The Safety Pro Podcast

Blaine J. Hoffmann, MS OSHM

The SafetyPro Podcast, where I discuss OSHA workplace safety topics, including OSHA Industrial safety, OSHA Construction safety, OSHA VPP, ANSI, NIOSH, Safety Management best practices and more. You get real, actionable tips and tricks as well as downloadable tools listeners can use right away! No platitudes. No guru speak. No 3-minute sage-talk.

000: Intro to The SafetyPro Podcast
Trailer 4 min 29 sec

All Episodes

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! This is the audio version of the video recorded for the SafetyPro Podcast Community site. I break down several arguments against the vaccine ETS. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message/live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Nov 16

38 min 41 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Lori Frederic joins us once again to talk about what's going on with her health right now, how we can rethink hot/cold therapy, and the extremely useful content you can find over at her new website. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message/live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Oct 21

45 min 22 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk to Marten Stenfors, the CEO and Founder of Phenium, an Environmental, Health, and Food Safety technology company (no affiliation), about safety and compliance in the food service industry. What is fascinating about our conversation is that we can clearly see a direct connection between workplace safety and food safety. Furthermore, we see the need for a strong workplace culture if we want to expect strong safety performance. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message, and even live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Oct 18

51 min 40 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! From Gallup As the U.S. and its workplaces start to eye post-pandemic normality, there is an urgent need for organizations to press forward with the progress made in employee wellbeing during the COVID-19 era. That's because after increasing to near 50% during the early months of the pandemic, the percentage of employees who strongly agree that their organization cares about their wellbeing has eroded, losing 13 percentage points since last spring. Here are 10 critically important best practices for enhancing employee wellbeing in 2021 and beyond. Maintain a strong and sustained leadership voice regarding the importance of wellbeing. Demonstrate a shared and consistent definition of what is meant by "wellbeing." Keep the line of communication constantly open. Lead by example. Include family members. Re-promote wellbeing programs and offerings. Scientifically evaluate the effectiveness of wellbeing programs. Leverage employee engagement to drive employee wellbeing. Develop a network of local wellbeing coaches and champions who serve as resources to collect and share best practices. Aim strengths at wellbeing. Posted with permission from Gallup Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message, and even live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Oct 12

26 min 19 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk with our good friend Drew Hinton about the ASSP Safety 2021 Conference - his takeaways and insight. Buckle up! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message, and even live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Sep 27

47 min 52 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk to Johnathon Furtado, a safety professional and Safety Pro Podcast Community member about unnecessary risk. He shares his incredible story of near-tragedy and how it inspired him to pursue a career in the safety field. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message, and even live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Sep 20

39 min 15 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk about how OSHA actually makes standards and emergency temporary standards (ETS). Check out this link for detailed info as well. Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, direct message, and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Sep 16

40 min 46 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk about some cool online tools you can use to make those remote training sessions and meetings a little more bearable. I also throw in a few tried and true games that require no technology all aimed at making training stick. Discussed in this episode (no affiliation): https://kahoot.com/business-u/ https://www.polleverywhere.com https://wheelofnames.com Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Sep 3

25 min 29 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Part three in the series on rethinking [safety] culture. In this episode, I discuss how standard work can help build a strong culture in the workplace. Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Aug 27

31 min 59 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I discuss how you can set the right expectations for workers that will integrate well into the business and drive [safety] culture. Check it out! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Aug 11

21 min 26 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Episode Intro by Abraham Gibson There is a lot of talk about safety culture, which is centered around our frustration at achieving a "safety" culture. So why not take another approach? Why not look through the business lens instead of our safety profession lens? Hear me out as I dive into this approach during this episode. Please listen and share with others. Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Jun 18

23 min 51 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk to my good friend Shawn Rafferty. He is the host of the Security Pro Podcast and the founder of SPR Group, LLC. We will focus on domestic travel safety - but not in a sense most think about; we get into a lot here, so take notes! BONUS: Shawn tells me the harrowing story of how he was stranded in Iraq during the war and had to get himself out of the country with no support from anyone! To see the full-length video interview, become a premium SafetyPro Community member. Premium members get access to exclusive content like video courses, downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Jun 4

1 hr 1 min

Episode intro by Jason Lucas from The Safety Justice League Podcast Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, Lori Frederic, the Movement Ninja from Balance Biomechanics, shares her expertise about kinesiology tape and how you might use it in your first aid kits. Check out Lori's YouTube channel for more info on this tape. To see the full-length video interview, become a premium SafetyPro Community member. You will also get access to premium content like video courses, downloads, and you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today!

May 11

53 min 8 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk to Grant Morgan, CEO/Co-Founder of RZero. We discuss the use of UVC light to sanitize workspaces most would not consider.  Please listen and share this episode with others. To see the full-length video interview, become a premium SafetyPro Community member. You will also get access to premium content like video courses, downloads, you can direct message and live chat with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Apr 28

49 min 31 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I will break down the top 10 biases that will absolutely wreck your incident investigations! Overconfidence Confirmation Bias Hindsight Bias Stereotyping Choice-supportive bias Bandwagon effect Blind-spot bias Fundamental attribution error Linear causality Lack of Systems View Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like video courses, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape**

Apr 19

26 min 23 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Jason Maldonado joins me to discuss why as Safety Pros we need to improve our writing skills! Check out Jason's website to get access to his own writing course and get started improving your writing skills today! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Mar 29

51 min 1 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Do you know the eight wastes in business? If so, have you made the connection to workplace safety? If not, I have! Here are the eight wastes: Transportation Inventory Motion People Waiting Over-Production Over-Processing Defects  Let's get into how you, the safety pro should learn these eight wastes and how they could increase risk. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Mar 24

