Pro Podcaster Stories

Pro Podcast Solutions

Have you ever thought about starting a podcast? Podcasting is an ever growing ocean covering every topic your imagination can fathom. But what about the podcasters? Why did they start a podcast? What hurdles did they have to overcome along the way? What drives them to keep creating content? How do they define success?

Pro Podcaster Stories dives deep to explore these questions and much more.

All Episodes

When your passion meets podcasting you get the Full Court Press NBA Podcast and Glen Willis.  Glen has always had a passion and love for the game of basketball, so he decided to launch a podcast.  Glen and his brother coached basketball for many years.  In their podcast Glen and Greg share the technical side of basketball from their coaching perspective.  They use their deep coaching background to break the game down in a different way. Their unique experiences and perspectives offer a unique story that helps them to stand out.   Glen Willis is an avid basketball fan.  He is a contributor at Peachtree Hoops. He is an inactive youth basketball coach that still looks for ways to contribute to the sport by way of helping to facilitate camps and training programs.  He lives in the Seattle, Washington area with his wife Sarah. In 2016 He launched the Full Court Press NBA Podcast which he co-hosts with his twin brother Greg.   He is a fascinating guy and a really insightful and well thought out guy.   We had a great conversation.  We talked about basketball and podcasting, but we talked about a few other things as well including long term content creation schedules, spending time on your core competency and engagement and feedback.  I think you are really going to enjoy this episode.   Show Notes: [03:13] Glen has an NBA focused podcast.   [03:26] Glen shares how he developed such a great love for the NBA. His love for basketball began in middle school.   [05:20] Glen and his twin brother coached basketball for many years.   [06:53] His passion and love for the game never disappeared or regressed at all despite the fact that his basketball journey wasn’t quite what he would have imagined. [08:24] He had a six-month break where he wasn’t doing a full-time job and that really helped him be able to launch the podcast.  [09:38] In order to cover the entire NBA, Glen needs to have a 12-month plan.  The hardest aspect is to get familiar with all the new players coming into the league.   [11:42] They watch and focus on three teams a week. They record on those teams and share what they saw and really dive into what they are doing and trying to do.    [13:47] Glen starts his draft work in April.   [16:03] There are many NBA podcasts to help you learn more about the game. [17:38] Glen knew they could use their deep coaching background to break it down in a different way.   [19:57] They wanted to bring a technical conversation from people that have a coaching and teaching background in the sport hoping that would not be better than everything else, but instead would contribute to what people consuming that type of content would find value in.   [21:04] Glen shares about joining a podcast network and what have been the benefits of the podcast network.   [23:41] Glen knew that he needed a team to fill in the gaps of his podcast knowledge and help him to learn even more.    [25:02] Parents were very appreciative of the time and effort Greg and Glen invested in their young people and when they launched their podcast they wanted to support and help.  It helped them to get some support and visibility at the beginning.  [27:43] The podcast network they are part of (Lineups) does all the marketing, promotion, and social media.   [30:09] Any advertisers that Glen or Greg pull in themselves are completely their revenue.  Any ad the podcasting network brings in is a 50/50 split.    [31:45] They are not in podcasting for the ad revenue.  They are energized by the content.   [34:01] They record their episode and hand the file off to professionals that are more passionate about podcast production like Pro Podcast Solutions. [35:01] Glen shares how they are handling the NBA shutdown and these challenging times.    [37:39] The podcast is currently on hold since the league has been on hold. They are doing a week by week assessment deciding if they feel like it is an appropriate time to start putting more content out again.  They don’t want to take the attention off what is important right now.    [39:45] They are looking at having a player’s series where they actually break down an individual player’s game.  They never have space at any other time.   [42:35] Success is about getting good feedback. They are very appreciative and grateful for the engagement and feedback they receive.   [44:44] They try to make their podcast technical enough that it is interesting and different, but still connect and land with listeners.    [46:20] If Glen did have a bucket list it would be to see Lebron James play in person.  He would also love to go to an NBA Finals game 7.  [48:19] It is not so much getting to do something as much as it is having appreciation and gratefulness for the opportunity and absolutely getting the most out of it.  [50:33] Glen shares his experience going to a Sacramento Kings game.   [52:28] He grew up in a challenging environment. [53:34] He hadn’t really seen a template of a successful adult man so he started reading about men that inspired him.  [58:08] Darrell's Takeaways: Glen talked about how he doesn’t get caught up in what the mainstream sports media is talking about.  He focuses on things that make his podcast unique. He keys in on things that few or maybe nobody else is talking about so he is able to stand apart.  He talked about his long-term content creation schedule and how important it is for him.  Glen builds his work schedule around this.  It is important to put in the big rocks first and then build you other things around that. He also talks about how he doesn’t spend time on things that are not his core competencies like editing, publishing, and promotions.  He says he measures success through engagement and engagement can come in a variety of ways.  Try to look at negative reviews with an open mind, because we can actually learn and improve from that.  We need to look at reviews as an opportunity to learn from your audience and grow as a podcaster.   Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Peachtree Hoops Glen on Twitter Lineups Lineups Podcasts Full Court Press NBA Podcast  Full Court Press NBA Podcast on Facebook

May 2020

1 hr 4 min

Have you ever thought about starting a podcast? Podcasting is an ever-growing ocean covering every topic your imagination can fathom.  What about the podcasters? Why did they start a podcast? What hurdles did they have to overcome along the way? What drives them to keep creating content?  There are now over a million podcasts in existence. That means people have many choices when they're looking for a podcast for whatever topic they’re seeking.  That means you have got to be on top of your game.  In this solo episode, I share seven of my best resources for new podcasters.  We are going to be talking about how to engage with other podcasters in the community, which conferences you should be attending, and detailing the equipment needed.  We are also going to be talking about what hosting company you should go with, how to get music, artwork, and many other great resources.  This episode is going to have so much great information! We also have a bonus for you in this episode.  We have put together a PDF guide that is going to be your go-to resource for this episode.   Show Notes: 1. Join Facebook Groups Podcaster’s Hangout was created by John Dennis to allow for the participation of community and collaboration of Podcasters around the world. Podcast Movement Community - For Podcasters was created by Podcast Movement (Dan Franks and Jared Easly) as a place for people who are podcasters, looking to become a podcaster, or who are members of the podcasting industry.  Independent Podcasters Group was created by Independent Podcast Conference (Joe Pardo) as a group designed to bring together independent podcasters. They are always looking to help others get to the next level and grow together.  Podcasters Paradise was created by the Entrepreneur on Fire Community (John Lee Dumas and Kate Erickson) as a place for fellow Paradisers to share valuable information, collaborate with other Paradise members, and provide others with constructive feedback on podcast-related topics.  She Podcasts was created by She Podcasts (Jessica Kupferman and Elsie Escobar) as a safe place for women and those who identify as female or identify as non-binary ONLY who podcast or who are setting up a show currently to ask questions, provide support, share resources, wins, advocate for each other and whatever else they like. 2. Attend a podcast conference Podcast Movement - August 5-8 Dallas, TX - Podcast Movement is the largest, longest running annual conference for podcasters and the podcast industry. Whether you’re just getting started or you’re an industry veteran, we’ve got over 150 sessions and events designed just for you. Podfest Expo - March 5-7 Orlando, FL - Whether you’re new to podcasting or a veteran podcaster looking to innovate and improve your podcast, our easy-to-understand conference tracks allow you to customize a daily agenda based on what you’re most interested in learning. No matter your skill level or experience, Podfest has plenty to offer. She Podcasts - October 15-18 Scottsdale, AZ - The largest in-person gathering of women podcasters, audio content creators, story tellers, and more. The purpose of She Podcasts LIVE is to offer women audio creators a chance to learn and experience community in an environment created JUST for them. We focus the education, the social interaction, and even the aesthetic on women only and it makes a big difference. Independent Podcasters Conference - September 24-26 Philadelphia, PA - ICON originally started out as Mid-Atlantic Podcast started (December 2014) as a Facebook group for podcasters who live in the Mid-Atlantic States. After seeing the interest to have a podcast (exclusive) conference in the northeast, Joe Pardo jumped on the opportunity to make it happen. This conference is for anyone that identifies as an independent podcaster all around the world.  3. Invest in quality equipment Microphones: I highly recommend a dynamic microphone, because they are more forgiving and have an easier learning curve.  Avoid a condenser microphone. Shure SM 58 - This microphone is very durable and great for traveling.   Audio Technica ATR2100 - Most popular microphone in all of podcasting. Kit with boom arm, shock mount, pop filter, and cable  Electro-Voice RE320 - This is the microphone I am currently using and my favorite mic.  Recorders:  Rodecaster Pro - This widely used and adored product can support multi- track recording and easily bring in guests.  Zoom H5 - Zoom recorders don’t require a computer.  You just record directly onto the SD card.  The interface is intuitive and easy to follow.   Zoom H6  Zoom F4 - This recorder is more portable with many awesome features.  USB Interface Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 - The best USB interface on the market and all you need.   Microphone Accessories: You want a microphone stand that will bring the microphone up to your mouth.   Boom Arm I recommend the Rode PSA 1.  Tabletop Stand  Pop Filter or a windscreen 4. Podcast Hosting CompanyIt is important to partner with a reputable hosting company because they are going to give you reliable service and reliable stats. Libsyn (PROPOD promo code) Simplecast Blubrry Buzzsprout Podbean Megaphone Use royalty-free musicIf you are using music in your podcast it needs to be royalty-free and not copyrighted music.  Look through their terms to see which one is best suited for you.  Audio Jungle Premium Beat  BenSound Incomptetech Create artwork that sells your brand Check out PPS episode 31  Video Library Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Darrell’s Email Video Library Podcaster’s Hangout Podcast Movement Community - For Podcasters Independent Podcasters Group Podcasters Paradise  She Podcasts Podcast Movement Podfest Expo  She Podcasts Independent Podcasters Conference Shure SM 58 Audio Technica ATR2100  Kit with boom arm, shock mount, pop filter, and cable Electro-Voice RE320  Kit with boom arm, shock mount, and cable Rodecaster Pro  Zoom H5  Zoom H6  Zoom F4 Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 Boom Arm  Tabletop Stand Pop Filter  Libsyn (PROPOD promo code) Simplecast Blubrry Buzzsprout Podbean Megaphone Audio Jungle Premium Beat BenSound  Incomptetech  Check out PPS Episode 31  Disclosure of Material Connection: The links above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, we only recommend products or services that we use personally and believe will add value to our listeners. We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Apr 2020

