Trump on Monday signed an executive order imposing sanctions against Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and other senior figures, with punitive measures against Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif expected later this week. The moves came after Iran shot down a U.S. drone on June 20 and Trump called off a retaliatory air strike minutes before impact, saying too many people would have been killed. It would have been the first time the United States had bombed the Islamic Republic in four decades of mutual hostility. On Tuesday, however, Trump tweeted: “Any attack by Iran on anything American will be met with great and overwhelming force. In some areas, overwhelming will mean obliteration.” Bessma Momani, Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, said the latest flare-up in deeply personal attacks is indicative of the escalation between the U.S. and Iran. “The Iranians obviously want to get relief from the international sanctions,” Momani said in a phone interview. “At the moment 80 per cent of the country is under economic sanctions, people are struggling, the regime is hurting and all of that is basically pushing them to try and hit, not perhaps the Americans directly, because they are smart enough not to do that, but to provoke the U.S.” (click to listen to the full interview with Bessma Momani) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190625-WIE30 A game of chicken? FILE - In this Thursday, June 13, 2019 file photo, an oil tanker is on fire in the sea of Oman. A series of attacks on oil tankers near the Persian Gulf has ratcheted up tensions between the U.S. and Iran -- and raised fears over the safety of one of Asia’s most vital energy trade routes, where about a fifth of the world’s oil passes through its narrowest at the Strait of Hormuz. T(AP Photo/ISNA, File) Provoking the U.S. includes everything from hitting oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz, through which up to one-fifth of world’s oil shipments pass, to shooting down a U.S. spy drone, which the Iranians claim was in their international waters, Momani said. “It’s really a way of trying to hit the Americans but not directly and not militarily in a way that would escalate matters, but in their mind hopefully to induce them to negotiate a way out of the sanctions,” she said. “Of course we see the reverse happening with the Americans: they are pushing for even more sanctions.” In a televised address on Tuesday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said the new sanctions against Khamenei would have no practical impact because the top cleric had no assets abroad. Rouhani, a pragmatist who won two elections on promises to open Iran up to the world, said the White House’s actions were “mentally retarded” - an insult that other Iranian officials have used in the past about Trump, but a departure from Rouhani’s own comparatively measured tone over the years. Crippling sanctions President Donald Trump speaks before signing an executive order to increase sanctions on Iran, in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, June 24, 2019, in Washington. Trump is accompanied by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, left, and Vice President Mike Pence. (Alex Brandon/AP Photo) The United States has imposed crippling financial sanctions against Iran since last year when Trump withdrew from a 2015 deal between Tehran and world powers under which it curbed its nuclear program and won a removal of sanctions in return. The crisis has escalated sharply since last month when the Trump administration tightened its sanctions noose, ordering all countries to halt purchases of Iranian oil. ","duration_ms":641176,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5Tz8fWnXy1JtT3F41izWzy"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5Tz8fWnXy1JtT3F41izWzy","html_description":"Washington and Tehran have reached a dangerous impasse as U.S. President Donald Trump threatened on Tuesday to obliterate parts of Iran if it attacked “anything American,” with Iranian officials calling White House actions “mentally retarded,” says a Canadian expert on Middle East politics.\n\nTrump on Monday signed an executive order imposing sanctions against Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and other senior figures, with punitive measures against Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif expected later this week.\n\nThe moves came after Iran shot down a U.S. drone on June 20 and Trump called off a retaliatory air strike minutes before impact, saying too many people would have been killed. It would have been the first time the United States had bombed the Islamic Republic in four decades of mutual hostility.\n\nOn Tuesday, however, Trump tweeted: “Any attack by Iran on anything American will be met with great and overwhelming force. In some areas, overwhelming will mean obliteration.”\n\nBessma Momani, Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, said the latest flare-up in deeply personal attacks is indicative of the escalation between the U.S. and Iran.\n\n“The Iranians obviously want to get relief from the international sanctions,” Momani said in a phone interview.\n\n“At the moment 80 per cent of the country is under economic sanctions, people are struggling, the regime is hurting and all of that is basically pushing them to try and hit, not perhaps the Americans directly, because they are smart enough not to do that, but to provoke the U.S.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Bessma Momani)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190625-WIE30\nA game of chicken?\nFILE - In this Thursday, June 13, 2019 file photo, an oil tanker is on fire in the sea of Oman. A series of attacks on oil tankers near the Persian Gulf has ratcheted up tensions between the U.S. and Iran -- and raised fears over the safety of one of Asia’s most vital energy trade routes, where about a fifth of the world’s oil passes through its narrowest at the Strait of Hormuz. T(AP Photo/ISNA, File)\n\nProvoking the U.S. includes everything from hitting oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz, through which up to one-fifth of world’s oil shipments pass, to shooting down a U.S. spy drone, which the Iranians claim was in their international waters, Momani said.\n\n“It’s really a way of trying to hit the Americans but not directly and not militarily in a way that would escalate matters, but in their mind hopefully to induce them to negotiate a way out of the sanctions,” she said. “Of course we see the reverse happening with the Americans: they are pushing for even more sanctions.”\n\nIn a televised address on Tuesday, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said the new sanctions against Khamenei would have no practical impact because the top cleric had no assets abroad.\n\nRouhani, a pragmatist who won two elections on promises to open Iran up to the world, said the White House’s actions were “mentally retarded” - an insult that other Iranian officials have used in the past about Trump, but a departure from Rouhani’s own comparatively measured tone over the years.\nCrippling sanctions\nPresident Donald Trump speaks before signing an executive order to increase sanctions on Iran, in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, June 24, 2019, in Washington. Trump is accompanied by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, left, and Vice President Mike Pence. (Alex Brandon/AP Photo)\n\nThe United States has imposed crippling financial sanctions against Iran since last year when Trump withdrew from a 2015 deal between Tehran and world powers under which it curbed its nuclear program and won a removal of sanctions in return.\n\nThe crisis has escalated sharply since last month when the Trump administration tightened its sanctions noose, ordering all countries to halt purchases of Iranian oil.\n\n","id":"5Tz8fWnXy1JtT3F41izWzy","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Washington and Tehran at impasse as Trump threatens Iran with ‘obliteration’","release_date":"2019-06-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5Tz8fWnXy1JtT3F41izWzy"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/c13ecb31d1d34f37b815b134a460965d46f635a6","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Human rights activists in Canada say they welcome new guidelines for Canadian diplomats working abroad aimed at enabling the work of human rights defenders around the world by ensuring their safety and security. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, announced Monday the launch of Voices at Risk: Canada’s Guidelines on Supporting Human Rights Defenders. The guidelines offer practical advice for Canadian diplomats working around the world, and in Canada, to support human rights defenders who seek help. “In many parts of the world, human rights defenders are at risk as a result of their courageous work and their willingness to speak truth to power,” Freeland said in a statement. “Canada and the international community need to be strong supporters of these brave individuals.” Human rights defenders must be able to act freely and without any interference, intimidation, abuse, threats, violence or reprisal, she added. 'Welcome first step' Jackie Hansen, major campaigns and women’s rights campaigner with Amnesty International Canada, said the guidelines update a series of recommendations that were issued by the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in 2016. The new guidelines include some stronger details about the expectations of Canadian diplomats to support human rights defenders all around the world, Hansen told Radio Canada International. “This is so very needed right now because human rights defenders are increasingly under attack all around the world,” Hansen said. “They are subject to smear campaigns, they’re being criminalized, they are subject to arbitrary detention and to violence.” (click to listen to the full interview with Jackie Hansen) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190618-WIE30 Jacqueline Hansen is Amnesty International Canada’s Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner. Her work covers a wide range of human rights concerns in Canada and internationally. (Courtesy: Amnesty International Canada) Knowing that Canada is stepping up its support for these activists is “incredibly welcome,” she said. Harassed, marginalized and murdered According to Front Line Defenders Global Analysis 2018, 321 human rights defenders in 27 countries were targeted and killed for their work in 2018. More than three-quarters of these were defending land, environmental or Indigenous peoples’ rights, often in the context of extractive industries and mega projects.  More than 80 per cent of those killed had previously received a specific death threat. “Now, that’s only activists who were murdered,” Hansen said. In addition, thousands of activists around the world have been harassed, marginalized because of their work, and forced to flee the countries of their origin, she said. “As populism is rising around the world, the space for civil society to peacefully advocate for basic human rights protections is getting smaller and smaller,” Hansen said. “And the activists who continue to do this work to expose human rights violations, and promote protection and respect for human rights are incredibly and increasingly at risk.” But even in this context some forms of human rights activism are much more riskier than others, she added. “We know that women’s rights defenders, LGBTI rights defenders, Indigenous rights defenders because of their multiple and intersecting identities are often targeted and at risk of human rights violations both because of who they are and the rights they are defending,” Hansen said. For Canada’s new guidelines to be effective in helping to protect and support human rights defenders, they will need to be accompanied by a comprehensive implementation plan and increased Canadian funding going directly to human rights defenders and the movements they represent, she said. “We really need to see Canada transform these nice words into some very strong, very concrete actions that are actually going to make a difference in the lives of human rights defenders o...","duration_ms":385358,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2tGKm1aCGzMHldY6KJBskn"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2tGKm1aCGzMHldY6KJBskn","html_description":"Human rights activists in Canada say they welcome new guidelines for Canadian diplomats working abroad aimed at enabling the work of human rights defenders around the world by ensuring their safety and security.\n\nForeign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, announced Monday the launch of Voices at Risk: Canada’s Guidelines on Supporting Human Rights Defenders.\n\nThe guidelines offer practical advice for Canadian diplomats working around the world, and in Canada, to support human rights defenders who seek help.\n\n“In many parts of the world, human rights defenders are at risk as a result of their courageous work and their willingness to speak truth to power,” Freeland said in a statement. “Canada and the international community need to be strong supporters of these brave individuals.”\n\nHuman rights defenders must be able to act freely and without any interference, intimidation, abuse, threats, violence or reprisal, she added.\n'Welcome first step'\nJackie Hansen, major campaigns and women’s rights campaigner with Amnesty International Canada, said the guidelines update a series of recommendations that were issued by the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in 2016.\n\nThe new guidelines include some stronger details about the expectations of Canadian diplomats to support human rights defenders all around the world, Hansen told Radio Canada International.\n\n“This is so very needed right now because human rights defenders are increasingly under attack all around the world,” Hansen said. “They are subject to smear campaigns, they’re being criminalized, they are subject to arbitrary detention and to violence.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Jackie Hansen)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190618-WIE30\n\nJacqueline Hansen is Amnesty International Canada’s Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner. Her work covers a wide range of human rights concerns in Canada and internationally. (Courtesy: Amnesty International Canada)\n\nKnowing that Canada is stepping up its support for these activists is “incredibly welcome,” she said.\nHarassed, marginalized and murdered\nAccording to Front Line Defenders Global Analysis 2018, 321 human rights defenders in 27 countries were targeted and killed for their work in 2018.\n\nMore than three-quarters of these were defending land, environmental or Indigenous peoples’ rights, often in the context of extractive industries and mega projects.  More than 80 per cent of those killed had previously received a specific death threat.\n\n“Now, that’s only activists who were murdered,” Hansen said.\n\nIn addition, thousands of activists around the world have been harassed, marginalized because of their work, and forced to flee the countries of their origin, she said.\n\n“As populism is rising around the world, the space for civil society to peacefully advocate for basic human rights protections is getting smaller and smaller,” Hansen said. “And the activists who continue to do this work to expose human rights violations, and promote protection and respect for human rights are incredibly and increasingly at risk.”\n\nBut even in this context some forms of human rights activism are much more riskier than others, she added.\n\n“We know that women’s rights defenders, LGBTI rights defenders, Indigenous rights defenders because of their multiple and intersecting identities are often targeted and at risk of human rights violations both because of who they are and the rights they are defending,” Hansen said.\n\nFor Canada’s new guidelines to be effective in helping to protect and support human rights defenders, they will need to be accompanied by a comprehensive implementation plan and increased Canadian funding going directly to human rights defenders and the movements they represent, she said.\n\n“We really need to see Canada transform these nice words into some very strong, very concrete actions that are actually going to make a difference in the lives of human rights defenders o...","id":"2tGKm1aCGzMHldY6KJBskn","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Rights group welcomes Canada’s new guidelines to support human rights defenders","release_date":"2019-06-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2tGKm1aCGzMHldY6KJBskn"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/974f9b14f353138bed58555023cfd213d6acaa11","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"When faced with an existential threat, the humanity will rally together despite geopolitical rivalries and political tensions between superpowers. That’s the main lesson of a comparative study published in the journal Polar Record, by Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia. The article, titled Cold, dark, and dangerous: international cooperation in the Arctic and space, compares Russian–Western cooperation in the Arctic and space, despite ongoing tensions in Ukraine, Syria and Venezuela. Whether its climate change or the threat of a potentially devastating asteroid collision, the history of Arctic and space exploration has taught us that countries would come together and put aside their differences, Byers told Radio Canada International. “What my research shows is that when the going gets really tough, when things are really dangerous, countries will cooperate,” Byers said. (click to listen to the full interview with Michael Byers) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190613-WIE30 Extreme environments A Canadian snowmobile rides along the Arctic ice in March of 2007 as part of annual Canadian Forces military exercises called Operation Nunalivut (Dianne Whelan/The Canadian Press) The Arctic and space are remote, extreme environments, where human activity is dangerous and expensive, and these factors seem to push towards international cooperation, said Byers. His interest in the subject was sparked when he realized that despite spiking tensions between Russia and the West following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, international cooperation in the Arctic continued almost unabated, Byers said. “And then I noticed that Russian rockets were being used to carry American, European and Canadian astronauts to the International Space Station, which suggested that cooperation in space was also continuing,” Byers said. 'Militarized but not substantially weaponized' In this photo taken on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, a Russian solder stands guard as Pansyr-S1 air defense system on the Kotelny Island, part of the New Siberian Islands archipelago located between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea, Russia. (Vladimir Isachenkov/AP Photo) The paper identifies eight different factors that seem to be contributing to the ongoing Russian-Western cooperation in both the Arctic and in space. “One of the commonalities between the Arctic and space is that both regions are militarized but not substantially weaponized,” Byers said. “In other words, both the Arctic and space are used heavily by militaries for surveillance and for communication, and sometimes for the transportation of weapons, but significant weapons systems are not actually based there.” While nuclear submarines armed with intercontinental ballistic missiles prowl under the Arctic ice and strategic bombers regularly patrol the region, they are not permanently based there, he said. “And in space we have literally hundreds of military satellites, providing communications and surveillance, and even targeting for advanced militaries,” Byers said, “but as far as we know, there are no anti-satellite weapons based in space nor is space used for the deployment of weapons systems aimed at the surface of the planet.” This commonality reflects the fact that weaponizing these regions would be extremely expensive, he said. “It would be a major diversion away from the military investments and deployments that Russia and Western countries do elsewhere in the world,” Byers said. Reliance on 'soft law' The heads of the eight Arctic nations’ coast guards take part in the Arctic Coast Guard Forum Academic Roundtable at Coast Guard base Boston, June 9, 2016. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard) The paper identifies other commonalities between Arctic and space-faring nations. They engage in risk management through international law-making; Arctic and space ...","duration_ms":591569,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/35Oi4rXf0GLxxcVRppWjM1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/35Oi4rXf0GLxxcVRppWjM1","html_description":"When faced with an existential threat, the humanity will rally together despite geopolitical rivalries and political tensions between superpowers.\n\nThat’s the main lesson of a comparative study published in the journal Polar Record, by Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia.\n\nThe article, titled Cold, dark, and dangerous: international cooperation in the Arctic and space, compares Russian–Western cooperation in the Arctic and space, despite ongoing tensions in Ukraine, Syria and Venezuela.\n\nWhether its climate change or the threat of a potentially devastating asteroid collision, the history of Arctic and space exploration has taught us that countries would come together and put aside their differences, Byers told Radio Canada International.\n\n“What my research shows is that when the going gets really tough, when things are really dangerous, countries will cooperate,” Byers said.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Michael Byers)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190613-WIE30\nExtreme environments\nA Canadian snowmobile rides along the Arctic ice in March of 2007 as part of annual Canadian Forces military exercises called Operation Nunalivut (Dianne Whelan/The Canadian Press)\n\nThe Arctic and space are remote, extreme environments, where human activity is dangerous and expensive, and these factors seem to push towards international cooperation, said Byers.\n\nHis interest in the subject was sparked when he realized that despite spiking tensions between Russia and the West following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, international cooperation in the Arctic continued almost unabated, Byers said.\n\n“And then I noticed that Russian rockets were being used to carry American, European and Canadian astronauts to the International Space Station, which suggested that cooperation in space was also continuing,” Byers said.\n'Militarized but not substantially weaponized'\nIn this photo taken on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, a Russian solder stands guard as Pansyr-S1 air defense system on the Kotelny Island, part of the New Siberian Islands archipelago located between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea, Russia. (Vladimir Isachenkov/AP Photo)\n\nThe paper identifies eight different factors that seem to be contributing to the ongoing Russian-Western cooperation in both the Arctic and in space.\n\n“One of the commonalities between the Arctic and space is that both regions are militarized but not substantially weaponized,” Byers said.\n\n“In other words, both the Arctic and space are used heavily by militaries for surveillance and for communication, and sometimes for the transportation of weapons, but significant weapons systems are not actually based there.”\n\nWhile nuclear submarines armed with intercontinental ballistic missiles prowl under the Arctic ice and strategic bombers regularly patrol the region, they are not permanently based there, he said.\n\n“And in space we have literally hundreds of military satellites, providing communications and surveillance, and even targeting for advanced militaries,” Byers said, “but as far as we know, there are no anti-satellite weapons based in space nor is space used for the deployment of weapons systems aimed at the surface of the planet.”\n\nThis commonality reflects the fact that weaponizing these regions would be extremely expensive, he said.\n\n“It would be a major diversion away from the military investments and deployments that Russia and Western countries do elsewhere in the world,” Byers said.\nReliance on 'soft law'\nThe heads of the eight Arctic nations’ coast guards take part in the Arctic Coast Guard Forum Academic Roundtable at Coast Guard base Boston, June 9, 2016. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard)\n\nThe paper identifies other commonalities between Arctic and space-faring nations.\n\nThey engage in risk management through international law-making; Arctic and space ...","id":"35Oi4rXf0GLxxcVRppWjM1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"‘Cold, dark and dangerous’ but the Arctic and space bring out the best in humanity: study","release_date":"2019-06-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:35Oi4rXf0GLxxcVRppWjM1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4a22f0506328190381c0c262913085813e0899a0","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The world’s oceans could lose nearly one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if global warming continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius that the world’s oceans warm, the total mass of sea animals is projected to drop by five per cent, according to a comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And that does not include effects of fishing. “What we find is that with the expected climate change under the ‘business as usual scenario’ we are looking into a 17 per cent or more decrease in the ocean biomass at the end of this century,” said study co-author William Cheung, a marine ecologist at the University of British Columbia. (click to listen to the full interview with William Cheung) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190612-WIE30 While warmer water is the biggest factor, climate change also produces oceans that are more acidic and have less oxygen, which also harms sea life, Cheung said. Impact beyond marine life If the world’s greenhouse gas emissions stay at the present rate, that means a 17 per cent loss of biomass — the total weight of all the marine animal life — by the year 2100, according to Tuesday’s study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (iStock) Oceans are crucial for humanity, he said. “We’re connected to oceans with all aspects of our life,” Cheung said. The decrease in the abundance of marine life in the oceans will have major impacts not only on the on coastline communities but also on communities far away from the oceans, he said. However, the negative changes are expected to hit hardest the tropics, Cheung said. “What we find is that across the tropical oceans, those that are closer to the equator, we see a widespread and large decrease in the animal biomass,” Cheung said. “And that’s because in those areas we’re seeing a particular decrease in availability of food for marine organisms and some of the organisms are particularly sensitive to temperatures as well.” We’re already experiencing some of the impacts of ocean warming on particular species, he said. For example, Atlantic cod off Canada’s and the U.S. East Coast is one of the species negatively affected by rising ocean temperatures, Cheung said. “We also know that Pacific salmon here on the British Columbia coast some of the decrease in their abundance is also related to the warming waters in the oceans and rivers,” Cheung said. Overfishing in the world’s oceans can further exacerbate the problem, he added. Reducing carbon emissions is the way to go The Syncrude plant at Ft McMurray, Alberta. Cutting carbon emissions is the only way to mitigate the impact of climate change for the world's oceans, scientists say.(Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS) But if the world reduces carbon pollution, losses can be limited to only about five per cent, the study said. “If we can commit to a low-carbon emissions pathway, then we can substantially reduce the impacts we’re projecting for marine life in this century,” Cheung said. “For example, with our study we project a three to four-times decrease in the impacts on marine life if we are able to go with a low carbon emissions pathway, that is close to what the international community committed to under the Paris Agreement, which tried to limit global warming to below 1.5 degree Celsius relative to preindustrial levels.” With files from The Associated Press","duration_ms":493244,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6twhgXfPunE6oTtcU215rW"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6twhgXfPunE6oTtcU215rW","html_description":"The world’s oceans could lose nearly one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if global warming continues on its current path, a new study says.\n\nEvery degree Celsius that the world’s oceans warm, the total mass of sea animals is projected to drop by five per cent, according to a comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.\n\nAnd that does not include effects of fishing.\n\n“What we find is that with the expected climate change under the ‘business as usual scenario’ we are looking into a 17 per cent or more decrease in the ocean biomass at the end of this century,” said study co-author William Cheung, a marine ecologist at the University of British Columbia.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with William Cheung)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190612-WIE30\n\nWhile warmer water is the biggest factor, climate change also produces oceans that are more acidic and have less oxygen, which also harms sea life, Cheung said.\nImpact beyond marine life\nIf the world’s greenhouse gas emissions stay at the present rate, that means a 17 per cent loss of biomass — the total weight of all the marine animal life — by the year 2100, according to Tuesday’s study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (iStock)\n\nOceans are crucial for humanity, he said.\n\n“We’re connected to oceans with all aspects of our life,” Cheung said.\n\nThe decrease in the abundance of marine life in the oceans will have major impacts not only on the on coastline communities but also on communities far away from the oceans, he said.\n\nHowever, the negative changes are expected to hit hardest the tropics, Cheung said.\n\n“What we find is that across the tropical oceans, those that are closer to the equator, we see a widespread and large decrease in the animal biomass,” Cheung said. “And that’s because in those areas we’re seeing a particular decrease in availability of food for marine organisms and some of the organisms are particularly sensitive to temperatures as well.”\n\nWe’re already experiencing some of the impacts of ocean warming on particular species, he said.\n\nFor example, Atlantic cod off Canada’s and the U.S. East Coast is one of the species negatively affected by rising ocean temperatures, Cheung said.\n\n“We also know that Pacific salmon here on the British Columbia coast some of the decrease in their abundance is also related to the warming waters in the oceans and rivers,” Cheung said.\n\nOverfishing in the world’s oceans can further exacerbate the problem, he added.\nReducing carbon emissions is the way to go\nThe Syncrude plant at Ft McMurray, Alberta. Cutting carbon emissions is the only way to mitigate the impact of climate change for the world's oceans, scientists say.(Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nBut if the world reduces carbon pollution, losses can be limited to only about five per cent, the study said.\n\n“If we can commit to a low-carbon emissions pathway, then we can substantially reduce the impacts we’re projecting for marine life in this century,” Cheung said.\n\n“For example, with our study we project a three to four-times decrease in the impacts on marine life if we are able to go with a low carbon emissions pathway, that is close to what the international community committed to under the Paris Agreement, which tried to limit global warming to below 1.5 degree Celsius relative to preindustrial levels.”\n\nWith files from The Associated Press","id":"6twhgXfPunE6oTtcU215rW","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Ocean warming may reduce sea life by 17%, study finds","release_date":"2019-06-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6twhgXfPunE6oTtcU215rW"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/421a28f44f669afc3aae4b183da882006c86a318","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Human rights groups are sounding the alarm over the world’s “most neglected displacement crisis” unfolding in western Cameroon, where government forces and pro-government militias are locked in a deadly spiral of violence targeting the West African country’s anglophone minority. \"The international community is asleep at the wheel when it comes to the crisis in Cameroon,\" the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), Jan Egeland, said in a report issued on Tuesday. \"Brutal killings, burned-down villages and massive displacement have been met with deafening silence.\" Two regions in Cameroon are in the grip of an armed campaign by English-speaking militants seeking independence from the francophone-majority country. On Oct. 1 2017, they declared the creation of the \"Republic of Ambazonia,\" covering the two English-speaking regions incorporated into post-independence Cameroon in 1961. The declaration went largely unnoticed outside Cameroon, and \"Ambazonia\" -- named after a bay at the mouth of the Douala River -- has been recognised by no-one. Violent crackdown Cameroonian elite Rapid Intervention Battalion (BIR) members patrol the abandoned village of Ekona near Buea in the anglophone southwest region, Cameroon Oct. 4, 2018. (Zohra Bensemra/REUTERS) The government responded with a brutal crackdown, and the separatists in turn have mounted a campaign of attacks on state buildings, shooting and kidnappings. According to the International Crisis Group think tank, 1,850 people have been killed, while more than 530,000 people have been forced from their homes, according to UN figures. A report by the Cameroon-based Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Africa (CHRDA), and the Montreal-based Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights, accused the armed forces of conducting \"a deliberate, violent campaign against civilian populations.