32 min 30 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Remote worker safety - are you approaching this topic as you would if employees were still in the office? Let's talk about some tips that can help you ensure your remote workers are safe and healthy! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Mar 13

27 min 12 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Small and wearable electronic devices used in workplaces rely on a power source that stores a high amount of energy in a small space (i.e., high energy density). Lithium cells provide sustained power and often have the capability to recharge. When designed, manufactured, and used properly, lithium batteries are a safe, high energy density power source for devices in the workplace. While lithium batteries are normally safe, they may cause injury if they have design defects, are made of low-quality materials, are assembled incorrectly, are used or recharged improperly, or are damaged. RESOURCES: https://www.cpsc.gov/th/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Batteries https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/High_Energy_Density_Batteries_Status_Report_2_12_18.pdf?UksG80UJqGY0q4pfVBkbCuUQ5sNHqtwO https://www.energy.gov/eere/articles/how-does-lithium-ion-battery-work https://www.cpsc.gov/th/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Batteries Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Feb 26

23 min 31 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! The OSHA guidance is intended to inform employers and workers in most workplace settings outside of healthcare to help them identify risks of being exposed to and/or contracting COVID-19 at work and to help them determine appropriate control measures to implement. Separate guidance is applicable to healthcare (CDC guidance) and emergency response (CDC guidance) settings. OSHA has additional industry-specific guidance. This guidance contains recommendations as well as descriptions of mandatory safety and health standards. The recommendations are advisory in nature, informational in content, and are intended to assist employers in providing a safe and healthful workplace. **Please see the OSHA website for these guidelines as information may have changed since the recording of this podcast episode.** Follow this link for information on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Feb 12

39 min

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I talk about the five things safety professionals need to focus on in 2021 to improve the employee experience by using workplace safety, something we are all good at! The hiring process The onboarding process Performance expectations Employee development Employee well-being Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Jan 29

23 min 39 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Jason Patton, VP at Fire Dept. Coffee and creator of Fire Department Chronicles shares his story and brings humor to 1st aid/CPR and emergency response training! Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Jan 25

41 min 34 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! After having a private business providing sports massage therapy and strength coaching, Lori wanted to raise her game and reach more people. She quickly found a love and respect for the hard-working men and women that make this first-world country thrive. Her biomechanics and movement knowledge complement the world of safety & health to provide an unconventional approach to injury prevention. When Lori isn’t inspiring blue-collar badasses, she’s hanging with her husband, 3 kids, and 3 dogs. Lori is constantly disrupting, innovating, and inspiring as she speaks across the country to safety and management audiences. You can also catch her on the SafetyPro Community page as well! Please visit www.balancebio.com or www.themovementninja.com/safetypro to subscribe for a free stretch & flex course! **PREMIUM MEMBERS: All SafetyPro Podcast Community Premium Members get a BONUS - a code to unlock Lori's Low Back Pain - Triage course for FREE! A $99.00 value** To get access to premium content like bonus materials, downloads, live chats with the Safety Pro (coming soon) - become a PREMIUM member! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Jan 18

46 min 45 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! The science and technology around connected devices/software and how we interact with them regarding workplace safety is continuing to advance. At what point do wearables, connected devices and software become intrusive?  In this episode I run down a list of really cool devices/wearables as well as emerging technology that has real safety and health benefits, but may not be socially acceptable. At least not yet. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Become a PREMIUM member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Jan 14

23 min 4 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! The COVID-19 pandemic has completely changed the way we view safety and health in the workplace. Especially the protocols that businesses have in place. Whether it's following social distancing measures, providing personal protective equipment (PPE), or conducting more rigorous cleaning and sanitization, businesses have made safety investments as a result. To understand employees' and business leaders' concerns regarding COVID-19 safety protocols in the workplace at healthcare, manufacturing, retail, and transportation/warehousing businesses, Stericycle conducted a survey of 1,000 U.S. employees who currently work on-site as well as 450 U.S. business leaders at companies with more than 100 employees. The Workplace Safety Survey highlights the perceptions that employees and business leaders have on COVID-19 safety investments and protocols, corporate responsibility, and concerns about employee safety. The following top five themes come to mind. COVID-19 Workplace Safety Investments COVID-19 Protocols and Training COVID-19 Compliance and Enforcement COVID-19 PPE Disposal at Work Flu and COVID-19 Prevention Efforts Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Become a PREMIUM member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Jan 6

20 min 14 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! As 2020 wraps up, I wanted to reflect on a few things that we, as safety professionals, should take away from one of the craziest years we can remember. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Become a PREMIUM member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today!   **Get Grammarly TODAY!**     **Visit MightyLine Tape** Get all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!

Dec 2020

16 min 6 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! SPR Group LLC was formed in 2018 by Shawn Rafferty. SPR Group LLC's strategic vision centers around threat management, preparedness, training, damage mitigation, and effective response. Shawn sees a dangerous disconnect between law enforcement, organizations, and individuals about how they can work together to help: 1. Prevent incidents 2. Mitigate damage 3. Respond during an active shooter event or other life-threatening situations Even more troubling is the apparent lack of preparation and training for individuals and organizations. It is unfortunate that even after so many active shooter events, people and organizations are still not prepared, and many do not know what to do. Shawn's main objective is to help save lives by preparing organizations and individuals to prevent, prepare, and respond during an active shooter event. SPR Group LLC is the embodiment of everything Shawn has learned and experienced over 25 years in various leadership and security roles. The work Shawn performed with the United States Military, local/federal law enforcement, and security firms opened his eyes in ways he would never have imagined. Far too often, people are left to react and hope the natural fight or flight response helps them figure out what to do when the worst happens. - this is not enough. When lives are at stake, the first line of defense is developing a strategy. Shawn's first weapon of choice is the strategy throughout Shawn's years of training and working as a security specialist for various organizations. When a strategy is in place, people train on what to do when the time comes. And then, if the worst happens, training kicks in, and that strategy helps reduce injuries and casualties. The event that laid the groundwork and future formation of SPR Group LLC occurred in 2007. Shawn just returned to the U.S. from working in Iraq and was anxiously awaiting his first child's birth. While Shawn was driving, he heard on the radio about the news of the Virginia Tech mass shooting that took the lives of over 32 people. Upon hearing the news, Shawn, both angry and sad, thought out loud, "There must be a way to help people survive these horrible incidents." From that point on, Shawn started to brainstorm ways to better educate people on what they can do and even help police respond in a more direct, informed manner. Over a decade later, Shawn puts his passion and plans into action to help save lives. Please listen and share this important topic with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Become a PREMIUM member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape for all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!**