51 min 58 sec

Real estate is a very competitive business and the real estate podcast area is a very competitive category within podcast directories. Brad Larsen shares his successes, authority, and opportunities that have come because of his podcast. Brad talks about creating The Property Management Mastermind, Property Management Mastermind Show and The Property Management Conference. His story, advice, and humility are truly inspiring. Brad’s advice is very helpful and timely for everybody. Brad Larsen was born and raised in Iowa – his parents were both school teachers. He graduated from the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell, NM and was commissioned as a 2LT in the US Army Infantry in 1996. He then graduated from Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa in 1998. He was able to earn a baseball scholarship for both schools as a shortstop. Brad later earned his MBA from the University of Phoenix in San Antonio, TX in 2011. After serving on active duty in the Army as an officer in the Infantry, Brad left the military as a Captain in 2002 and moved to San Antonio to pursue his interests in real estate. He has been managing single-family homes since 2004. Brad is a member of the San Antonio Board of Realtors (SABOR), Texas Association of Realtors (TAR), National Association of Realtors (NAR), and the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM®). Brad has been licensed since 2003 and has earned top honors in real estate to include the Platinum Top 50 award for agents in San Antonio. Brad is married to Leah Larsen and has two children.  Brad is so selfless even though at times he tries to argue differently and invites everyone to come on this journey and learn along with him. This episode is packed full of great advice and tips for real estate, podcasting, and life in general.  Show Notes: [03:37] Brad shares what led him into the world of real estate.  [04:06] Brad created the Property Management Mastermind where property managers can share ideas, thoughts, and collaborations on a national scale. Then he created his podcast, The Property Management Mastermind Show.  [05:03] Brad’s podcast has opened up a lot of doors and opportunities including other business ventures and speaking gigs.  [06:13] Brad looks at podcasting as an audio blog.  [07:11] Brad shares how his business looked before his podcast and how it has expanded his business ventures.  [08:43] Brad started a Facebook group and now has 8,600 members. This is another advertising avenue for getting the podcast shows out to more people.  [10:09] Another opportunity the podcast has facilitated is a national annual conference called The Property Management Mastermind Conference.  [10:32] All of his business ventures have stemmed from simply starting a podcast.  [13:03] Brad really wants to improve and benefit the real estate industry.  [15:40] On his podcast he tries to interview folks that he would want to understand better because likely others will also.  [16:49] Brad started his own podcast so he could answer the questions he wanted to answer for the community. It was a better option for him than a webinar.  [18:42] The podcast was a giant advertisement for his in-person live conference.  [20:04] Brad’s next live conference, Property Management Mastermind Conference, will be in March 2021 in Las Vegas.  [21:49] Brad has a Facebook Live every day to discuss current issues and how they affect renters and property managers.  [24:13] The current issues will be short-lived, so we should have a quick spike back up when this is over.  [26:08] The dollars are in the change. We are in the middle of change, so how we embrace it is going to be part of our attitude. We need to make it work for us.  [28:29] If home prices go down, investors will create the bottom. It creates the basement and that it is as low as the market goes.  [31:44] Brad recommends investing in residential single-family homes.   [34:12] Brad has sponsors for his podcast that pay monthly or annually for commercials spots. This has helped to offset the cost of quality productions like Pro Podcast Solutions.  [36:55] Finding the next good guest has been Brad’s biggest podcast challenge.  [37:25] Brad suggest putting out content that is timeless, so people can go out to it years down the road.  [39:24] Brad got used to podcasting, by creating Youtube narrations and videos for his real estate business.  [40:12] Brad’s advice is to look at the competition. Brad looked to see how many podcasts were talking about property management before he started.  [41:19] Don’t let your fear of podcasting intimidate you.  [42:33] The goal of his podcast is just a bigger advertising campaign. It is important to tie podcasting in with other ideas and ventures.  [44:01] Brad set a goal several years ago to make a million dollars a year. He is a long way, but he is getting on the right track.  [46:02] Brad suggests checking out one of the first episodes of his podcast. His episode with Tim Melton has been the most downloaded episode.  [46:21] Brad has found that doing live interviews in a remote location is very difficult, so he utilizes Zoom to record his podcast episodes.  [48:13] Darrell's Takeaways: Brad’s advice was really helpful and timely for everybody. He gave great advice for those who are landlords, tenants, and even those looking to get into income property. Brad recommended going hyperlocal with your podcast to really get involved with your community. He talked about using his podcast as a way to create opportunities and his authority. Because of his authority, he was able to create the Property Management Mastermind Conference. He is seeing a lot of success with his conference because of the authority he is establishing because of his relationships and podcast. Brad gave a tip to try and make content that is timeless. It is more important now to think about this then it was a month ago. Sometimes it is a good move to create content about current issues and sometimes it is not. Make sure you are using terminology, phrases, and titles that are not going to date and make your content seem like it is no longer relevant in the long term.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Property Management Mastermind Property Management Mastermind Show Rent Werx Property Management Mastermind on Facebook Property Management Mastermind Conference Bigger Pockets Brrrr Technique Robert Kiyosaki Brad’s episode with Tim Melton

Apr 2020

52 min 31 sec

Having a business, career or job enables us to pay the bills, but many of us want work that is life-giving and meaningful. One way for Christians to find this type of meaningful work is to be employed by a Christian organization. Al Lopus is the President and co-founder of Best Christian Workplaces Institute. Al began ranking the best Christian organizations to work for in a Christianity Today article which led to founding BCWI in 2002. This organization uses research-based measurement tools and culture change advisory services to help Christian organizations set the standard as the best and most effective workplaces in the world.  There is even a certification for workplaces that get a client survey score of 4.0 or above. This signals that this is a great place to work with great leadership. Having the certification can attract high-quality employees, and it also appeals to potential donors. Al is also the host of The Flourishing Culture Podcast. On his show, Al conducts interviews with leaders on how they have created some of the best and most effective Christian workplaces. Al is a client of ours, and I’m excited to talk to him about his podcast, how he started, what success means to him, his unique pre-interview question method, and the example that his father set for him.  Al is an author, speaker, and consultant. Prior to co-founding BCWI, Al served 21 years in leadership roles. He held key leadership roles at the consulting firm Willis Towers Watson. He chaired the Board of Directors for The Nicolas Fund for Education. He also served on the Christian Leadership Alliance Board and is currently on the Advisory Board. He was also on the Board for Virginia Mason Medical Center. His passion and experience for proven leadership and amazing workplace culture are highlighted in this interview. I thought his interview was relevant for these current times, but my solo episode is still coming up in the near future.  Show Notes: [03:20] The BCWI vision is for Christian organizations to set the standard as the best most effective place to work in the world. They do this by measuring the health of the culture through an engagement survey. They also measure effectiveness of leadership organizations and do culture consulting.  [04:14] They want to inspire Christian leaders to create a flourishing workplace. [04:32] Al is the co-founder of BCWI. The firm started by trying to compile a list of best Christian workplaces.  [05:33] Al started The Flourishing Culture podcast to get his message to a broader audience.  [06:09] His daughter helped him with his first podcast.  [08:02] Al wanted stories of great Christian workplaces and what the leaders did to create that environment. [09:24] The podcast is really a way to reinforce their message to leaders, by listening to other successful leaders and sharing helpful tips. [12:57] To be certified as a best Christian workplace you need a client survey score of a 4.0 or above. Only about half of the organizations are certified.  [15:51] Al's been podcasting for about five years now. When he first started out, he bought lower-end equipment and then worked his way up. [16:30] He also sends his guests the script with all the questions prior to the podcast, and they send it back to him. [17:10] To produce the podcast Al and his team have a schedule of who the guests will be. Once the guest accepts the invitation, Al and the team writes the script. Then they record on Skype. [18:25] Then they upload it to the social media manager who sends the audio to Pro Podcast Solutions. Once published, the guests gets a notification email which includes social media prompts.  [21:20] The podcast is an educational and a marketing piece. [22:54] Being certified as a best Christian workplace helps improve the quality of candidates who apply to work there. High-quality individuals usually have offers from other workplaces. [24:17] Current employees also know that it will be difficult to find a better workplace than where they are already at. Donors also appreciate the certification. [27:52] Things to look for in the survey include having a good leader and having the company well managed. They also want the leader to demonstrate fairness and integrity. Another important factor is life-giving work. This is one of the reasons why people want to work at Christian workplaces. [29:13] Al does look at numbers and how many downloads he has. He also defines success by the way he positively affects his listeners.  [31:22] Recognition from the podcast also creates a place to start a relationship.  [31:37] They are also using transcripts from one of their podcast series and using that to write a book.  [33:04] Al's dad is a CFO which is relevant because BCWI has had a recent revenue drop. His dad taught him the value of saving. He's grateful to his dad for teaching him to build the reserves that are sustaining them now. [34:43] Al is also a fan of Donald Miller and the Storybrand framework. He's also reading Marketing Made Simple and listens to other inspirational podcasts.  [38:58] Darrell's Takeaways: A lot of people are dealing with remote working. Al's podcast episode can help. He also learned saving from his dad which is helping him during these times of uncertainty. Saving for the lean times during the good times is great advice. Al sends out his questions and gets the answers back ahead of time. This technique may not be right for everybody, but it could be right for you. He also gives his guests guidance on sharing the episode on social media. Podcasts are a great way to better connect.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Best Christian Workplaces Institute The Flourishing Culture Podcast Michael Hyatt Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World Christianity Today Cliff Ravenscraft Belay Virtual Assistants Building a StoryBrand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen Marketing Made Simple: A Step-by-Step StoryBrand Guide for Any Business Season 5 Episode 12: Important Advice on Managing Remote Employees // Robert Bortins, Jr., Classical Conversations Season 5 Episode 11: What it Takes to Be a Flourishing Leader // Barry Slauenwhite, BCWI Best Christian Workplaces Institute on Facebook ALopus@BCWInstitute.org