\" Pearl Eliadis, a Canadian human rights lawyer based in Montreal and a co-author of the report, entitled Cameroon's Unfolding Catastrophe, said Cameroon is now the sixth largest source of displaced persons in the world. Many are fleeing violence as a result of raids on villages and surrounding areas. Men, women, and children have found refuge in forests where they lack hygiene, health services, sanitation, shelter, and food, Eliadis said. (click to listen to the full interview with Pearl Eliadis) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190605-WIE30 The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported in January 2019 that 1.3 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. “We are not exaggerating when we say this is a human rights catastrophe,” Eliadis said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. Around a fifth of Cameroon's population of 24 million are English-speakers. Honrne Waba, 40, who has fled the northwestern village of Njinikom because of violence cooks in the courtyard of the house where she is staying in Yaounde, Cameroon, Oct. 3, 2018. (Zohra Bensemra/REUTERS) Resentment has long festered at perceived discrimination at the hands of the francophone majority in education, law and the economy. In recent years, growing demands for autonomy or a return to Cameroon's federal structure were rejected by President Paul Biya, prompting radicals to gain the ascendancy in the anglophone movement. “Those who have been engaged in criminal activity need to be prosecuted, yes, but that does not in any way excuse barring access to humanitarian aid,” Eliadis said. “The existence of a separatist element does not in any way excuse the government from activities like razing villages, sending soldiers in in reprisal attacks, detaining people arbitrarily, detaining civilians and torturing them, and we have extensive documentation of all of those activities.” An important role for Canada Canada has an important multilateral role to play in helping to resolve the conflict, said Eliadis,","duration_ms":597264,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7w1WFscrXUid2i67AcdcHR"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7w1WFscrXUid2i67AcdcHR","html_description":"Human rights groups are sounding the alarm over the world’s “most neglected displacement crisis” unfolding in western Cameroon, where government forces and pro-government militias are locked in a deadly spiral of violence targeting the West African country’s anglophone minority.\n\n\"The international community is asleep at the wheel when it comes to the crisis in Cameroon,\" the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), Jan Egeland, said in a report issued on Tuesday.\n\n\"Brutal killings, burned-down villages and massive displacement have been met with deafening silence.\"\n\nTwo regions in Cameroon are in the grip of an armed campaign by English-speaking militants seeking independence from the francophone-majority country.\n\nOn Oct. 1 2017, they declared the creation of the \"Republic of Ambazonia,\" covering the two English-speaking regions incorporated into post-independence Cameroon in 1961.\n\nThe declaration went largely unnoticed outside Cameroon, and \"Ambazonia\" -- named after a bay at the mouth of the Douala River -- has been recognised by no-one.\nViolent crackdown\nCameroonian elite Rapid Intervention Battalion (BIR) members patrol the abandoned village of Ekona near Buea in the anglophone southwest region, Cameroon Oct. 4, 2018. (Zohra Bensemra/REUTERS)\n\nThe government responded with a brutal crackdown, and the separatists in turn have mounted a campaign of attacks on state buildings, shooting and kidnappings.\n\nAccording to the International Crisis Group think tank, 1,850 people have been killed, while more than 530,000 people have been forced from their homes, according to UN figures.\n\nA report by the Cameroon-based Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Africa (CHRDA), and the Montreal-based Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights, accused the armed forces of conducting \"a deliberate, violent campaign against civilian populations.\"\n\nPearl Eliadis, a Canadian human rights lawyer based in Montreal and a co-author of the report, entitled Cameroon's Unfolding Catastrophe, said Cameroon is now the sixth largest source of displaced persons in the world.\n\nMany are fleeing violence as a result of raids on villages and surrounding areas. Men, women, and children have found refuge in forests where they lack hygiene, health services, sanitation, shelter, and food, Eliadis said.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Pearl Eliadis)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190605-WIE30\n\nThe United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported in January 2019 that 1.3 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance.\n\n“We are not exaggerating when we say this is a human rights catastrophe,” Eliadis said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International.\n\nAround a fifth of Cameroon's population of 24 million are English-speakers.\n\nHonrne Waba, 40, who has fled the northwestern village of Njinikom because of violence cooks in the courtyard of the house where she is staying in Yaounde, Cameroon, Oct. 3, 2018. (Zohra Bensemra/REUTERS)\n\nResentment has long festered at perceived discrimination at the hands of the francophone majority in education, law and the economy.\n\nIn recent years, growing demands for autonomy or a return to Cameroon's federal structure were rejected by President Paul Biya, prompting radicals to gain the ascendancy in the anglophone movement.\n\n“Those who have been engaged in criminal activity need to be prosecuted, yes, but that does not in any way excuse barring access to humanitarian aid,” Eliadis said.\n\n“The existence of a separatist element does not in any way excuse the government from activities like razing villages, sending soldiers in in reprisal attacks, detaining people arbitrarily, detaining civilians and torturing them, and we have extensive documentation of all of those activities.”\nAn important role for Canada\nCanada has an important multilateral role to play in helping to resolve the conflict, said Eliadis,","id":"7w1WFscrXUid2i67AcdcHR","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Rights groups sound alarm over ‘neglected’ Cameroon crisis","release_date":"2019-06-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7w1WFscrXUid2i67AcdcHR"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/558ba823c416b06f16d6ac5cf0d60085e3c4cd5f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Liberal government accepts the finding of a national commission of inquiry that the murders and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls across Canada in recent decades amount to an act of \"genocide,\" Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday. But Trudeau also urged Canadians to focus on solutions to the ongoing crisis rather than dwell on the past or spend their energy on debates over the definition of genocide. The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, which presented its final report Monday, found that Indigenous women and girls are 12 times more likely to be murdered or to go missing than members of any other demographic group in Canada — and 16 times more likely to be slain or to disappear than white women. Canada complicit in ‘race-based genocide’ against Indigenous women and girls: report The inquiry report described the deaths and disappearances as “a race-based genocide.” “We accept the findings of the commissioners that it was genocide,” Trudeau told reporters in Vancouver. “But our focus is going to be, as it must be, on the families, on the communities that have suffered such loss, on the systems that have repeatedly failed Indigenous women and girls across this country.” Trudeau said his government will present an action plan in coming months to deal with recommendations made in the report. 'A race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples' Lorelei Williams, second left, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wipes away tears while seated with Rhiannon Bennett, from left to right, Sophie Merasty and Summer Rain Bentham, after responding to the report on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, along with other Indigenous women and allies in Vancouver, on Monday June 3, 2019. (Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Entitled Reclaiming Power and Place, the report, presented at an emotional ceremony at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec, comes with 231 individual “Calls for Justice” – recommendations directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians. “The truths shared in these National Inquiry hearings tell the story – or, more accurately, thousands of stories – of acts of genocide against First Nations, Inuit and Métis women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA (two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual) people,” the report says. “This violence amounts to a race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis, which especially targets women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people.” The report describes Canada as a country at war, where “Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people are under siege.” Thousands of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA have been lost to the “Canadian genocide” to date, the report says. Is it a genocide? Commissioners Marion Buller (left) and Commissioner Michele Audette prepare the official copy of the report for presentation to the government during ceremonies marking the release of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women report in Gatineau, Monday June 3, 2019. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The inquiry’s finding of genocide sparked a debate over the use of the term. Retired Lt.-Gen. Roméo Dallaire, who oversaw the 1994 UN mission in Rwanda that failed to prevent that country's genocide, told CBC News he has \"a problem\" with how the inquiry used the word. \"My definition of genocide, I read it very deliberately at the start of the Rwandan genocide, and it was a deliberate act of a government to exterminate deliberately, and by force and directly, an ethnicity or a group or an entity of human beings,\" Dallaire said. Frank Chalk, a historian, a genocide scholar and author, said there is “a strong case to be made” that Canada’s Indian Residential Schools system and the ...","duration_ms":787148,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/21LcEiSgYAbC0bJ59Ifdp3"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/21LcEiSgYAbC0bJ59Ifdp3","html_description":"The Liberal government accepts the finding of a national commission of inquiry that the murders and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls across Canada in recent decades amount to an act of \"genocide,\" Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday.\n\nBut Trudeau also urged Canadians to focus on solutions to the ongoing crisis rather than dwell on the past or spend their energy on debates over the definition of genocide.\n\nThe National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, which presented its final report Monday, found that Indigenous women and girls are 12 times more likely to be murdered or to go missing than members of any other demographic group in Canada — and 16 times more likely to be slain or to disappear than white women.\n\n \tCanada complicit in ‘race-based genocide’ against Indigenous women and girls: report\n\nThe inquiry report described the deaths and disappearances as “a race-based genocide.”\n\n“We accept the findings of the commissioners that it was genocide,” Trudeau told reporters in Vancouver.\n\n“But our focus is going to be, as it must be, on the families, on the communities that have suffered such loss, on the systems that have repeatedly failed Indigenous women and girls across this country.”\n\nTrudeau said his government will present an action plan in coming months to deal with recommendations made in the report.\n'A race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples'\nLorelei Williams, second left, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wipes away tears while seated with Rhiannon Bennett, from left to right, Sophie Merasty and Summer Rain Bentham, after responding to the report on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, along with other Indigenous women and allies in Vancouver, on Monday June 3, 2019. (Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nEntitled Reclaiming Power and Place, the report, presented at an emotional ceremony at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec, comes with 231 individual “Calls for Justice” – recommendations directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.\n\n“The truths shared in these National Inquiry hearings tell the story – or, more accurately, thousands of stories – of acts of genocide against First Nations, Inuit and Métis women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA (two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual) people,” the report says.\n\n“This violence amounts to a race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis, which especially targets women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people.”\n\nThe report describes Canada as a country at war, where “Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people are under siege.”\n\nThousands of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA have been lost to the “Canadian genocide” to date, the report says.\nIs it a genocide?\nCommissioners Marion Buller (left) and Commissioner Michele Audette prepare the official copy of the report for presentation to the government during ceremonies marking the release of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women report in Gatineau, Monday June 3, 2019. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe inquiry’s finding of genocide sparked a debate over the use of the term.\n\nRetired Lt.-Gen. Roméo Dallaire, who oversaw the 1994 UN mission in Rwanda that failed to prevent that country's genocide, told CBC News he has \"a problem\" with how the inquiry used the word.\n\n\"My definition of genocide, I read it very deliberately at the start of the Rwandan genocide, and it was a deliberate act of a government to exterminate deliberately, and by force and directly, an ethnicity or a group or an entity of human beings,\" Dallaire said.\n\nFrank Chalk, a historian, a genocide scholar and author, said there is “a strong case to be made” that Canada’s Indian Residential Schools system and the ...","id":"21LcEiSgYAbC0bJ59Ifdp3","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Trudeau accepts the finding of genocide in deaths and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls","release_date":"2019-06-04","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:21LcEiSgYAbC0bJ59Ifdp3"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e1d28dcab91c9a54c4d6ec5b35c65dea958cdd01","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Polar deserts in Canada’s High Arctic are undergoing rapid changes as increases in summer air temperatures lead to permafrost thaw, leaving giant horseshoe-shaped pockmarks on the barren terrain, according to a new study. The study by McGill University researchers, published recently in Environmental Research Letters, presents close to 30 years of aerial surveys and extensive ground mapping of the Eureka Sound Lowlands area of Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands, Canada’s northernmost Arctic islands, located at approximately 80 °N. The research focuses on these horseshoe-shaped landforms, also known as thaw slumps, that develop when the ice within the permafrost melts and the land slips down. Permafrost thawing faster than previously thought: study Permafrost thaw: more CO2 than previously thought? While thaw slumps are very common in the lower Arctic latitudes, researchers had assumed the High Canadian Arctic, where average annual ground and air temperatures are -16.5 C and -19.7 C, respectively and the permafrost is over 500 metres deep, would be more immune to the effects of warmer temperatures, said Melissa Ward Jones, the study’s lead author and a PhD candidate in McGill’s Department of Geography. “For a long time we thought that areas that permafrost areas that are closer to the thawing point… further south were the most sensitive to change because they were closer to that zero degree thawing point,” Ward Jones said in a telephone interview from Fairbanks, Alaska. “But what my study is showing is that, no, these places aren’t immune to climate change.” (click to listen to the interview with Melissa Ward Jones) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190524-WIE30 Scientists had not expected to see the spread of these landforms, known as retrogressive thaw slumps, in the high Arctic because of the extremely cold ground and air temperatures. (Melissa Ward Jones/McGill University) Even a slight increase in summer temperatures is enough to trigger a bigger permafrost thaw, she said. Despite short Arctic summers, the thaw season, which lasts for just 3-6 weeks a year, leads to the development and expansion of slumps, which could have major implications for northern infrastructure, Ward Jones said. “I think it’s a wakeup call that change is happening in these areas that are really far north,” Ward Jones said. There has been a widespread development of retrogressive thaw slumps in high Arctic polar deserts over a short period, particularly during the unusually warm summers of 2011, 2012 and 2015, the research shows. “When we see these widespread increases, these large jumps in numbers going from 100 active slumps to over 200 active slumps, that means something is going on bigger regional scale, so we’re linking this with increases in summer temperatures,” Ward Jones said. McGill researchers have been studying the high Arctic polar deserts for close to 30 years, mapping the landscape within the Eureka Sound Lowlands, Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands. (Melissa Ward Jones/McGill University) This happens because the terrain in Canada’s Arctic polar deserts has very little vegetation and organic cover to insulate it from increased summer temperatures, Ward Jones said. “Where we are on Ellesmere Island permafrost is more in equilibrium with climate, so any increase in summer temperatures if you reach a new maximum summer temperatures, you’re going to have an increase in your thaw depth – the layer of soil at the surface that goes above zero every summer – and if you have ice-rich permafrost, which we do have in these areas, the ice within the permafrost is going to melt,” she said. Wayne Pollard, a professor in McGill’s Department of Geography and co-author on the study, said their research clearly demonstrates the complex nature of ice-rich permafrost systems and climate-permafrost interaction. “Furthermore, it raises concerns about the over simplification of some studies that generali...","duration_ms":476238,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/63a5xaarCTu4xz4Upkw8TO"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/63a5xaarCTu4xz4Upkw8TO","html_description":"Polar deserts in Canada’s High Arctic are undergoing rapid changes as increases in summer air temperatures lead to permafrost thaw, leaving giant horseshoe-shaped pockmarks on the barren terrain, according to a new study.\n\nThe study by McGill University researchers, published recently in Environmental Research Letters, presents close to 30 years of aerial surveys and extensive ground mapping of the Eureka Sound Lowlands area of Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands, Canada’s northernmost Arctic islands, located at approximately 80 °N.\n\nThe research focuses on these horseshoe-shaped landforms, also known as thaw slumps, that develop when the ice within the permafrost melts and the land slips down.\n\n \tPermafrost thawing faster than previously thought: study\n \tPermafrost thaw: more CO2 than previously thought?\n\nWhile thaw slumps are very common in the lower Arctic latitudes, researchers had assumed the High Canadian Arctic, where average annual ground and air temperatures are -16.5 C and -19.7 C, respectively and the permafrost is over 500 metres deep, would be more immune to the effects of warmer temperatures, said Melissa Ward Jones, the study’s lead author and a PhD candidate in McGill’s Department of Geography.\n\n“For a long time we thought that areas that permafrost areas that are closer to the thawing point… further south were the most sensitive to change because they were closer to that zero degree thawing point,” Ward Jones said in a telephone interview from Fairbanks, Alaska.\n\n“But what my study is showing is that, no, these places aren’t immune to climate change.”\n\n(click to listen to the interview with Melissa Ward Jones)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190524-WIE30\n\nScientists had not expected to see the spread of these landforms, known as retrogressive thaw slumps, in the high Arctic because of the extremely cold ground and air temperatures. (Melissa Ward Jones/McGill University)\n\nEven a slight increase in summer temperatures is enough to trigger a bigger permafrost thaw, she said.\n\nDespite short Arctic summers, the thaw season, which lasts for just 3-6 weeks a year, leads to the development and expansion of slumps, which could have major implications for northern infrastructure, Ward Jones said.\n\n“I think it’s a wakeup call that change is happening in these areas that are really far north,” Ward Jones said.\n\nThere has been a widespread development of retrogressive thaw slumps in high Arctic polar deserts over a short period, particularly during the unusually warm summers of 2011, 2012 and 2015, the research shows.\n\n“When we see these widespread increases, these large jumps in numbers going from 100 active slumps to over 200 active slumps, that means something is going on bigger regional scale, so we’re linking this with increases in summer temperatures,” Ward Jones said.\n\nMcGill researchers have been studying the high Arctic polar deserts for close to 30 years, mapping the landscape within the Eureka Sound Lowlands, Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands. (Melissa Ward Jones/McGill University)\n\nThis happens because the terrain in Canada’s Arctic polar deserts has very little vegetation and organic cover to insulate it from increased summer temperatures, Ward Jones said.\n\n“Where we are on Ellesmere Island permafrost is more in equilibrium with climate, so any increase in summer temperatures if you reach a new maximum summer temperatures, you’re going to have an increase in your thaw depth – the layer of soil at the surface that goes above zero every summer – and if you have ice-rich permafrost, which we do have in these areas, the ice within the permafrost is going to melt,” she said.\n\nWayne Pollard, a professor in McGill’s Department of Geography and co-author on the study, said their research clearly demonstrates the complex nature of ice-rich permafrost systems and climate-permafrost interaction.\n\n“Furthermore, it raises concerns about the over simplification of some studies that generali...","id":"63a5xaarCTu4xz4Upkw8TO","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Permafrost degradation spreads in High Arctic","release_date":"2019-05-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:63a5xaarCTu4xz4Upkw8TO"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b506ebf75bbbe8ef95f3e8f779ef03107ef5c74f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"It took the federal government 134 years but on Thursday Prime Minister Justin Trudeau finally exonerated a Saskatchewan chief of treason and apologized for the conviction of the Indigenous leader who “made his indelible mark” on Canada’s history. The exoneration of Chief Poundmaker, also known under his Cree name as Pihtokahanapiwiyin , was announced at the reserve that bears his name -- Poundmaker Cree Nation -- about 200 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon. Following prayers and traditional drumming, Trudeau told a crowd that the government must acknowledge wrongs of the past and that Poundmaker was unjustly convicted of treason-felony in 1885. “We recognize that during his lifetime, Chief Poundmaker was not treated justly nor showed the respect he deserved as a leader of his people,” Trudeau told hundreds of people who had joined the reconciliation ceremony on the windy prairie plain. “We know that the colonial perspectives which dominated relations between Indigenous peoples and the Crown did not allow for open and collaborative dialogue.” (listen to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's apology) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190523-WIE30 'Make right by the Poundmaker Cree Nation' Prime Minister Justin Trudeau kneels Thursday at the site of Chief Poundmaker's grave. (Bonnie Allen/CBC News) The federal government has a “duty to take an honest look” at this difficult chapter of Canadian history and “make right by the Poundmaker Cree Nation,” he said. “It is my sincere hope that by coming together today and taking this important step together as equal partners, we can continue the important work of reconciling the past and renewing our relationship.” Trudeau to apologize and exonerate an historical Indigenous leader Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde congratulated the federal government for “getting it right.” “Because this man that we’re honouring he was a diplomat for our people, he was a statesman for our people, he was a chief, a leader and he was a warrior, but he didn’t use a gun to fight he used the pipe and he brought peace,” Bellegarde said. The exoneration of Chief Poundmaker and the prime minister's apology are an opportunity to address a past injustice and correct the historical record, Bellegarde said. A diplomat, a statesman and a peacemaker Chief Poundmaker is credited with saving many lives during the 1885 Northwest Rebellion. (Library and Archives Canada) In a brief historical discourse, Trudeau reminded the audience of Chief Poundmaker’s achievements and struggles. According to oral tradition, Chief Poundmaker’s role as an influential leader began in 1873, with the conclusion of peace negotiations between the Cree and the Blackfoot nations. Known as the “Peacemaker” by the Indigenous peoples of the Northern Plains, Chief Poundmaker had tried to maintain peaceful relations and open dialogue between the Cree and European settlers. In 1876, Poundmaker was part of the Cree delegation at Fort Carlton where Treaty 6 was concluded with Alexander Morris, Lieutenant-Governor of the Northwest Territories and Treaty Commissioner. In the years following the signing of Treaty 6, Chief Poundmaker, along with others such as Big Bear or Mistahimaskwa, pushed government officials to live up to the promises and obligations laid out in the Treaty, often with frustrating results, Trudeau said. But by the winter of 1885, the combination of a depleted bison population, cuts to government aid and fundamental disagreements regarding the implementation of treaty promises resulted in wide-spread dissatisfaction in the Prairies. “In the push to settle Western Canada, and guided by colonial thinking and policies, the federal government sought to exert increased control over Indigenous peoples,” Trudeau said. “Tension between the Canadian government, Métis, First Nations and settlers eventually amounted to a conflict known as the Northwest Resistance.” ","duration_ms":1020761,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1kJBsIkJMUQxac2Fpy1VZy"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1kJBsIkJMUQxac2Fpy1VZy","html_description":"It took the federal government 134 years but on Thursday Prime Minister Justin Trudeau finally exonerated a Saskatchewan chief of treason and apologized for the conviction of the Indigenous leader who “made his indelible mark” on Canada’s history.\n\nThe exoneration of Chief Poundmaker, also known under his Cree name as Pihtokahanapiwiyin , was announced at the reserve that bears his name -- Poundmaker Cree Nation -- about 200 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon.\n\nFollowing prayers and traditional drumming, Trudeau told a crowd that the government must acknowledge wrongs of the past and that Poundmaker was unjustly convicted of treason-felony in 1885.\n\n“We recognize that during his lifetime, Chief Poundmaker was not treated justly nor showed the respect he deserved as a leader of his people,” Trudeau told hundreds of people who had joined the reconciliation ceremony on the windy prairie plain.\n\n“We know that the colonial perspectives which dominated relations between Indigenous peoples and the Crown did not allow for open and collaborative dialogue.”\n\n(listen to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's apology)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190523-WIE30\n'Make right by the Poundmaker Cree Nation'\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau kneels Thursday at the site of Chief Poundmaker's grave. (Bonnie Allen/CBC News)\n\nThe federal government has a “duty to take an honest look” at this difficult chapter of Canadian history and “make right by the Poundmaker Cree Nation,” he said.\n\n“It is my sincere hope that by coming together today and taking this important step together as equal partners, we can continue the important work of reconciling the past and renewing our relationship.”\n\n \tTrudeau to apologize and exonerate an historical Indigenous leader\n\nAssembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde congratulated the federal government for “getting it right.”\n\n“Because this man that we’re honouring he was a diplomat for our people, he was a statesman for our people, he was a chief, a leader and he was a warrior, but he didn’t use a gun to fight he used the pipe and he brought peace,” Bellegarde said.\n\nThe exoneration of Chief Poundmaker and the prime minister's apology are an opportunity to address a past injustice and correct the historical record, Bellegarde said.\nA diplomat, a statesman and a peacemaker\nChief Poundmaker is credited with saving many lives during the 1885 Northwest Rebellion. (Library and Archives Canada)\n\nIn a brief historical discourse, Trudeau reminded the audience of Chief Poundmaker’s achievements and struggles.\n\nAccording to oral tradition, Chief Poundmaker’s role as an influential leader began in 1873, with the conclusion of peace negotiations between the Cree and the Blackfoot nations.\n\nKnown as the “Peacemaker” by the Indigenous peoples of the Northern Plains, Chief Poundmaker had tried to maintain peaceful relations and open dialogue between the Cree and European settlers.\n\nIn 1876, Poundmaker was part of the Cree delegation at Fort Carlton where Treaty 6 was concluded with Alexander Morris, Lieutenant-Governor of the Northwest Territories and Treaty Commissioner.\n\nIn the years following the signing of Treaty 6, Chief Poundmaker, along with others such as Big Bear or Mistahimaskwa, pushed government officials to live up to the promises and obligations laid out in the Treaty, often with frustrating results, Trudeau said.\n\nBut by the winter of 1885, the combination of a depleted bison population, cuts to government aid and fundamental disagreements regarding the implementation of treaty promises resulted in wide-spread dissatisfaction in the Prairies.\n\n“In the push to settle Western Canada, and guided by colonial thinking and policies, the federal government sought to exert increased control over Indigenous peoples,” Trudeau said. “Tension between the Canadian government, Métis, First Nations and settlers eventually amounted to a conflict known as the Northwest Resistance.”\n\n","id":"1kJBsIkJMUQxac2Fpy1VZy","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Prime Minister Justin Trudeau exonerates Chief Poundmaker, apologizes for conviction","release_date":"2019-05-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1kJBsIkJMUQxac2Fpy1VZy"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/233dd7c2c173acf8d26582781b593a919d429746","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"While much of the world attention has been focused on rapid sea ice reduction in the Arctic, the changes underneath the receding ice in parts of the Arctic Ocean have been no less dramatic, according to a Canadian researcher. Karen Filbee-Dexter, a research fellow in Marine Biology at Laval University in Quebec City, says while climate change is decimating underwater kelp forests off the coast of western Australia, eastern North America, southern Europe and northern California, the lush forests of large brown seaweeds are thriving in the Arctic. “The Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing coastal zones in the entire world, it’s warming much faster than the rest of the world, and we’re seeing these really dramatic declines in sea ice,” Filbee-Dexter told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from northern Norway. “Most of the work in places like Norway, parts of Greenland, as well as some models of what this will look like have suggested that as we get less sea ice and less classic Arctic conditions, that these seaweed forests are actually expanding into our Arctic.” (click to listen to the full interview with Karen Filbee-Dexter) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190517-WIE30 A silver lining A kelp forest off the coast of the Norwegian Arctic (Karen Filbee-Dexter) While we tend to think about changes as being negative, having increased algae and increased marine plant presence in the Arctic has a silver lining by making these ecosystems more productive and creating new opportunities, she said. “Just like forests do on land they, actually, underwater can form these beautiful habitats that are homes for fish and animals, and they grow really fast, they are really quite productive and they’re quite valuable ecosystems,” Filbee-Dexter said. Kelps are found all throughout cold water coasts but they extend all the way to the Arctic. They occur on rocky coasts throughout the Arctic “anywhere you get rocks and have sunlight reaching the sea floor,” Filbee-Dexter said. “They can survive in the coldest water we can find in the Arctic, they can survive in places that get scoured by ice, they can survive underneath the sea ice for most of their life, and grow in a very short burst during a very short window where the ice actually isn’t there and the light can reach the bottom of the ocean,” Filbee-Dexter said. “They are actually remarkably adapted to live sort of hidden underneath the ice on these very remote Arctic coasts where you don’t have any forests; the whole land is quite barren but then you go under water and suddenly there is underwater marine forest there.” A double edged sword However, the rapid warming of the Arctic introduces other variables that can make it more difficult for kelp forests to thrive. In Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Norway and Siberia, permafrost soils that have been frozen for thousands of years are receding by leaps and bounds every year. Thawing permafrost and crumbling Arctic coasts are dumping sediments into coastal waters at alarming rates, which blocks light and could limit plant growth. The run-off from melting glaciers will also lower salinity and increase turbidity, which impacts young kelp, Filbee-Dexter said. “Whether you’re going to have expansion of kelp forests is going depend on a combination of what happens on land and what happens in the sea,” she said. Underwater forests The longest kelp recorded in the Arctic measured 15 metres and was found in Canada, and the deepest was found at 60-metre depth in Disko Bay, Greenland. Kelps forests are similar to their terrestrial cousins in the way they create habitat and modify the physical environment by shading light and softening waves. “We call them a nursery habitat, because they actually provide habitat for young species of fish… but then you also get crabs and lobsters, a number of different species, and then very tiny things, tiny invertebrates,","duration_ms":798145,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5eWvjZ0hgdpYhqD94bxnYu"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5eWvjZ0hgdpYhqD94bxnYu","html_description":"While much of the world attention has been focused on rapid sea ice reduction in the Arctic, the changes underneath the receding ice in parts of the Arctic Ocean have been no less dramatic, according to a Canadian researcher.