Dec 2020

1 hr 2 min

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers say a comprehensive public health strategy is needed to protect younger workers. This comes after their recent study shows that the rate of nonfatal on-the-job injuries among 15- to 24-year-olds is between 1.2 and 2.3 times higher than that of the 25-44 age group. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System found that hospital ERs treated an estimated 3.2 million nonfatal occupational injuries to workers ages 15-24 between 2012 and 2018. Of those, 18- and 19-year-olds experienced the highest injury rate, at 404 per 10,000 full-time equivalent workers. The injury rate for workers ages 20-24 and 15-17 was 287 and 281 per 10,000 FTEs, respectively, compared with 195 per 10,000 for workers 25-44. Although contact with objects and equipment was the leading cause of work-related injury requiring ER treatment for all age groups studied, lacerations and punctures were the most common type of injury among younger workers. According to NIOSH, adolescents and young adults comprise about 13% of the workforce and traditionally have sustained higher rates of occupational injuries. Around half of the injured workers, ages 15-17 were employed in the accommodations and food services subsector of the leisure and hospitality industry. Click here for the published CDC report. If you want to go more in-depth on this, and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (it is FREE to join). Become a PREMIUM member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape for all your facility marking needs! Request a FREE sample for being a SafetyPro Podcast listener!**

Dec 2020

16 min 28 sec

Join the Community of Safety Pros today! From PositivePsychology.com Emotional intelligence is what we use when we empathize with our coworkers, have deep conversations about our relationships with significant others, and attempt to manage an unruly or distraught child. It allows us to connect with others, understand ourselves better, and live a more authentic, healthy, and happy life. Although there are many kinds of intelligence, and they are often connected to one another, there are some very significant differences between them. IQ vs. EQ EQ is emotional intelligence, which, as stated above, is all about identifying emotions in ourselves and others, relating to others, and communicating about our feelings. IQ, on the other hand, is cognitive intelligence. This is the intelligence that people are generally most familiar with, as it is the type that is most often referred to when the word “intelligence” is used. It is also the type that is most often measured through testing and estimated through things like grade-point average. This episode goes into detail on this and sheds light on how safety professionals need to develop their EQ to be successful at what we do! Here are some MUST HAVE resources to get started:           Catch Dr. Travis Bradberry and his TEDx here. Do you like our material? Go more in-depth - become a SafetyPro Community Premium member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today!

Dec 2020

29 min 14 sec

How WELL Promotes Workplace Safety, Health, and Confidence from FacilitiesNet The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) created the WELL Health-Safety Rating application and label for buildings. The rating program focuses on 25 features for health and safety in buildings. Organizations can earn this designation by achieving compliance with 15 of the 25. This rating for buildings is flexible, scalable across varying building types, and easily applied across an extensive portfolio of properties. The WELL Health-Safety areas of focus are: Cleaning and Sanitation Procedures Emergency Preparedness Programs Health Service Resources Air and Water Quality Management Stakeholder Engagement and Communication As our knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 and specifically COVID-19 evolves, so do the safety measures we can apply. The WELL Health-Safety Rating for facility operations provides tools and guidance for facility managers to capture how their onsite team prioritizes health and safety for people at their facilities. Many facility teams have already implemented enhanced cleaning procedures, preventive measures such as signage and communication to ensure masks and distancing occur, plus outside air and extended run operating procedures and suite-cleaning options to limit spread. Check out the full article here. Do you like our material? Go more in-depth - become a SafetyPro Community Premium member and get access to exclusive Safety & Health Management content and engage with other safety pros! Live chats, mentorship, premium downloads, videos, tools, and more! Join the Community of Safety Pros today!

Dec 2020

17 min 46 sec

The all-new SafetyPro Community is available!  Now subscribers can get exclusive access to live chats, member-only videos, posts, downloads, guests, and more! Be sure to check out the ALL NEW SafetyPro Community group today! DON'T MISS OUT!