Apr 2020

46 min 16 sec

Mike and Brian Mountan are a father and son duo who together host the Bri The Sports Guy podcast. They both love watching, playing, and talking about sports. Brian has an unusual gift for being able to remember and recall stats and history about sports that most of us often forget. They also have a very close father and son relationship and planned starting their podcast together to coincide with Brian graduating from high school and Mike retiring from his finance career.   Mike is a native of Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin. He received his BA and an MBA from Northwest University in Evanston, Illinois. He spent 13 years with Procter & Gamble and 18 years with Johnson & Johnson in a variety of finance roles including VP of Finance for Johnson & Johnson's Consumer Division Asia Pacific based in Singapore and Global CFO of Johnson & Johnson's diabetes care business. Mike also serves on the board for the Jacksonville School for Autism and is chairman of the finance committee of St Joseph Academy. Brian is a 20 year old who was diagnosed at age 3 with autism. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and has lived in Jacksonville, Florida twice. He’s also lived in Singapore and San Ramon, California. Brian graduated from high school in May of 2019 and has been working on the podcast ever since. In addition to sports broadcasting and blogging, Brian also works at the Brooks YMCA. You are going to love this conversation as we dive into their sports podcast and the wonderful father and son dynamic that flows throughout the show.  Show Notes: [04:04] Growing up, Mike watched a lot of sports and played a lot of sports. [04:16] When Brian and his brother were born, his family tried to get them involved in as many sports as possible. [04:41] Brian is six feet and six inches tall. He's a great basketball player and a great golfer. [05:03] Mike grew up watching sports on TV. He was fortunate to grow up in Wisconsin, a state that had all of the pro teams. [06:02] Brian's mom thought the podcast would be a good idea after Brian graduated from high school. They've done over a hundred and thirty two episodes now. [07:21] Mike and his family knew that Brian had a gift. Mike shares a story about Brian talking about a game, and a nearby restaurant patron being amazed at everything he could remember. [09:50] Students are really being impacted by the shutdown. [10:23] The baseball and basketball seasons have been put on hold, so the NFL is one of the main things they have to talk about right now. [11:50] They are doing a free agency review by division. Then they'll do an NFC and AFC draft preview. Then they'll talk about what they think about the upcoming teams. They're hopeful that by late May, they will see some broadcasts. [15:22] They subscribe to many sports resources in order to go deep in their podcast. [16:22] They would rather have too much content as opposed to too little content. They plan out in advance which sports they will talk about during the week. [18:07] They do three podcasts a week, and they have a sponsor.  [19:22] Brian talks about some of the awesome guests that they have had on the show. [20:19] They would love to get the manager of the Milwaukee Brewers on the show. His name is Craig Counsell. They are also trying to make some connections with local golfers and the Jaguars. [23:03] Mike timed his retirement to Brian's graduation, so they could both start the podcast together. [24:53] Mike has always been a workaholic, so the podcast gives him a lot to work on with so many different sports to cover. [25:32] They came up with the idea around Christmas of 2018. [26:40] Sports podcasting is a very crowded space. They did the show for their friends and to show the autism community that there's a lot of practical things they can do. [27:44] They define success by having a lot of great content and having fun.  [30:29] People in Florida are really interested in hearing them talk about football. [31:33] They use a lot of different magazines to help keep things straight when covering college football. [32:41] The NBA is the easiest to cover because of the stability. [33:06] They take notes and get their research the old-fashioned way. [34:39] Brian has learned planning and not procrastinating from his parents.  [36:12] Mike learned social skills from his dad and work ethic from his grandparents.  [37:06] Mike would like to expand their audience.  [39:26] They would also like to cover the Milwaukee Bucks NBA game live.  [42:48] Darrell's takeaways: The way Mike and Brian interact shows how special their relationship is. The subject of their content has been significantly reduced because they are covering sports. They've adapted, and they're focusing deeper on the draft. They're making the most of the situation they have. They have reduced their schedule to two episodes per week instead of three. Think about your contingency plan in case of a dry spell. Look for inspiration for content. Cover what's most important and build your schedule around that. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Bri The Sports Guy Mike Mountan on Facebook E132: Our interview with NY Post columnist and 2020 NY state baseball hall of fame inductee Kevin Kernan MountanMike@Yahoo.com

Apr 2020

47 min 6 sec

I talked to some amazing podcast hosts and podcast professionals when I was at Podfest in Orlando. It was a great experience, and many experts were kind enough to share podcast tips that will help podcasters and especially beginners have a smooth start and a show that they feel great about. Super Joe Pardo who runs the Independent Podcast Conference shares the importance of letting your personality shine through and the goal that you should have to move the needle.  Then I talk with Glenn the Geek who has been podcasting since 2006 and has hosted thousands of shows. He runs the Horse Radio Network and the Florida Podcast Network. Glenn talks about the importance of consistency and what sponsors are really looking for. If advertising is something you are interested in, his advice is very useful. Chris Curran from Podcast Engineering School shares tips for microphone technique including how to speak soft and low and speak loudly.  Harry Duran from Podcast Junkies talks about how to leverage the power of SEO in your podcast and how and why you should do that. If legal issues are something you’re concerned about, pay special attention to this next clip from Gordon Firemark, the podcast lawyer. Gordon talks about protecting your brand and content and gives us information on the types of consent forms and contracts that are useful to podcasters.  Dave Jackson from the School of Podcasting gives super good advice about what new podcasters really shouldn’t do. Even though it's a common mistake that many make. Jeni Wren Stottrup from Gritty Birds Podcasting gives a great tip for avoiding perfectionism and fear. Craig from Ingles Podcast talks about the importance of audience engagement. Coach Chris from The Personal Branding Playbook talks about how important marketing is. Emily Peck Prokop from E Podcast Productions talks about not trying to do everything all at once, and Christy Haussler from Team Podcast rounds out the show with her advice on rankings and list building.  Show Notes: [03:13] Super Joe Pardo runs the Independent Podcast Conference, and he feels that it's important to have your personality come out in your podcast. The goal all the time is to move the needle and make people feel something. [04:09] Glenn the Geek is from the Horse Radio and Florida Podcast Network. He's been podcasting since 2006. It takes awhile to make money. You need to be consistent. Sponsors are buying you not your show.  [06:27] Go to small companies in your niche. Work with them and involve them from the beginning. [07:53] Chris Curran runs Podcast Engineering School. He teaches people how to engineer and produce podcasts at a professional level. He also hosts the podcast engineering show. [08:43] Microphone technique is really important. Stay close and speak into the microphone from the right angle. You can get closer to sound soft and low. Lean back to say something loud. Be passionate and love what you are talking about. [09:26] Harry Duran is the host of Podcast Junkies. His tip is to leverage the SEO power of podcasting. Choose a name that people are searching for that also speaks to a pain point. [10:08] Be careful how you choose your name and what you put in your description. Choose words that people are searching for. [10:16] Gordon Firemark is the podcast lawyer. Creating media content is big business, so think of yourself as a business. You may need to form a company. [11:10] Protect yourself by protecting your title and your brand. Register a trademark for your brand and a copyright for your content. [11:41] Get consent from your guests in the form of a release. Use royalty free music or make sure you have the proper license. Always use contracts. [13:10] Dave Jackson is from the School of Podcasting. He also works for Libsyn tech support. Don't compare your show to other people's shows.  [14:28] Jeni Wren Stottrup is from Gritty Birds Podcasting. She's a producer, editor, and podcast coach. Once you have a concept of what your show is then get your equipment and record right away. [15:33] Craig from Ingles Podcast says gauge the success of your podcast by audience engagement as opposed to download numbers. [18:30] Coach Chris from The Personal Branding Playbook says sharing episodes instead of marketing them is one of the biggest mistakes he sees podcasters make. [23:10] Emily Peck Prokop from E Podcast Productions says new podcasters need to start with one step at a time and stop trying to do everything at once. [24:01] Christy Haussler from Team Podcast says not to focus on ranking in iTunes categories because it won't translate to anything tangible. The list is a vanity metric. Every podcaster should begin with an offer of something free to build their email list.  [26:13] Darrell's takeaways: Build that email list. Sponsors are buying you. Don't get too clever with your podcast name. Make your podcast name easily searchable. Focus on engaging with your audience. Provide a way for your listeners to engage with you. Keeping a spreadsheet of your listeners is really helpful. Focus on one thing at a time.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions You Don’t Need Thousands of Downloads To Sell Ads – The Return of Glenn The Geek Podfest Glenn The Geek Florida Podcast Network  Super Joe Pardo Independent Podcast Conference Chris Curran Podcast Engineering School Podcast Junkies Gordon Firemark Podcaster's Legal & Business Toolkit (Template Bundle) School of Podcasting The Happiness Lab Gritty Birds Podcast Editing Ingles Podcast SpeakPipe The Personal Branding Playbook Coach Chris E Podcast Productions Team Podcast Cliff Ravenscraft Mindset Strategies That Go Beyond Podcasting With Cliff Ravenscraft

Mar 2020

31 min 54 sec

Mark Des Cotes is a podcast design specialist and the owner of Podcast Branding. He's an award-winning graphic designer with over 30 years in the design industry. He designs for both print and web. He started podcasting in 2013 doing television fan podcasts. He launched his Resourceful Designer podcast in 2015. It's a weekly podcast that helps graphic and web designers start and run their own design business.  Mark has worked with over 200 podcasters to enhance their shows appearance and help them stand out among the growing sea of podcasts through his professional designs. He designs podcast websites, cover artwork, and more. Mark is also the graphic designer that we use as part of our team here at Pro Podcast Solutions. He and I were both at Podfest Orlando a couple of weeks ago.  During this face-to-face sit down we talk about what podcast branding is, what makes great cover art, common mistakes people make and more. We also tackle the question of whether you should put your photo on the cover, looking at the camera, and who should actually have a microphone on their cover art. Mark also shares advice to create a cohesive brand for all of your platforms.  Mark's passion for design and podcast branding really shine through in this interview. He shares how even moving a design element a couple of pixels makes a difference. He strives for perfection and making everything look right. He also shares the elements of cohesive branding. We talk about having a color palette to make your brand easily identifiable across platforms.  Mark shares the difference between a logo and cover art and why both are so important. We also talk about social media. Why it’s important to simplify and mistakes beginners often make. We also discuss why a professional design across all of your platforms can complete your brand and make you stand out.  Show Notes: [02:50] This is our fourth or fifth time meeting in person. We've become really good friends over the years. [03:01] Mark owns a business called Podcast Branding and we'll be discussing podcast artwork, branding and more.  [03:47] Mark wanted to go into television advertising. He never intended to become a graphic designer.  [04:54] In high school, he won the equivalent of a college scholarship for one year. His guidance counselor suggested he go to graphic design school. He tried it for a year and decided to finish the program. He hasn't looked back since. [06:06] He discovered podcasting in 2012 and got into it in 2013. Our mutual friend, Wayne Henderson, had the worst podcast art Mark had ever seen. Mark designed something for Wayne and then Wayne started spreading the word.  [08:48] Mark also worked for a commercial printer and then dabbled in web design.  [09:36] Mark started a web design business at home.  [11:57] Be honest with your current employer and make sure your contract doesn't forbid side work. [15:03] Mark wanted to be the podcast branding expert. He has a video chat with every client.  [17:38] He never would have designed Melissa Radke's artwork the way it is without talking to her first.  [19:14] The first thing most people see is the podcast cover when they are looking for podcasts. If they like the cover, then they'll read the description. [21:17] Your artwork needs to be simple. Taking something away from a design will always make it cleaner. Overcomplicated artwork becomes amateurish. All you need on your podcast cover is the title of your show and possibly your name. [22:08] You can put your tagline in the description. [22:37] Your text needs to be readable on a small piece of artwork. Also, keep it down to one or two fonts. Don't overcomplicate it. [23:41] Microphones and headphones should only be included if your podcast is about microphones in headphones. The word podcast also doesn't need to be on your cover.  [24:31] The word show sounds more professional. [25:00] When it comes to using your photo ask if you are recognized in your space or if you are trying to build a personal brand.  [29:21] You have to be comfortable to have your image on your podcast cover. [30:50] Think about how your target audience is going to perceive your artwork. [34:43] Make sure your text is readable in a 125 X 125 pixel image. [35:53] Podcast logos and artwork are two different things. Have a logo and include it on your artwork. Think of an album cover. The band name is the logo.  [37:24] Carry over your branding to your social media accounts. Have a separate account for your podcast unless you are using it to create a personal brand. You can also rotate through your color pallet.  [44:21] A brand encompasses every touchpoint of your design system.  [46:47] Many of us have skills, but it's better to hire a true professional.  [51:49] Mark shares things that he has noticed that differ between the US and Canada. Hint: it has to do with restaurants and manners.  [54:35] He is a huge fan of fantasy books and science fiction. He loves The Expanse book series. He is also a fan of Building a StoryBrand.  [57:43] Darrell's takeaways: Mark gave a presentation about this very topic at Podfest. Your art is the first impression people get. They often use it to decide if they want to listen or not. Great cover art can get your show chosen above others. Make sure it looks good at 125 pixels. Think through using your own photo. Have a color palette and podcast logo to reinforce your brand across all venues.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Resourceful Designer Resourceful Designer - A Graphic Design Podcast Resourceful Designer on Instagram Mark Des Cotes on LinkedIn Solo Talk Media Podcast Branding Podfest Orlando Wayne Henderson Being Authentic and Sharing Your Real Self With Your Audience with Melissa Radke Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World Building a StoryBrand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen The Expanse Book Series