\n\nKaren Filbee-Dexter, a research fellow in Marine Biology at Laval University in Quebec City, says while climate change is decimating underwater kelp forests off the coast of western Australia, eastern North America, southern Europe and northern California, the lush forests of large brown seaweeds are thriving in the Arctic.\n\n“The Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing coastal zones in the entire world, it’s warming much faster than the rest of the world, and we’re seeing these really dramatic declines in sea ice,” Filbee-Dexter told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from northern Norway.\n\n“Most of the work in places like Norway, parts of Greenland, as well as some models of what this will look like have suggested that as we get less sea ice and less classic Arctic conditions, that these seaweed forests are actually expanding into our Arctic.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Karen Filbee-Dexter)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190517-WIE30\nA silver lining\nA kelp forest off the coast of the Norwegian Arctic (Karen Filbee-Dexter)\n\nWhile we tend to think about changes as being negative, having increased algae and increased marine plant presence in the Arctic has a silver lining by making these ecosystems more productive and creating new opportunities, she said.\n\n“Just like forests do on land they, actually, underwater can form these beautiful habitats that are homes for fish and animals, and they grow really fast, they are really quite productive and they’re quite valuable ecosystems,” Filbee-Dexter said.\n\nKelps are found all throughout cold water coasts but they extend all the way to the Arctic.\n\nThey occur on rocky coasts throughout the Arctic “anywhere you get rocks and have sunlight reaching the sea floor,” Filbee-Dexter said.\n\n“They can survive in the coldest water we can find in the Arctic, they can survive in places that get scoured by ice, they can survive underneath the sea ice for most of their life, and grow in a very short burst during a very short window where the ice actually isn’t there and the light can reach the bottom of the ocean,” Filbee-Dexter said.\n\n“They are actually remarkably adapted to live sort of hidden underneath the ice on these very remote Arctic coasts where you don’t have any forests; the whole land is quite barren but then you go under water and suddenly there is underwater marine forest there.”\nA double edged sword\nHowever, the rapid warming of the Arctic introduces other variables that can make it more difficult for kelp forests to thrive.\n\nIn Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Norway and Siberia, permafrost soils that have been frozen for thousands of years are receding by leaps and bounds every year.\n\nThawing permafrost and crumbling Arctic coasts are dumping sediments into coastal waters at alarming rates, which blocks light and could limit plant growth. The run-off from melting glaciers will also lower salinity and increase turbidity, which impacts young kelp, Filbee-Dexter said.\n\n“Whether you’re going to have expansion of kelp forests is going depend on a combination of what happens on land and what happens in the sea,” she said.\nUnderwater forests\n\n\nThe longest kelp recorded in the Arctic measured 15 metres and was found in Canada, and the deepest was found at 60-metre depth in Disko Bay, Greenland.\n\nKelps forests are similar to their terrestrial cousins in the way they create habitat and modify the physical environment by shading light and softening waves.\n\n“We call them a nursery habitat, because they actually provide habitat for young species of fish… but then you also get crabs and lobsters, a number of different species, and then very tiny things, tiny invertebrates,","id":"5eWvjZ0hgdpYhqD94bxnYu","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Arctic underwater forests set to expand with rapid warming","release_date":"2019-05-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5eWvjZ0hgdpYhqD94bxnYu"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/021fdce6d4708405ec9923ae26c4fcf45f45574e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"As the Democratic Republic of Congo grapples with the second largest ever Ebola outbreak, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) is appealing to Canada and other donors to step up their contributions to help efforts to stop the deadly virus from spreading within DRC and to neighbouring countries. While the World Health Organization (WHO) is the lead UN agency helping Congolese authorities in containing Ebola, WFP plays a critical role by providing food to people potentially carrying the virus, and by providing crucial logistical services, including flights to remote areas in the eastern regions of the country, said  WFP Senior Partnership Adviser in DRC Arnhild Spence. The current outbreak is concentrated in the restive eastern provinces of Ituri and North Kivu, Spence told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from capital Kinshasa. “The situation on the ground is not good,” Spence said. ListenEN_Interview_3-20190425-WIE30 The latest outbreak of Ebola, which was declared last August and is Congo’s tenth since the virus was discovered in 1976, is believed to have killed 872 people and infected nearly 500 more in North Kivu and Ituri, Spence said. “It is the second one we are grappling with in the course of less than one year,” Spence said. 'Community scepticism and fear' Medical stuff and an Ebola survivor treat Ebola patient Ibrahim Mupalalo inside the Biosecure Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) at the ALIMA (The Alliance for International Medical Action) Ebola treatment centre in Beni, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 31, 2019. Picture taken March 31, 2019. (Baz Ratner/REUTERS) The fact that the outbreak happened in eastern DRC complicates the response to the crisis, she added. “First of all, eastern DRC has been an active conflict zone for several decades with a multitude of armed groups, which makes it difficult to get access to the people who are affected by Ebola,” Spence said. But international agencies working to contain the virus, which causes the deadly hemorrhagic fever, are also facing a high degree of “community scepticism and fear,” Spence said. “It is a population who have felt neglected for decades,” Spence said. “So they are critical of what they perceive as the ‘sudden’ international interest in helping to stop Ebola.” Many people feel that the international community is getting involved in the Ebola crisis out of narrow self-interest, rather than genuine concern for the well-being of the affected population, she added. “This is one of the key challenges that this response has been faced with because without the active participation and support of the communities that are affected by Ebola you can’t actually bring it under control,” Spence said. A crisis within a crisis Health workers dressed in Ebola protective suits carry a coffin with the body of Congolese woman Kahambu Tulirwaho, who died of Ebola, as it is transported for a burial from the Ebola treatment centre in Butembo, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 28, 2019. (Baz Ratner /REUTERS) The last few weeks have also seen a drastic deterioration of security in Ebola hotspots, further complicating the response and threatening the lives of patients as well as medical workers, Spence said. Last week a Cameroonian epidemiologist deployed by the WHO, Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, was killed in an attack on Butembo University Hospital, in North Kivu. Two other people were injured in the attack. Health workers in Butembo threatened on Wednesday to go on strike as early as next week if authorities don’t do more to protect them. The Ebola epidemic is a health crisis occurring within the broader humanitarian crisis in the DRC, Spence said. “We already have a massive hunger response in this country, we are trying to help more than five million people suffering from acute hunger and malnutrition,” Spence said. “In terms of food insecurity it is the country with the largest needs after Y...","duration_ms":848509,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1bi7lK0KjrrIqp3Mo9Qk3m"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1bi7lK0KjrrIqp3Mo9Qk3m","html_description":"As the Democratic Republic of Congo grapples with the second largest ever Ebola outbreak, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) is appealing to Canada and other donors to step up their contributions to help efforts to stop the deadly virus from spreading within DRC and to neighbouring countries.\n\nWhile the World Health Organization (WHO) is the lead UN agency helping Congolese authorities in containing Ebola, WFP plays a critical role by providing food to people potentially carrying the virus, and by providing crucial logistical services, including flights to remote areas in the eastern regions of the country, said  WFP Senior Partnership Adviser in DRC Arnhild Spence.\n\nThe current outbreak is concentrated in the restive eastern provinces of Ituri and North Kivu, Spence told Radio Canada International in a phone interview from capital Kinshasa.\n\n“The situation on the ground is not good,” Spence said.\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190425-WIE30\n\nThe latest outbreak of Ebola, which was declared last August and is Congo’s tenth since the virus was discovered in 1976, is believed to have killed 872 people and infected nearly 500 more in North Kivu and Ituri, Spence said.\n\n“It is the second one we are grappling with in the course of less than one year,” Spence said.\n'Community scepticism and fear'\nMedical stuff and an Ebola survivor treat Ebola patient Ibrahim Mupalalo inside the Biosecure Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) at the ALIMA (The Alliance for International Medical Action) Ebola treatment centre in Beni, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 31, 2019. Picture taken March 31, 2019. (Baz Ratner/REUTERS)\n\nThe fact that the outbreak happened in eastern DRC complicates the response to the crisis, she added.\n\n“First of all, eastern DRC has been an active conflict zone for several decades with a multitude of armed groups, which makes it difficult to get access to the people who are affected by Ebola,” Spence said.\n\nBut international agencies working to contain the virus, which causes the deadly hemorrhagic fever, are also facing a high degree of “community scepticism and fear,” Spence said.\n\n“It is a population who have felt neglected for decades,” Spence said. “So they are critical of what they perceive as the ‘sudden’ international interest in helping to stop Ebola.”\n\nMany people feel that the international community is getting involved in the Ebola crisis out of narrow self-interest, rather than genuine concern for the well-being of the affected population, she added.\n\n“This is one of the key challenges that this response has been faced with because without the active participation and support of the communities that are affected by Ebola you can’t actually bring it under control,” Spence said.\nA crisis within a crisis\nHealth workers dressed in Ebola protective suits carry a coffin with the body of Congolese woman Kahambu Tulirwaho, who died of Ebola, as it is transported for a burial from the Ebola treatment centre in Butembo, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 28, 2019. (Baz Ratner /REUTERS)\n\nThe last few weeks have also seen a drastic deterioration of security in Ebola hotspots, further complicating the response and threatening the lives of patients as well as medical workers, Spence said.\n\nLast week a Cameroonian epidemiologist deployed by the WHO, Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, was killed in an attack on Butembo University Hospital, in North Kivu. Two other people were injured in the attack.\n\nHealth workers in Butembo threatened on Wednesday to go on strike as early as next week if authorities don’t do more to protect them.\n\nThe Ebola epidemic is a health crisis occurring within the broader humanitarian crisis in the DRC, Spence said.\n\n“We already have a massive hunger response in this country, we are trying to help more than five million people suffering from acute hunger and malnutrition,” Spence said. “In terms of food insecurity it is the country with the largest needs after Y...","id":"1bi7lK0KjrrIqp3Mo9Qk3m","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"UN agency asks for international support to fight Ebola","release_date":"2019-04-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1bi7lK0KjrrIqp3Mo9Qk3m"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a31f3966f6da047a44137367b93b99a24d4f7454","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"An overwhelming majority of Canadians supports the federal government’s commitment to set aside at least 17 per cent of Canada’s lands and inland waters as protected conservation areas by 2020, according to a new poll. Almost nine out of 10 Canadians either strongly support or support the government’s 2010 conservation commitment as part of the Convention on Biological Diversity, according to the poll conducted by Abacus Data for the International Boreal Conservation Campaign (IBCC). “Canadians want to lead on conservation,” said in a statement Cathy Wilkinson, senior advisor to the IBCC. “Canada is home to the biggest intact forest left on the planet. We have some of cleanest lakes and rivers. We have huge landscapes that help fight climate change. We still have a chance to protect nature on a grand scale.” Indigenous stewardship Edéhzhíe is home to headwater lakes, mature spruce forests, and vibrant wetlands; this diversity supports 36 mammal species, 197 bird species and 24 species of fish. (Bill Carpenter/Dehcho First Nations) The poll, which was released Tuesday, ahead of a major conservation summit in Montreal, also found that over two-thirds of Canadians back a federal program to support Indigenous protected areas and Indigenous Guardians programs to help manage lands. Canada will host a Nature Champions Summit in Montreal, from Apr. 24 to 25, 2019. Many Indigenous Nations are working to create new Indigenous Protected Areas across the country, said Valérie Courtois, director of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative, a partner in the IBCC. “What we mean by Indigenous-led conservation is when Indigenous Peoples are a part of the design and decision-making on the boundaries and the measures within those boundaries of proposed protected areas and that the push for those areas comes from the Indigenous nations themselves,” said Courtois. (click to listen to the interview with Valérie Courtois) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190423-WIE30 These proposed conservation areas cover over a million square kilometres of protected area, she said. Ottawa and Dehcho First Nations create Canada’s newest Indigenous protected area The survey also found that almost all Canadians view land conservation as a way to address climate change. “Average Canadians are much more conservationist than we give them credit for,” Courtois said. “It’s important if we want to ensure our future as a country, as a Canadian society, that we think about the future of our land.” David Coletto, CEO of Abacus Data, said conservation is an issue that unites Canadians. “It’s rare to see this kind of consensus on issues, but people overwhelmingly agree the country should do more to conserve nature,” Coletto said in a statement. “They want leaders to work together here at home and internationally. And they want to empower Indigenous communities to manage the lands they know so well.”","duration_ms":282201,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2hGUD8tBDia5J7qQdv2HXd"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2hGUD8tBDia5J7qQdv2HXd","html_description":"An overwhelming majority of Canadians supports the federal government’s commitment to set aside at least 17 per cent of Canada’s lands and inland waters as protected conservation areas by 2020, according to a new poll.\n\nAlmost nine out of 10 Canadians either strongly support or support the government’s 2010 conservation commitment as part of the Convention on Biological Diversity, according to the poll conducted by Abacus Data for the International Boreal Conservation Campaign (IBCC).\n\n“Canadians want to lead on conservation,” said in a statement Cathy Wilkinson, senior advisor to the IBCC.\n\n“Canada is home to the biggest intact forest left on the planet. We have some of cleanest lakes and rivers. We have huge landscapes that help fight climate change. We still have a chance to protect nature on a grand scale.”\nIndigenous stewardship\nEdéhzhíe is home to headwater lakes, mature spruce forests, and vibrant wetlands; this diversity supports 36 mammal species, 197 bird species and 24 species of fish. (Bill Carpenter/Dehcho First Nations)\n\nThe poll, which was released Tuesday, ahead of a major conservation summit in Montreal, also found that over two-thirds of Canadians back a federal program to support Indigenous protected areas and Indigenous Guardians programs to help manage lands.\n\nCanada will host a Nature Champions Summit in Montreal, from Apr. 24 to 25, 2019.\n\nMany Indigenous Nations are working to create new Indigenous Protected Areas across the country, said Valérie Courtois, director of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative, a partner in the IBCC.\n\n“What we mean by Indigenous-led conservation is when Indigenous Peoples are a part of the design and decision-making on the boundaries and the measures within those boundaries of proposed protected areas and that the push for those areas comes from the Indigenous nations themselves,” said Courtois.\n\n(click to listen to the interview with Valérie Courtois)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190423-WIE30\n\nThese proposed conservation areas cover over a million square kilometres of protected area, she said.\n\n \tOttawa and Dehcho First Nations create Canada’s newest Indigenous protected area\n\nThe survey also found that almost all Canadians view land conservation as a way to address climate change.\n\n“Average Canadians are much more conservationist than we give them credit for,” Courtois said. “It’s important if we want to ensure our future as a country, as a Canadian society, that we think about the future of our land.”\n\nDavid Coletto, CEO of Abacus Data, said conservation is an issue that unites Canadians.\n\n“It’s rare to see this kind of consensus on issues, but people overwhelmingly agree the country should do more to conserve nature,” Coletto said in a statement.\n\n“They want leaders to work together here at home and internationally. And they want to empower Indigenous communities to manage the lands they know so well.”","id":"2hGUD8tBDia5J7qQdv2HXd","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadians strongly support nature conservation: poll","release_date":"2019-04-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2hGUD8tBDia5J7qQdv2HXd"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/406c54e0fe8ca0262e8ed534f4d8d2de377a8132","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Alberta premier-designate Jason Kenney says he’ll move fast to repeal the carbon tax legislation adopted by the previous centre-left New Democratic Party government and jump-start stalled pipeline projects, setting the stage for a confrontation with the federal government, neighbouring British Columbia and Quebec. Kenney, 50, who will be sworn as premier of the oil-rich Western Canadian province on Apr. 30, after his United Conservative Party secured a landslide victory in Tuesday’s election, said his first order of business would be to kill the carbon tax legislation adopted by Rachel Notley’s NDP government. At the same time Kenney vowed to revive a bill that was passed by Notley’s government but never enacted, threatening to cut oil and gas shipments to B.C. if the provincial government there continues to resist the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project. “We are going to act according to the best interests of Alberta,” Kenney said Wednesday, speaking to reporters in Edmonton. “I think the job of the premier of Alberta is to defend our vital economic interests, and for me it means demonstrating to the government of British Columbia and other provincial governments that we mean business.” ListenEN_Clip_3-20190418-WME30 Carrot and stick approach to get the pipelines A load of pipes originally destined for the Trans Mountain pipeline sits idle on a Kamloops B.C. rail siding. (Dennis Owen/Reuters) Kenney said he spoke with B.C. Premier John Horgan who called to congratulate him and added that he wants to have one-on-one substantive meeting with his western neighbour. “I think Premier Horgan knows very well that we are serious about defending our vital economic interests,” Kenney said. “I’ve always said that it’s not our intention to begin with reducing energy shipments to British Columbia but to have the power to do so.” At the same time, despite disagreements with B.C. over the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline to transport oil from northern Alberta to the Pacific Coast near Vancouver, Kenney said he will continue to seek common ground with the Horgan government on a massive liquefied natural gas project. In his victory speech on Tuesday, Kenney had also reached out to voters in the French-speaking province of Quebec with a pitch in French for another pipeline expansion project, this one going east towards oil refineries on the Atlantic Coast. On Wednesday, Quebec Premier François Legault congratulated Kenney on his electoral victory but shot down his idea for more oil pipelines. “What I am saying is there is no social acceptability for a new oil pipeline in Quebec,” Legault said, while expressing his enthusiastic support for a natural gas pipeline from Alberta to Quebec. Jason Kenney spoke in French last night to ask for the support of Quebec to build a new oil #pipeline to a Canadian coastline. François Legault replied in English this morning. Here is what he said about the UCP's big win in Alberta.#ableg #abvote #abvotes pic.twitter.com/GlCAs1APBL — Geneviève Normand (@GeNormand) April 17, 2019 'Fight for a fair deal' Alberta’s economy, which depends heavily on the oil and gas industry, has fallen on hard times following the collapse of oil prices in 2008 and then 2014. Alberta’s economic woes have also been compounded by limited pipeline capacity to pump its crude to world markets, forcing producers to sell their oil at huge discounts. “Alberta is going to fight for a fair deal in the federation,” Kenney said. “And we don’t think it’s reasonable for other provinces like Quebec to take our equalization money while opposing pipeline projects that will help us pay the bills within the federation.” Nevertheless, he’d like to begin his relationship with the Quebec premier on a positive note, Kenney added. “I hope to have a chance to sit down with Premier Legault,” Kenney said. “I am hopeful that we can find a way to work together.” ","duration_ms":129123,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5gA5bHVT7arEpB7hNGCE71"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5gA5bHVT7arEpB7hNGCE71","html_description":"Alberta premier-designate Jason Kenney says he’ll move fast to repeal the carbon tax legislation adopted by the previous centre-left New Democratic Party government and jump-start stalled pipeline projects, setting the stage for a confrontation with the federal government, neighbouring British Columbia and Quebec.\n\nKenney, 50, who will be sworn as premier of the oil-rich Western Canadian province on Apr. 30, after his United Conservative Party secured a landslide victory in Tuesday’s election, said his first order of business would be to kill the carbon tax legislation adopted by Rachel Notley’s NDP government.\n\nAt the same time Kenney vowed to revive a bill that was passed by Notley’s government but never enacted, threatening to cut oil and gas shipments to B.C. if the provincial government there continues to resist the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project.\n\n“We are going to act according to the best interests of Alberta,” Kenney said Wednesday, speaking to reporters in Edmonton. “I think the job of the premier of Alberta is to defend our vital economic interests, and for me it means demonstrating to the government of British Columbia and other provincial governments that we mean business.”\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190418-WME30\nCarrot and stick approach to get the pipelines\nA load of pipes originally destined for the Trans Mountain pipeline sits idle on a Kamloops B.C. rail siding. (Dennis Owen/Reuters)\n\nKenney said he spoke with B.C. Premier John Horgan who called to congratulate him and added that he wants to have one-on-one substantive meeting with his western neighbour.\n\n“I think Premier Horgan knows very well that we are serious about defending our vital economic interests,” Kenney said. “I’ve always said that it’s not our intention to begin with reducing energy shipments to British Columbia but to have the power to do so.”\n\nAt the same time, despite disagreements with B.C. over the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline to transport oil from northern Alberta to the Pacific Coast near Vancouver, Kenney said he will continue to seek common ground with the Horgan government on a massive liquefied natural gas project.\n\nIn his victory speech on Tuesday, Kenney had also reached out to voters in the French-speaking province of Quebec with a pitch in French for another pipeline expansion project, this one going east towards oil refineries on the Atlantic Coast.\n\nOn Wednesday, Quebec Premier François Legault congratulated Kenney on his electoral victory but shot down his idea for more oil pipelines.\n\n“What I am saying is there is no social acceptability for a new oil pipeline in Quebec,” Legault said, while expressing his enthusiastic support for a natural gas pipeline from Alberta to Quebec.\nJason Kenney spoke in French last night to ask for the support of Quebec to build a new oil #pipeline to a Canadian coastline.\n\nFrançois Legault replied in English this morning. Here is what he said about the UCP's big win in Alberta.#ableg #abvote #abvotes pic.twitter.com/GlCAs1APBL\n\n— Geneviève Normand (@GeNormand) April 17, 2019\n\n'Fight for a fair deal'\nAlberta’s economy, which depends heavily on the oil and gas industry, has fallen on hard times following the collapse of oil prices in 2008 and then 2014.\n\nAlberta’s economic woes have also been compounded by limited pipeline capacity to pump its crude to world markets, forcing producers to sell their oil at huge discounts.\n\n“Alberta is going to fight for a fair deal in the federation,” Kenney said. “And we don’t think it’s reasonable for other provinces like Quebec to take our equalization money while opposing pipeline projects that will help us pay the bills within the federation.”\n\nNevertheless, he’d like to begin his relationship with the Quebec premier on a positive note, Kenney added.\n\n“I hope to have a chance to sit down with Premier Legault,” Kenney said. “I am hopeful that we can find a way to work together.”\n\n","id":"5gA5bHVT7arEpB7hNGCE71","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Alberta to repeal carbon tax and press on pipelines, says incoming premier","release_date":"2019-04-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5gA5bHVT7arEpB7hNGCE71"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/44291ec63a282cb9ce89bacbf6b0d16a004cecd0","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Alberta woke up to a new centre-right government today after voters in the oil-rich Western Canadian province that has fallen on hard times recently delivered a landslide victory to the United Conservative Party led by Jason Kenney. Tuesday’s election turned a page on Alberta’s brief experiment with left-of-centre politics as the New Democratic Party led by outgoing premier Rachel Notley suffered a resounding defeat and moved to the opposition benches. The UCP elected in 63 of 87 seats in the provincial legislature Tuesday night. The NDP held the other 24. The other two major parties – the Alberta Party (AP), led by Stephen Mandel, and the Alberta Liberal Party (ALP), led by David Khan – failed to elect any MPs to the legislature. However, the arrival of a new provincial conservative government could have repercussions for federal politics in Canada far beyond Alberta’s borders. Premier-designate Kenney, 50, a former federal Conservative cabinet minister, who left federal politics to help create the United Conservative Party and bring it to power, vowed to stand up to the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa and “begin to fight back.” “Today our great province has sent a message to Canada and the world that Alberta is open for business,” said Kenney to cheers. “Help is on the way and hope is on the horizon.” ListenEN_Clip_3-20190417-WME30 Albertans have elected “a government that will be obsessed with getting this province back to work,” Kenney said. His first step in government would be to repeal the provincial carbon tax introduced by Notley’s government, Kenney has said. The measure would put Alberta on a collision course with Ottawa, which will be forced to introduce a federal carbon levy. Kenney is also promising to wage war on “foreign funded special interests” who oppose Alberta's oil and gas industry. “The foreign funded special interests campaigning against Canadian energy have done precisely nothing to stop the doubling of oil production in the United States, or to reduce by one barrel energy coming from OPEC dictatorships, or Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” Kenney said. “And in Ottawa, we have a federal government that has made this bad situation worse, killing two major coastal pipelines, including Energy East that would have helped Quebec and Atlantic Canada displace foreign oil imports with Canadian energy!” ListenEN_Clip_7-20190417-WME70 Trudeau released a statement in the immediate aftermath of the election, congratulating Kenney. \"Albertans have chosen to elect a majority government led by the United Conservative Party,\" it read. \"I look forward to working with the provincial government to create good, middle class jobs, build infrastructure, and grow the businesses and industries at the heart of Alberta's prosperity so the province can remain competitive in our changing economy.\" \"Together, we will address issues of importance to Albertans and all Canadians, including supporting canola producers, and taking decisive action on climate change while getting our natural resources to market.\" With files from CBC News","duration_ms":80953,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7sAcHa6OnjByfPzBuX6JZ1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7sAcHa6OnjByfPzBuX6JZ1","html_description":"Alberta woke up to a new centre-right government today after voters in the oil-rich Western Canadian province that has fallen on hard times recently delivered a landslide victory to the United Conservative Party led by Jason Kenney.\n\nTuesday’s election turned a page on Alberta’s brief experiment with left-of-centre politics as the New Democratic Party led by outgoing premier Rachel Notley suffered a resounding defeat and moved to the opposition benches.\n\nThe UCP elected in 63 of 87 seats in the provincial legislature Tuesday night. The NDP held the other 24.\n\nThe other two major parties – the Alberta Party (AP), led by Stephen Mandel, and the Alberta Liberal Party (ALP), led by David Khan – failed to elect any MPs to the legislature.\n\nHowever, the arrival of a new provincial conservative government could have repercussions for federal politics in Canada far beyond Alberta’s borders.\n\nPremier-designate Kenney, 50, a former federal Conservative cabinet minister, who left federal politics to help create the United Conservative Party and bring it to power, vowed to stand up to the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa and “begin to fight back.”\n\n“Today our great province has sent a message to Canada and the world that Alberta is open for business,” said Kenney to cheers. “Help is on the way and hope is on the horizon.”\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190417-WME30\n\nAlbertans have elected “a government that will be obsessed with getting this province back to work,” Kenney said.\n\nHis first step in government would be to repeal the provincial carbon tax introduced by Notley’s government, Kenney has said. The measure would put Alberta on a collision course with Ottawa, which will be forced to introduce a federal carbon levy.\n\n\nKenney is also promising to wage war on “foreign funded special interests” who oppose Alberta's oil and gas industry.\n\n“The foreign funded special interests campaigning against Canadian energy have done precisely nothing to stop the doubling of oil production in the United States, or to reduce by one barrel energy coming from OPEC dictatorships, or Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” Kenney said.\n\n“And in Ottawa, we have a federal government that has made this bad situation worse, killing two major coastal pipelines, including Energy East that would have helped Quebec and Atlantic Canada displace foreign oil imports with Canadian energy!”\n\nListenEN_Clip_7-20190417-WME70\n\nTrudeau released a statement in the immediate aftermath of the election, congratulating Kenney.\n\n\"Albertans have chosen to elect a majority government led by the United Conservative Party,\" it read. \"I look forward to working with the provincial government to create good, middle class jobs, build infrastructure, and grow the businesses and industries at the heart of Alberta's prosperity so the province can remain competitive in our changing economy.