Nov 2020

9 min 1 sec

From Gallup: To say the "world's largest work-from-home experiment" has presented challenges would be an understatement. These challenges range from strategy and brand loyalty to customer centricity and employee wellbeing. While it might have been easy to dismiss well-being as simply a personal matter in the past, top leaders and managers who emphasize it will see significant returns. Employees with high well-being are more resilient during widespread or personal tough times, are less likely to have unplanned days out of the office, and have better performance than those with low well-being. The data tell us that remote workers have experienced well-being challenges, including ergonomics and lower back pain, poor mental and emotional wellbeing, less exercise, low self-care, and fewer social connections. Here's how leaders can address each of these relevant topics with their teams and organization. Stress and Mental Wellbeing On average, only 5% of employees reach out to their employee assistance program (EAP) each year. Yet many people are experiencing mental stressors: Gallup data from May showed that about half (47%) of employees felt worried, and 24% felt lonely "during a lot of the day yesterday." Leaders can encourage EAP utilization by bringing in experts to discuss it, identifying champions of mental health within the organization or its partners, and consistently communicating about program benefits. Leaders don't need to be mental health experts; they need to become a conduit to the right resources. Social Wellbeing Zoom gatherings have helped boost team relationships because employees have an opportunity to be more vulnerable (i.e., introducing their homes, pets, and children) and see their leaders in a more authentic home setting. But still, employees crave an even deeper solution. To promote social wellbeing, leaders should create a work environment that is conducive to friendship. Gallup finds that women who strongly agree they have a best friend at work are twice as likely to be engaged as those who say otherwise. Strong social connections outside of work are essential as well. Leaders and managers should ask employees about their friends and loved ones and ask employees to share stories about time spent away from work to demonstrate their authentic care. Physical Activity One of the best ways to sustain team physical wellbeing is by providing a robust organizational wellness program. Leaders should actively participate in well-being initiatives to stay current, strengthen relationships, and encourage employees to participate. When leaders are involved, it "green lights" individuals to activate and experiment with new ways to move and live healthy lives. Ergonomics As we moved to home offices, many of us settled into chairs and workspaces that don't meet our body's musculoskeletal (MSK) system needs. Even if leaders can't immediately offer home ergonomic solutions, they can aid workers by sharing free resources like professional videos and advice about reducing the risk and severity of ergonomic ailments. Self-Care Prioritizing individual well-being over a long list of responsibilities is easier said than done for many. Leaders should communicate that self-care is more than a trip to the spa; it includes a range of items from getting clinically recommended screenings to relaxing to intentionally using your strengths. Gallup research found that those who spent more time using their strengths experienced less worry, stress, anger, sadness, and pain. Employee wellbeing isn't something leaders can afford to overlook - on the contrary, it's more important than ever. Leaders who start prioritizing employee wellbeing will start seeing how it correlates with employee engagement - and, in turn, a host of personal and business outcomes. Reprinted with permission from Gallup. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Nov 2020

20 min 25 sec

Picture: TapRooT® I recently read an article from the folks over at TapRooT® that I wanted to share. It talks about how to have a successful root cause analysis and lists some best proactices. You can read their full article here. In order to be successful in completing a root cause analysis you should: Provide a complete, clear picture of what happened. Identify all the problems (Causal Factors) that led to the incident being investigated. Find the real root causes of each problem. Find the Generic Causes of each Root Cause. Develop effective corrective actions. Get management to understand the problems and solutions and take timely action to get the solutions implemented. 1st Root Cause Analysis Best Practice The first thing you should do is provide a complete, clear picture of WHAT HAPPENED. Without a complete, clear picture of what happened, the investigator is just making things up. The results of the investigation will be guesses. If you need to provide a complete, clear picture of what happened, you need to: Know how to collect evidence. (Covered in a previous episode) Organize that evidence into a complete, easy to understand story.  Share that evidence and story with others (management, other investigation team members, or workers). 2nd Root Cause Analysis Best Practice Identify all the problems (Causal Factors) that led to the incident being investigated. Many people focus on a single problem (even a single root cause) when they are investigating an incident. If the investigator focuses on a single cause, they will be missing other opportunities to improve performance and stop future incidents. Why? Because usually there is more than one problem (Causal Factor) that leads to an Incident. 3rd Root Cause Analysis Best Practice Find the real root causes of each problem. Even with all the evidence in front of them, people can get tricked into the wrong root cause. How? There are several common errors but here’s a shortlist of potential problems: Confirmation Bias Favorite-Cause-itis No human factors training/guidance No systematic process Thinking the know the cause Picking from a list of causes 4th Root Cause Analysis Best Practice Find the Generic Causes of each Root Cause. Some people stop when they find a root cause. But we’ve found a best practice that goes beyond a simple root cause. We discovered Generic Causes. Generic Causes start with root causes and then go beyond the root cause to find what is allowing the root cause to exist. Fixing Generic Causes can help you eliminate whole classes of problems. Here is an example… Let’s say that you have a problem with a procedure that has more than one action in a step. On the Root Cause Tree® you would identify the root cause: more than one action per step To fix that procedure, you would rewrite the procedure with just a single action per step. Once you have finished fixing the one procedure involved in this incident, you might start thinking: What about our other procedures? Do those procedures have similar problems? What if you find that many procedures have “more than 1 action per step?” Then you know there is a Generic Cause. You need to ask what in the system is allowing procedures written with more than one action per step. 5th Root Cause Analysis Best Practice Develop effective corrective actions. You might think that once an investigator finds the real root causes (and Generic Causes) that we are home free. What could go wrong? But even in the 1990s many people, even when the identified root causes, still didn’t develop effective corrective actions. 6th Root Cause Analysis Best Practice Get management to understand the problems and solutions and take timely action to get the solutions implemented. Now we’ve: Understand what happened, Defined the Causal Factors, Identified the all Causal factors root causes, Identified any Generic Causes, and Developed effective corrective action. What’s left? Getting management to approve the corrective actions and get the corrective actions implemented. And that’s where the last best practice comes in. The last best practice is an effective method to present the investigation to management and get their approval to implement effective corrective actions. Management is much more likely to commit resources to corrective actions when they understand what happened and how the: What happened, Why it happened, and How we can fix it, All fit together into an easy to understand presentation. Listen to the podcast episode for more commentary. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Nov 2020