Mar 2020

1 hr 1 min

Dr. Romie Mushtaq is a neurologist, mindfulness teacher, entrepreneur, and speaker. She is also the Chief Wellness Officer for Evolution Hospitality and the host of the Wellness Evolved Podcast. She shares how she had a love for brain science and neurology and became a medical doctor. About 10 years into her career, she had a very serious health crisis and discovered mindfulness during her journey to recovery. She is now on a mission to bring together her advanced training in Western and Eastern medicine to alleviate stress and bring health and wellness to the corporate world.  We talk about how she created and the first mindfulness program for a hospitality company and became the first hospitality Chief Wellness Officer. Then we talk about the podcast and how it became a way to reach employees with the message of mindfulness and people first. Dr. Romie found that wellness emails were going unread, but the podcasts made communication easier and provided tools for mindfulness and wellness with her guided meditations. Even though the podcast is targeted at Evolution Hospitality employees, it also has turned out to be a recruitment tool for potential employees.  Dr. Romie also shares some of the surprising results from the podcast and how a mixed format of guided meditation, interviews, and solo shows works for her. We talk about how she keeps organized and challenges with finding quality outside guests can be. We also get to hear a very touching story of how Dr. Romie’s maternal grandmother had faith in her and her potential. Even though she isn’t here anymore her presence is always with Dr. Romie. This is a fantastic interview with a very fun and smart lady who I’m happy to have the pleasure to work with.  Show Notes: [04:37] Darrell and Dr. Romie met at Podfest in Orlando. It was so great that they met in person before Dr. Romie's podcast launched.  [06:33] Dr. Romie's background is in neurology and neurophysiology. In 2013, she got a board certification in integrative medicine. [06:48]  She brings the world of Eastern and Western medicine together. The mission for her wellness company is changing the brain and mental health of corporate America.  [07:01] Evolution Hospitality hired Dr. Romie to be their keynote speaker and talk about the brain science of mindfulness for stress management. After that, she started consulting for them. She's now their Chief Wellness Officer and her job is to guide the mindfulness and wellness programs for their 7,000 employees. [08:37] When she was in medical school, she had a love and passion for neuroscience. She was a practicing doctor, and she got sick from too much stress. [09:02] She had to have a life-saving surgery and this led to her journey of mindfulness, meditation, and integrative medicine. [10:37] The Wellness Evolved Podcast just turned one year old.  [11:44] The podcast is targeted for the Evolution Hospitality employees. She wanted the podcast to be a public-facing recruitment tool for the organization. [12:28] She created and scaled a mindfulness program from scratch. They started with The Power of Pause. They decided that a podcast would be the perfect way to get this program out and supply the employees with the tools they would need.  [14:02] The podcast was first and foremost for the Evolution Hospitality employees, but other hospitality employees started showing interest in the program. It's a great PR tool.  [15:56] There's brain science behind the intimate connection of hearing someone's voice in your ear. [16:56] Communication and spreading the word was what was needed for The Power of Pause. Management had to think through if they wanted something targeted for the employees to be public facing.  [19:31] Dr. Romie is finding ways to measure impact. Her top downloads were the meditations. Their format includes guided meditations, solo shows, and interviews. [22:05] Seeing leaders play the podcast episodes and lead meditations is an indicator of success. Dr. Romie is also getting LinkedIn messages from job seekers. Most people in panel interviews listen to the podcast to prepare. [23:35] The podcast has helped spread the mindfulness program and bring in new candidates. [26:20] Rule #1 turn on your microphone!!! Technical glitches happen when you're in a hurry. [29:11] Dr. Romie has a busy schedule, so she has a team that helps keep things on schedule. She interviews people face-to-face when she is traveling. She also has a content calendar of podcast topics.  [34:39] Serving your audience is what it's all about. [36:05] It's been challenging to get external guests from other companies and vendors on the podcast.  [37:35] They do want to have subject matter experts on the show.  [39:54] Dr. Romie still uses her grandmother's prayer beads when she meditates. Her grandmother always believed that she was going to rise up and do amazing things. She calls upon her grandmother often. She is anchored in unwavering faith.  [43:53] Darrell's takeaways: Dr. Romie's emails were going unopened, but the podcast actually reached people. Podcasts are effective for communication and recruitment. A content calendar is great for organizing themes and ideas and collaborating with others. Don't be afraid to break the mold and try something new. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Dr. Romie brainSHIFT  The powerful secret of your breath -- Romila “Dr. Romie” Mushtaq, MD | Romila Mushtaq | TEDxFargo Evolution Hospitality Wellness Evolved Podcast Podfest Why Workplace Wellness & Mindfulness is Important for Leaders & Culture: Interview with Evo's President John Murphy Bonus Episode: Home 10 Minute Guided Meditation: Power of Pause Tips for New Podcasters from Lead Audio Editor Mike Lalonde Turning ADHD Coping Strategies Into a Successful Podcast with Eric Tivers

Mar 2020

47 min

Mike Lalonde is the lead audio editor for Pro Podcast Solutions. I’m happy to have Mike on the show to talk about sound quality, what makes a great podcast, and tips for beginning podcasters. Mike is in Calgary, Alberta, Canada where it snows, gets cold, and is the perfect base for someone who works from home. Mike shares how his love for music and being in a band sparked his interest in audio production. He decided to pursue that passion and started freelancing and working on audiobooks.  I was fortunate enough to be introduced to Mike through an email he sent me. That was four years ago and now he is the lead audio editor for PPS. Every new show goes through Mike as he tweaks it, gets the sound perfect, and creates a template for moving forward. We have a great conversation talking about what beginners can do to get good audio quality. Hint: It starts with a quiet recording environment and the right microphone. Mike gives tips on how to record in a quiet area, things you can do to get better sound quality from your microphone, and microphones for beginners. We also talk about why you might want to hire an editor.  We geek out on audio software, plugins, and tools that can help produce a great sounding podcast. We also talk about things hosts can do to make their show stand out, unique questions to ask, and calls-to-action. Mike gives a lot of examples and shout outs to some of the hosts that we’ve been fortunate enough to work with. I am so fortunate to have Mike as a lead part of the team. He talks about the example and work ethic of his parents. This definitely shines through with Mike’s work ethic, skill set, and passion for audio. We also talk about the Canadian band that was the beginning of his inspiration.  Show Notes: [03:42] Mike has been with PPS since February of 2016. His first project was an audiobook for PPS then he began working on podcast audio. [06:05] Mike was one of the first PPS editors.  [07:04] Mike handles all of the audio, sound, and templates for new clients. Once everything is worked out and established then another audio editor on the team may take over.  [08:52] He began in music. He and his friends started a band. That's when Mike got into Audacity, Cubase, and Logic. They also had a lot of outboard gear for EQ etc.  [09:42] They also helped other bands out with music recordings. Mike enjoyed audio production and started looking for gigs on Elance. This is how he found his first audiobook gigs and a couple of podcast gigs.  [10:59] He enjoyed audio work, and after sending a cold email to Darrell, he started doing audio for PPS. [11:02] The first podcasts that Mike listened to were about video games. [11:48] Mike plays guitar, bass, and drums.  [13:14] Mike's in Calgary, Alberta, Canada where there's snow. That's one of the reasons he works from home. [15:19] The first tip Mike gives for new podcasters is to record in a quiet space. Close your windows and reduce as much noise as possible. Get comfortable and don't shuffle around. Also, do some test recordings with your microphone. [18:27] Learn basic microphone etiquette. Don't put the microphone right in your mouth. Make sure you're not wearing bulky clothes or jewelry that will rub on your microphone. [19:35] A sock or a windscreen will help disperse air and get rid of the plosives.  [20:36] USB microphones are great for beginners. If you have an audio interface you may need a microphone with a preamp like a condenser microphone. A lot of people have had good luck with SM 48s or SM58s.  [23:11] One podcast misconception is people are seeing it as a hobby or a niche industry, but the podcast industry is huge today.  [26:19] You can use a podcast to grow a huge community. You don't have to be famous to become a host. [28:27] Mike and Darrell talk about calls-to-action. Amy Porterfield is great at this. Jen Briney has a lot of community engagement. She does entire episodes reading messages from her fans. Kasey Bell gives away freebies in every episode. She also encourages community engagement with community questions. [31:39] Stephen Spencer breaks down his episodes into a checklist. At the end, he gives a one-sentence call-to-action inviting people to check out the show notes. [32:31] They all put in the time and effort to provide extra content for the listeners. [36:20] We talk about things that make podcasts stand out. For example, Sip, Suds, & Smokes has fun sound effects. Jen Briney's show is community supported. Things like music breaks can help with the flow.  [39:41] Stephan Spencer always asks guests, before the interview, what would make this the best interview that they have ever had. Mike shares this and other unique questions that some of our shows ask.  [43:50] Watch plosives if you want to get your sound as clean as possible. Get a good stand and use a pop filter. Talk into the mic.  [45:15] Darrell uses an Audition plugin called Kill the Mic Rumble.  [47:58] It's a good idea to remove pets before you record. [49:17] Mike shares software tools and plugins that he uses.  [50:45] Try sitting in silence when you first record to have a recording of room tone. Also separate tracks for the different speakers.  [51:48] Most people start with Audacity and then move on to something like what we use which is Adobe Audition. [53:45] There are so many tools you can use for audio editing, but the easiest way to make it easy on yourself is to hire somebody to do it for you. [54:16] Having someone edit your audio is like paying to get YOUR time back. You can focus on what you do best. You also get access to a team of professionals.  [56:44] Mike had his first job when he was 14. He learned from his hard-working parents that if you want something you work for it. [57:58] Mike shares his favorite Canadian band. He has seen them live and got a book signed by Geddy Lee. Geddy is why Mike started playing base.  [01:00:21] Darrell's takeaways: Find a quiet space when recording and do test recordings. The microphone we recommend is the ATR2100X. It's important to create an engagement piece. Get your guest comfortable before hitting record. What benefit will hiring someone allow you to have? Hiring someone can save you time. You also get expertise and wisdom. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Tips for Launching a Successful Podcast with Launch Specialist Jodey Smith Audacity Cubase Logic Pro X Foam Microphone Windscreen  ATR2100-USB Microphone Shure SM58 Shure SM48 Joe Rogan The Pat McAfee Show Amy Porterfield Podcast Congressional Dish with Jennifer Briney 80% of Being an Entrepreneur Is What You Think and Feel with Amy Porterfield Using the Value for Value Model to Earn a Living, Travel, and Do Good in the World with Jen Briney Shake Up Learning Stephan Spencer Sip, Suds, & Smokes Talk of 12 Oaks How Talking About Everything Good in Life Turned Into an Award Winning Podcast and Radio Show with Good Ol’ Boy Mike Stellar Life Podcast Seeing Business as a Creative Act and Focusing on What You Do Best with Andy Kushner Adobe Audition RX 7 Plugin Pack Garage Band Hindenburg Pro Tools REAPER Rush