\"\n\n\"Together, we will address issues of importance to Albertans and all Canadians, including supporting canola producers, and taking decisive action on climate change while getting our natural resources to market.\"\n\nWith files from CBC News","id":"7sAcHa6OnjByfPzBuX6JZ1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Alberta elects United Conservative Party government","release_date":"2019-04-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7sAcHa6OnjByfPzBuX6JZ1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/934d96679477544c7249618eec6297fcfd84e42b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A hardy yeast infection has researchers in Canada and around the world worried about the rise of a new generation of drug resistant superbugs. There are fewer than 20 documented cases in Canada so far but the fungus known as Candida auris has epidemiologists and public health officials concerned. “The reason that we’re concerned about it is because these organisms seem to be able to transmit between patients very efficiently within hospitals and because they have intrinsic resistance to the antifungal medication that we would typically use for a patient that has an invasive yeast infection,” said Dr. Ilan Schwartz, an infectious disease physician and assistant professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. “The rapid spread of this organism is quite alarming but what’s most alarming is the difficulty that we have in eradicating it from hospitals once it has arrived, and in treating patients that are infected.” (click to listen to the full interview about Candida auris with Dr. Ilan Schwartz) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190412-WIE30 In fact, eradicating the fungus from hospitals is so difficult that last year the Brooklyn branch of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York State had to bring in special cleaning equipment and rip out some of the ceiling and floor tiles to eradicate it. Candida auris is a yeast fungus that was first described in 2009, when it was isolated from the ear canal of a patient in Japan – hence its name auris, which means ear in Latin, said Schwartz. “However, the clinical significance of it has since become much more clear and it’s much more fearsome than just something causing ear infections,” said Schwartz, who has been studying the superbug. Global reach (Source: CDC) Over the ensuing decade, Candida auris (C. auris) has spread to 32 countries, including Canada, which reported 19 cases from 2012 to February 2019, according to Health Canada statistics. There were 6 cases in Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario) between 2012 and 2017, and 13 cases in Western Canada (Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia) between 2014 and February 2019. C. auris is a relatively new bug and it was traced back to 2006 when scientists with the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) analysed samples of yeast isolates. “For some reason it really wasn’t around before then,” Schwartz said. “But at the same time scientists at the CDC and elsewhere have analysed the isolates that have been found and determined that they come from at least four different geographic regions and the all seemed to have emerged independently but simultaneously, which is very odd.” High mortality rate C. auris usually infects people who are already quite sick, Schwartz said. “Generally these are patients that are admitted to intensive care units for other reasons, often it’s because of pre-existing problems like cancer or sometimes surgery,” Schwartz said. “These are patients that generally have been in hospital for a long time and end up in the intensive care unit.” Usually, these patients have already been exposed to a lot of antibiotics and have catheters and intravenous tubes going into their veins, he said. “Generally these patients do very poorly: the mortality rate is about 30 to 40 per cent for patients for whom the yeast is in the blood stream,” Schwartz said. The germ is usually contaminated from the skin of patients who become colonized and then transmit it to the environment – the hospital room, various appliances and tools that are used for monitoring and caring for patients, he said. “Now, there is a process for decontamination of any tools that touch one patient and are going to touch another but because of the particularly hardy nature of Candida auris we have seen outbreaks around the world where these protocols aren’t adhered to very closely,” said Schwartz. Efforts to control the spread The National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba,","duration_ms":1033143,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1fEyd5wafpguhin1Qm0xcL"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1fEyd5wafpguhin1Qm0xcL","html_description":"A hardy yeast infection has researchers in Canada and around the world worried about the rise of a new generation of drug resistant superbugs.\n\nThere are fewer than 20 documented cases in Canada so far but the fungus known as Candida auris has epidemiologists and public health officials concerned.\n\n“The reason that we’re concerned about it is because these organisms seem to be able to transmit between patients very efficiently within hospitals and because they have intrinsic resistance to the antifungal medication that we would typically use for a patient that has an invasive yeast infection,” said Dr. Ilan Schwartz, an infectious disease physician and assistant professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.\n\n“The rapid spread of this organism is quite alarming but what’s most alarming is the difficulty that we have in eradicating it from hospitals once it has arrived, and in treating patients that are infected.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview about Candida auris with Dr. Ilan Schwartz)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190412-WIE30\n\nIn fact, eradicating the fungus from hospitals is so difficult that last year the Brooklyn branch of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York State had to bring in special cleaning equipment and rip out some of the ceiling and floor tiles to eradicate it.\n\nCandida auris is a yeast fungus that was first described in 2009, when it was isolated from the ear canal of a patient in Japan – hence its name auris, which means ear in Latin, said Schwartz.\n\n“However, the clinical significance of it has since become much more clear and it’s much more fearsome than just something causing ear infections,” said Schwartz, who has been studying the superbug.\nGlobal reach\n(Source: CDC)\n\nOver the ensuing decade, Candida auris (C. auris) has spread to 32 countries, including Canada, which reported 19 cases from 2012 to February 2019, according to Health Canada statistics.\n\nThere were 6 cases in Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario) between 2012 and 2017, and 13 cases in Western Canada (Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia) between 2014 and February 2019.\n\nC. auris is a relatively new bug and it was traced back to 2006 when scientists with the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) analysed samples of yeast isolates.\n\n“For some reason it really wasn’t around before then,” Schwartz said. “But at the same time scientists at the CDC and elsewhere have analysed the isolates that have been found and determined that they come from at least four different geographic regions and the all seemed to have emerged independently but simultaneously, which is very odd.”\nHigh mortality rate\nC. auris usually infects people who are already quite sick, Schwartz said.\n\n“Generally these are patients that are admitted to intensive care units for other reasons, often it’s because of pre-existing problems like cancer or sometimes surgery,” Schwartz said. “These are patients that generally have been in hospital for a long time and end up in the intensive care unit.”\n\nUsually, these patients have already been exposed to a lot of antibiotics and have catheters and intravenous tubes going into their veins, he said.\n\n“Generally these patients do very poorly: the mortality rate is about 30 to 40 per cent for patients for whom the yeast is in the blood stream,” Schwartz said.\n\nThe germ is usually contaminated from the skin of patients who become colonized and then transmit it to the environment – the hospital room, various appliances and tools that are used for monitoring and caring for patients, he said.\n\n“Now, there is a process for decontamination of any tools that touch one patient and are going to touch another but because of the particularly hardy nature of Candida auris we have seen outbreaks around the world where these protocols aren’t adhered to very closely,” said Schwartz.\nEfforts to control the spread\nThe National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba,","id":"1fEyd5wafpguhin1Qm0xcL","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"New superbug yeast infection puzzles and worries researchers","release_date":"2019-04-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1fEyd5wafpguhin1Qm0xcL"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/913ce2af84c92c405d012a22cb2f4e0835368b6f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A coalition of Canadian humanitarian groups is urging Canadians to show their generousity and donate to a federal matching fund for relief efforts in three southern African countries hit by Tropical Cyclone Idai last month. Ottawa pledges to match donations made by individual Canadians to Canada’s Humanitarian Coalition and its members between March 15 and April 14, 2019, up to a maximum total of $2 million for relief efforts in flood-hit Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. Melanie Murphy, safety lead with CARE Canada, who has just returned from Zimbabwe after spending two weeks in the southern African country following the devastating cyclone, said the need is immense. The cyclone hit Zimbabwe’s mountainous Manicaland province around 10 pm local time on March 15 and it lasted for about three hours, she said. The cyclone caused flooding and deadly landslides, particularly in Chimanimani district, where huge boulders rolled down the mountain slopes and leveled houses and everything in their path, Murphy said. “This was night time and most of the villagers in this area were asleep,” she said. “They really didn’t have time to react.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190411-WIE30 Many of those who managed to escape their houses were swept away by the torrential flood waters, Murphy said. “Some of their bodies were found as far away as Mozambique while others are still missing,” Murphy said. Children carry drinking water over debris created by Cyclone Idai at Peacock Growth Point in Chimanimani, on the border with Mozambique, Zimbabwe March 22, 2019. (Philimon Bulawayo/REUTERS) Cyclone Idai hit an already highly impoverished part of the country. The Chimanimani and Chipinge districts of Manicaland were the hardest-hit, with at least half of the population there affected by the flooding and landslides. According to preliminary reports by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), more than 10,000 people are living in improvised camps, in public buildings (schools and government buildings), in transit camps and with host families in several districts. The government of Zimbabwe reported 299 deaths and more than 300 people are still missing. In Mutare, the cyclone destroyed 584 houses and damaged 1,263 houses. More than 2,200 houses were damaged in Buhera district. These numbers are likely to increase as more areas become accessible in the hardest hit districts. “A week and a half after this, when I was there, there were still people out trying to dig for their missing family members,” Murphy said. “It was one of the most heart-wrenching things I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been part of many emergency responses.” Women wash clothing in the river as they clean up after Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe, March 22, 2019. (Philimon Bulawayo/REUTERS) CARE was one of the first humanitarian groups in Chimanimani and their team began immediately working with community leaders to identify the most vulnerable families and people in need, Murphy said. “We’ve been distributing life-saving supplies that help with accessing clean water,” she said. “There has been a really extensive damage to the water supply and any time that happens we really worry about diarrheal diseases and cholera, in particular, which has already hit the affected communities in Mozambique.” So far CARE has reached more than 6,000 people with its emergency response efforts in Zimbabwe, said Darcy Knoll, a spokesperson for CARE Canada. CARE teams on the ground in Chimanimani and Chipinge provided water purification tablets, jerrycans for clean water and other water, sanitation and hygiene products, Murphy said. “When I was there, I attended the distribution of dignity kits,” she said. “These are kits that we give to adolescent girls and women that have menstrual hygiene items in them.” A man collects tools and supplies as walks away from houses destroyed by Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani,","duration_ms":468193,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/18W61ljUamisqMnzlZUvsW"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/18W61ljUamisqMnzlZUvsW","html_description":"A coalition of Canadian humanitarian groups is urging Canadians to show their generousity and donate to a federal matching fund for relief efforts in three southern African countries hit by Tropical Cyclone Idai last month.\n\nOttawa pledges to match donations made by individual Canadians to Canada’s Humanitarian Coalition and its members between March 15 and April 14, 2019, up to a maximum total of $2 million for relief efforts in flood-hit Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe.\n\nMelanie Murphy, safety lead with CARE Canada, who has just returned from Zimbabwe after spending two weeks in the southern African country following the devastating cyclone, said the need is immense.\n\nThe cyclone hit Zimbabwe’s mountainous Manicaland province around 10 pm local time on March 15 and it lasted for about three hours, she said.\n\nThe cyclone caused flooding and deadly landslides, particularly in Chimanimani district, where huge boulders rolled down the mountain slopes and leveled houses and everything in their path, Murphy said.\n\n“This was night time and most of the villagers in this area were asleep,” she said. “They really didn’t have time to react.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190411-WIE30\n\nMany of those who managed to escape their houses were swept away by the torrential flood waters, Murphy said.\n\n“Some of their bodies were found as far away as Mozambique while others are still missing,” Murphy said.\n\nChildren carry drinking water over debris created by Cyclone Idai at Peacock Growth Point in Chimanimani, on the border with Mozambique, Zimbabwe March 22, 2019. (Philimon Bulawayo/REUTERS)\n\nCyclone Idai hit an already highly impoverished part of the country. The Chimanimani and Chipinge districts of Manicaland were the hardest-hit, with at least half of the population there affected by the flooding and landslides.\n\nAccording to preliminary reports by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), more than 10,000 people are living in improvised camps, in public buildings (schools and government buildings), in transit camps and with host families in several districts.\n\nThe government of Zimbabwe reported 299 deaths and more than 300 people are still missing.\n\nIn Mutare, the cyclone destroyed 584 houses and damaged 1,263 houses. More than 2,200 houses were damaged in Buhera district.\n\nThese numbers are likely to increase as more areas become accessible in the hardest hit districts.\n\n“A week and a half after this, when I was there, there were still people out trying to dig for their missing family members,” Murphy said. “It was one of the most heart-wrenching things I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been part of many emergency responses.”\n\nWomen wash clothing in the river as they clean up after Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe, March 22, 2019. (Philimon Bulawayo/REUTERS)\n\nCARE was one of the first humanitarian groups in Chimanimani and their team began immediately working with community leaders to identify the most vulnerable families and people in need, Murphy said.\n\n“We’ve been distributing life-saving supplies that help with accessing clean water,” she said. “There has been a really extensive damage to the water supply and any time that happens we really worry about diarrheal diseases and cholera, in particular, which has already hit the affected communities in Mozambique.”\n\nSo far CARE has reached more than 6,000 people with its emergency response efforts in Zimbabwe, said Darcy Knoll, a spokesperson for CARE Canada.\n\nCARE teams on the ground in Chimanimani and Chipinge provided water purification tablets, jerrycans for clean water and other water, sanitation and hygiene products, Murphy said.\n\n“When I was there, I attended the distribution of dignity kits,” she said. “These are kits that we give to adolescent girls and women that have menstrual hygiene items in them.”\n\nA man collects tools and supplies as walks away from houses destroyed by Cyclone Idai in Chimanimani,","id":"18W61ljUamisqMnzlZUvsW","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Humanitarian groups urge Canadians to donate to Cyclone Idai relief fund","release_date":"2019-04-11","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:18W61ljUamisqMnzlZUvsW"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/1091263a066a9d447e305bc2b017440897b54413","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canadians jihadists who left the country to fight for ISIS or Al-Qaeda and its offshoots in the Middle East are distinct from other radical Islamists and may be more amenable to rehabilitation and reintegration back into the Canadian society, according to a new report. Alex Wilner, a terrorism expert at Carleton University in Ottawa and the lead author of the report published this week, by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, said it examines the phenomenon of Canadians joining and supporting terrorist organizations and militant movements associated with ISIS, Al-Qaeda, and other similar groups. Wilner, who teaches International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA), said he and his assistant, Irfan Yar, developed a dataset of Canadian Islamist radicalization in order to provide a detailed sketch of Canadian jihadists and their supporters spanning a decade between 2006 and 2017. Using open sources - media, government and academic reports - Wilner and Yar were able to find 95 such individuals with ties to Canada. Uniquely Canadian jihadists? As ISIS loses its territory and moves underground, questions arise about how to deal with Canadians with links to the group. (THE CANADIAN PRESS) They also examined existing literature and data on European and U.S. radicalization and compared it to Canadian findings. “What we found was that the Canadians, generally speaking, are older, they’re more educated, they have less criminal motivation before the radicalization process, they’re more ethnically diverse than their European and American counterparts,” Wilner said. “I think there is enough evidence there to suggest that there is a Canadian type or a larger Canadian biographical characteristic that informed this process that is distinct from the European and American models.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190410-WIE30 The average age of Canadian jihadists identified by the study was 27, he said. “When you compare that to the average age of many European cases, it’s quite a few years older,” Wilner said. “And in terms of enrollment in post-secondary education, over half of our dataset had some enrollment in post-secondary education, including within CEGEP or university studies and graduate studies.” A chance for rehabilitation? A video was recently released of Toronto's Mohammed Abdullah Mohammed, after he was captured by Kurdish forces battling ISIS in Syria. (CBC) The fact that Canadian extremist foreign travellers and foreign fighters are older augurs well for attempts to de-radicalize and rehabilitate them upon their return to Canada, Wilner said. “There is corroborating evidence in terrorism studies suggesting that motivation in political violence wanes as you get older,” Wilner said. “It’s very much a young person’s activity, not exclusively but often it is.” The flip side of that coin is that because these Canadian jihadists are older and better educated than their European counterparts, they are also well-suited to assume leadership positions in the global jihadist movement, Wilner acknowledged. “We know that Canadians have been leaders in certain very dramatic, very damaging terrorist attacks,” he said. “But all in all, the data would suggest that by and large there is at least potential for an opening for a very unique and a very Canadian-oriented repatriation and rehabilitation process that would be distinct from Belgian or German or American case because we have a Canadian narrative in this phenomenon and you would assume that our response should also have this Canadian lens to it.”","duration_ms":583706,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3voGF5nDOvq0LaxZe0FBSa"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3voGF5nDOvq0LaxZe0FBSa","html_description":"Canadians jihadists who left the country to fight for ISIS or Al-Qaeda and its offshoots in the Middle East are distinct from other radical Islamists and may be more amenable to rehabilitation and reintegration back into the Canadian society, according to a new report.\n\nAlex Wilner, a terrorism expert at Carleton University in Ottawa and the lead author of the report published this week, by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, said it examines the phenomenon of Canadians joining and supporting terrorist organizations and militant movements associated with ISIS, Al-Qaeda, and other similar groups.\n\nWilner, who teaches International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA), said he and his assistant, Irfan Yar, developed a dataset of Canadian Islamist radicalization in order to provide a detailed sketch of Canadian jihadists and their supporters spanning a decade between 2006 and 2017.\n\nUsing open sources - media, government and academic reports - Wilner and Yar were able to find 95 such individuals with ties to Canada.\nUniquely Canadian jihadists?\nAs ISIS loses its territory and moves underground, questions arise about how to deal with Canadians with links to the group. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThey also examined existing literature and data on European and U.S. radicalization and compared it to Canadian findings.\n\n“What we found was that the Canadians, generally speaking, are older, they’re more educated, they have less criminal motivation before the radicalization process, they’re more ethnically diverse than their European and American counterparts,” Wilner said.\n\n“I think there is enough evidence there to suggest that there is a Canadian type or a larger Canadian biographical characteristic that informed this process that is distinct from the European and American models.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190410-WIE30\n\nThe average age of Canadian jihadists identified by the study was 27, he said.\n\n“When you compare that to the average age of many European cases, it’s quite a few years older,” Wilner said.\n\n“And in terms of enrollment in post-secondary education, over half of our dataset had some enrollment in post-secondary education, including within CEGEP or university studies and graduate studies.”\nA chance for rehabilitation?\nA video was recently released of Toronto's Mohammed Abdullah Mohammed, after he was captured by Kurdish forces battling ISIS in Syria. (CBC)\n\nThe fact that Canadian extremist foreign travellers and foreign fighters are older augurs well for attempts to de-radicalize and rehabilitate them upon their return to Canada, Wilner said.\n\n“There is corroborating evidence in terrorism studies suggesting that motivation in political violence wanes as you get older,” Wilner said. “It’s very much a young person’s activity, not exclusively but often it is.”\n\nThe flip side of that coin is that because these Canadian jihadists are older and better educated than their European counterparts, they are also well-suited to assume leadership positions in the global jihadist movement, Wilner acknowledged.\n\n“We know that Canadians have been leaders in certain very dramatic, very damaging terrorist attacks,” he said.\n\n“But all in all, the data would suggest that by and large there is at least potential for an opening for a very unique and a very Canadian-oriented repatriation and rehabilitation process that would be distinct from Belgian or German or American case because we have a Canadian narrative in this phenomenon and you would assume that our response should also have this Canadian lens to it.”","id":"3voGF5nDOvq0LaxZe0FBSa","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian jihadists are distinct from other Islamist radicals, study finds","release_date":"2019-04-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3voGF5nDOvq0LaxZe0FBSa"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7fa08c839529fcd4081e834108d6b902018ccc86","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A Canadian conservation group says more research into the impact of vessel traffic on narwhal and other marine life is needed before a regulator in the Arctic territory of Nunavut allows a mining company to expand its production at one of the world’s northernmost iron ore mines. The Baffinland Iron Mines Corp., which operates the Mary River mine site on Baffin Island, is looking at expanding its production from nearly six million tonnes of iron ore a year currently to 12 million tonnes a year. Baffinland, a joint venture between Nunavut Iron Ore and ArcelorMittal, would like to see its production rising to 30 million tonnes per year by 2025. However, that would mean a significant increase in vessel traffic to ship iron ore from northeastern Baffin Island to steel producers in Europe and elsewhere. According to marine conservation group Oceans North, bulk cargo vessels and supply ships used by Baffinland made nearly 150 trips last summer to resupply the mine and transport over five million tonnes of iron ore. Iron ore from the Mary River mine operated by Baffinland is loaded onto bulk carrier ships during the ice-free summer season in July through September (Baffinland/Youtube) If the territorial regulator approves Baffinland’s plans for increased production at the mine, that would more than double the vessel traffic in the area, which until recently saw very little shipping, said Kristin Westdal, marine biologist for Oceans North. Environmental group welcomes Baffinland’s decision to abandon icebreaking plans Speaking to Radio Canada International by phone from Vancouver, British Columbia, Westdal said there is simply not enough data to figure out how this increased traffic will affect the population of the iconic narwhal that summer in the area. \"We need to take a precautionary approach,” Westdal said. “If we don’t know exactly what might happen with this increased with vessel traffic, we need to slow down a minute and really try and understand with the current vessel traffic what those effects are and then try to extrapolate into the future what that might look like.” A monitoring project Kristin Westdal (L), Alex Ootoowak (C) Jefferson Killiktee (R) return to base after a successful deployment of multiple hydrophones in Lancaster Sound region (Photo courtesy of Josh Jones) A monitoring project launched by Oceans North before the mine began its operations shows that the noise produced by vessels overlaps with some of the frequencies used by narwhals for their communications and that these animals might be exposed to almost continuous vessel noise during the short summer shipping season, Westdal said. (Listen to the interview with Kristin Westdal) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190405-WIE30 The project to monitor the impact of vessel traffic on marine life in the area began in 2014 because of concerns by the local hunters’ and trappers’ association in the Inuit community of Pond Inlet, in northeastern Baffin Island, Westdal said. Narwhals, small Arctic whales with long spiralling tusks in males, are a key Arctic marine species and an important food source for local Inuit communities. “At that time we weren’t sure when Baffinland was going to start doing any monitoring and if they were going to be able to get in there before the vessels actually started,” Westdal said. “We wanted to jump the gun and do some baseline monitoring before any of the large vessels showed up.” The researchers wanted to get some basic data on the ambient noise levels and what effect ship noise was having on the narwhal that migrate through the area, she said. Kristin Westdal, marine biologist with Oceans North Canada (L), Jefferson Killiktee (C) and Alex Ootoowak (R), local field technicians for Oceans North, deploy a hydrophone in Milne Inlet(Photo by Josh Jones) The team from Oceans North placed one hydrophone in Tremblay Sound where there wasn’t going to be any vessel traffic and another near ...","duration_ms":330162,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5wOqNclXV9b8i3nybnRsQj"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5wOqNclXV9b8i3nybnRsQj","html_description":"A Canadian conservation group says more research into the impact of vessel traffic on narwhal and other marine life is needed before a regulator in the Arctic territory of Nunavut allows a mining company to expand its production at one of the world’s northernmost iron ore mines.\n\nThe Baffinland Iron Mines Corp., which operates the Mary River mine site on Baffin Island, is looking at expanding its production from nearly six million tonnes of iron ore a year currently to 12 million tonnes a year.\n\nBaffinland, a joint venture between Nunavut Iron Ore and ArcelorMittal, would like to see its production rising to 30 million tonnes per year by 2025.\n\nHowever, that would mean a significant increase in vessel traffic to ship iron ore from northeastern Baffin Island to steel producers in Europe and elsewhere.\n\nAccording to marine conservation group Oceans North, bulk cargo vessels and supply ships used by Baffinland made nearly 150 trips last summer to resupply the mine and transport over five million tonnes of iron ore.\n\nIron ore from the Mary River mine operated by Baffinland is loaded onto bulk carrier ships during the ice-free summer season in July through September (Baffinland/Youtube)\n\nIf the territorial regulator approves Baffinland’s plans for increased production at the mine, that would more than double the vessel traffic in the area, which until recently saw very little shipping, said Kristin Westdal, marine biologist for Oceans North.\n\n \tEnvironmental group welcomes Baffinland’s decision to abandon icebreaking plans\n\nSpeaking to Radio Canada International by phone from Vancouver, British Columbia, Westdal said there is simply not enough data to figure out how this increased traffic will affect the population of the iconic narwhal that summer in the area.\n\n\"We need to take a precautionary approach,” Westdal said.\n\n“If we don’t know exactly what might happen with this increased with vessel traffic, we need to slow down a minute and really try and understand with the current vessel traffic what those effects are and then try to extrapolate into the future what that might look like.”\nA monitoring project\nKristin Westdal (L), Alex Ootoowak (C) Jefferson Killiktee (R) return to base after a successful deployment of multiple hydrophones in Lancaster Sound region (Photo courtesy of Josh Jones)\n\nA monitoring project launched by Oceans North before the mine began its operations shows that the noise produced by vessels overlaps with some of the frequencies used by narwhals for their communications and that these animals might be exposed to almost continuous vessel noise during the short summer shipping season, Westdal said.\n\n(Listen to the interview with Kristin Westdal)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190405-WIE30\n\nThe project to monitor the impact of vessel traffic on marine life in the area began in 2014 because of concerns by the local hunters’ and trappers’ association in the Inuit community of Pond Inlet, in northeastern Baffin Island, Westdal said.\n\nNarwhals, small Arctic whales with long spiralling tusks in males, are a key Arctic marine species and an important food source for local Inuit communities.\n\n“At that time we weren’t sure when Baffinland was going to start doing any monitoring and if they were going to be able to get in there before the vessels actually started,” Westdal said. “We wanted to jump the gun and do some baseline monitoring before any of the large vessels showed up.”\n\nThe researchers wanted to get some basic data on the ambient noise levels and what effect ship noise was having on the narwhal that migrate through the area, she said.\n\nKristin Westdal, marine biologist with Oceans North Canada (L), Jefferson Killiktee (C) and Alex Ootoowak (R), local field technicians for Oceans North, deploy a hydrophone in Milne Inlet(Photo by Josh Jones)\n\nThe team from Oceans North placed one hydrophone in Tremblay Sound where there wasn’t going to be any vessel traffic and another near ...","id":"5wOqNclXV9b8i3nybnRsQj","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Conservation group calls for more research into effects of Nunavut mine shipping noise on narwhal","release_date":"2019-04-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5wOqNclXV9b8i3nybnRsQj"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/82259dc6826ec02afe5ba3ac54e2ad3aaed6c7c6","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Interference by foreign “malign actors” in the upcoming federal election in Canada “is very likely,” Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Friday. “We're, we are very concerned.  I think our judgement is interference is very likely,” Freeland told reporters Friday. “And we think there has probably already, there have probably already been efforts by maligned foreign actors to disrupt our democracy.” Freeland’s comments on the sidelines of a G7 meeting in France are the latest warning from the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about the treat by foreign actors such as Russia, China and others to meddle in the Oct. 21 federal election. “What I think we're seeing is something that is happening in many liberal democracies, which is the effort is not so much to secure a particular outcome in an election, the effort is to make our societies more polarized and to make us as citizens of democracies, more cynical about the very idea that democracy exists and that it can work,” speaking at a media freedom event on the sidelines of a G7 foreign ministers meeting in France. ListenEN_Clip_3-20190405-WME30 While Freeland did not specifically mention Russia in her comments, speaking to reporters in Toronto, Trudeau was more blunt. \"We have seen over the past number of years an increase in the interference or the implication of foreign actors in democratic processes,\" Trudeau said. \"We saw very clearly that countries like Russia are behind a lot of divisive campaigns, divisive social media.