17 min 45 sec

In 2020, an estimated 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women in the U.S., as well as 48,530 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer. 64% of breast cancer cases are diagnosed at a localized stage (there is no sign that cancer has spread outside of the breast), for which the 5-year survival rate is 99%. This year, an estimated 42,170 women will die from breast cancer in the U.S. 1 in 8 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, except for skin cancers. It is estimated that in 2020, approximately 30% of all new women cancer diagnoses will be breast cancer. There are over 3.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. On average, every 2 minutes, a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Oct 2020

13 min 21 sec

We're back with Wesley Carter, CCPSC, as part of our ongoing collaboration comparing and contrasting the PSM standard with OSHA general industry regulations. In this episode, we cover the requirements surrounding Hot Work, any work that involves burning, welding, cutting, brazing, soldering, grinding, using fire- or spark-producing tools, or other work that produces a source of ignition. You'll learn what the PSM standard requires for hot work, its relationship with standard 1910.252 (for the general industry), and even about what the OSHA construction standard says about hot work activities. You'll also hear an up close and personal story about hot work and associated hazards, and then we'll walk you through 7 key lessons from the CSB to prevent worker deaths during hot work in and around tanks. Listen to the Contractor Management episode we referenced a few times here: https://thesafetypropodcast.com/108-contractor-safety-with-wesley-carter-ccpsc   CSB Fact Sheet: Safe Hot Work Practices (Summary of 7 Key Lessons to Prevent Worker Deaths during Hot Work in and around Tanks)   Full CSB Safety Bulletin: Seven Key Lessons to Prevent Worker Deaths During Hot Work In and Around Tanks Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Sep 2020

32 min 2 sec

In this episode, I was back with Wesley Carter, CCPSC on the Amplify Your Process Safety Podcast for another collaboration where we talk about both occupational safety and process safety, and this time we cover contractor management. We talk about what OSHA says about contractor management for the general industry, and what's required for PSM-covered facilities, how contractor management relates to both occupational and process safety, and why you should care. Find OSHA's Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs, Communication and Coordination for Host Employers, Contractors, and Staffing Agencies, here. * CORRECTION: While we regularly recommend videos from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) and think they make excellent training material, in this episode we mistakenly said that there was a CSB animation video for the Phillips disaster of 1989 in Pasadena, TX. No such video exists, but you may learn more about the incident on its Wikipedia page, on Youtube, or from ABC13 Houston. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Sep 2020

37 min 44 sec

  In this episode, I share some great resources for businesses considering reopening during the current COVID-19 Pandemic from our friends at Mighty Line Tape. Mighty Line even got a shout-out from Mr. Wonderful himself, check it out here. The plan to reopen must be carefully considered and planned in order to protect workers and their families. Listen to this episode for some great tips and links to resources you will need to reopen safely. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Aug 2020

33 min 7 sec

  We've teamed up with the Amplify folks once again to bring you an episode on emergency planning and response. Wesley Carter will cover the general industry requirements, what PSM says, and a bit about RMP's requirements. If you work at a PSM-covered facility, or in an industry where safety is essential, you don't want to miss this episode. CCPS Process Safety Beacon - Emergency Preparation - The Titanic Disaster (July 2012) Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Jul 2020

32 min 10 sec

  In this very special episode, process safety and occupational safety worlds collide as Wesley teams up with Blaine Hoffmann from The SafetyPro Podcast to discuss incident investigation. You'll learn what OSHA's PSM standard says about incident investigations, as well as OSHA's requirements for the general industry, why an incident investigation is important, why root cause analysis matters, and more. Check out the Amplify Your Process Safety Podcast page! Mentioned in this episode: OSHA Recordkeeping Policies and Procedure Manual OSHA/EPA Root Cause Analysis Fact Sheet The SafetyPro Podcast, 082: SMS Pt 3 - What is Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Jun 2020

39 min 46 sec

  As more states are taking steps to reopen their economies and workers are returning to their workplaces, OSHA is receiving complaints from affected workers in non-essential businesses. As a result, they have a new interim enforcement guideline. Click HERE for the interim guideline. OSHA also has new guidance with respect to the recording of occupational illnesses, specifically cases of COVID-19. Click HERE for the Revised Enforcement Guidance for Recording Cases of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Check out the podcast episode for more detailed information. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Jun 2020

31 min 10 sec

  Do valves on respirators impact their effectiveness? The purpose of a respirator’s exhalation valve is to reduce the breathing resistance during exhale; it does not impact a respirator’s ability to provide respiratory protection. The valve is designed to open during exhalation to allow exhaled air to exit the respirator and then close tightly during inhalation, so inhaled air is not permitted to enter the respirator through the valve. While a valve does not change a respirator’s ability to help reduce a wearer’s exposure to bioaerosols, a person who is exhibiting symptoms of illness should not wear a valved respirator, because exhaled particles may leave the respirator via the valve and enter the surrounding environment, potentially exposing other people. Check out the CDC FAQ on this topic here. Take a look at the LinkedIn post that started it all here. Check out the podcast episode for more detailed information. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

May 2020

27 min 43 sec

Powered by iReportSource More than three weeks into the pandemic-driven cascade of cancelations, closings, and social distancing, U.S. workplaces are experiencing unprecedented disruption -- and it's measurable. Here's what has changed in a stunningly short period of time (comparing Gallup Panel surveys conducted March 13-16 vs. March 27-29): The percentage of full-time employees who say COVID-19 has disrupted their life "a great deal" or "a fair amount" has jumped from 58% to 81%. 40% of U.S. employees say their employer has frozen hiring, and 33% say their employer has reduced hours or shifts because of COVID-19 -- up from 33% and 27%, respectively. The percentage of full-time employees working from home because of COVID-19 closures has increased from 33% to 61%. The percentage of parents working full time who have kept their kids home from school because of COVID-19 has increased from less than half (44%) to everyone(100%). The combined effects of frightening uncertainty about physical and financial health in the near future and the pressures of required self-isolation have led to record levels of stress and worry that far surpass those recorded in past years. Compared with 2019, reports of daily worry have increased from 37% to 60% among the full-time working population. Daily stress has increased from 48% to 65%. On March 23, Gallup reported on five key elements that organizations can influence and measure to gauge their progress. They have been tracking how well organizations are doing on each of these five elements. *Reprinted with permission from Gallup. Listen to the whole episode to get my thoughts. I will post an update on this topic. Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