Mar 2020

1 hr 5 min

Deirdre Breakenridge is Chief Executive Officer of Pure Performance Communications, a strategic communications and technology consulting firm in the New York Metro area. She’s a veteran in PR, marketing, and branding. She is the author of six books including her latest book Answers for Modern Communicators. She’s counseled senior-level executives at Fortune 500 companies, and she travels worldwide speaking to corporations and associations about the changing media landscape.  She blogs at PR Expanded. She has six video courses on LinkedIn Learning. She is the co-founder of #PRStudChat a dynamic Twitter community dedicated to educating PR students, professionals, and professors. She’s also the host of the Women Worldwide podcast where she has published over 250 episodes. Deirdre shares the importance of having mentors and being a mentor. We also talk about how social media has changed the mentor relationship and has opened up new opportunities. We dive into why she started her podcast and how she is always experimenting and trying new things. She shares how her goals for the podcast changed and how she finally realized that the podcast was about helping people and building a community.  Deirdre has taken a unique approach to forming a community around her podcast guests. They have a network where these women answer questions and help each other. She even ran a mastermind experiment with some of her guests that allowed them to celebrate what they were working on and ask for help. Deirdre is passionate about community, sharing information, and helping people. She is also passionate about how helping others leads to opportunities and connections you wouldn’t otherwise expect. She also shares a personal loss that led to a research journey with millennials and the FEEL Model. This interview is truly inspiring.  Show Notes: [03:40] Deirdre has been mentoring women for over 20 years. [04:19] Deirdre had a mentor in high school and in college. She had a close friend of the family who was a mentor who helped her get her first job. Although, she didn't actually realize they were mentors. It just kind of happened. [05:04] As Deirdre got into her career, it was natural for her to start answering questions and taking others under her wing. Now mentoring happens on social media. [07:13] It's okay to ask for help. [11:04] The fact that you can show up anywhere and speak is a sign that you could be a very good mentor.  [12:29] Find the people you want to serve and find a way to help them the most. Find out what they care about and where they are.  [15:00] Women Worldwide now has over 250 episodes. [16:01] Podcasting was a reinvention and a passion for Deirdre. [17:17] Women Worldwide is more than a podcast. They now have a network. The women are connecting and collaborating. She also tried a mastermind experiment with a handful of guests where they have a Zoom call. They meet once a month, and it's called Women Worldwide Connect. The purpose is to celebrate what they are working on and ask for help. [20:02] The listeners of the show also interact on social media. [21:39] There are a lot of goals you can have with a podcast. There are other podcasters who see the opportunities with each individual guest. They may not take it as far as forming a network and mastermind group.  [23:59] Deirdre's first goal was to be a podcast host. Then she wanted 100,000 downloads per episode to attract advertisers. She put a lot of marketing dollars into this. She achieved her goal and then realized that wasn't what the listeners wanted.  [25:31] She realized it was about the community she served and helping people. She recently noticed, it's all about the guests.  [28:07] You should learn what your listeners care about and what your guests are willing to share. Guests that engage on social media and audiograms help increase listeners.  [30:57] Deirdre has a project manager that helps with everything. They use Hootsuite, Basecamp, and Headliner.  [32:15] The value from the podcast is flowing into the business. The greatest connection is to the guests through the network. [34:33] Deirdre is a relationship connector. [36:30] Her parents definitely shaped her. Her mom is very strong and passionate. Her dad is a mediator and a negotiator. Deirdre stepped away with a very strong foundation. [37:39] The loss of Deirdre's stepdaughter caused her to take a step back and re-evaluate her life. [38:04] Deirdre went on a research journey with millennials. She learned what they needed. They built a model called FEEL. Face your fears. Engage with empathy. Use ethics and good judgment. Unleash the love. [39:26] Her stepdaughter Noelle was a huge influence on her.  [40:58] The Feel First Test evaluates where you are and gives you exercises to improve. [43:14] Darrell's takeaways: Don't be afraid to experiment and try new ideas. Deirdre was all about cultivating a culture of collaboration and support within her community. When you are serving the needs of others, you and your business will be lifted up. Deirdre's podcast is a marketing arm of Women Worldwide. It's also used to build community. The FEEL Test will give you exercises that you can do to become a better rounded person. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Deirdre Breakenridge PR Expanded Feel First Test Pure Performance Communications Women Worldwide Deirdre Breakenridge on LinkedIn Deirdre Breakenridge on Twitter Deirdre@PurePerformancecomm.com Deirdre Breakenridge on Facebook Answers for Modern Communicators Other Books by Deirdre Breakenridge Why Social Media and Being Strategic Is Important With Dede Watson Hootsuite Basecamp Headliner

Mar 2020

47 min 52 sec

Justin Honaman has taken his experience in business, data analytics, and strategic sourcing and procurement and combined it with his love of creativity and leadership and built a business and a podcast around it. He is the co-founder and president of Contender Brands where he and his wife run a business that combines consumer products and other creative ventures. They feature products such as the Ringo Ring Cleaner and several clever card games that are meant to spark fun and conversation in groups.  They also feature other creative ventures such as their books and even music. Justin and his wife and business partner, Monique, believe life should be an adventure and that sometimes you just need to listen to your heart and trust your gut. Justin is a frequent speaker on leadership, personal development, and organizational culture. He is also an accomplished sales and marketing executive and the host of the ContenderCast podcast which is a leadership and entrepreneurship podcast centered on shining a light on bright ideas.  Justin shares why he started his podcast and tips that he feels are important to have a great show. We talk about letting your guests shine, the value of consistency, and how it’s okay to do things differently and have your own twist like bonus episodes and “best of” episodes. Justin is a man with a diverse background and professional experience, but whatever he is doing it’s revolving around creativity and great ideas. This is an episode about how being creative can lead to great things and great podcasts and ideas are the basis for any business, product, or creative endeavor. He also shares wisdom about how your worst show can be your most popular show, how he defines success, and the value of being consistent.  Show Notes: [03:08] We started working with Justin over two years ago, and he has recorded 107 episodes.  [04:43] Justin has an Industrial Engineer degree from Georgia Tech and an MBA from Auburn University. [05:51] Justin has spent his career in the consumer goods industry. He has been at Georgia Pacific for about a year. His background is technology and business. He's moved between consulting firms and the business side of things. [06:14] He also has a side hustle which includes the podcast. Justin and his wife have a number of creative endeavors, and they run Contender Brands together. [06:35] Justin and his wife had ideas for a couple of consumer products and card games. He had already been blogging and decided to convert it into a podcast.  [07:27] Justin's wife is better at some of the business and numbers side of things. Justin is the idea guy. He loves selling, relationship building, figuring out new ways to get products to market, and finding guests for the podcast.  [08:24] Justin had been blogging about leadership topics and content. A lot of the information was expanded upon information from his first two books.  [09:24] He knew how to manage sound from his music experience. Justin understood sound mixing, but needed help getting the show to the podcast platforms. His podcast is a passion product for his creativity.  [10:08] He and his wife have had a great time recording shows about the creation of their own products. Contender Brands is a collection of their creative outlets. They have books, products, the podcast, and music.  [11:45] Justin loves using his creative mind to create awesome podcasts. [12:34] All creatives know that when you make a product, there's going to be someone who hates it. When you put yourself out there you have to be willing to accept the criticism along with the praise. The majority of the feedback that Justin has gotten back from the podcast has been awesome. [13:53] Ironically, the podcast episode that Justin thought was the worst ended up being his top downloaded episode. [15:39] An episode is released every Monday morning. Justin keeps a calendar. If he has crazy good content he wants to release, he will launch an extra episode on Thursday. [17:12] He also has “best of” episodes. It also gives him a space of extra content.  [18:14] Justin organizes everything in Evernote and uses Dropbox to exchange files. [19:32] Success for Justin is providing content that people want to listen to and that he's excited about. It also has to be something he's able to make time for. He keeps manageable expectations for download numbers. [23:07] Justin does most of his interviews over the phone. He has portable microphones. [24:02] Start with a big idea and focus on it. Justin chose entrepreneurship. Decide on your format. Have a prerecorded intro person. Have a structured approach to the interviews.  [26:16] A challenge Justin faced was determining his focus for the podcast. Podcasting takes time and a commitment to release on a regular schedule. [29:09] Let your guest talk and don't interrupt. Make them the center of attention. [30:44] Good habits that Justin learned from his mom and dad was having a calendar and a to-do list. His early schedule was packed with activities. [31:55] Justin loves leading worship with kids on Sunday. [32:59] He saw Pink Floyd in the mid-90s and would love it if they went on tour again. [33:21] If you love leadership content, read Turn the Ship Around and FOR by Jeff Henderson. [37:53] Darrell's takeaways: Sometimes the show you're most afraid to release will be your best episode. Justin doing a "best of" episode is a really clever idea. You have to deliver or people will stop listening. Committing to releasing weekly episodes can become a grind. Be consistent with your releases. Let your guests talk. Let them be the star. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Justin Honaman on LinkedIn Justin Honaman on Twitter Justin Honaman on Instagram Books by Justin Honaman Contender Brands ContenderCast Evernote Dropbox Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders Know What You're FOR: A Growth Strategy for Work, An Even Better Strategy for Life Turning ADHD Coping Strategies Into a Successful Podcast with Eric Tivers