\" Best defence is aware citizenry, says Freeland The top diplomats of the G7 nations – Canada, France, Japan, Germany, Britain, Italy and the U.S., as well as the European Union – are meeting in Dinard, Brittany, where they are expected later to agree on common norms that would seek to prevent foreign powers from destabilizing democratic nations. Canada has already introduced a number of measures to prepare the country to fight foreign interference in the upcoming election, Freeland said. “A very important one is just to be sure that Canadians are aware of the danger,” Freeland said. “One of the things we've learned, especially from talking to our friends in the Baltic States and in Ukraine is that probably the most important and most powerful defence is an aware citizenry.” During Canada’s chairmanship of the G7 last year, Ottawa spearheaded the creation of “a rapid response mechanism to help all of us identify efforts to interfere in our democracies and to support one another where we see those efforts,” Freeland said. Need for deterrence strategy Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland and human rights lawyer Amal Clooney attend a news conference on media freedom as part of the G7 Foreign Ministers' meeting in Dinard, France, April 5, 2019. (Stephane Mahe/REUTERS) British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said it was imperative for liberal democracies to tackle interference by Russia and others. “We know that states like Russia have got a very active, planned, thought-through strategy to interfere in democratic processes in Western countries and [to sow] dissension and chaos wherever they can,” Hunt said. “We are getting much better at fending off these attacks when they happen. What we don't do at the moment is deter them from happening in the first place.” He said the discussions at the G7 on Friday would be aimed at finding a deterrence strategy that imposed a high price for meddling with democratic processes. Russia’s has strenuously denied interfering in elections in Western countries and has instead accused the West of interfering in Russian politics through direct funding of a number of international and local NGOs, civil society groups and media organizations. The Russian embassy in Ottawa dismissed Freeland's comments as \"pure disinformation.\" Blaming Moscow for fake #meddling is pure disinformation ","duration_ms":113633,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3nDK5C4g80ieJ1gawKrUG2"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3nDK5C4g80ieJ1gawKrUG2","html_description":"Interference by foreign “malign actors” in the upcoming federal election in Canada “is very likely,” Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Friday.\n\n“We're, we are very concerned.  I think our judgement is interference is very likely,” Freeland told reporters Friday. “And we think there has probably already, there have probably already been efforts by maligned foreign actors to disrupt our democracy.”\n\nFreeland’s comments on the sidelines of a G7 meeting in France are the latest warning from the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about the treat by foreign actors such as Russia, China and others to meddle in the Oct. 21 federal election.\n\n“What I think we're seeing is something that is happening in many liberal democracies, which is the effort is not so much to secure a particular outcome in an election, the effort is to make our societies more polarized and to make us as citizens of democracies, more cynical about the very idea that democracy exists and that it can work,” speaking at a media freedom event on the sidelines of a G7 foreign ministers meeting in France.\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190405-WME30\n\nWhile Freeland did not specifically mention Russia in her comments, speaking to reporters in Toronto, Trudeau was more blunt.\n\n\"We have seen over the past number of years an increase in the interference or the implication of foreign actors in democratic processes,\" Trudeau said. \"We saw very clearly that countries like Russia are behind a lot of divisive campaigns, divisive social media.\"\nBest defence is aware citizenry, says Freeland\nThe top diplomats of the G7 nations – Canada, France, Japan, Germany, Britain, Italy and the U.S., as well as the European Union – are meeting in Dinard, Brittany, where they are expected later to agree on common norms that would seek to prevent foreign powers from destabilizing democratic nations.\n\nCanada has already introduced a number of measures to prepare the country to fight foreign interference in the upcoming election, Freeland said.\n\n“A very important one is just to be sure that Canadians are aware of the danger,” Freeland said. “One of the things we've learned, especially from talking to our friends in the Baltic States and in Ukraine is that probably the most important and most powerful defence is an aware citizenry.”\n\nDuring Canada’s chairmanship of the G7 last year, Ottawa spearheaded the creation of “a rapid response mechanism to help all of us identify efforts to interfere in our democracies and to support one another where we see those efforts,” Freeland said.\nNeed for deterrence strategy\nBritain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland and human rights lawyer Amal Clooney attend a news conference on media freedom as part of the G7 Foreign Ministers' meeting in Dinard, France, April 5, 2019. (Stephane Mahe/REUTERS)\n\nBritish Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said it was imperative for liberal democracies to tackle interference by Russia and others.\n\n“We know that states like Russia have got a very active, planned, thought-through strategy to interfere in democratic processes in Western countries and [to sow] dissension and chaos wherever they can,” Hunt said.\n\n“We are getting much better at fending off these attacks when they happen. What we don't do at the moment is deter them from happening in the first place.”\n\nHe said the discussions at the G7 on Friday would be aimed at finding a deterrence strategy that imposed a high price for meddling with democratic processes.\n\nRussia’s has strenuously denied interfering in elections in Western countries and has instead accused the West of interfering in Russian politics through direct funding of a number of international and local NGOs, civil society groups and media organizations.\n\nThe Russian embassy in Ottawa dismissed Freeland's comments as \"pure disinformation.\"\nBlaming Moscow for fake #meddling is pure disinformation\n\n","id":"3nDK5C4g80ieJ1gawKrUG2","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada ‘very concerned’ about foreign meddling, says Chrystia Freeland","release_date":"2019-04-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3nDK5C4g80ieJ1gawKrUG2"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/cf2af941a2de2f01a2ea966e116e15b241064ec4","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould was booted out of the Liberal caucus Tuesday despite writing a passionate plea to her party colleagues defending her stance in a political scandal that has hobbled the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trudeau expelled Wilson-Raybould and former Treasury Board president Jane Philpott from the Liberal caucus, saying that trust with the two former cabinet ministers has been irreparably broken. \"The trust that previously existed between these two individuals and our team has been broken, whether it's taping conversations without consent, or repeatedly expressing a lack of confidence in our government or me personally as leader,\" he said. \"It's become clear that Ms. Wilson-Raybould and Dr. Philpott can no longer remain part of our Liberal team.\" I have just been informed by the Prime Minister of Canada that I am removed from the Liberal caucus and as the confirmed Vancouver Granville candidate for the Liberal Party of Canada in the 2019 federal election. More to come... — Jody Wilson-Raybould (@Puglaas) April 2, 2019 I ran to be a Member of Parliament for the purpose of improving people’s lives. Nothing will stop me from continuing in that pursuit. More details here: https://t.co/zSoLgR62j8 — Jane Philpott (@janephilpott) 2 April 2019 Earlier in the day Trudeau’s former right hand man released a series of documents designed to poke holes in Wilson-Raybould’s claims that she was moved to a less prestigious cabinet position because she stood up to pressure from the Prime Minister’s Office to intervene in a criminal case against Canadian engineering and construction giant SNC-Lavalin. Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet in February following an explosive report by The Globe and Mail newspaper. It alleged that she was moved to the less prestigious veterans affairs portfolio in January because she refused to bend to PMO pressure to override the director of public prosecutions and offer SNC-Lavalin a remediation agreement instead of a criminal trial on corruption charges tied to Libya contracts. 'I'm not the one who tried to interfere' Former Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould testified before a parliamentary hearing into what is being called a case of improper interference into a legal case against SNC-Lavalin . (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS) In her testimony to the House of Commons Justice Committee last month Wilson-Raybould, the first Indigenous Canadian to hold the position of justice minister and attorney general, said she felt inappropriate pressure from the PMO and other officials to intervene in the SNC-Lavalin case. She also reiterated her belief that her demotion to veterans affairs minister was retribution for her principled stance in protecting the independence of the office of the public prosecutor. Last week she also released a recording of her conversation with the former Clerk of the Privy Council about the SNC-Lavalin affair as another proof of the pressure she faced. Former attorney general recorded conversation as she faced pressure over SNC-Lavalin file Canada’s top bureaucrat resigns amid SNC-Lavalin controversy The seemingly unending political scandal has seriously undermined Liberal chances of re-election in the upcoming federal elections later this fall. In her letter to her Liberal colleagues, Wilson-Raybould wrote that she understands their anger and frustration. \"I am angry, hurt and frustrated because I feel and believe I was upholding the values that we all committed to,” she wrote. “In giving the advice I did, and taking the steps I did, I was trying to help protect the prime minister and the government from a horrible mess.\" She also defended her actions on the SNC-Lavalin file. \"I am not the one who tried to interfere in sensitive proceedings, I am not the one who made it public, and I am not the one who publicly denied what happened,\" she says in the statement. ","duration_ms":94668,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/39OUFryvEZCMJWTGBiCPUN"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/39OUFryvEZCMJWTGBiCPUN","html_description":"Former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould was booted out of the Liberal caucus Tuesday despite writing a passionate plea to her party colleagues defending her stance in a political scandal that has hobbled the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.\n\nTrudeau expelled Wilson-Raybould and former Treasury Board president Jane Philpott from the Liberal caucus, saying that trust with the two former cabinet ministers has been irreparably broken.\n\n\"The trust that previously existed between these two individuals and our team has been broken, whether it's taping conversations without consent, or repeatedly expressing a lack of confidence in our government or me personally as leader,\" he said.\n\n\"It's become clear that Ms. Wilson-Raybould and Dr. Philpott can no longer remain part of our Liberal team.\"\nI have just been informed by the Prime Minister of Canada that I am removed from the Liberal caucus and as the confirmed Vancouver Granville candidate for the Liberal Party of Canada in the 2019 federal election. More to come...\n\n— Jody Wilson-Raybould (@Puglaas) April 2, 2019\n\nI ran to be a Member of Parliament for the purpose of improving people’s lives. Nothing will stop me from continuing in that pursuit. More details here: https://t.co/zSoLgR62j8\n\n— Jane Philpott (@janephilpott) 2 April 2019\n\n\nEarlier in the day Trudeau’s former right hand man released a series of documents designed to poke holes in Wilson-Raybould’s claims that she was moved to a less prestigious cabinet position because she stood up to pressure from the Prime Minister’s Office to intervene in a criminal case against Canadian engineering and construction giant SNC-Lavalin.\n\nWilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet in February following an explosive report by The Globe and Mail newspaper.\n\nIt alleged that she was moved to the less prestigious veterans affairs portfolio in January because she refused to bend to PMO pressure to override the director of public prosecutions and offer SNC-Lavalin a remediation agreement instead of a criminal trial on corruption charges tied to Libya contracts.\n'I'm not the one who tried to interfere'\nFormer Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould testified before a parliamentary hearing into what is being called a case of improper interference into a legal case against SNC-Lavalin . (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nIn her testimony to the House of Commons Justice Committee last month Wilson-Raybould, the first Indigenous Canadian to hold the position of justice minister and attorney general, said she felt inappropriate pressure from the PMO and other officials to intervene in the SNC-Lavalin case.\n\nShe also reiterated her belief that her demotion to veterans affairs minister was retribution for her principled stance in protecting the independence of the office of the public prosecutor.\n\nLast week she also released a recording of her conversation with the former Clerk of the Privy Council about the SNC-Lavalin affair as another proof of the pressure she faced.\n\n \tFormer attorney general recorded conversation as she faced pressure over SNC-Lavalin file\n \tCanada’s top bureaucrat resigns amid SNC-Lavalin controversy\n\nThe seemingly unending political scandal has seriously undermined Liberal chances of re-election in the upcoming federal elections later this fall.\n\nIn her letter to her Liberal colleagues, Wilson-Raybould wrote that she understands their anger and frustration.\n\n\"I am angry, hurt and frustrated because I feel and believe I was upholding the values that we all committed to,” she wrote. “In giving the advice I did, and taking the steps I did, I was trying to help protect the prime minister and the government from a horrible mess.\"\n\nShe also defended her actions on the SNC-Lavalin file.\n\n\"I am not the one who tried to interfere in sensitive proceedings, I am not the one who made it public, and I am not the one who publicly denied what happened,\" she says in the statement.\n","id":"39OUFryvEZCMJWTGBiCPUN","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Former justice minister ejected out of Liberal caucus as new documents poke holes in her story","release_date":"2019-04-02","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:39OUFryvEZCMJWTGBiCPUN"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/599c1d849e9609a4a6e49a66818712f337778500","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"As Nunavut celebrates the 20th anniversary of becoming Canada’s northernmost territory, Premier Joe Savikataaq says he wants people in the rest of the country and outside its borders to remember that it is not just an expanse of frozen land and sea. “We’re up here!” Savikataaq told Radio Canada International. “It’s not just a big wilderness here. We have 25 communities, we’re proud Canadians, we’re resilient and we adapt to climate change and we just want to be treated as equals within Canada.” Nunavut, which means “Our Land” in Inuktitut, was created on April 1, 1999, when the sprawling northern territory that covers an area of nearly 2 million square kilometres separated from the Northwest Territories (NWT) to become Canada’s third northern territory with its own capital Iqaluit. “I think the biggest achievement is the fact that our current governments they’re closer to the people now and they’re more responsive to the people’s wants and needs than back when it was NWT and the government seemed like it was so far away from the people,” Savikataaq said. “We have our Inuit language protection act and any of our laws and legislation or policies have to align with Inuit society values.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190401-WIE30 About 80 per cent of the region’s nearly 38,000 residents are Inuit. Functioning government and legislature The Nuvanut Legislature is seen Saturday, April 25, 2015 in Iqaluit, Nunavut. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Aluki Kotierk, president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., said the creation of Nunavut and its accomplishments have to be seen in the context of the 1993 Nunavut Agreement. The Nunavut Agreement, the largest land claims agreement in Canadian history signed after nearly two decades of negotiations, set the groundwork for the creation of the territory. Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. was set up to manage the implementation of the agreement. “Article 4 stipulates the creation of the territory of Nunavut with its own legislative assembly and the government of Nunavut,” Kotierk said in a phone interview from Ottawa. “When I look at it from that perspective, the mere creation of the territory of Nunavut, altering the map of Canada all very peacefully, is a great accomplishment in itself – that there is a functioning government, that there is a functioning legislative assembly I think are all very key accomplishments.” The decentralized model of government, which allows to spread government jobs in other communities instead of concentrating all of the territorial bureaucracy in the capital Iqaluit, is another major accomplishment of the last 20 years, she said. The number of Inuit working for the government has almost doubled, Savikataaq said. Infrastructure deficit A view of Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, Canada. The federal government has promised to spend $700 million over the next 10 years for Canada’s North, with money coming for post-secondary education in the North, new infrastructure and Arctic research. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) And the territory has built about 1,900 public housing units, Savikataaq said. “We’re still short of what we need but we’ve built a lot of houses,” he said. Still, Nunavut has to overcome tremendous challenges when it comes to basic infrastructure, social and health services, and education, Savikataaq said. “Here in Nunavut we’re still far so behind in infrastructure that we’re not even at the start line that Canada has to do some nation-building, whether it be building ports, building roads into Nunavut, fibre optics into Nunavut, or upgrading the runways,” Savikataaq said, adding that the territory has a lot of catching up to the rest of Canada. Services that are taken for granted in southern Canada, either don’t exist in Nunavut or are prohibitively expensive to provide within the territory, he said. “Our cost of living is really-really high here and food insecurity is a big issue and it’s not going away,","duration_ms":494681,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2U5ZCY7dOOMVjK1H5ul8k8"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2U5ZCY7dOOMVjK1H5ul8k8","html_description":"As Nunavut celebrates the 20th anniversary of becoming Canada’s northernmost territory, Premier Joe Savikataaq says he wants people in the rest of the country and outside its borders to remember that it is not just an expanse of frozen land and sea.\n\n“We’re up here!” Savikataaq told Radio Canada International. “It’s not just a big wilderness here. We have 25 communities, we’re proud Canadians, we’re resilient and we adapt to climate change and we just want to be treated as equals within Canada.”\n\nNunavut, which means “Our Land” in Inuktitut, was created on April 1, 1999, when the sprawling northern territory that covers an area of nearly 2 million square kilometres separated from the Northwest Territories (NWT) to become Canada’s third northern territory with its own capital Iqaluit.\n\n“I think the biggest achievement is the fact that our current governments they’re closer to the people now and they’re more responsive to the people’s wants and needs than back when it was NWT and the government seemed like it was so far away from the people,” Savikataaq said.\n\n“We have our Inuit language protection act and any of our laws and legislation or policies have to align with Inuit society values.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190401-WIE30\n\nAbout 80 per cent of the region’s nearly 38,000 residents are Inuit.\nFunctioning government and legislature\nThe Nuvanut Legislature is seen Saturday, April 25, 2015 in Iqaluit, Nunavut. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nAluki Kotierk, president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., said the creation of Nunavut and its accomplishments have to be seen in the context of the 1993 Nunavut Agreement.\n\nThe Nunavut Agreement, the largest land claims agreement in Canadian history signed after nearly two decades of negotiations, set the groundwork for the creation of the territory. Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. was set up to manage the implementation of the agreement.\n\n“Article 4 stipulates the creation of the territory of Nunavut with its own legislative assembly and the government of Nunavut,” Kotierk said in a phone interview from Ottawa.\n\n“When I look at it from that perspective, the mere creation of the territory of Nunavut, altering the map of Canada all very peacefully, is a great accomplishment in itself – that there is a functioning government, that there is a functioning legislative assembly I think are all very key accomplishments.”\n\nThe decentralized model of government, which allows to spread government jobs in other communities instead of concentrating all of the territorial bureaucracy in the capital Iqaluit, is another major accomplishment of the last 20 years, she said.\n\nThe number of Inuit working for the government has almost doubled, Savikataaq said.\nInfrastructure deficit\nA view of Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, Canada. The federal government has promised to spend $700 million over the next 10 years for Canada’s North, with money coming for post-secondary education in the North, new infrastructure and Arctic research. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nAnd the territory has built about 1,900 public housing units, Savikataaq said.\n\n“We’re still short of what we need but we’ve built a lot of houses,” he said.\n\nStill, Nunavut has to overcome tremendous challenges when it comes to basic infrastructure, social and health services, and education, Savikataaq said.\n\n“Here in Nunavut we’re still far so behind in infrastructure that we’re not even at the start line that Canada has to do some nation-building, whether it be building ports, building roads into Nunavut, fibre optics into Nunavut, or upgrading the runways,” Savikataaq said, adding that the territory has a lot of catching up to the rest of Canada.\n\nServices that are taken for granted in southern Canada, either don’t exist in Nunavut or are prohibitively expensive to provide within the territory, he said.\n\n“Our cost of living is really-really high here and food insecurity is a big issue and it’s not going away,","id":"2U5ZCY7dOOMVjK1H5ul8k8","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"‘We’re up here!’ says Nunavut premier as territory celebrates 20th anniversary","release_date":"2019-04-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2U5ZCY7dOOMVjK1H5ul8k8"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/598223e426f07c2b277eb04ed3dd9aea68f9c2fc","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"White supremacism and Islamophobia are among “the gravest threats” facing the world, Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told the United Nations Thursday. The terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 15, when a white supremacist terrorist killed 50 Muslim worshippers at two mosques underlined once again that tragic reality, Freeland said, addressing a UN Security Council debate on terrorism. The attack in Christchurch was all too familiar to Canadians who had seen another terrorist kill six people in a Quebec City mosque two years ago, she said. “Neo-Nazis, white supremacists, ‘incels,’ nativists and radical anti-globalists who resort to violent acts are a threat to the stability of my country and countries around the world,” Freeland said. ListenEN_Interview_3-20190328-WIE30 No time for euphemisms Candles are placed to commemorate victims of Friday's shooting, outside the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, Monday, March 18, 2019. Three days after Friday's attack, New Zealand's deadliest shooting in modern history, relatives were anxiously waiting for word on when they can bury their loved ones. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian) These attacks need to be at the top of the global agenda during discussions on confronting global terrorism, Freeland added. And when such violence does occur, the international community must not be afraid to specifically condemn it for what it is: Neo-Nazism, white supremacism, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, terrorism, Freeland said. “We cannot hide behind euphemisms that distract from the truth,” Freeland said. “In fact, doing so puts our citizens, especially those from religious minorities and racialized communities, in greater danger.” In the wake of acts of terrorism carried out by Muslims, Western countries often call upon Muslim countries and Muslim leaders to condemn those attacks in the name of their people and their faith, she said. “It should follow that, as the foreign minister of a majority-white and majority-Christian country, I feel a specific and personal responsibility to denounce white supremacist attacks in the same way,” Freeland said. Collective effort is needed Women wearing headscarves in solidarity with the victims of the mosque attacks are seen before Friday prayers at Hagley Park outside Al-Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand March 22, 2019. (Jorge Silva/REUTERS) While hate is eternal, the way it spreads changes with time, she added. The international community must keep a close watch on how hateful messages spread on the Internet through online forums and on social media, Freeland said. This work cannot be undertaken in isolation, she added. “Each of our countries will, of course, address this issue in different ways, but we need to recognize that this is ultimately an international problem, and we need to act collectively to address it,” Freeland said. “The Internet and social media know no borders and so we must work together to find ways to address online radicalization.” 'We are family' New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern leaves after the Friday prayers at Hagley Park outside Al-Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand March 22, 2019. (Jorge Silva/REUTERS) Freeland also took the opportunity to offer Canada’s support and compassion to the people of New Zealand. “As fellow members of the Commonwealth, Canada and New Zealand have a close relationship, we are more than friends, we are family, and Canadians felt great compassion and real pain following the terrible attacks in Christchurch,” Freeland said. “In particular, I’d like to salute the moral leadership of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern who has distinguished herself not only to the people of New Zealand, but to the whole world.” Canada contributes $15M to boost numbers of female peacekeepers Later in the day, Freeland announced that Canada will contribute $15 million for the launch of the Elsie Initiative Fund for Un...","duration_ms":203154,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1Rme3SMQ0krmSDf3TlFU2G"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1Rme3SMQ0krmSDf3TlFU2G","html_description":"White supremacism and Islamophobia are among “the gravest threats” facing the world, Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told the United Nations Thursday.\n\nThe terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 15, when a white supremacist terrorist killed 50 Muslim worshippers at two mosques underlined once again that tragic reality, Freeland said, addressing a UN Security Council debate on terrorism.\n\nThe attack in Christchurch was all too familiar to Canadians who had seen another terrorist kill six people in a Quebec City mosque two years ago, she said.\n\n“Neo-Nazis, white supremacists, ‘incels,’ nativists and radical anti-globalists who resort to violent acts are a threat to the stability of my country and countries around the world,” Freeland said.\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190328-WIE30\nNo time for euphemisms\nCandles are placed to commemorate victims of Friday's shooting, outside the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, Monday, March 18, 2019. Three days after Friday's attack, New Zealand's deadliest shooting in modern history, relatives were anxiously waiting for word on when they can bury their loved ones. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)\n\nThese attacks need to be at the top of the global agenda during discussions on confronting global terrorism, Freeland added.\n\nAnd when such violence does occur, the international community must not be afraid to specifically condemn it for what it is: Neo-Nazism, white supremacism, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, terrorism, Freeland said.\n\n“We cannot hide behind euphemisms that distract from the truth,” Freeland said. “In fact, doing so puts our citizens, especially those from religious minorities and racialized communities, in greater danger.”\n\nIn the wake of acts of terrorism carried out by Muslims, Western countries often call upon Muslim countries and Muslim leaders to condemn those attacks in the name of their people and their faith, she said.\n\n“It should follow that, as the foreign minister of a majority-white and majority-Christian country, I feel a specific and personal responsibility to denounce white supremacist attacks in the same way,” Freeland said.\nCollective effort is needed\nWomen wearing headscarves in solidarity with the victims of the mosque attacks are seen before Friday prayers at Hagley Park outside Al-Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand March 22, 2019. (Jorge Silva/REUTERS)\n\nWhile hate is eternal, the way it spreads changes with time, she added.\n\nThe international community must keep a close watch on how hateful messages spread on the Internet through online forums and on social media, Freeland said.\n\nThis work cannot be undertaken in isolation, she added.\n\n“Each of our countries will, of course, address this issue in different ways, but we need to recognize that this is ultimately an international problem, and we need to act collectively to address it,” Freeland said.\n\n“The Internet and social media know no borders and so we must work together to find ways to address online radicalization.”\n'We are family'\nNew Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern leaves after the Friday prayers at Hagley Park outside Al-Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand March 22, 2019. (Jorge Silva/REUTERS)\n\nFreeland also took the opportunity to offer Canada’s support and compassion to the people of New Zealand.\n\n“As fellow members of the Commonwealth, Canada and New Zealand have a close relationship, we are more than friends, we are family, and Canadians felt great compassion and real pain following the terrible attacks in Christchurch,” Freeland said.\n\n“In particular, I’d like to salute the moral leadership of Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern who has distinguished herself not only to the people of New Zealand, but to the whole world.”\nCanada contributes $15M to boost numbers of female peacekeepers\nLater in the day, Freeland announced that Canada will contribute $15 million for the launch of the Elsie Initiative Fund for Un...","id":"1Rme3SMQ0krmSDf3TlFU2G","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"White supremacism and Islamophobia are ‘gravest threats,’ Freeland tells UN","release_date":"2019-03-28","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1Rme3SMQ0krmSDf3TlFU2G"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/605bed335b5d2a8780eebca5743db263a1387415","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Chinese officials pressured a Montreal-based human rights research institute affiliated with Concordia University to cancel a conference featuring a prominent exiled Uighur leader, says one of the organizers of the event. Kyle Matthews, executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University, said he received an email from the Chinese consul general in Montreal on Monday, asking him for an urgent meeting to discuss a planned conference on the Uighur minority in China. While he chose to ignore the request and went ahead with the conference on Tuesday as planned, Matthews said he later found out that the consul general was also putting pressure on different people in Montreal to get Concordia University to annul the event. “I think that’s problematic, it goes against freedom of speech, it goes against the right of universities to talk about complex issues and contemporary issues,” Matthews told Radio Canada International on Wednesday. “This I think shows that a university event attracting 30 people was deemed to be a major foreign policy priority for the Chinese government to disrupt and try to end.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190327-WIE30 Wang Wenzhang, Chinese consul general in Montreal, could not be reached for comment Wednesday. Officials at the Chinese embassy in Ottawa did not respond to Radio Canada International’s request for comment in time for publication. 