May 2020

29 min 11 sec

NOTICE: Published April 22, 2020 - The information in this post/episode is subject to change. Powered by iReportSource The new CDC face-covering recommendations do not change the MASK guidance. So what is new? What is the same? Let's talk about that in this episode. Essentially, the CDC recommends anyone going out in public wear a face-covering. These can be homemade cloth-type coverings. What is the intended purpose? Will they offer you protection? What protection do they offer others?  Also, I decided to add a healthy dose of "rant" for safety professionals that are commenting on others' LinkedIn posts celebrating efforts to stay safe during the COVID-19 Pandemic. In short; stop looking for problems! Curious? Listen to the whole episode to get my thoughts. What do you think? Masks or no masks? I will post an update on this topic as well as take all of your comments to heart! Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Apr 2020

35 min 59 sec

Powered by iReportSource 100 Episodes! Thanks to all the listeners that helped make this happen - you are the reason I continue to produce this podcast. Here's to the next 100 episodes!

Apr 2020

9 min 54 sec

NOTICE: Published April 1, 2020 - The information in this post/episode is subject to change. Powered by iReportSource All of the discussions about surgical masks got me thinking; what do we know about viruses (CVID-19 or others), and what are the EXPERTS saying? I wanted to explore this topic and share my thoughts. As of April 1, 2020, the WHO, CDC, OSHA guidance on wearing masks (if you are HEALTHY) is the same; you do NOT need to wear a mask except for specific circumstances. Let's read what they have to say. World Health Organization On the Questions and Answers page: Should I wear a mask to protect myself? Only wear a mask if you are ill with COVID-19 symptoms (especially coughing) or looking after someone who may have COVID-19. A disposable face mask can only be used once. If you are not ill or looking after someone who is sick, then you are wasting a mask. There is a world-wide shortage of masks, so WHO urges people to use masks wisely. WHO advises the rational use of medical masks to avoid unnecessary wastage of precious resources and misuse of masks  (see Advice on the use of masks). The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to frequently clean your hands, cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue and maintain a distance of at least 1 meter (3 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing (the rest of us use 6 feet). See basic protective measures against the new coronavirus for more information. CDC What does the CDC say about wearing asks? Wear a facemask if you are sick If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick. If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply, and they should be saved for caregivers.   OSHA Surgical masks are used as a physical barrier to protect the user from hazards, such as splashes of large droplets of blood or body fluids. Surgical masks also protect other people against infection from the person wearing the surgical mask. Such masks trap large particles of body fluids that may contain bacteria or viruses expelled by the wearer. Surgical masks are used for several different purposes, including the following: They are placed on sick people to limit the spread of infectious respiratory secretions to others. They are worn by healthcare providers to prevent accidental contamination of patients' wounds by the organisms normally present in mucus and saliva. Worn by workers to protect themselves from splashes or sprays of blood or bodily fluids, they may also keep contaminated fingers/hands away from the mouth and nose. Surgical masks are not designed or certified to prevent the inhalation of small airborne contaminants. These particles are not visible to the naked eye but may still be capable of causing infection. Surgical masks are not designed to seal tightly against the user's face. During inhalation, much of the potentially contaminated air can pass through gaps between the face and the surgical mask and not be pulled through the filter material of the mask. Their ability to filter small particles varies significantly based upon the type of material used to make the surgical mask, so they cannot be relied upon to protect workers against airborne infectious agents. Only surgical masks that are cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be legally marketed in the United States have been tested for their ability to resist blood and body fluids. Listen to the whole episode to get my thoughts. What do you think? Masks or no masks? I will post an update on this topic as well as take all of your comments to heart! Join the discussion on LinkedIn. Just be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Apr 2020