Feb 2020

41 min 25 sec

Music is such an important part of our lives. It brings us joy, makes us feel good, and is just a wonderful way to celebrate life. I’m very passionate about the topic of music education for young people and being in school band. This is why I’m happy to be talking with Mary Luehrsen from the National Association for Music Merchants or NAMM.  The NAMM Foundation is a supporting organization of NAMM, a 119 year old music products trade association. The NAMM Foundation is funded by NAMM members through trade association activities and private donations.  Mary is the Director of Public Affairs and Government Relations for NAMM and the Executive Director of the NAMM Foundation. The NAMM Foundation is about advancing music programs in school and across life. They support scientific research, philanthropic giving, public service programs, and are a great resource for people wanting to help further public music programs. Mary is also the host of the “Talking Up Music Education” podcast. She talks with artist advocates, teachers, parents, students, and business and community leaders about what they are doing to create music learning opportunities. According to Mary, this podcast is about inspiring people to support music programs. Mary’s passion for music education shines through as she shares what NAMM and the NAMM Foundation are. She also talks a little bit about The NAMM Show and how this event helps support furthering music and music education. We talk about the importance of music education, how Mary uses her podcast to build awareness, and what you can do to help music education in your local community. We also talk about being relentlessly positive, networking with school leaders and board members, the importance of music research in promoting music education, and how anyone can help through volunteer efforts.  Show Notes: [04:34] NAMM is the National Association for Music Merchants. It's a 119 year old music products trade association. It started in 1901, when the world was so different. [05:16] NAMM has been carrying the flag, emblems and the torch of the value and importance of music making and music learning since 1901. [05:29] The global music products industry includes musical instruments, pro audio event technology, and all of the infrastructure and technology for large stadium concerts. All of the things for sound enhancement of the industry come together globally. [06:10] We had 129 countries represented at the NAMM Show in Southern California. [07:18] NAMM has also sponsored music brain research and the impact of having children study music early in life. [08:03] Music education is at the heart of the NAMM Foundation. [08:29] Their industry unites around the trade show experience. Because NAMM is a non-profit they can funnel resources into policy and advocacy.  [08:53] They also lobby in DC for federal legislation. [09:08] They also build advocacy networks for education. This activity is fueled through sponsored research. [09:35] The foundation is the consumer outreach entity for the mission and vision.  [10:14] The NAMM Foundation wants to be the engine of promoting music education. [10:55] There's 14,000 school districts in America and about 50 million children in public school everyday. Mary wants resources to support public music education for all of these children. [11:34] Participation and opportunity are never as good as they would like it to be. A social impact movement needs to be pressing continually for the benefit of the children and young people. [17:05] Music is a powerful way to get people together to embrace a common cause.  [18:08] The podcast is almost up to 100 episodes.  [19:28] The podcast team has worked really hard with building content and helping to form the advocacy portfolio. They have a schedule consistent with their mission. People always like to see new podcasts. Mary is able to record at home with a recorder and a good microphone. [21:30] They produce shows once or twice a month, and do live events from the NAMM Show. [21:58] They also promote the shows as actively as they can. [24:24] They have a pretty good download rate, the impact of the show is something that they are leaving to faith. The show may be having an impact because Mary was asked for her autograph. [25:39] The podcast is mainly about inspiration. [26:49] School music programs are frequently underfunded.  [28:12] Being supportive of music teachers and programs can be helpful.  [30:00] They are starting a relentlessly positive advocacy effort. Part of that effort is saying thank you. [33:43] When it comes to funding, there are levers to pull. We just need to be a positive part of the conversation with our school leaders. [35:36] Darrell wishes that everybody can experience how awesome being in band is. [38:57] School administrators want the music programs, they just need to know that they have support. [39:29] When Mary is walking she listens to NPR or has quiet time. She does love the Sirius Radio Met Opera and Jazz channels. She's also not opposed to Bruno Mars. [41:16] The NAMM Foundation has a huge music research database. This information is open source and can be used with citations.  [42:14] They also have press kits for any group trying to start a music program. The information is open to the public.  [45:10] Parents supporting students are truly making a difference with getting music programs in every school. [46:18] Darrell's takeaways: Mary's work is very much needed. Parents and non parents can get involved supporting band students. Volunteers can make children's lives better through their love of music. The podcast draws attention to the work of the organization. Have a podcast that gains awareness of work being done and your partners. Be relentlessly positive. Get into the conversation and build relationships with leaders and the school board. Ask for a three year commitment. They need support to figure out how to get funding. Use NAMM resources. It's astounding what people will do when they feel support. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Mary Luehrsen NAMM The NAMM Show NAMM Foundation Mary Luehrsen on Twitter NAMM Foundation on Facebook The NAMM Foundation on Twitter NAMM Foundation on YouTube “Talking Up Music Education” Podcast Music is for Life - Music Tells Our Story

Feb 2020

51 min 24 sec

Jennifer Tribe is the director of content at Auvik Networks. Auvik makes software for Managed Service Providers or MSPs. MSPs are the companies and people that handle IT solutions for businesses that don’t have in-house IT departments. Auvik has focused on content marketing from the beginning. Jennifer is the perfect person to head up this effort. She is a trained journalist, a huge fan of writing great copy and Copyhackers, and has worked in multiple content roles from blogger, to book publisher, to podcast host. Jennifer is also the host of the Frankly MSP podcast. Many vendors in the network and MSP space have “company name” podcasts, but Jennifer and the people at Auvik decided to take their podcast in a different direction. They wanted to focus on sharing great content and helping MSPs not advertising for their company. That’s why they chose The Frankly MSP name for their podcast. The podcast was so popular that they now have a Frankly MSP resource section and just held their first Frankly MSP Live event. Jennifer shares some interesting facts about her company and her podcast, and why they deliberately have an accessible conversational tone in all of their content.  She also shares how the Auvik polar bear mascot can help lighten the conversation about IT and networking. His name is Nanook, which is Inuit for polar bear. She also shares what Auvik means in Inuit and how it fits in perfectly with their fun arctic theme. We talk about the usefulness of having a blog and newsletter before starting a podcast. Jennifer also shares how Frankly MSP has evolved and why it’s important to pay attention to what is and isn’t working. We learn what Jennifer believes is the key to podcasting success, her regrets, and why her favorite vacation spot might just be one of the world’s most beautiful places.  Show Notes: [02:56] Jennifer works in marketing at Auvik Networks. They make software for Managed Service Providers or MSPs. These are companies that other companies outsource their IT to.  [03:43] The Frankly MSP mascot is a polar bear named Nanook which is the Inuit name for polar bear. Auvik is also the Inuit name for a block of snow used to build an igloo.  [04:01] They use an arctic theme in their marketing.  [04:41] Nanook adds personality to technical IT work.  [06:12] Auvik has been focused on using content marketing from the beginning. They want to add value and not just talk about their product, but they also want to help MSPs be better. [06:29] They had an established blog and newsletter. In 2017, when they were launching the podcast, they wanted to call it something other than the Auvik podcast.  [06:54] The name needed to convey that the podcast was about helping MSPs by providing information. They named the podcast Frankly MSP and after it's success, they spun Frankly MSP into a broader content brand including the blog and Frankly MSP Live. [07:34] The first Frankly MSP Live event was in January in Santa Barbara, CA, and it was so much fun. They had speakers, and Jennifer did a live podcast recording.  [09:45] Jennifer met many fans of the podcast at the event.  [10:26] She does pay attention to downloads. Numbers do tell them if they are resonating. The real goal is to put Auvik forward as a valued content brand. This strategy has been working.  [13:09] The sincerity of the people at the conference was awesome. One listener even prints out the notes and takes them to meetings.  [14:17] The podcast was intended to expand the audience. They had a news portion, but it wasn't evergreen. The news portion also bogged down the production schedule. They now just focus on the interview and skip the news section.  [16:31] The podcast has helped increase their profile in the industry and their brand. [17:46] The sales reps and business development reps listen to the podcast and it helps them understand their customers. It's a great internal communication tool now.  [18:51] Jennifer uses Todoist to keep track of everything.  [19:29] They had a blog and newsletter to get the word out about the podcast. Having avenues of communication are key to starting.  [20:22] The podcast comes out every other week. The newsletter comes out in the weeks in between. Each issue of the newsletter features the last two blog posts and the latest podcast. They will also have more detailed blog posts about some of the podcast episodes. [21:52] Jennifer regrets not starting the podcast sooner. [23:36] Consistency is key with podcasting just like it is with blogging. Choose a schedule that you can commit to and then make sure you hit your schedule every time. [24:12] There are a lot of things you can do with your podcast so put a lot of thought into your format. [25:08] You want to work your podcasts into the rhythms of people's lives. [26:00] Jennifer's copy writing hero is Joanna Wiebe of Copyhackers. She has all of their ebooks and refers to them often. The Copyhackers blog and courses are also excellent.  [27:02] The most recent book she read was Profit First by Mike Michalowicz who was the keynote speaker at Frankly MSP Live. [27:20] A goal is to grow the podcast audience and get people more involved. [28:13] Jennifer likes to vacation in Northern Ontario in the Muskoka area where there are lots of lakes, evergreens, and rocky landscapes. She thinks it's one of the most beautiful places on Earth. [30:17] Darrell's Takeaways: Jennifer's journalism background came out during our discussion. She talked about establishing a blog and a newsletter. These are important pieces. You can leverage these items to grow your podcast and gain momentum through the podcast. The podcast isn't focused on the company, it's focused on helping MSPs. Ask how you can create a podcast for your audience? Clearly discover how you define success. Be consistent with your release.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Auvik Frankly MSP Frankly MSP Live 2020 Todoist Copyhackers Profit First Muskoka Auvik Networks on Twitter Auvik Networks on Facebook Auvik Networks on LinkedIn “How do I build an audience for my podcast?”