'A massive internment camp' A perimeter fence is constructed around what is officially known as a vocational skills education centre in Dabancheng in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China September 4, 2018. This centre, situated between regional capital Urumqi and tourist spot Turpan, is among the largest known ones, and was still undergoing extensive construction and expansion at the time the photo was taken. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS) Uighurs are a Turkic-speaking Muslim minority in northwestern China who accuse Beijing of religious and political persecution. Beijing, in turn, says Uighur dissidents are leading an Islamic separatist movement. International human rights groups such as the Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, as well the UN have been sounding the alarm over the situation facing the Uighur minority in Xinjiang, Matthews said. A UN panel of human rights experts said last August it had received many credible reports that one million ethnic Uighurs in China were being held in what resembles a “massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy.” The institute was approached by the Uighur community in Canada to talk about the situation in Xinjaing, Matthews said. Dolkun Isa, president of the Munich-based World Uighur Congress, was doing a tour of North America and was asked to speak at the event, Matthews said. “A lot Uighurs have not heard from family members, UN diplomats have not been able to travel to see the situation, so we thought it was important to talk about this,” Matthews said. “We talk about situations related to genocide, mass atrocity crimes, and gross human rights violations in many-many countries and we decided to have the president of the World Uighur Congress come and speak to us about what was happening in Xinjiang, China.” A thorn in China's side Ethnic Uighur people walk in front of a giant screen with a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping in the main city square in Kashgar in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China September 6, 2018. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS) Matthews said Beijing doesn’t like to talk about human rights and Chinese officials have dismissed what has been happening in Xinjiang as a counter-terrorism operation. Other Canadian universities that have featured speakers critical of China’s policies in Xinjiang and Tibet have also faced pressure from Chinese students on campus who have coordinated their campaigns with Chinese officials, Matthews said. The Washington Post reported in February that Chinese stud...","duration_ms":380944,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1MBxS0WKqC9LhjOSz2CCyX"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1MBxS0WKqC9LhjOSz2CCyX","html_description":"Chinese officials pressured a Montreal-based human rights research institute affiliated with Concordia University to cancel a conference featuring a prominent exiled Uighur leader, says one of the organizers of the event.\n\nKyle Matthews, executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University, said he received an email from the Chinese consul general in Montreal on Monday, asking him for an urgent meeting to discuss a planned conference on the Uighur minority in China.\n\nWhile he chose to ignore the request and went ahead with the conference on Tuesday as planned, Matthews said he later found out that the consul general was also putting pressure on different people in Montreal to get Concordia University to annul the event.\n\n“I think that’s problematic, it goes against freedom of speech, it goes against the right of universities to talk about complex issues and contemporary issues,” Matthews told Radio Canada International on Wednesday.\n\n“This I think shows that a university event attracting 30 people was deemed to be a major foreign policy priority for the Chinese government to disrupt and try to end.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190327-WIE30\n\nWang Wenzhang, Chinese consul general in Montreal, could not be reached for comment Wednesday. Officials at the Chinese embassy in Ottawa did not respond to Radio Canada International’s request for comment in time for publication.\n'A massive internment camp'\nA perimeter fence is constructed around what is officially known as a vocational skills education centre in Dabancheng in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China September 4, 2018. This centre, situated between regional capital Urumqi and tourist spot Turpan, is among the largest known ones, and was still undergoing extensive construction and expansion at the time the photo was taken. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS)\n\nUighurs are a Turkic-speaking Muslim minority in northwestern China who accuse Beijing of religious and political persecution. Beijing, in turn, says Uighur dissidents are leading an Islamic separatist movement.\n\nInternational human rights groups such as the Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, as well the UN have been sounding the alarm over the situation facing the Uighur minority in Xinjiang, Matthews said.\n\nA UN panel of human rights experts said last August it had received many credible reports that one million ethnic Uighurs in China were being held in what resembles a “massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy.”\n\nThe institute was approached by the Uighur community in Canada to talk about the situation in Xinjaing, Matthews said.\n\nDolkun Isa, president of the Munich-based World Uighur Congress, was doing a tour of North America and was asked to speak at the event, Matthews said.\n\n“A lot Uighurs have not heard from family members, UN diplomats have not been able to travel to see the situation, so we thought it was important to talk about this,” Matthews said.\n\n“We talk about situations related to genocide, mass atrocity crimes, and gross human rights violations in many-many countries and we decided to have the president of the World Uighur Congress come and speak to us about what was happening in Xinjiang, China.”\nA thorn in China's side\nEthnic Uighur people walk in front of a giant screen with a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping in the main city square in Kashgar in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China September 6, 2018. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS)\n\nMatthews said Beijing doesn’t like to talk about human rights and Chinese officials have dismissed what has been happening in Xinjiang as a counter-terrorism operation.\n\nOther Canadian universities that have featured speakers critical of China’s policies in Xinjiang and Tibet have also faced pressure from Chinese students on campus who have coordinated their campaigns with Chinese officials, Matthews said.\n\nThe Washington Post reported in February that Chinese stud...","id":"1MBxS0WKqC9LhjOSz2CCyX","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Chinese officials pressured Canadian university to cancel event with Uighur activist","release_date":"2019-03-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1MBxS0WKqC9LhjOSz2CCyX"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/63f7e66bff33473847d20c7aae8635c2c713a84e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A Filipino woman and her daughter who sheltered U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden while he went into hiding in Hong Kong in 2013 boarded a plane to Toronto Monday after Canada granted them asylum, according to a charity that sponsored the pair. Ethan Cox, a spokesperson for the Montreal-based non-profit For the Refugees, said Vanessa Mae Rodel, 42, an asylum seeker from the Philippines, and her 7-year-old daughter, Keana Nihinsa, are expected to land at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport around 6 pm (2200 UTC) Monday. “Vanessa and Keana are coming to Canada as privately sponsored refugees, sponsored by our non-profit, For the Refugees,” Cox said. ListenEN_Interview_3-20190325-WIE30 They will then make their way to Montreal where they will be settled with help from For the Refugees. The charity was set up in 2016 by a group of lawyers in Montreal to support three refugee families also known as “Snowden’s angels,” Cox said. Rodel and five other asylum seekers sheltered Snowden, at the request of their Canadian-born immigration lawyer Robert Tibbo. The former National Security Agency contractor retained Tibbo after he revealed his identity as the whistleblower who exposed the U.S. government’s Prism surveillance program. Snowden, who at that point had become the most-wanted man for U.S. security services, lived with refugee families from the Philippines and Sri Lanka for about two weeks in Hong Kong slums until he was whisked away to Moscow. Asylum seekers Vanessa Mae Bondalian Rodel, 42, from the Philippines, and Ajith Pushpakumara, 44, from Sri Lanka, who helped hiding Edward Snowden while he was in Hong Kong in 2013, attend a special screening of the film \"Snowden\" directed by Oliver Stone, in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 30, 2016. (Bobby Yip/REUTERS) Their role in helping the wistleblower escape capture was featured in Oliver Stone’s 2016 biographical thriller “Snowden,” exposing them to retaliation from the Hong Kong government. Hong Kong authorities retaliated against the refugees for their role in the Snowden drama, cutting off support payment to them years ago, Cox said. “The only reason they’re still alive is because our non-profit has been raising money and sending it to them every month to live on,” Cox said. “There have been reports of agents from the Sri Lankan government coming to Hong Kong, looking for some of these refugees. They have been brought in and interrogated about their role with Edward Snowden by Hong Kong authorities.” They are in a situation of extreme distress, he added. “It’s tremendous that the Canadian government has finally brought in Vanessa and Keana and we’re very happy about that and thankful to the Trudeau government for that,” Cox said. “But we also need them to expedite the processing to get the other vulnerable refugees out of a dangerous situation.” It is exactly this type of situation that is envisaged in the law, allowing Canada’s Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen to step in and expedite the processing of their applications, he added. “They have suffered a lot for many years and they need to be brought to Canada as soon as possible,” Cox said. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada has a rigorous immigration and refugee process that works in large part independent of “political engagement.” “We trust the professionals who work on various files to make the right decisions,” Trudeau said, speaking to reporters in Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Speaking to reporters in Washington DC, after a meeting with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said she doesn’t believe that granting asylum to refugees who sheltered Snowden will complicate Ottawa’s relations with Washington. “Ambassador Lighthizer did not raise the issue,” Freeland said. Decisions with respect to refugees are not made as part of a political process, she added. ","duration_ms":45662,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2rEtpp5ODFzrMWu5s5Q6v6"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2rEtpp5ODFzrMWu5s5Q6v6","html_description":"A Filipino woman and her daughter who sheltered U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden while he went into hiding in Hong Kong in 2013 boarded a plane to Toronto Monday after Canada granted them asylum, according to a charity that sponsored the pair.\n\nEthan Cox, a spokesperson for the Montreal-based non-profit For the Refugees, said Vanessa Mae Rodel, 42, an asylum seeker from the Philippines, and her 7-year-old daughter, Keana Nihinsa, are expected to land at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport around 6 pm (2200 UTC) Monday.\n\n“Vanessa and Keana are coming to Canada as privately sponsored refugees, sponsored by our non-profit, For the Refugees,” Cox said.\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190325-WIE30\n\nThey will then make their way to Montreal where they will be settled with help from For the Refugees.\n\nThe charity was set up in 2016 by a group of lawyers in Montreal to support three refugee families also known as “Snowden’s angels,” Cox said.\n\nRodel and five other asylum seekers sheltered Snowden, at the request of their Canadian-born immigration lawyer Robert Tibbo.\n\nThe former National Security Agency contractor retained Tibbo after he revealed his identity as the whistleblower who exposed the U.S. government’s Prism surveillance program.\n\nSnowden, who at that point had become the most-wanted man for U.S. security services, lived with refugee families from the Philippines and Sri Lanka for about two weeks in Hong Kong slums until he was whisked away to Moscow.\n\nAsylum seekers Vanessa Mae Bondalian Rodel, 42, from the Philippines, and Ajith Pushpakumara, 44, from Sri Lanka, who helped hiding Edward Snowden while he was in Hong Kong in 2013, attend a special screening of the film \"Snowden\" directed by Oliver Stone, in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 30, 2016. (Bobby Yip/REUTERS)\n\nTheir role in helping the wistleblower escape capture was featured in Oliver Stone’s 2016 biographical thriller “Snowden,” exposing them to retaliation from the Hong Kong government.\n\nHong Kong authorities retaliated against the refugees for their role in the Snowden drama, cutting off support payment to them years ago, Cox said.\n\n“The only reason they’re still alive is because our non-profit has been raising money and sending it to them every month to live on,” Cox said.\n\n“There have been reports of agents from the Sri Lankan government coming to Hong Kong, looking for some of these refugees. They have been brought in and interrogated about their role with Edward Snowden by Hong Kong authorities.”\n\nThey are in a situation of extreme distress, he added.\n\n“It’s tremendous that the Canadian government has finally brought in Vanessa and Keana and we’re very happy about that and thankful to the Trudeau government for that,” Cox said. “But we also need them to expedite the processing to get the other vulnerable refugees out of a dangerous situation.”\n\nIt is exactly this type of situation that is envisaged in the law, allowing Canada’s Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen to step in and expedite the processing of their applications, he added.\n\n“They have suffered a lot for many years and they need to be brought to Canada as soon as possible,” Cox said.\n\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada has a rigorous immigration and refugee process that works in large part independent of “political engagement.”\n\n“We trust the professionals who work on various files to make the right decisions,” Trudeau said, speaking to reporters in Maple Ridge, British Columbia.\n\nSpeaking to reporters in Washington DC, after a meeting with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said she doesn’t believe that granting asylum to refugees who sheltered Snowden will complicate Ottawa’s relations with Washington.\n\n“Ambassador Lighthizer did not raise the issue,” Freeland said.\n\nDecisions with respect to refugees are not made as part of a political process, she added.\n\n","id":"2rEtpp5ODFzrMWu5s5Q6v6","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada grants asylum to one of Edward Snowden’s ‘angels’","release_date":"2019-03-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2rEtpp5ODFzrMWu5s5Q6v6"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/89c3a159c56dd4ee13b391f94812d5dd16cd0daa","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"British rock star Sting performed a live concert on Thursday as a “gesture of solidarity” with General Motors workers facing layoffs in Oshawa, Ontario. Thousands of people filled Oshawa’s Tributes Communities Centre for a special acoustic performance by Sting and the Toronto cast of his musical The Last Ship, which is currently playing at Mirvish's Princess of Wales Theatre. Sting began the concert with a rendition of The Police classic “Message in a Bottle\" as the crowd joined in. The rock legend also performed a selection of songs from The Last Ship, which tells the story of a British shipbuilding town as it grapples with the collapse of the shipbuilding industry that sustained it. The story is based on the rock star’s hometown Wallsend, England. Sting, 62, wrote The Last Ship's music and lyrics based on his own experiences growing up in Wallsend. The former Police frontman stars in the production as a protest leader fighting to hold the community together by building one last ship. Sting performs the song \"Message in a Bottle,\" before being joined by the cast of his musical \"The Last Ship\" to perform in support of General Motors workers in Oshawa, Ont. on Thursday, February 14, 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The story of the musical is eerily similar to the realities now faced by GM workers in Oshawa, who are fighting a plant closure expected the end of 2019. \"We felt it was important to show our support for you,\" Sting told the crowd. Sting to support Oshawa GM workers Speaking at a press conference after the show, Sting said it’s important that the auto workers’ story is heard. “This story is hugely important. This can’t be buried under the political carpet,” Sting said. “The world needs to know, Canada needs to get behind you. It’s important.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190214-WIE30 With files from CBC News","duration_ms":267781,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4NTGeRwD2ZJcou9ppYk2Zr"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4NTGeRwD2ZJcou9ppYk2Zr","html_description":"British rock star Sting performed a live concert on Thursday as a “gesture of solidarity” with General Motors workers facing layoffs in Oshawa, Ontario.\n\nThousands of people filled Oshawa’s Tributes Communities Centre for a special acoustic performance by Sting and the Toronto cast of his musical The Last Ship, which is currently playing at Mirvish's Princess of Wales Theatre.\n\nSting began the concert with a rendition of The Police classic “Message in a Bottle\" as the crowd joined in.\n\nThe rock legend also performed a selection of songs from The Last Ship, which tells the story of a British shipbuilding town as it grapples with the collapse of the shipbuilding industry that sustained it.\n\nThe story is based on the rock star’s hometown Wallsend, England. Sting, 62, wrote The Last Ship's music and lyrics based on his own experiences growing up in Wallsend. The former Police frontman stars in the production as a protest leader fighting to hold the community together by building one last ship.\n\nSting performs the song \"Message in a Bottle,\" before being joined by the cast of his musical \"The Last Ship\" to perform in support of General Motors workers in Oshawa, Ont. on Thursday, February 14, 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe story of the musical is eerily similar to the realities now faced by GM workers in Oshawa, who are fighting a plant closure expected the end of 2019.\n\n\"We felt it was important to show our support for you,\" Sting told the crowd.\n\n \tSting to support Oshawa GM workers\n\nSpeaking at a press conference after the show, Sting said it’s important that the auto workers’ story is heard.\n\n“This story is hugely important. This can’t be buried under the political carpet,” Sting said. “The world needs to know, Canada needs to get behind you. It’s important.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190214-WIE30\n\nWith files from CBC News","id":"4NTGeRwD2ZJcou9ppYk2Zr","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Sting performs for Oshawa GM workers facing layoffs","release_date":"2019-02-14","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4NTGeRwD2ZJcou9ppYk2Zr"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0c26bae1207ad3f5cbd3a1783d36a225b30d417f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada will provide $53 million in aid to help those most affected by the Venezuelan crisis, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Monday as he hosted a meeting of nearly dozen countries opposed to the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. “Today, Canada is stepping up and announcing $53 million to address the most pressing needs of Venezuelans on the ground, including the almost three million refugees,” Trudeau said in his opening remarks at at the John G. Diefenbaker Building in Ottawa. “The bulk of the funds will go to trusted partners and neighbouring countries to help them support Venezuela and Venezuelans.” Since the eruption of crisis in Venezuela in 2017, Canada has provided $2.2 million in humanitarian assistance to help the most vulnerable populations affected by the Venezuelan crisis, according to Global Affairs Canada. With the additional $53 million announced by Trudeau Monday, Canada’s overall contribution to respond to the effects of the Venezuela crisis now stands at over $55 million. 'A pivotal moment' Peru's Foreign Minister Nestor Popolizio, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland applaud after Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaido delivered a video message during the opening session of the Lima Group meeting in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, February 4, 2019. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) Trudeau thanked foreign ministers from most of the Lima Group countries — Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Saint Lucia — for travelling to Ottawa to discuss their response to the political, economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela. Ecuador, the European Union, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, the UK, and the U.S. have also joined the discussions in Ottawa. Last week, as hundreds of thousands marched in capital Caracas to demand the end of Maduro’s socialist government, Canada joined the United States, the Organization of American States, and ten other Latin American states in recognizing Venezuela’s parliamentary speaker, Juan Guaido, as the country’s interim president. Trudeau said he spoke with Guaido Sunday and was “pleased to convey Canada’s support personally.” “This is a pivotal moment for the people of Venezuela: we are observing a widespread rejection of the Maduro regime's illegitimate claim to power following fraudulent elections last May,\" Trudeau said. “For years now, we've witnessed the breakdown in democracy in Venezuela and a dictatorship willing to use force, fear and coercion to retain power. The violation of human rights and the complete disregard for the rule of law shown by the regime has been both inexcusable and unacceptable.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190204-WIE30 Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido walks as he speaks to journalists before a news conference at the National Assembly in Caracas, Venezuela February 4, 2019. (Andres Martinez Casares/REUTERS) Canada has not only called on Maduro to cede power to the “democratically elected” National Assembly but has also imposed sanctions on the socialist leader and his officials, Trudeau said. “The use of excessive force against peaceful protesters, arbitrary detentions, extrajudicial killings – all have become staples of a dictatorship clinging to power at the expense of their people,” Trudeau said. Guaido has given hope to countless people around the world, marking a turning point in the ongoing humanitarian, economic and political crisis that has plagued Venezuela for years, Trudeau said. Venezuela now has “a legitimate interim president and a clear constitutional path forward to free and fair elections,” Trudeau said. 'Peaceful restoration of democracy' Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland delivers brief remarks at the opening session of the 10th ministerial meeting of the Lima Group in Ottawa on...","duration_ms":329482,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7eQEFAQevuMxGQC80nhaag"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7eQEFAQevuMxGQC80nhaag","html_description":"Canada will provide $53 million in aid to help those most affected by the Venezuelan crisis, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Monday as he hosted a meeting of nearly dozen countries opposed to the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro.\n\n“Today, Canada is stepping up and announcing $53 million to address the most pressing needs of Venezuelans on the ground, including the almost three million refugees,” Trudeau said in his opening remarks at at the John G. Diefenbaker Building in Ottawa.\n\n“The bulk of the funds will go to trusted partners and neighbouring countries to help them support Venezuela and Venezuelans.”\n\nSince the eruption of crisis in Venezuela in 2017, Canada has provided $2.2 million in humanitarian assistance to help the most vulnerable populations affected by the Venezuelan crisis, according to Global Affairs Canada.\n\nWith the additional $53 million announced by Trudeau Monday, Canada’s overall contribution to respond to the effects of the Venezuela crisis now stands at over $55 million.\n'A pivotal moment'\nPeru's Foreign Minister Nestor Popolizio, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland applaud after Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaido delivered a video message during the opening session of the Lima Group meeting in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, February 4, 2019. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)\n\nTrudeau thanked foreign ministers from most of the Lima Group countries — Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Saint Lucia — for travelling to Ottawa to discuss their response to the political, economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela.\n\nEcuador, the European Union, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, the UK, and the U.S. have also joined the discussions in Ottawa.\n\nLast week, as hundreds of thousands marched in capital Caracas to demand the end of Maduro’s socialist government, Canada joined the United States, the Organization of American States, and ten other Latin American states in recognizing Venezuela’s parliamentary speaker, Juan Guaido, as the country’s interim president.\n\nTrudeau said he spoke with Guaido Sunday and was “pleased to convey Canada’s support personally.”\n\n“This is a pivotal moment for the people of Venezuela: we are observing a widespread rejection of the Maduro regime's illegitimate claim to power following fraudulent elections last May,\" Trudeau said.\n\n“For years now, we've witnessed the breakdown in democracy in Venezuela and a dictatorship willing to use force, fear and coercion to retain power. The violation of human rights and the complete disregard for the rule of law shown by the regime has been both inexcusable and unacceptable.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190204-WIE30\n\nVenezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido walks as he speaks to journalists before a news conference at the National Assembly in Caracas, Venezuela February 4, 2019. (Andres Martinez Casares/REUTERS)\n\nCanada has not only called on Maduro to cede power to the “democratically elected” National Assembly but has also imposed sanctions on the socialist leader and his officials, Trudeau said.\n\n“The use of excessive force against peaceful protesters, arbitrary detentions, extrajudicial killings – all have become staples of a dictatorship clinging to power at the expense of their people,” Trudeau said.\n\nGuaido has given hope to countless people around the world, marking a turning point in the ongoing humanitarian, economic and political crisis that has plagued Venezuela for years, Trudeau said.\n\nVenezuela now has “a legitimate interim president and a clear constitutional path forward to free and fair elections,” Trudeau said.\n'Peaceful restoration of democracy'\nCanada's Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland delivers brief remarks at the opening session of the 10th ministerial meeting of the Lima Group in Ottawa on...","id":"7eQEFAQevuMxGQC80nhaag","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada pledges $53M for those affected by Venezuela crisis","release_date":"2019-02-04","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7eQEFAQevuMxGQC80nhaag"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/6efd0f17f63b2a24d9f4573f0734c7d9be4dfa90","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Slightly more than half of Canadians (52 per cent) say they are dissatisfied with the way Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government have handled the diplomatic crisis with China that followed the arrest in Canada of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou last December, according to a new poll. The survey from the Angus Reid Institute also reveals that a slight majority of Canadians (55 per cent) think that Canada was right to act on the U.S. arrest warrant for Meng, the chief financial officer of the Chinese telecom giant, while four-in-ten Canadians (44 per cent) said they would like to see the Liberals take a tougher approach with Beijing. Nearly two-thirds (62 per cent) of Canadians say China’s record on human rights and the rule of law should be a more important consideration than trade and investment opportunities for Canada when assessing the Canada-China relationship, according to the survey. “I think the most surprising thing for me when looking at these results is the degree to which Canadians have not really made up their minds about what they want or how they want their government to handle this issue,” said Ian Holliday, a research associate at the Angus Reid Institute. “We see that there is a great deal of dissatisfaction with way the Trudeau government has handled relations with China over the last couple of weeks… but at the same time when we look at an ‘agree-disagree’ statement about [whether] Canada should have resisted the U.S. request and not arrested Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei CFO, in the first place, what we find is that Canadians disagree with that assertion as well.” That suggests that there is degree of support for the actions the federal government has taken, Holliday said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. (click to listen to the full interview with Ian Holliday) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190201-WIE30 Facing China's wrath Chinese officials say Canadians Michael Kovrig, right, and Michael Spavor were arrested for undermining Chinese 'national security,' while Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was arrested 'illegally' in Canada upon U.S. request (Associated Press/ International Crisis Group/Canadian Press) Meng’s arrest has caused a bruising diplomatic row between Ottawa and Beijing. Days after Meng’s arrest, Chinese authorities detained Michael Kovrig, who took a leave of absence from Global Affairs Canada to work as the North East Asia analyst for the non-governmental think tank International Crisis Group, and Michael Spavor, a China-based Canadian entrepreneur. They are accused of “endangering national security” but no official charges have been laid against the two Canadians. Then on Jan. 14, a Chinese court sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial of a drug-smuggling case. Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, 36, had appealed his original 15-year sentence. Schellenberg death sentence was seen by many in Canada as another attempt by Beijing to apply pressure on Ottawa following Meng’s arrest. Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained Dec. 1 at the behest of American authorities, leaves her home to attend a court appearance regarding her bail conditions, in Vancouver, on Tuesday January 29, 2019. (Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Meng, who is also the daughter of company founder Ren Zhengfei, could face extradition to the U.S. over allegations she was involved in violating sanctions on Iran, with each charge carrying a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison. She was released on bail by a Canadian court after she agreed to post a $10-million bail, surrender her passports and abide by more than a dozen conditions. According to a 13-count indictment presented in New York on Monday, Meng, Huawei, the telecom giant’s U.S. subsidiary, and Skycom, a Hong-Kong-registered company, which mainly does business in Iran, are accused of committing bank fraud,","duration_ms":707422,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/59615DUvABaKhW7uxakBjS"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/59615DUvABaKhW7uxakBjS","html_description":"Slightly more than half of Canadians (52 per cent) say they are dissatisfied with the way Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government have handled the diplomatic crisis with China that followed the arrest in Canada of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou last December, according to a new poll.\n\nThe survey from the Angus Reid Institute also reveals that a slight majority of Canadians (55 per cent) think that Canada was right to act on the U.S. arrest warrant for Meng, the chief financial officer of the Chinese telecom giant, while four-in-ten Canadians (44 per cent) said they would like to see the Liberals take a tougher approach with Beijing.\n\nNearly two-thirds (62 per cent) of Canadians say China’s record on human rights and the rule of law should be a more important consideration than trade and investment opportunities for Canada when assessing the Canada-China relationship, according to the survey.\n\n“I think the most surprising thing for me when looking at these results is the degree to which Canadians have not really made up their minds about what they want or how they want their government to handle this issue,” said Ian Holliday, a research associate at the Angus Reid Institute.\n\n“We see that there is a great deal of dissatisfaction with way the Trudeau government has handled relations with China over the last couple of weeks… but at the same time when we look at an ‘agree-disagree’ statement about [whether] Canada should have resisted the U.S. request and not arrested Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei CFO, in the first place, what we find is that Canadians disagree with that assertion as well.”\n\nThat suggests that there is degree of support for the actions the federal government has taken, Holliday said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Ian Holliday)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190201-WIE30\nFacing China's wrath\nChinese officials say Canadians Michael Kovrig, right, and Michael Spavor were arrested for undermining Chinese 'national security,' while Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was arrested 'illegally' in Canada upon U.S. request (Associated Press/ International Crisis Group/Canadian Press)\n\nMeng’s arrest has caused a bruising diplomatic row between Ottawa and Beijing.