23 min 43 sec

Powered by iReportSource UPDATE: The CDC has made changes to workplace guidance as of March 21, 2020, which may make some of the information on this post obsolete: Updated cleaning and disinfection guidance Updated best practices for conducting social distancing Updated strategies and recommendations that can be implemented now to respond to COVID-19 We are currently in the throws of the 2020 Corona Virus pandemic, or COVID-19. Much information is being disseminated - from how far apart we should stand from one another to how to wash our hands properly. I have even seen videos on how to properly wash hands using ink to illustrate how to achieve full coverage of soap. Because hygiene is critical, many disinfecting products are harder to find now as a result of panic buyers hoarding supplies of items that they believe will make them safer. The truth is, many of these disinfectants are just not necessary according to all currently available information. Think about it, to prevent the spread of illness, we must avoid touching our face (eyes, nose, mouth) and simply wash our hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. People think they need to use bleach, alcohol, or some product containing these ingredients to disinfect surfaces around the clock. All available guidance tells us that routine cleaning is adequate for general work areas. Disinfecting is only recommended for suspected cases of CORONA-19. At the risk of sounding like a word-nerd, let me share the CDC definition of the two terms in use here; cleaning and disinfecting. Cleaning refers to the removal of germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces. Cleaning does not kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection. Disinfecting refers to using chemicals to kill germs on surfaces. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs, but by killing germs on a surface after cleaning, it can further lower the risk of spreading infection. Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers So what are employers supposed to do? According to the CDC Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers, you should perform routine environmental cleaning, which means routinely cleaning all frequently touched surfaces in the workplace, such as workstations, countertops, and doorknobs. Perform enhanced cleaning and disinfection after persons suspected/confirmed to have COVID-19 have been in the facility The CDC also recommends employers to use the cleaning agents that are usually used in these areas and follow the directions on the label. Furthermore, provide disposable wipes so that commonly used surfaces can be wiped down before each use. (UPDATE: The CDC has made changes to workplace guidance as of March 21, 2020). OSHA goes even further: Because the transmissibility of COVID-19 from contaminated environmental surfaces and objects is not fully understood, employers should carefully evaluate whether or not work areas occupied by people suspected to have a virus may have been contaminated and whether or not they need to be decontaminated in response. Outside of healthcare and deathcare facilities, there is typically no need to perform special cleaning or decontamination of work environments when a person suspected of having the virus has been present unless those environments are visibly contaminated with blood or other body fluids. In limited cases where further cleaning and decontamination may be necessary, consult U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for cleaning and disinfecting environments, including those contaminated with coronaviruses. Disinfecting Your Facility if Someone is Sick If there is a worker under investigation of having COVID-19 or there has been a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the workplace, here is where disinfecting comes into play. Employers will need to clean and disinfect all areas used by the sick person, such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment like tablets, touch screens, keyboards, remote controls, and ATMs. Here are the steps: Clean surfaces using soap and water. Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces. Remember, high touch surfaces include tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc. Disinfect using diluted household bleach solutions, alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol, other EPA-registered household disinfectants. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date.  Follow the manufacturer's instructions for application and proper ventilation. For example, never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have proper ventilation during the use of the product. For soft surfaces like carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes: Clean the surface using soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces. Launder items (if possible) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely OR disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant. These disinfectants meet EPA's criteria for use against COVID-19. For electronics, such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards, remote controls, and ATMs Consider putting a wipeable cover on electronics. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for cleaning and disinfecting. If no instructions are available, use alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol and dry the surface thoroughly. For clothing, towels, linens, and other items: Wear disposable gloves. Wash hands with soap and water as soon as you remove the gloves. Do not shake dirty laundry. Launder items according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people's items. Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to the guidance above for the appropriate type of surface. So remember, increase the frequency you clean the general work environment, which opens up a wide variety of cleaning products that might not be in high demand. Reserve those precious disinfectants for cleaning visibly contaminated surfaces (think bloodborne pathogens) or where there is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case. Coupled with other recommendations like reviewing your company's sick policy, social distancing, staggering start/stop times, breaks, lunches, and limiting meetings - these will make your workplaces less likely to experience a significant outbreak. Let me know what you are doing to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 at work on LinkedIn - be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Mar 2020

23 min 35 sec

Powered by iReportSource COVID-19 Resources for Businesses and Employers from the CDC Let me know what you are doing to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 at work on LinkedIn - be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.  