Feb 2020

34 min 42 sec

What do you get when you take a fun loving Southern family with a hilariously authentic mom and combine that with media? You get the Radkes. The Radkes are a loud, sweet, and charming family from East Texas led by David “The Attorney General” Radke and fun loving mom Melissa. Melissa Radke is the author of Eat Cake. Be Brave. The host of the Ordinary People Ordinary Things podcast, and the star of the family sitcom The Radkes featuring her family. I talk to Melissa and David about the podcast and ask a couple of behind the scenes questions about the show. Melissa’s wit and offbeat humor made her a social media success when she recorded a rant about the inconvenience of “Red Ribbon Week” at her children’s school. She is no stranger to being in the limelight. Melissa spent 15 years in Nashville, Tennessee pursuing her dream of singing and performing, before returning home to Texas. Melissa’s career has taken some twists and turns, but she believes she’s where she is supposed to be helping people by being her true authentic self. She is someone that other people can relate too, because she is just like them.  I talk to Melissa and David about their podcast. I get the inside scoop on how they organize the show and schedule guests. They also offer wisdom on being authentic, knowing the audience you are speaking to, podcast categories, and how real life can’t be scheduled too far ahead. Melissa also talks a little bit about her and David’s morning show and how being themselves just works. I ask about what the future has in store, and Melissa shares that she is working on a new book and shares the name of the second podcast she is starting. She also shares her biggest dream for the future in this fun show.  Show Notes: [03:13] Darrell's wife is from East Texas similar to Melissa.  [04:47] About a year after things took off for Melissa online, she got a message from a woman who said she didn't have a reason to live, but then she saw one of Melissa's videos, and it sounded just like her.  [05:44] Melissa realized that people were listening and it was meaning something.  [06:29] Melissa has an ability to tell stories and share her life in an authentic way. [07:57] We wanted every episode of the show to be based on real life that really happened. Some things had to be relived a bit. [09:12] Melisa and David have a live morning show on YouTube, Instagram, and IGTV. They are just themselves and it works.  [09:56] Now in the evening when they check their views, they often have about fifteen thousand viewers. [10:45] Melissa thinks one of the reasons that things have spread like wildfire is because she just looks like other people. [12:31] The things that Melissa used to want to change about herself are now the things that make her stand out. She likes herself a lot better in her forties. [13:41] Melissa is the creative and David is the technical side of this marriage. David is very good at staying ahead of the Curve. [14:21] Melissa started listening to podcasts and she found herself thinking about the things that she would do differently. David was the motivator behind the podcast. [15:18] David knew that podcasting was a great way to get their voice out and communicate with people while they were in transit or at the gym. [17:26] When you're trying to get your voice out there and build your brand, it's important to be on as many platforms as possible.  [18:36] Melissa's podcast was put in the religious category. It allows her to bring out a different side that she doesn't show on other platforms.  [20:40] Knowing your audience and categories is important. Know what audience that you are speaking too.  [22:04] Melissa and David are rolling out a new podcast that is completely different than their current one. She is super excited. [22:29] The new podcast is going to be about Melissa's reviews of binge watching streaming services. It's going to be called Streamher.  [23:43] Streamher should debut in the middle of February.  [24:47] Don't get too obsessed with download numbers or 5 Star reviews. Everyone's show is on a different journey. [27:20] Melissa's podcast is interview based. David is the one who keeps everything organized.  [27:52] He uses Calendly to schedule interviews. He uses Air Table to get all of the guest information. Then they use Zoom to record the episode.  [29:22] Batching too early can be a mistake when you are talking about people's lives. Their stories can change. Batch maybe four episodes ahead, but don't go months ahead. Fresh shows are also better for cross promotion.  [32:16] Melissa's jam are boy bands. Her current favorite is Jonas Brothers, but she loves New Kids on the Block and even got to meet them when she was 16.  [34:02] Melissa's parents were extremely generous people, and she learned generosity from them.  [35:14] Melissa's family agreed to be part of the show, because Melissa always respected their privacy in the past. She also doesn't want to embarrass her children who happen to be really great sports. [36:19] Melissa feels like she's just getting warmed up. It's her dream to have a talk show one day. [39:24] Darrell's takeaways: It's really clear how authentic they are and how people are drawn to that. It's challenging to be vulnerable when you are in the driver's seat. If you find yourself saying I would do this differently, you might be onto something. Identifying your own uniqueness will help you stand apart. It's important to remember who your audience is and where they're at. Downloads don't define success but reviews are a good indicator. Batching too far ahead can be a mistake. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Melissa Radke Ordinary People Ordinary Things Eat Cake. Be Brave. Melissa Radke on Facebook Melissa Radke on Instagram Melissa Radke on Twitter Calendly Airtable Zoom

Feb 2020

44 min 20 sec

My friend Chip Mims is here to talk about his new podcast, his retired podcasts, and even one that we did together. Chip is a lifelong science fiction and fantasy comics geek. He loves great comedy, drama, art, music, politics, and beer. He is a Renaissance man when it comes to his taste and podcasting. We’ve been friends for a really long time, and he is our longest running customer at Pro Podcast Solutions.  Up until recently, Chip was the CEO of Mims Distributing Company. Chip spent 28 years helping to bring the best beer, wine, and specialty beverages to his area. He also walked the talk with his own love of craft beers and specialty drinks. He started the Tales From the Cask podcast to talk about craft beers and beverages that he loved. This was also the first podcast that I produced for him. It has now reached 344 episodes and is now retired, coinciding with the closing of Mims Distributing.  Chip isn’t done with podcasting, though. He has a brand new podcast out called The Alethiometer which is based on the HBO series called His Dark Materials. This podcast is co-hosted with his wife Sara. Chip and Sara also hosted Watching the Americans which was based on the show The Americans which has now ended. Chip and I also did an X-Files podcast called We Still Believe.  We talk about how we met, our love of cool shows, and podcasting adventures. Chip shares how he got started, what he wished he had done sooner, and the surprising result of connections he made through his podcasts. He also gives tips on landing those big guests and some of the connections that he’s made. We even find out how many degrees I am away from Kevin Bacon. We have fun as I ask Chip three questions from Good Ol’ Boy Mike and talk about our favorite shows.  Show Notes: [03:04] It's been seven years since Darrell and Chip were at the Fringe finale. Darrell had a big finale party in Oklahoma City where he lives. Chip told Darrell that he was thinking about starting a podcast right at the time that Darrell was thinking about starting a podcast production service.  [04:45] Chip and his wife had been listening to a Lost podcast. They then started listening to a Fringe podcast. Chip thought it would be fun to do a beer podcast which led to Tales From the Cask.  [07:17] Chip and a couple of co-workers decided to start a podcast. They recorded a few shows, and then they bought the equipment list that Darrell gave them. That's how they got started in 2013. [09:39] Chip was client number two and has been the longest standing client. He was also co-host with Darrell on the We Still Believe podcast about the X-Files. He also has two other podcasts. The current one is The Alethiometer and his past one was Watching the Americans.  [11:51] Podcasting takes awhile to get into a cadence and rhythm with your co-host. Chip approached the podcast as something fun that they wanted to discuss.  [14:27] Chip wanted listeners to discover Tales From the Cask organically. They wanted to talk about things they loved. Even things they didn't sell. It also attracted breweries to their distributor.  [16:57] Chip and his wife go to Paris every year, and Chip shares his favorite spicy beer from Paris.  [18:24] Chip thinks it would have been great to start with good equipment from day one. He had three co-hosts, and they just got started with what they had and bought the equipment a few episodes in.  [21:32] The bar of podcast audio quality has been raised over the years. [22:08] Challenges have been logistics with interviews and the guests equipment.  [24:46] One of Chip's most fun interviews was with Jim Koch the founder of Samuel Adams beer.  [26:51] Using social media can be a great way to get in touch with potential guests even actors in the show you're talking about. [29:31] Chip made so many friends from podcast listeners and had a huge finale party for The Americans. He's had friends who've followed him from show to show.  [32:54] It's really fun to get audio feedback and play it back. Interaction creates a cool energy.  [33:37] The Americans podcast is retired because the show ended. Tales has also retired.  [35:04] Chip and his wife watched season one of The Americans on a flight. They couldn't find a great podcast about the show, so they started one. They did five or six seasons and had a great show.  [37:12] At the end of the season, they had a big goodbye show. [37:38] Mims Distributing is going out of business after 56 years. Chip decided to close the podcast with the business. They had a quick goodbye show and thanked the listeners. It's bittersweet, but it felt like the right time. [39:17] There was a lot of listener surprise, but people were really kind, gracious, and grateful.  [40:46] Chip answers Good Ol' Boy Mike's three questions.  [46:45] Chip's dad taught him integrity and honesty. His mom was super kind and people loved her. He tries to treat people with kindness the way that she did.  [49:48] If in Paris, Chip recommends the elevated walkway near Notre Dame. It's an old train track that's been turned into a walkway, and it goes about 5 miles outside of Paris. You may not know it's there unless your from Paris, but it has amazing views of the city. [51:09] Chips tops three TV shows are: Star Trek the Next Generation, X-Files , and Lost. [51:25] Darrell's top three TV shows are: The original Twilight Zone, Lost, and it's a toss-up between Fringe and Breaking Bad. [53:20] Chip's Superman power would be flight.  [54:59] You have to ask your favorite guest to get them on your show. Don't be intimidated. Find a respectful way to approach someone and don't get discouraged.  [59:33] Darrell's first beer was a Coors or Bud Light. Darrell prefers pilsners. His magic refrigerator might contain guinness.  [01:04:08] Podcasting is the right kind of addiction for Chip.  [01:06:49] Darrell's Takeaways: To get that special guest on your podcast start low and work your way up. When Chip started Tales From The Cask, he didn't make promoting his business his first goal. It's important to incorporate listeners into your show.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Mims Distributing Company Tales From the Cask We Still Believe The Alethiometer The Alethiometer on Facebook The Alethiometer on Twitter (919) 907- 0542 TheAlethiometerPodcast@Gmail.com His Dark Materials Watching the Americans Chip Mims on Twitter Chip Mims on LinkedIn Fringe Brasserie de la Goutte d'Or Jim Koch How Talking About Everything Good in Life Turned Into an Award Winning Podcast and Radio Show with Good Ol’ Boy Mike