\n\nDays after Meng’s arrest, Chinese authorities detained Michael Kovrig, who took a leave of absence from Global Affairs Canada to work as the North East Asia analyst for the non-governmental think tank International Crisis Group, and Michael Spavor, a China-based Canadian entrepreneur.\n\nThey are accused of “endangering national security” but no official charges have been laid against the two Canadians.\n\nThen on Jan. 14, a Chinese court sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial of a drug-smuggling case. Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, 36, had appealed his original 15-year sentence.\n\nSchellenberg death sentence was seen by many in Canada as another attempt by Beijing to apply pressure on Ottawa following Meng’s arrest.\n\nHuawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained Dec. 1 at the behest of American authorities, leaves her home to attend a court appearance regarding her bail conditions, in Vancouver, on Tuesday January 29, 2019. (Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nMeng, who is also the daughter of company founder Ren Zhengfei, could face extradition to the U.S. over allegations she was involved in violating sanctions on Iran, with each charge carrying a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison.\n\nShe was released on bail by a Canadian court after she agreed to post a $10-million bail, surrender her passports and abide by more than a dozen conditions.\n\nAccording to a 13-count indictment presented in New York on Monday, Meng, Huawei, the telecom giant’s U.S. subsidiary, and Skycom, a Hong-Kong-registered company, which mainly does business in Iran, are accused of committing bank fraud,","id":"59615DUvABaKhW7uxakBjS","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Most Canadians dissatisfied with Trudeau’s handling of row with China: poll","release_date":"2019-02-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:59615DUvABaKhW7uxakBjS"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/dad3c855e8db0039077665399ffb0ac4890f4a43","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau is denying suggestions by the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberal government may have paid too much to acquire the Trans Mountain Pipeline (TMP) and Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMEP). The report by the independent parliamentary officer released Thursday estimates that the Trans Mountain Pipeline and the controversial project to nearly triple its capacity have a value of between $3.6 billion and $4.6 billion. In May 2018, Morneau announced the federal government paid $4.5 billion to purchase the pipeline that runs from northern Alberta to British Columbia’s Pacific Coast in a desperate attempt to salvage the project. The expansion of the 1,150-kilometre pipeline that currently carries about 300,000 barrels of oil per day from northern Alberta to the oil terminal in Burnaby, a suburb of Vancouver, is seen as critical for Alberta’s and Canada’s economy but has run into stiff opposition from Indigenous and environmental groups, as well as the B.C. government. 'They paid the sticker price' Pipes are seen at the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain facility in Edmonton, Thursday, April 6, 2017. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The PBO report said the Trudeau government negotiated a purchase price at the higher end of its valuation range. \"If it was a car, we would say they paid sticker price, they didn't negotiate very much, they didn't get that many deals or manufacturers rebates — quite the opposite,\" Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux told reporters Thursday morning at a press briefing. \"It's a very risky project to have bought something that nobody else in the private sector wanted to acquire.\" Liberal government to buy Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5B But speaking to reporters in Ottawa Thursday, Morneau said the net price paid by the feds was $4.1 billion, not $4.5 billion as announced last May. “In fact, the purchase price was $4.5 billion less the amount of tax advantage, which brings it to $4.1 billion,” Morneau said. “That means we paid $4.1 billion net for the Trans Mountain pipeline and the expansion.” That’s right in the middle of the range that the PBO analysis calculated, he said. ListenEN_Interview_3-20190131-WIE30 Project delays A load of pipe originally destined for the Trans Mountain pipeline sits idle on a Kamloops B.C. rail siding. (Dennis Owen/Reuters) The PBO report also warned of a financial hit the government and Canadian taxpayers will take if the pipeline construction is delayed or cancelled. “The worst case scenario is that the Trans Mountain expansion project doesn’t see the light of day, and then the value of the asset that the government has acquired is diminished significantly and the government could lose anywhere between $2-2.5 billion in that worst case scenario,” Giroux said. B.C. Premier John Horgan has sought to stop the expansion project in court, forcing Ottawa to step in and buy the project. Indigenous groups have said they were not adequately consulted by the federal government before the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approved it in 2016. In August 2018, the Federal Court of Appeal quashed cabinet approvals for the project, citing inadequate consultations and incomplete environmental assessments. “We believe that it’s important that we respond appropriately to the Federal Court of Appeal decision,” Morneau said. “That’s what we are working through right now in order to make sure that we do this the right way to move forward.” The government sees a significant commercial advantage in the purchase of the pipeline and the expansion project, which would allow Canada to get its oil to international markets where they can fetch a better price as opposed to being dependent on the U.S. market where Canadian crude is sold at a discount, Morneau said. Giroux acknowledged that should the pipeline be built, there will be some positive tradeoffs for the Canadia...","duration_ms":143595,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7nOFZsxMAtstmd8QRmz2Z2"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7nOFZsxMAtstmd8QRmz2Z2","html_description":"Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau is denying suggestions by the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberal government may have paid too much to acquire the Trans Mountain Pipeline (TMP) and Trans Mountain Expansion Project (TMEP).\n\nThe report by the independent parliamentary officer released Thursday estimates that the Trans Mountain Pipeline and the controversial project to nearly triple its capacity have a value of between $3.6 billion and $4.6 billion.\n\nIn May 2018, Morneau announced the federal government paid $4.5 billion to purchase the pipeline that runs from northern Alberta to British Columbia’s Pacific Coast in a desperate attempt to salvage the project.\n\nThe expansion of the 1,150-kilometre pipeline that currently carries about 300,000 barrels of oil per day from northern Alberta to the oil terminal in Burnaby, a suburb of Vancouver, is seen as critical for Alberta’s and Canada’s economy but has run into stiff opposition from Indigenous and environmental groups, as well as the B.C. government.\n'They paid the sticker price'\nPipes are seen at the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain facility in Edmonton, Thursday, April 6, 2017. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe PBO report said the Trudeau government negotiated a purchase price at the higher end of its valuation range.\n\n\"If it was a car, we would say they paid sticker price, they didn't negotiate very much, they didn't get that many deals or manufacturers rebates — quite the opposite,\" Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux told reporters Thursday morning at a press briefing.\n\n\"It's a very risky project to have bought something that nobody else in the private sector wanted to acquire.\"\n\n \tLiberal government to buy Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5B\n\nBut speaking to reporters in Ottawa Thursday, Morneau said the net price paid by the feds was $4.1 billion, not $4.5 billion as announced last May.\n\n“In fact, the purchase price was $4.5 billion less the amount of tax advantage, which brings it to $4.1 billion,” Morneau said. “That means we paid $4.1 billion net for the Trans Mountain pipeline and the expansion.”\n\nThat’s right in the middle of the range that the PBO analysis calculated, he said.\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190131-WIE30\nProject delays\nA load of pipe originally destined for the Trans Mountain pipeline sits idle on a Kamloops B.C. rail siding. (Dennis Owen/Reuters)\n\nThe PBO report also warned of a financial hit the government and Canadian taxpayers will take if the pipeline construction is delayed or cancelled.\n\n“The worst case scenario is that the Trans Mountain expansion project doesn’t see the light of day, and then the value of the asset that the government has acquired is diminished significantly and the government could lose anywhere between $2-2.5 billion in that worst case scenario,” Giroux said.\n\nB.C. Premier John Horgan has sought to stop the expansion project in court, forcing Ottawa to step in and buy the project.\n\nIndigenous groups have said they were not adequately consulted by the federal government before the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approved it in 2016.\n\nIn August 2018, the Federal Court of Appeal quashed cabinet approvals for the project, citing inadequate consultations and incomplete environmental assessments.\n\n“We believe that it’s important that we respond appropriately to the Federal Court of Appeal decision,” Morneau said. “That’s what we are working through right now in order to make sure that we do this the right way to move forward.”\n\nThe government sees a significant commercial advantage in the purchase of the pipeline and the expansion project, which would allow Canada to get its oil to international markets where they can fetch a better price as opposed to being dependent on the U.S. market where Canadian crude is sold at a discount, Morneau said.\n\nGiroux acknowledged that should the pipeline be built, there will be some positive tradeoffs for the Canadia...","id":"7nOFZsxMAtstmd8QRmz2Z2","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Liberals deny overpaying for Trans Mountain pipeline project","release_date":"2019-01-31","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7nOFZsxMAtstmd8QRmz2Z2"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/76bafabfa593b39939945f0c37f789ca92bcb66c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"With nine month to go until Canadians head to polls to elect the next federal government, Ottawa unveiled a series of new measures aimed at further beefing up Canada's electoral system against foreign interference, and enhancing its ability to defend the democratic process from cyber threats and disinformation. The new measures unveiled Wednesday in Ottawa by Minister of Democratic Institutions Karina Gould, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan will focus on four areas. These include taking proactive measures to combat foreign interference, enhancing citizen preparedness, improving coordination between Canada’s security agencies and calling on social media platforms to take “actions to increase transparency, authenticity and integrity on their systems.” A new panel and a task force A woman holding a baby enters a polling station to vote in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015. The federal government setting up a five-person panel of senior bureaucrats to sound the alarm when a serious attempt to meddle in the election by a foreign actor that could threaten the integrity of the electoral process has taken place. (Mark Blinch/REUTERS) Ottawa is also setting up a five-person panel of senior bureaucrats to sound the alarm when a serious attempt to meddle in the election by a foreign actor that could threaten the integrity of the electoral process has taken place. The panel will consist of the Clerk of the Privy Council, the federal national security and intelligence adviser, the deputy minister of justice, the deputy minister of public safety and the deputy minister of Global Affairs Canada (GAC). The government is also setting up a new task force composed of members of Canada's security and intelligence agencies — the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), along with GAC — to try to prevent clandestine forces from influencing the electoral process. The Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections (SITE) Task Force, chaired by the CSE, Canada’s signal intelligence agency, will work to identify foreign threats to Canada's electoral process and help the government respond, Goodale said. (click to listen to Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale's remarks) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190130-WIE30 “Whether it’s hacking, intimidation, bribery or whatever, they have the tools and the skills to identify the interference and its source,” Goodale said. Role for political parties, news and social media outlets Political parties in Canada bear a particular responsibility for securing their own IT infrastructure against unlawful access by foreign and domestic actors, Goodale said. To help them in that task, the federal government will provide security briefings to key members of national political parties with appropriate security clearance to warn them of any threats, Goodale said. The news media also have a key role to play in safeguarding the integrity of Canada’s democratic process, he said. “Never has journalism been under such pressure from those who would masquerade as legitimate but whose strings are pulled by foreign authorities as they use cyberspace to manipulate,” Goodale said. Finally, social media giants such as Twitter and Facebook have a very important role to play in ensuring “that they are contributing to and not detracting from political discourse,” Goodale said. “Individually and through the Five Eyes and the G7 we have challenged the social media operators to help us combat such evils as terrorist propaganda, the sexual exploitation of children and human trafficking,” Goodale said. “More and more insidious foreign interference to subvert democracy is being added to the list of harms that these service providers need to help stop.” Minister of Democratic Institutions, Karina Gould, along with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Prepared...","duration_ms":430420,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5FbmWA9nPZOvAKnqMWY4bt"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5FbmWA9nPZOvAKnqMWY4bt","html_description":"With nine month to go until Canadians head to polls to elect the next federal government, Ottawa unveiled a series of new measures aimed at further beefing up Canada's electoral system against foreign interference, and enhancing its ability to defend the democratic process from cyber threats and disinformation.\n\nThe new measures unveiled Wednesday in Ottawa by Minister of Democratic Institutions Karina Gould, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan will focus on four areas.\n\nThese include taking proactive measures to combat foreign interference, enhancing citizen preparedness, improving coordination between Canada’s security agencies and calling on social media platforms to take “actions to increase transparency, authenticity and integrity on their systems.”\nA new panel and a task force\nA woman holding a baby enters a polling station to vote in Calgary, Alberta, October 19, 2015. The federal government setting up a five-person panel of senior bureaucrats to sound the alarm when a serious attempt to meddle in the election by a foreign actor that could threaten the integrity of the electoral process has taken place. (Mark Blinch/REUTERS)\n\nOttawa is also setting up a five-person panel of senior bureaucrats to sound the alarm when a serious attempt to meddle in the election by a foreign actor that could threaten the integrity of the electoral process has taken place.\n\nThe panel will consist of the Clerk of the Privy Council, the federal national security and intelligence adviser, the deputy minister of justice, the deputy minister of public safety and the deputy minister of Global Affairs Canada (GAC).\n\nThe government is also setting up a new task force composed of members of Canada's security and intelligence agencies — the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), along with GAC — to try to prevent clandestine forces from influencing the electoral process.\n\nThe Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections (SITE) Task Force, chaired by the CSE, Canada’s signal intelligence agency, will work to identify foreign threats to Canada's electoral process and help the government respond, Goodale said.\n\n(click to listen to Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale's remarks)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190130-WIE30\n\n“Whether it’s hacking, intimidation, bribery or whatever, they have the tools and the skills to identify the interference and its source,” Goodale said.\nRole for political parties, news and social media outlets\nPolitical parties in Canada bear a particular responsibility for securing their own IT infrastructure against unlawful access by foreign and domestic actors, Goodale said.\n\nTo help them in that task, the federal government will provide security briefings to key members of national political parties with appropriate security clearance to warn them of any threats, Goodale said.\n\nThe news media also have a key role to play in safeguarding the integrity of Canada’s democratic process, he said.\n\n“Never has journalism been under such pressure from those who would masquerade as legitimate but whose strings are pulled by foreign authorities as they use cyberspace to manipulate,” Goodale said.\n\nFinally, social media giants such as Twitter and Facebook have a very important role to play in ensuring “that they are contributing to and not detracting from political discourse,” Goodale said.\n\n“Individually and through the Five Eyes and the G7 we have challenged the social media operators to help us combat such evils as terrorist propaganda, the sexual exploitation of children and human trafficking,” Goodale said. “More and more insidious foreign interference to subvert democracy is being added to the list of harms that these service providers need to help stop.”\n\nMinister of Democratic Institutions, Karina Gould, along with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Prepared...","id":"5FbmWA9nPZOvAKnqMWY4bt","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Ottawa unveils new measures to combat election interference","release_date":"2019-01-30","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5FbmWA9nPZOvAKnqMWY4bt"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9666fe37e3016f2a90eec395f32ddc74be291971","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"National security investigators from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) have arrested and charged a youth in Kingston, Ontario, with a terrorism-related offence, Canada’s national police force said Friday. Police have laid two charges against the youth, whose identity cannot be revealed due to Canada’s Youth Criminal Justice Act because he is a minor. The youth is accused of knowingly facilitating a terrorist activity and counselling another person to \"deliver, place, discharge or detonate an explosive or other lethal device” in a public place “with the intent to cause death or serious bodily injury.\" Police have also detained and questioned a 20-year-old man but have yet to lay charges against him. CBC News identified the man as Hussam Eddin Alzahabi, a Syrian refugee whose family was sponsored to come to Canada from Kuwait in 2017. (listen to the statement by Michael LeSage, a chief superintendent with the RCMP's \"O\" Division) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190125-WIE30 During a press conference Friday, the RCMP said they received a \"credible\" tip from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in late December 2018 about a planned terrorist attack. The investigation, which involved several local and federal law enforcement and security agencies, eventually led to the police raids at two homes in Kingston Thursday. No specific target Police officers carry evidence after raiding a house in Kingston, Ontario, on Thursday Jan. 24, 2019. (Lars Hagberg/THE CANADIAN PRESS) \"There was no specific target identified but there was an attack planned,\" RCMP Superintendent Peter Lambertucci told reporters. Police found trace elements of homemade explosives at one of the residences and had to call in a bomb squad to detonate an explosive substance, Lambertucci said. \"I want to reassure the citizens of the greater Kingston, Ont., area and all Canadians that during the investigation, our primary focus was the safety and protection of the public,\" said Michael LeSage, a chief superintendent with the RCMP's \"O\" Division. Police would not comment on the ideological motivations of the people apprehended or say if they had any ties to foreign elements. Family dumbfounded A home in shown in Kingston, Ont., on Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. The RCMP say they have charged a Kingston youth with terrorism. They have also arrested an adult man but have not charged him with anything at this point. Amin Alzahabi, the father of Hussam Eddin Alzahabi, 20, said Friday his son had been arrested but not charged. (Jim Bronskill/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Earlier Friday, Alzahabi’s father told CBC News he was astounded by the arrest of his 20-year-old son. \"They tell me they search about him about terrorists. I know my son, he didn't think about that. He like Canada. He like the safety in Canada. How could he think about that?\" Amin Alzahabi told CBC News' Philip Ling in an interview from his home Friday morning. \"It's fake news about my son. I trust my son. I know he cannot do anything against any human, humanity. \"They inspected everything from my house. They didn't find anything. I think this is not good.\" No reason to raise terror alert This photo provided by Neil Aird, taken on Jan. 13, 2019 in Kingston, Ontario shows a police surveillance plane. A surveillance plane has been flying over downtown Kingston since early January, and word of the RCMP plane flying overhead might have prompted police to take action in the arrest. (Neil Aird via AP) Public Security Minister Ralph Goodale said there is no reason to bump up Canada’s terrorism threat level, which has remained at “medium” since 2014. “The Government of Canada constantly monitors all potential threats and has robust measures in place to address them,” Goodale said in a statement. “Canadians can be confident that whenever credible information is obtained about a potential threat, the RCMP, CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) and other poli...","duration_ms":213577,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/25g2sg25cfZ6hHZF2PZ9Po"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/25g2sg25cfZ6hHZF2PZ9Po","html_description":"National security investigators from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) have arrested and charged a youth in Kingston, Ontario, with a terrorism-related offence, Canada’s national police force said Friday.\n\nPolice have laid two charges against the youth, whose identity cannot be revealed due to Canada’s Youth Criminal Justice Act because he is a minor.\n\nThe youth is accused of knowingly facilitating a terrorist activity and counselling another person to \"deliver, place, discharge or detonate an explosive or other lethal device” in a public place “with the intent to cause death or serious bodily injury.\"\n\nPolice have also detained and questioned a 20-year-old man but have yet to lay charges against him.\n\nCBC News identified the man as Hussam Eddin Alzahabi, a Syrian refugee whose family was sponsored to come to Canada from Kuwait in 2017.\n\n(listen to the statement by Michael LeSage, a chief superintendent with the RCMP's \"O\" Division)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190125-WIE30\n\nDuring a press conference Friday, the RCMP said they received a \"credible\" tip from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in late December 2018 about a planned terrorist attack.\n\nThe investigation, which involved several local and federal law enforcement and security agencies, eventually led to the police raids at two homes in Kingston Thursday.\nNo specific target\nPolice officers carry evidence after raiding a house in Kingston, Ontario, on Thursday Jan. 24, 2019. (Lars Hagberg/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\n\"There was no specific target identified but there was an attack planned,\" RCMP Superintendent Peter Lambertucci told reporters.\n\nPolice found trace elements of homemade explosives at one of the residences and had to call in a bomb squad to detonate an explosive substance, Lambertucci said.\n\n\"I want to reassure the citizens of the greater Kingston, Ont., area and all Canadians that during the investigation, our primary focus was the safety and protection of the public,\" said Michael LeSage, a chief superintendent with the RCMP's \"O\" Division.\n\nPolice would not comment on the ideological motivations of the people apprehended or say if they had any ties to foreign elements.\nFamily dumbfounded\nA home in shown in Kingston, Ont., on Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. The RCMP say they have charged a Kingston youth with terrorism. They have also arrested an adult man but have not charged him with anything at this point. Amin Alzahabi, the father of Hussam Eddin Alzahabi, 20, said Friday his son had been arrested but not charged. (Jim Bronskill/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nEarlier Friday, Alzahabi’s father told CBC News he was astounded by the arrest of his 20-year-old son.\n\n\"They tell me they search about him about terrorists. I know my son, he didn't think about that. He like Canada. He like the safety in Canada. How could he think about that?\" Amin Alzahabi told CBC News' Philip Ling in an interview from his home Friday morning.\n\n\"It's fake news about my son. I trust my son. I know he cannot do anything against any human, humanity.\n\n\"They inspected everything from my house. They didn't find anything. I think this is not good.\"\nNo reason to raise terror alert\nThis photo provided by Neil Aird, taken on Jan. 13, 2019 in Kingston, Ontario shows a police surveillance plane. A surveillance plane has been flying over downtown Kingston since early January, and word of the RCMP plane flying overhead might have prompted police to take action in the arrest. (Neil Aird via AP)\n\nPublic Security Minister Ralph Goodale said there is no reason to bump up Canada’s terrorism threat level, which has remained at “medium” since 2014.\n\n“The Government of Canada constantly monitors all potential threats and has robust measures in place to address them,” Goodale said in a statement.\n\n“Canadians can be confident that whenever credible information is obtained about a potential threat, the RCMP, CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) and other poli...","id":"25g2sg25cfZ6hHZF2PZ9Po","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian police charge youth with terror-related offence","release_date":"2019-01-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:25g2sg25cfZ6hHZF2PZ9Po"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ba48e8721b54ef1cb94f36d2f484ff36e2b3f63e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada scored high in many categories in a recently released survey of 12 countries comparing attitudes towards attracting highly skilled immigrants. Canada is in the first place when it comes to the education levels of its immigrant population. Nearly two-thirds of Canadian immigrants (65 per cent) have a college degree compared to only third in the U.S. (36 per cent), according to according to the new Pew Research Center report released this week. As of 2015, highly skilled immigrants in Canada numbered 4.4 million, second only to the U.S. which had 14.7 million highly skilled immigrants but with an overall population that is ten times larger than that of Canada. Canada is in the third place when it comes to attitudes towards encouraging the immigration of highly skilled people. Eight-in-ten Canadian adults (84 per cent) support encouraging highly skilled immigration to Canada, compared to 88 per cent in Sweden, 85 per cent in the UK and 78 per cent in the U.S. Feds unveil pilot project to attract skilled immigrants to rural and northern Canada Study co-author and senior researcher Phillip Connor said Canada’s success in attracting highly skilled immigrants can be traced back to the introduction of a largely points-based immigration system with the 1967 Immigration Act. “For example in the 1970s the United States and Canada had about the same level of its immigrant population that was highly educated,” Connor said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. “But come 2010 we see that being very different, about 63 per cent in 2010 are highly educated in Canada versus 47 per cent in the United States.” (click to listen to the full interview with Phillip Connor) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190122-WIE30","duration_ms":388833,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4u9ctadk3rw1gv8zajV5n0"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4u9ctadk3rw1gv8zajV5n0","html_description":"Canada scored high in many categories in a recently released survey of 12 countries comparing attitudes towards attracting highly skilled immigrants.\n\nCanada is in the first place when it comes to the education levels of its immigrant population. Nearly two-thirds of Canadian immigrants (65 per cent) have a college degree compared to only third in the U.S. (36 per cent), according to according to the new Pew Research Center report released this week.\n\nAs of 2015, highly skilled immigrants in Canada numbered 4.4 million, second only to the U.S. which had 14.7 million highly skilled immigrants but with an overall population that is ten times larger than that of Canada.\n\nCanada is in the third place when it comes to attitudes towards encouraging the immigration of highly skilled people. Eight-in-ten Canadian adults (84 per cent) support encouraging highly skilled immigration to Canada, compared to 88 per cent in Sweden, 85 per cent in the UK and 78 per cent in the U.S.\n\n \tFeds unveil pilot project to attract skilled immigrants to rural and northern Canada\n\nStudy co-author and senior researcher Phillip Connor said Canada’s success in attracting highly skilled immigrants can be traced back to the introduction of a largely points-based immigration system with the 1967 Immigration Act.\n\n“For example in the 1970s the United States and Canada had about the same level of its immigrant population that was highly educated,” Connor said in a phone interview with Radio Canada International. “But come 2010 we see that being very different, about 63 per cent in 2010 are highly educated in Canada versus 47 per cent in the United States.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Phillip Connor)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190122-WIE30","id":"4u9ctadk3rw1gv8zajV5n0","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"U.S. study gives Canada top points for attracting highly skilled immigrants","release_date":"2019-01-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4u9ctadk3rw1gv8zajV5n0"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/52228b4a2ed6de5f602d270aaa5f5292899eb757","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada’s opposition leader is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to fire the country’s ambassador in China over comments he made regarding the case of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou to Canadian-Chinese media outlets on Tuesday. Speaking with Canadian Chinese-language media in the Toronto suburb of Markham on Tuesday, John McCallum said Meng, whose arrest in Canada at the request of the United States has led to a bruising diplomatic showdown between Ottawa and Beijing, has a strong case to fight extradition. The chief financial officer of the Chinese telecom giant, has \"quite good arguments on her side,\" McCallum said. \"One, political involvement by comments from Donald Trump in her case. Two, there's an extraterritorial aspect to her case, and three, there's the issue of Iran sanctions which are involved in her case, and Canada does not sign on to these Iran sanctions,” McCallum said in his opening remarks at the press conference. “So I think she has some strong arguments that she can make before a judge.\" ListenEN_Clip_3-20190123-WME30 McCallum’s surprisingly candid remarks especially unusual since Canadian officials almost never comment on ongoing judicial cases for fear of appearing to undermine the jealously guarded judicial independence set off a firestorm in Ottawa. \"If I were Prime Minister, I would fire John McCallum,\" said Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer in an interview with CBC’s Power & Politics. \"If I were Prime Minister, I would fire John McCallum,\" says @AndrewScheer after @HonJohnMcCallum's comments that Huawei executive has 'quite good arguments on her side' #cdnpoli #scheer #MengWanzhou pic.twitter.com/O3YPyQBG4W — Power & Politics (@PnPCBC) January 23, 2019 'A country of the rule of law' When asked to comment on McCallum’s comments on Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sidestepped the question sticking to his earlier message that Canada is “a country of a rule of law.” “We will make sure that the rule of law is properly and fully followed,” Trudeau told reporters during a press conference in La Loche, Saskatchewan. “That of course includes the opportunity for her to mount a strong defence. That is part of our justice system and we are going to apply that justice system in its integrity as all Canadians and indeed people around the world expect us to do as a country.” Tit-for-tat actions Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou has been released on bail and is living in one of her two mansions in Vancouver. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press/file) Meng, who was arrested in Vancouver in December while changing planes, is wanted in the U.S. on charges of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran. The 46-year-old daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei was released on bail by a Canadian court to await the results of extradition proceedings. Meng’s case has drawn international attention and triggered a diplomatic row between Canada and China. Days after Meng’s arrest, Chinese authorities detained Michael Kovrig, who took a leave of absence from Global Affairs Canada to work as the North East Asia analyst for the non-governmental think tank International Crisis Group, and Michael Spavor, a China-based Canadian entrepreneur. Chinese officials say Canadians Michael Kovrig, right, and Michael Spavor were arrested for undermining Chinese 'national security,' while Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was arrested 'illegally' in Canada upon U.S. request (Associated Press/ International Crisis Group/Canadian Press) Then on Jan. 14, a Chinese court sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial of a drug-smuggling case. Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, 36, had appealed his original 15-year sentence. Schellenberg death sentence was seen by many in Canada as another attempt by Beijing to apply pressure on Ottawa following Meng’s arrest. U.S. to make formal extradition request On Tuesday, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S. David MacNaughton,","duration_ms":91925,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/61JzWGt2VEU0ULN4Y79hN2"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/61JzWGt2VEU0ULN4Y79hN2","html_description":"Canada’s opposition leader is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to fire the country’s ambassador in China over comments he made regarding the case of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou to Canadian-Chinese media outlets on Tuesday.\n\nSpeaking with Canadian Chinese-language media in the Toronto suburb of Markham on Tuesday, John McCallum said Meng, whose arrest in Canada at the request of the United States has led to a bruising diplomatic showdown between Ottawa and Beijing, has a strong case to fight extradition.\n\nThe chief financial officer of the Chinese telecom giant, has \"quite good arguments on her side,\" McCallum said.\n\n\"One, political involvement by comments from Donald Trump in her case. Two, there's an extraterritorial aspect to her case, and three, there's the issue of Iran sanctions which are involved in her case, and Canada does not sign on to these Iran sanctions,” McCallum said in his opening remarks at the press conference. “So I think she has some strong arguments that she can make before a judge.\"\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190123-WME30\n\nMcCallum’s surprisingly candid remarks especially unusual since Canadian officials almost never comment on ongoing judicial cases for fear of appearing to undermine the jealously guarded judicial independence set off a firestorm in Ottawa.\n\n\"If I were Prime Minister, I would fire John McCallum,\" said Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer in an interview with CBC’s Power & Politics.\n\"If I were Prime Minister, I would fire John McCallum,\" says @AndrewScheer after @HonJohnMcCallum's comments that Huawei executive has 'quite good arguments on her side' #cdnpoli #scheer #MengWanzhou pic.twitter.com/O3YPyQBG4W\n\n— Power & Politics (@PnPCBC) January 23, 2019\n\n'A country of the rule of law'\nWhen asked to comment on McCallum’s comments on Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sidestepped the question sticking to his earlier message that Canada is “a country of a rule of law.”\n\n“We will make sure that the rule of law is properly and fully followed,” Trudeau told reporters during a press conference in La Loche, Saskatchewan. “That of course includes the opportunity for her to mount a strong defence. That is part of our justice system and we are going to apply that justice system in its integrity as all Canadians and indeed people around the world expect us to do as a country.”\nTit-for-tat actions\nHuawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou has been released on bail and is living in one of her two mansions in Vancouver. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press/file)\n\nMeng, who was arrested in Vancouver in December while changing planes, is wanted in the U.S. on charges of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran.\n\nThe 46-year-old daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei was released on bail by a Canadian court to await the results of extradition proceedings.\n\nMeng’s case has drawn international attention and triggered a diplomatic row between Canada and China.\n\nDays after Meng’s arrest, Chinese authorities detained Michael Kovrig, who took a leave of absence from Global Affairs Canada to work as the North East Asia analyst for the non-governmental think tank International Crisis Group, and Michael Spavor, a China-based Canadian entrepreneur.\n\nChinese officials say Canadians Michael Kovrig, right, and Michael Spavor were arrested for undermining Chinese 'national security,' while Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was arrested 'illegally' in Canada upon U.S. request (Associated Press/ International Crisis Group/Canadian Press)\n\nThen on Jan. 14, a Chinese court sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial of a drug-smuggling case. Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, 36, had appealed his original 15-year sentence.\n\nSchellenberg death sentence was seen by many in Canada as another attempt by Beijing to apply pressure on Ottawa following Meng’s arrest.\nU.S. to make formal extradition request\nOn Tuesday, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S. David MacNaughton,","id":"61JzWGt2VEU0ULN4Y79hN2","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Huawei executive has strong defence to fight extradition to U.S., says envoy","release_date":"2019-01-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:61JzWGt2VEU0ULN4Y79hN2"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/667258a004188c305191c4e6411f2f5275cb5479","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eat vegetables and fruits, whole grain foods and protein foods often, cut out processed meats and foods that contain mostly saturated fat and plenty of sugar. Drink plenty of water. Cook at home and enjoy your meals with family and friends. That in a nutshell is the federal government’s advice to Canadians for developing healthy eating patterns and maintaining their health. Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor unveiled Canada's new food guide on Tuesday at a popular market in Montreal. “It aims to change the way Canadians see food and it begins with a simple idea that eating should be a pleasure,” Petitpas Taylor said. “Canada’s Food Guide reflects an important concept: healthy eating is more than just the food that you eat.” ListenEN_Clip_3-20190122-WME30 The guide, which was first introduced during WWII to help the country cope with wartime rations, gives Canadians the tools they need to eat healthy in the age of smartphones and social media, Petitpas Taylor said. “It puts more focus on what, when and how we eat and less on food groups and servings,” Petitpas Taylor said. Practical approach to nutrition (Source: Health Canada) Heart & Stroke Foundation applauded Health Canada for its work on the revised Food Guide. The new guide takes a practical approach to nutrition that will make healthy eating easier, simpler and even more fun, with an emphasis on consuming whole foods, cooking at home, and enjoying meals together, said Yves Savoie, CEO of Heart & Stroke. “With our deep commitment to the health of Canadians and our understanding of the challenges faced by people who want to live healthier lives, we were proud to collaborate with Health Canada on the direction and content of the new food guide,” Savoie said. “It was designed to make preparing and sharing healthy food a pleasure, while improving our health.” No consumption level recommendations Bill Jeffery, editor of Food for Life Report, said while the new food guide is a step in the right direction, it “seems unwisely imprecise and too fearful of industry conflict in dropping nearly all quantitative recommendations for various foods.” “Failing to specify optimum consumption levels for things like whole grains (100-150 grams per day) and nuts (20 grams per day)—which would prevent thousands of deaths each—doesn’t seem like a good way to steer Canadians to get the right amounts,” Jeffery said in statement. “By contrast, food labels have long set precise but too high daily targets for sugar (100 gram of total sugar instead of 25-50 grams of free sugars) and sodium (2,300 mg instead of 1,500 mg), even higher than Health Canada itself recommends.” 'A rigorous scientific process' Eating in accordance with the new Food Guide can help Canadians meet nutrient needs, reduce their risk of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer, and promote overall health and well-being, Health Canada officials said. Health Canada says it followed a rigorous scientific process to review the best available evidence. It is the first food guide in decades that has been developed without formal consultations or input from the various agricultural and food industry groups, officials said. “The safeguards against industry interference did not prevent them from lobbying the colleagues and bosses of the Food Guide scientists,” Jeffery said. “For instance, according to the Lobbyist Registry, in 2018 alone, the dairy, grocery, cattle, edible oil, chicken, soft drink, meat, and soy industries met with the Minister or her staff while she supervised plans for a national food strategy, front-of-pack nutrition labelling, and the new Food Guide.” Focus on plant-based foods The new Food Guide urges Canadians to include plenty of vegetables and fruits in their meals and snacks.(Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images) In developing its recommendations, Health Canada considered only high-quality scientific reports from...","duration_ms":197120,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0LSlN6cjX0RSTtqqw7EP9o"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0LSlN6cjX0RSTtqqw7EP9o","html_description":"Eat vegetables and fruits, whole grain foods and protein foods often, cut out processed meats and foods that contain mostly saturated fat and plenty of sugar. Drink plenty of water. Cook at home and enjoy your meals with family and friends.\n\nThat in a nutshell is the federal government’s advice to Canadians for developing healthy eating patterns and maintaining their health.\n\nHealth Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor unveiled Canada's new food guide on Tuesday at a popular market in Montreal.\n\n“It aims to change the way Canadians see food and it begins with a simple idea that eating should be a pleasure,” Petitpas Taylor said. “Canada’s Food Guide reflects an important concept: healthy eating is more than just the food that you eat.”\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190122-WME30\n\nThe guide, which was first introduced during WWII to help the country cope with wartime rations, gives Canadians the tools they need to eat healthy in the age of smartphones and social media, Petitpas Taylor said.\n\n“It puts more focus on what, when and how we eat and less on food groups and servings,” Petitpas Taylor said.\nPractical approach to nutrition\n(Source: Health Canada)\n\nHeart & Stroke Foundation applauded Health Canada for its work on the revised Food Guide. The new guide takes a practical approach to nutrition that will make healthy eating easier, simpler and even more fun, with an emphasis on consuming whole foods, cooking at home, and enjoying meals together, said Yves Savoie, CEO of Heart & Stroke.\n\n“With our deep commitment to the health of Canadians and our understanding of the challenges faced by people who want to live healthier lives, we were proud to collaborate with Health Canada on the direction and content of the new food guide,” Savoie said. “It was designed to make preparing and sharing healthy food a pleasure, while improving our health.”\nNo consumption level recommendations\nBill Jeffery, editor of Food for Life Report, said while the new food guide is a step in the right direction, it “seems unwisely imprecise and too fearful of industry conflict in dropping nearly all quantitative recommendations for various foods.”\n\n“Failing to specify optimum consumption levels for things like whole grains (100-150 grams per day) and nuts (20 grams per day)—which would prevent thousands of deaths each—doesn’t seem like a good way to steer Canadians to get the right amounts,” Jeffery said in statement.\n\n“By contrast, food labels have long set precise but too high daily targets for sugar (100 gram of total sugar instead of 25-50 grams of free sugars) and sodium (2,300 mg instead of 1,500 mg), even higher than Health Canada itself recommends.”\n'A rigorous scientific process'\nEating in accordance with the new Food Guide can help Canadians meet nutrient needs, reduce their risk of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer, and promote overall health and well-being, Health Canada officials said.\n\nHealth Canada says it followed a rigorous scientific process to review the best available evidence.\n\nIt is the first food guide in decades that has been developed without formal consultations or input from the various agricultural and food industry groups, officials said.\n\n“The safeguards against industry interference did not prevent them from lobbying the colleagues and bosses of the Food Guide scientists,” Jeffery said.\n\n“For instance, according to the Lobbyist Registry, in 2018 alone, the dairy, grocery, cattle, edible oil, chicken, soft drink, meat, and soy industries met with the Minister or her staff while she supervised plans for a national food strategy, front-of-pack nutrition labelling, and the new Food Guide.”\nFocus on plant-based foods\nThe new Food Guide urges Canadians to include plenty of vegetables and fruits in their meals and snacks.(Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images)\n\nIn developing its recommendations, Health Canada considered only high-quality scientific reports from...","id":"0LSlN6cjX0RSTtqqw7EP9o","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada’s new food guide stresses importance of eating plant-based foods","release_date":"2019-01-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0LSlN6cjX0RSTtqqw7EP9o"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f3a504bbf179ba5032e482aca2e224b2b20f8abd","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"With the world increasingly in turmoil – politically, economically and environmentally – Canada needs to remain an oasis of hope, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Sunday at the opening of a two-day caucus retreat for Liberal MPs on Parliament Hill. “People across the country — and really, around the world — are anxious about what they see happening on the news, and in their communities,” Trudeau told his Liberal troops. Advances in automation and artificial intelligence are threatening once stable jobs, he said. Climate change is an increasingly dire threat, with floods and fires “destroying whole towns at a blistering pace.” “The world's two largest economies are at odds, and our founding European nations are going through unprecedented political turmoil,” Trudeau said, referring to the ongoing trade war between China and the U.S., and political crisis in Britain over Brexit, as well as “yellow vest” protests in France. “But we have to stay focused. We owe it to Canadians.” ListenEN_Interview_3-20190121-WIE30 He took the opportunity to tout the Liberal record, and slam the Conservatives at the same time. “Our unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in over 40 years, giving people the chance to get out of poverty and start building a new life for themselves,” Trudeau said to applause from party faithful. More than 800,000 jobs have been created since the Liberals came to power in October of 2015, he said. “Make no mistake: The Conservatives pretend to be 'for the people,' but that couldn't be further from the truth. This is still very much the party of Stephen Harper,” Trudeau said, referring to his Conservative predecessor. Trudeau used Sunday's speech to sharpen what will be his core campaign message when Canadians are expected to go the polls in October in the next federal election. The Liberals will run on the “hopeful vision of Canada once again,” he said. Trudeau took several partisan shots at the Conservatives, saying they have no plan for tackling climate change and the economy while citing Liberal gains in lowering taxes and unemployment. Throughout his eight-minute speech Trudeau never mentioned the left-of-centre New Democratic Party, hinting that the Liberals are gearing up for a two-way race with Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives and do not consider the NDP and its new leader Jagmeet Singh to be a serious threat. With files from The Canadian Press","duration_ms":84428,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2nwnURHE1MqZ75302PK82T"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2nwnURHE1MqZ75302PK82T","html_description":"With the world increasingly in turmoil – politically, economically and environmentally – Canada needs to remain an oasis of hope, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Sunday at the opening of a two-day caucus retreat for Liberal MPs on Parliament Hill.\n\n“People across the country — and really, around the world — are anxious about what they see happening on the news, and in their communities,” Trudeau told his Liberal troops.\n\nAdvances in automation and artificial intelligence are threatening once stable jobs, he said.\n\nClimate change is an increasingly dire threat, with floods and fires “destroying whole towns at a blistering pace.”\n\n“The world's two largest economies are at odds, and our founding European nations are going through unprecedented political turmoil,” Trudeau said, referring to the ongoing trade war between China and the U.S., and political crisis in Britain over Brexit, as well as “yellow vest” protests in France.\n\n“But we have to stay focused. We owe it to Canadians.”\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190121-WIE30\n\nHe took the opportunity to tout the Liberal record, and slam the Conservatives at the same time.\n\n“Our unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in over 40 years, giving people the chance to get out of poverty and start building a new life for themselves,” Trudeau said to applause from party faithful.\n\nMore than 800,000 jobs have been created since the Liberals came to power in October of 2015, he said.\n\n“Make no mistake: The Conservatives pretend to be 'for the people,' but that couldn't be further from the truth. This is still very much the party of Stephen Harper,” Trudeau said, referring to his Conservative predecessor.\n\nTrudeau used Sunday's speech to sharpen what will be his core campaign message when Canadians are expected to go the polls in October in the next federal election.\n\nThe Liberals will run on the “hopeful vision of Canada once again,” he said.\n\nTrudeau took several partisan shots at the Conservatives, saying they have no plan for tackling climate change and the economy while citing Liberal gains in lowering taxes and unemployment.\n\nThroughout his eight-minute speech Trudeau never mentioned the left-of-centre New Democratic Party, hinting that the Liberals are gearing up for a two-way race with Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives and do not consider the NDP and its new leader Jagmeet Singh to be a serious threat.\n\nWith files from The Canadian Press","id":"2nwnURHE1MqZ75302PK82T","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Trudeau urges Liberals to campaign on ‘hopeful’ vision of Canada","release_date":"2019-01-21","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2nwnURHE1MqZ75302PK82T"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b6f094f7d550bc38bbb7546804a7fc7d1b03e22b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A Quebec woman who went missing in Burkina Faso in mid-December is in all likelihood still alive, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday at the conclusion of a cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Quebec. Edith Blais, 34, a native of Sherbrooke, and her Italian friend Luca Tacchetto, 30, have been missing since Dec. 15 and are believed to have been kidnapped. The pair who were travelling in a car were last heard from in the western city of Bobo-Dioulasso and never made it to capital Ouagadougou. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau, who is also the federal member of parliament for Sherbrooke, met with Blais’ mother and sister on the sidelines of the cabinet retreat on Friday morning. “First of all our hearts go out to the family of Edith Blais and to the entire community. This is something that has people around here and indeed across the country preoccupied,” Trudeau said. “The government of Canada takes extremely seriously our responsibility to keep Canadians safe wherever they are and our engagement in the region diplomatically with our partners, our continued efforts to find out more is all part of what we have reassured the family we are continuing to do.” ListenEN_Clip_3-20190118-WME30 Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to questions during a news conference following a cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Que. on Friday, January 18, 2019. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Canadian government officials in Burkina Faso are in contact with local authorities to gather additional information, Global Affairs Canada spokesperson Brendan Sutton said in an email. He would not comment on reports that Blais and Tacchetto have been kidnapped. “We will not comment on or release any information which may compromise ongoing efforts or endanger the safety of Canadians,” Sutton said. A Canadian geologist killed Kirk Woodman is seen in this undated handout photo from his Linkedin page. Canadian officials are condemning the killers of a Canadian mining company executive whose bullet-riddled body has been found in Burkina Faso. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Linkedin) Trudeau’s comments came two days after a Canadian man reportedly abducted by jihadists in northern Burkina Faso was found dead. Kirk Woodman was kidnapped by a jihadist group that raided a mining operation of Vancouver-based Progress Mineral Mining Company near the country’s restive border with Niger and Mali on Tuesday night, according to Burkinabe security officials. Canada ‘appalled’ by death of Canadian kidnapped in Burkina Faso His bullet-riddled body was discovered Wednesday by locals in Oudalan province about 100 kilometres from the site of the abduction closer to the Mali border, Radio-Canada reported.","duration_ms":39184,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/11BeZlCjZLoqOZWMPVzWee"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/11BeZlCjZLoqOZWMPVzWee","html_description":"A Quebec woman who went missing in Burkina Faso in mid-December is in all likelihood still alive, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday at the conclusion of a cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Quebec.\n\nEdith Blais, 34, a native of Sherbrooke, and her Italian friend Luca Tacchetto, 30, have been missing since Dec. 15 and are believed to have been kidnapped.\n\nThe pair who were travelling in a car were last heard from in the western city of Bobo-Dioulasso and never made it to capital Ouagadougou.\n\nForeign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau, who is also the federal member of parliament for Sherbrooke, met with Blais’ mother and sister on the sidelines of the cabinet retreat on Friday morning.\n\n“First of all our hearts go out to the family of Edith Blais and to the entire community. This is something that has people around here and indeed across the country preoccupied,” Trudeau said.\n\n“The government of Canada takes extremely seriously our responsibility to keep Canadians safe wherever they are and our engagement in the region diplomatically with our partners, our continued efforts to find out more is all part of what we have reassured the family we are continuing to do.”\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190118-WME30\n\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to questions during a news conference following a cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Que. on Friday, January 18, 2019. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nCanadian government officials in Burkina Faso are in contact with local authorities to gather additional information, Global Affairs Canada spokesperson Brendan Sutton said in an email.\n\nHe would not comment on reports that Blais and Tacchetto have been kidnapped.\n\n“We will not comment on or release any information which may compromise ongoing efforts or endanger the safety of Canadians,” Sutton said.\nA Canadian geologist killed\nKirk Woodman is seen in this undated handout photo from his Linkedin page. Canadian officials are condemning the killers of a Canadian mining company executive whose bullet-riddled body has been found in Burkina Faso. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Linkedin)\n\nTrudeau’s comments came two days after a Canadian man reportedly abducted by jihadists in northern Burkina Faso was found dead.\n\nKirk Woodman was kidnapped by a jihadist group that raided a mining operation of Vancouver-based Progress Mineral Mining Company near the country’s restive border with Niger and Mali on Tuesday night, according to Burkinabe security officials.\n\n \tCanada ‘appalled’ by death of Canadian kidnapped in Burkina Faso\n\nHis bullet-riddled body was discovered Wednesday by locals in Oudalan province about 100 kilometres from the site of the abduction closer to the Mali border, Radio-Canada reported.","id":"11BeZlCjZLoqOZWMPVzWee","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian missing in Burkina Faso is still alive, says Trudeau","release_date":"2019-01-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:11BeZlCjZLoqOZWMPVzWee"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8dcf079ea95faf1651f78917c4e64c81e2c821c8","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"HMCS Ville de Québec is finally heading home after having spent nearly six months at sea in support of NATO operations in the Mediterranean and Northern Atlantic. The Canadian frigate deployed from its home port of Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 18, 2018 as Canada’s naval contingent to Operation REASSURANCE, said the ship’s captain Commander Scott Robinson in an interview from the mid-Atlantic. (click to listen to the full interview with Commander Scott Robinson) ListenEN_Interview_3-20190116-WIE30 The Halifax-class frigate with Canada’s new CH-148 Cyclone helicopter on board joined Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) in the Mediterranean Sea. In fact this was the first deployment for the CH-148 Cyclone helicopter, which officially replaced Canada’s ageing CH-124 Sea King helicopters in 2018, said Maj. Erik Weigelin, air officer at HMCS Ville de Québec. (click to listen to the full interview with Maj. Erik Weigelin) ListenEN_Clip_3-20190116-WME30 Members of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) VILLE DE QUEBEC’s deck department receive Ship Without Air Detachment (SWOAD) training from the Helicopter Air Detachment while sailing in the Mediterranean Sea during Operation REASSURANCE on January 4, 2018.(Master Cpl. Andre Maillet, MARPAC Imaging Services) During the 189-day deployment, HMCS Ville de Québec conducted patrols across the Western, Central and Eastern Mediterranean. The frigate also joined 63 other NATO and allied warships for Exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE 18 in the North and Norwegian Seas in what was the largest NATO exercise since the end of Cold War, Robinson said. NATO's Arctic dilemma: Two visions of the Arctic collide as NATO and Russia flex muscles “Actually we had the privilege of being the force antisubmarine warfare commander,” Robinson said. “We looked after all that aspect of that area of warfare for countering ‘enemy’ submarines, which was quite a big responsibility.” Showcasing navy's prowess Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) VILLE DE QUEBEC’s CH-148 Cyclone helicopter, Avalanche, fires flares while flying over the Mediterranean Sea during Operation REASSURANCE on December 27, 2018.(Master Cpl. Andre Maillet/MARPAC Imaging Services) HMCS Ville de Québec’s voyage showcases a very successful procurement development for the modernization of the Royal Canadian Navy and should be celebrated, said Canadian defence expert Rob Huebert. “Ville de Québec was part of the midlife modernization program that came under budget and was actually ahead of time,” Huebert said. The deployment of HMCS Ville de Québec to participate in Trident Juncture also showed that the Canadian government is once again recommitting to these kinds of exercises in the North Atlantic, Huebert said. “These NATO exercises quite frankly are designed to respond to an increasingly aggressive Russia,” Hueber said. 'A great opportunity' Over the course of the deployment, HMCS Ville de Québec conducted operational ports of call in 12 countries, Robinson said. “It’s a great opportunity for the crew to see a part of the world that they would not have probably seen on their own,” Robinson said. In Tunisia, the crew got to see ancient Carthage, in Algeria, they got to visit Roman ruins near the capital Algiers, and in Egypt, they got a chance to go to Giza to visit the pyramids, Robinson said. And just before Christmas, when the frigate made a stop in Haifa, Israel, most of the crew got a chance to visit Jerusalem, he said. But now the crew is now anxiously awaiting their return home to see families and get some rest before the next deployment, Robinson said. Weather permitting HMCS Ville de Québec is expected to return to Halifax on Jan. 21.","duration_ms":798407,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3h0gIT9WAaapQTscUo4w5P"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3h0gIT9WAaapQTscUo4w5P","html_description":"HMCS Ville de Québec is finally heading home after having spent nearly six months at sea in support of NATO operations in the Mediterranean and Northern Atlantic.\n\nThe Canadian frigate deployed from its home port of Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 18, 2018 as Canada’s naval contingent to Operation REASSURANCE, said the ship’s captain Commander Scott Robinson in an interview from the mid-Atlantic.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Commander Scott Robinson)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20190116-WIE30\n\nThe Halifax-class frigate with Canada’s new CH-148 Cyclone helicopter on board joined Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) in the Mediterranean Sea.\n\nIn fact this was the first deployment for the CH-148 Cyclone helicopter, which officially replaced Canada’s ageing CH-124 Sea King helicopters in 2018, said Maj. Erik Weigelin, air officer at HMCS Ville de Québec.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Maj. Erik Weigelin)\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20190116-WME30\n\nMembers of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) VILLE DE QUEBEC’s deck department receive Ship Without Air Detachment (SWOAD) training from the Helicopter Air Detachment while sailing in the Mediterranean Sea during Operation REASSURANCE on January 4, 2018.(Master Cpl. Andre Maillet, MARPAC Imaging Services)\n\nDuring the 189-day deployment, HMCS Ville de Québec conducted patrols across the Western, Central and Eastern Mediterranean.\n\nThe frigate also joined 63 other NATO and allied warships for Exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE 18 in the North and Norwegian Seas in what was the largest NATO exercise since the end of Cold War, Robinson said.\n\n \tNATO's Arctic dilemma: Two visions of the Arctic collide as NATO and Russia flex muscles\n\n“Actually we had the privilege of being the force antisubmarine warfare commander,” Robinson said. “We looked after all that aspect of that area of warfare for countering ‘enemy’ submarines, which was quite a big responsibility.”\nShowcasing navy's prowess\nHer Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) VILLE DE QUEBEC’s CH-148 Cyclone helicopter, Avalanche, fires flares while flying over the Mediterranean Sea during Operation REASSURANCE on December 27, 2018.(Master Cpl. Andre Maillet/MARPAC Imaging Services)\n\nHMCS Ville de Québec’s voyage showcases a very successful procurement development for the modernization of the Royal Canadian Navy and should be celebrated, said Canadian defence expert Rob Huebert.\n\n“Ville de Québec was part of the midlife modernization program that came under budget and was actually ahead of time,” Huebert said.\n\nThe deployment of HMCS Ville de Québec to participate in Trident Juncture also showed that the Canadian government is once again recommitting to these kinds of exercises in the North Atlantic, Huebert said.\n\n“These NATO exercises quite frankly are designed to respond to an increasingly aggressive Russia,” Hueber said.\n'A great opportunity'\nOver the course of the deployment, HMCS Ville de Québec conducted operational ports of call in 12 countries, Robinson said.\n\n“It’s a great opportunity for the crew to see a part of the world that they would not have probably seen on their own,” Robinson said.\n\nIn Tunisia, the crew got to see ancient Carthage, in Algeria, they got to visit Roman ruins near the capital Algiers, and in Egypt, they got a chance to go to Giza to visit the pyramids, Robinson said.\n\nAnd just before Christmas, when the frigate made a stop in Haifa, Israel, most of the crew got a chance to visit Jerusalem, he said.\n\nBut now the crew is now anxiously awaiting their return home to see families and get some rest before the next deployment, Robinson said.\n\nWeather permitting HMCS Ville de Québec is expected to return to Halifax on Jan. 21.","id":"3h0gIT9WAaapQTscUo4w5P","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian frigate heading home after 6-month deployment","release_date":"2019-01-16","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3h0gIT9WAaapQTscUo4w5P"}],"limit":50,"next":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/77yVw7fHEoGMHMNLdKO3tS/episodes?offset=50&limit=50&market=US","offset":0,"previous":null,"total":89},"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/show/77yVw7fHEoGMHMNLdKO3tS"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/77yVw7fHEoGMHMNLdKO3tS","id":"77yVw7fHEoGMHMNLdKO3tS","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/320ef1ae37af706e8082facc14b5ae52690c0bd5","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0ff8e69ce92e84d207573f15531f3616965138aa","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0f1561d11cc812f11f6686114607a2ae2cca1194","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"languages":["en"],"media_type":"audio","name":"RCI | English : Reports","publisher":"RCI | English","total_episodes":89,"type":"show","uri":"spotify:show:77yVw7fHEoGMHMNLdKO3tS"};