Mar 2020

7 min 23 sec

Interview with Drew Hinton, CSP, CHMM, SHRM-CP Powered by iReportSource If you don't currently have a safety committee at your workplace, adding one can seem like a daunting task. Listen to this episode with Drew Hinton, CSP, CHMM, SHRM-CP to get ten tips that are sure to help you create and sustain a successful safety committee! If you don't currently have a safety committee at your workplace, adding one can seem like a daunting task. While there are no federal regulations that require a safety committee, your state may be one of the 15+ states that require one under certain situations. For example, Alabama state code requires that "any employer subject to worker's compensation rules must establish a safety committee upon the written require of any employee." Connecticut states that "all employers with 25 or more employees, and employers whose rate of injury or illness exceeds the average OSHA recordable injury and illness rates of all industries in the state, must establish safety committees." However, even if it's not required by any legislation, it can potentially save you money on your worker's compensation premiums, but most importantly, it gets your employees engaged in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Before you can tell everyone that you have a safety committee, below are ten key guidelines that will help ensure you are getting the most out of your safety-leading employees: How many people should be on your safety committee? As a general rule of thumb, you want between five and ten employees on your committee. Having more than that can produce undesired results, such as meetings lasting longer than expected, creating too much to focus on, and confirmation bias among members. On the contrary, if you don't have enough members, your committee may suffer from a lack of diversity, too much workload for such a small group, and a seemingly "close-minded" group. If you start out with a specific number during your first few meetings and then realize that you need more to add value and different backgrounds to your committee, you can always add more. It's better to add more than having to essentially kick someone off the committee just because you need to reduce numbers. Who should be on your safety committee? When selecting members to be on the committee, you need to do so very carefully and be intentional. Picking people because they are a close friend and/or valued co-worker may seem beneficial, but it can also lead to the confirmation bias issue mentioned previously. At a minimum, you want to have at least one member on your committee from each department/area. For example, you may have the following departments/areas represented on your committee: EHS, production, maintenance, field service, general shop, engineering, and management. Some companies will choose not to have upper management attend the meetings (e.g., General Manager, Vice President, etc.) due to people being afraid to speak up and say something with them in the room. However, if you have established psychological safety in the workplace (which is another issue in itself), this shouldn't be an issue. If you do feel that management may cause fear in others, maybe have them attend every other meeting, or simply follow-up with them separately after the meeting to review the meeting minutes with them one-on-one. By doing this, you can take the ideas of your fellow safety committee members to management and present them in an informal, yet documented session. How often should your safety committee meet? Most safety committees will meet at least once a month. However, this can vary depending on the size of your company. If your safety committee consists of multiple facilities, it may be best to meet quarterly, but stay in contact at least once a month. If you have a smaller group of members, you can schedule micro-sessions. Instead of meeting for one hour per month, it may be more efficient to meet for 15-20 minutes per week. I have a safety committee member who never shows up. Now what? Your safety committee policy should outline the minimum expectations of the members. Typically on an active and efficient committee, you need to require that all members attend at least 75% of the meetings during each calendar year. If a member falls below this quota, you should consider getting an alternative person to come in their place. Keep in mind, however, that the act of being on the safety committee should be completely voluntary, never forced. Once I've established a safety committee, do the members stay on indefinitely? Depending on the size of your company, this is up to you. However, as a best practice, rotating out the members on an annual basis will bring a fresh set of minds to the table to allow varying perspectives and ideas. You can have members serve from January 1st through December 31st, July 1st through June 30th, or whatever predefined term you want to go with. I will note that not every member needs to be rotated off. For example, you will want to keep the EHS Dept. and department/area supervisors on, but maybe swap out the hourly/front-line workers. What will your safety committee do? This is where you need to determine the goals and objectives of the safety committee. Some may want safety committees to review recent work-related injuries and illnesses, some may want them to be the go-to person in each department/area for safety-related issues and concerns, whereas others may want to get the committee involved with performing various workplace inspections (e.g., fire extinguishers, housekeeping, etc.). Safety committees can serve as a great cross-functional team for getting various safety-related tasks completed in the different areas of your workplace. Regardless of what you determine your goals and objectives to be, you need to do more than just meet once a month to review items that could have been sent out in an email. Of course, you want the safety committee to help maintain a safe workplace, but the big question is how will you do that? That is something you will need to determine based on your site-specific needs, but whatever you decide, be sure to document and track your short-term and long-term goals. How should you track the progress of your safety committee? If you have your goals established and documented, you need to track the progress throughout the year. This can be done independently or it can be included as part of your company's KPIs, but regardless, you need to see a progression. If your goal is to implement a new incident investigation process, be sure and document the completion of each step. If you assigned a specific task to someone, follow up with them and offer assistance if they need it. Remember, you are steering the committee, but you are also in your position to be a coach and mentor when it comes to safe work practices and ensuring everyone meets minimum requirements. Should the items discussed during meetings be communicated to the rest of the company? ABSOLUTELY! Topics and discussions covered at each meeting should be documented and put into some form of "Meeting Minutes" document, then published so that the company can see that you're not just sitting around at 7:00 AM every week eating donuts and talking about the news (although, that may happen from time to time!). The meeting minutes should be posted on an employee bulletin board, sent out via email, or communicated in whatever method you see fit. Employees who are aware that their company has an active safety committee and are "in the loop" of what's going on tend to feel better about how the company takes safety as a whole. What if my employees work remotely or are "out in the field"? There are numerous web-based platforms that employees can interact from either a computer or a smartphone. You can choose from Microsoft Teams, Skype, GoToMeeting, WebEx, or a number of other different video conference call programs. This allows employees to call in from wherever they are, as well as see the documents and PowerPoint slides that you have to show. Not being in one place at the same time is not an excuse to not have a safety committee. This may also be a great idea to have a periodic meeting in which you have safety committees from other facilities call in so that you can meet others from across the country (or world) and gain even more diversity and experience. Use it to your benefit! Will my safety committee guarantee a safer workplace? Nothing will guarantee a safe workplace, but it will certainly help. If utilized properly and efficiently, the committee will help identify unsafe conditions and behaviors, help determine corrective actions, and boost compliance with applicable standards. BUT, that doesn't mean this is the miraculous bag of solutions that will solve all the world's problems. Even though it may help, it won't fix everything. It takes a lot of effort from all employees at all levels to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses. You, along with the rest of the safety committee, must adapt to the changing times and determine how to approach your site-specific hazards. You are the ones that know your workplace better than anyone, so you need to determine what works best for you. There is no "cookie-cutter" curriculum for establishing a safety committee, but hopefully, these tips will help guide you on the path to progression! Let me and Drew know what you think on LinkedIn - be sure to @ mention Drew Hinton and Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Get the full article Drew Hinton wrote on LinkedIn here.

Mar 2020

28 min 5 sec

Powered by iReportSource Confined Space Rescue Teams save lives! They are a critical component of permit-required confined space operations. In this interview with a fellow SafetyPro, Drew Hinton, CSP, CHMM, EMT we will explore what it takes to set up a successful rescue team and some things to look out for when doing so. If your organization has a team or is thinking about establishing a team - this is the episode for you! Drew has been in the safety profession full-time time since 2013 and has traveled across the country, teaching over 100+ confined space rescue courses as a safety consultant. He is currently President of Arrow Safety, an EHS consulting company based out of Glasgow, KY. In the past, Drew has been the Corporate Manager for Industrial Service Solutions, Global EHS&S Manager for Dallas Group of America, and spent ten years as career firefighter/EMT in the metro Louisville, Kentucky area. He was also a member of Jefferson County Special Operations Command (JSOC) - specifically, on the confined space rescue team. Listen as we talk about this critical topic. Let me know what you think on LinkedIn - be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Feb 2020

38 min 24 sec

Podcasting from the 2020 ACI/OSHA Safety Day. Powered by iReportSource Listen as I talk with Paula Burleson, OSHA Onsite Consultant with the OhioBWC as she explains what OSHA Onsite services can do for small businesses. Let me know what you think of this episode on LinkedIn if you have used this app at all - be sure to @ mention Blaine J. Hoffmann or The SafetyPro Podcast LinkedIn page. You can also find the podcast on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Feb 2020

19 min 8 sec