Jan 2020

1 hr 11 min

Tom Conrad is the Chief Business Development Officer and co-owner of Rock Recovery Center. Rock is located in West Palm Beach, Florida where they offer a unique and effective approach to drug and alcohol treatment that is fitness and adventure based. What sets the programs at Rock apart is that in order to get and maintain sobriety, there needs to be a purpose. People need to enjoy being sober. The adventure based activities help highlight this approach. They also offer group therapy, and he works with addicts and alcoholics to help them break free from the chains of addiction.  He has also managed to break free from his own addictions and now makes it a priority to share his experiences with others through Rock Recovery Center. He's been a certified addiction counselor since 2013. He finds great enjoyment with helping others through adventure and outdoor activities. He has built a life beyond belief since getting sober himself. He's married, has two beautiful children, and has rekindled his love for archery. He takes pride in his wins, and he loves showing others how they can do the same.  Tom started the Real Recovery Talk podcast in 2017. He and his co-host Ben use the show to educate addicts and family members of addicts about recovery, addiction, and the process. He is impacting the world through his podcast and Rock in different ways. Tom shares his journey, how Rock began, and the impact of each one. He also shares his future plans for helping even more people who may not have all of the resources to attend a recovery program. Tom has the desire to help people in any capacity that he can and is helping to transform lives in a tangible way. I'm really excited to talk about his program and experience. Show Notes: [03:38] Tom is a week or two away from hitting episode 100 of his Real Recovery Talk podcast. [04:27] Tom's most personal episode was episode one. This was his most vulnerable episode. He just ended up recording something. It was very humbling and personal. [07:12] When Tom was 26, he discovered that he was a full-blown alcoholic and drug addict. He was fired from his job. On September 15th of 2010, he had to go to treatment.  [07:41] He went to a treatment center in Jacksonville. He spent 45 days, and then went to West Palm Beach for an outpatient treatment experience for the next 9 months.  [08:21] After being sober for a year, he got his first job in the drug and alcohol treatment industry. [09:28] He's worked in almost every department including operations and clinical. He's also a certified addictions counselor. [09:40] After being sober for about 4 years, he had an opportunity to open up what is now Rock Recovery Center. It opened in 2013 and is still going strong today. [11:26] Traditional treatment consists of a repetitive cookie cutter approach to group therapy.  [12:06] They wanted Rock to be different, so they made it fitness and adventure based. They still have group rooms, but they also have activities a couple of times a week.  [12:58] They want their clients to know that they are able to have fun without using drugs or alcohol.  [14:19] Dealing with loved ones can be a challenge for treatment facilitators, but Tom is good at talking to them. The podcast also helps them understand how to get through it.  [18:45] Family members can listen to the podcast and learn so much about what they are going through and what the addict experiences. It's a great resource. [21:47] Tom used to think podcast success was measured by downloads, but now he measures it by each download being a person who he reaches.  [25:20] Podcast outreach is another challenge that he has. He doesn't market all of the time. He also thinks video for YouTube is a bit of a chore. [29:04] Ben is Tom's co-host. They brainstorm and talk to parents and loved ones. They try to find their biggest pain points. Tom also repurposes blog posts on popular topics.  [31:11] Tom and Ben record, and PPS handles everything else.  [32:01] Tom wants to offer more than Rock and the podcast for people who don't have the resources. He wants to create some free material and offer lower level sober coaching.  [33:35] He wants to focus on what he is good at and become great at it.  [34:28] Tom loves heavy metal and Slipknot.  [35:35] If you are struggling with addiction, ask for help because you can't do everything on your own. There's nothing wrong with getting help, and there's nothing to be ashamed of. [37:33] Families need to show support and let their loved one know that they aren't there to criticize.  [43:10] Darrell's Takeaways: Tom keeps tabs on the tasks and the media outlets that he uses. If it becomes too much, think about how much time you are putting in and how much reward you are getting. He gets content inspiration from personal experience and other people's content as inspiration. Reach out to Tom if you or someone you love can benefit from what he is doing. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Rock Recovery Center Real Recovery Talk Real Recovery Talk on YouTube Tom Conrad on Instagram Zoom H6

Jan 2020

46 min 34 sec

Eric Tivers is the host of the ADHD reWired podcast which is a number one rated and reviewed podcast on the topic of ADHD in Apple podcasts. Eric is a licensed clinical social worker, speaker, entrepreneur, coach, and productivity enthusiast. He loves helping people and after a few different paths, he discovered that podcasting about ADHD and coaching people with ADHD was the perfect fit. When Eric was in college he discovered that he had ADHD. He knew something was wrong when the more he studied the worse his grades became. During the summer, he went on a date with someone who had ADHD, and a light bulb went off, and he realized that he might also have ADHD. He was diagnosed and medicated, but he knew he still needed strategies for coping with it. It was a long and winding road, but he now helps others with the things that he has learned and is still learning. Eric’s podcast has reached a milestone and passed the 300 episode mark. Eric shares some of the most impactful moments created through the podcast. One was how a heartfelt listener letter led to him switching from solo episodes to interviews. He also shares how he almost didn’t publish his most personal and authentic episode, but when he did, it became his most popular episode.  He was one of the first podcasters in the ADHD space, but many others are now in the space. Eric shares how he feels about this and his philosophy around competitors. He also shares how his willingness to experiment and try new things has led to things working out better than he thought. We even get a personal story about the impact ADHD reWired had on a former PPS team member. Eric shares abundant knowledge about podcasting, learning what works, and ADHD. Show Notes: [03:56] Eric didn't learn that he had ADHD until he was in college. He got a 2.2 GPA in his first semester in college. He put down the beers and hit the books and ended up with a 1.8 GPA.  [04:33] He knew something wasn't right.  [05:49] During the summer he had a dinner date with someone who said they had ADHD. One clue was reading that triggered thoughts and never focusing on the reading.  [06:38] He went to the school health center and got evaluated for ADHD.  [08:28] The medication allowed him to quiet all of his thoughts. He felt normal for the first time. His head wasn't in the clouds. [09:31] He became the hardest working yet least efficient student on the campus. [09:47] After grad school, he realized that he needed strategies to go along with his medication. [12:02] He changed his major to social work and fell in love with it. When you enjoy what you are learning, it's fun. [13:36] He began working with autism and found that there were a lot of similarities between autism and ADHD such as challenges with task transitioning.  [17:42] He got a job as a clinical program director in a residential treatment center for autism. This lasted for 18 months. [18:02] Then he worked with kids with Asperger's Syndrome. He ended up getting laid off, and it was time to start his own practice. [19:51] He then worked with autism and ADHD in his own practice. [21:19] Two years into it, his son was diagnosed with autism. He started his podcast the same day.  [23:22] He decided to step away from working with families on the spectrum and focus more on his podcast. [23:33] It started as a solo show. His first guest interview was with a listener that sent him a beautiful letter.  [27:24] Listener's were grateful when Eric shared that he actually had ADHD.  [28:19] He now runs coaching groups for people with ADHD.  [30:48] He had to scale back from three groups to two groups. Now he has a membership program.  [31:42] Everything has evolved just like the podcast. The less he focuses on, the more he does. [35:13] Ironically, the more missteps he took with the podcast, the more popular it became. He tries to just show up and be human. [37:15] He's trying to shorten his episodes and get closer to the 45-minute mark. [37:37] He spends a lot of time writing his ads and trying to make them engaging and compelling. This is how he gets people to sign up for his coaching programs. [40:12] Eric has reached 300 episodes. That's a milestone.  [43:31] Eric has also helped start other podcasts. When it comes to competition, he doesn't think there's a shortage of people who need help. What resonates with one person might resonate differently for someone else, so there's room in the space. [47:56] ADHD reWired is impacting lives. [51:42] Darrell's takeaways: The two things that made the biggest impact on Eric's podcast are the letter from the listener which led him to interviewing that listener, and the episode he recorded in the car that showed his authenticity. He also makes sure that he keeps his listeners in mind. Who is your listener? What do they want to listen to? Things happen, you're going to miss an episode. Welcome competitors in your space. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free ADHD reWired ADHD reWired Podcast Crested Kimono: Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family 47: ADHD at 55 MPH Brene Brown Jeff Walker How to ADHD 128: How to ADHD with Jessica McCabe

Jan 2020

56 min 16 sec

I am so happy to have the wonderful Aimee J. here to talk about chasing your dreams and living an authentic life. Aimee is a wonderfully positive person to be around. She always makes me smile. She is the host of the Chasing Dreams podcast. Aimee interviews people who have achieved their dreams by taking chances. She believes that everyone should live without regrets. It’s her goal to inspire people to make moves, take chances, and chase their dreams.  Aimee knows a little bit about this topic. She has a master’s degree in computer science, she was a NASA engineer, and she is an attorney. In spite of these achievements, she didn’t feel happy with what she was doing until she discovered podcasting. What started out as a fun hobby with a friend about their favorite show led to a calling and passion to help other people. Aimee uses her Chasing Dreams podcast to inspire and help others achieve their dreams.  She shares her background and the story that led to this passion. She also shares her setup and how she runs things behind the scenes. She has a producer and a VA along with help from Pro Podcast Solutions. This is the perfect episode for the beginning of the year. Aimee shares her motto for this year and how it will be woven into everything that she does. She also shares some unique things that she has done to stand out from the rest of the crowd.  We also get to hear about what she has in store for the future and the direction she is taking her show and plans for merchandise. We talk about how everyone is enough and should get started pursuing their dreams. We also talk about how special listener feedback can be and the importance of gratitude. This episode will inspire you and make you smile.  Show Notes: [02:54] Aimee is always smiling and has a positive glow. There's something about her that makes me feel better after speaking with her. [04:09] Aimee chooses a motto a year. She wants something to guide her year. 2019 was embrace your fears. The 2020 motto is I am enough. This reminds her that who she is and how she is is enough for this world.  [05:18] Having a certain level of ability is enough, but she wants to make it to the best of her ability. 2020 is a milestone year for Aimee, because she turns 40. [07:41] Aimee is a twin. Her and her sister are very different. She's an Indian in America. In India, she's seen as an American. In America, she's not always seen that way. She also has cultural expectations that are always playing out. [08:36] She had a college scholarship in computer science.  [09:28] She had an internship at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She worked there after college and got her master's in computer science.  [09:59] She wasn't happy with what she was doing, so she decided to go to law school like her twin sister. [10:53] She had a wonderful mentorship and a job, but she still wasn't happy with it. [11:08] She started experimenting with podcasting. [11:38] She loved podcasting with her friend about her favorite show. She enjoyed working on the podcast and on social media. Her podcast caught the attention of the cast and crew of the show Haven.  [12:00] They even got to do a whole day of interviews on the set in Canada.  [12:24] The show ended in 2016, but people still listen to the podcast. [12:46] The power of podcasting brought everyone together. [13:28] There are so many people who are following their passions and who are happy, especially in creative arts. [13:45] Aimee decided to do a show called Aimee J. Live where she talked to her friends who were happy. She did this for about six months. [14:03] She raised money with a Go Fund Me account to podcast.  [14:35] Darrell and PPS helped Aimee get going with equipment, intro, outro, show art, and everything.  [15:09] It was slow, but people started listening. She also got a job offer with Comcast. She moved to Philadelphia and took the job. [16:00] It's now her goal to help people and show them that they are and they can do what they want to do. It's her job to help others chase their dreams.  [16:31] Her day job helps fund her podcast. She is still having fun.  [19:43] Aimee sends her guests gifts. Her episodes aren't made by themselves, so she wants to give back to those that she is grateful for. She sends guests wristbands that say Don't Stop, Keep Going.  [24:00] To meet people at Podcast Movement, Aimee carried two signs that said I am a Dream Chaser or Chase Your Dreams. She would take pictures with the sign and share on social. She would follow-up and nurture the relationship. [28:53] It was a fun way to meet people and get to know them. [31:10] Aimee now has a producer. She uses a Calendly link to schedule guests. She also sends them a Google form with questions. She also asks for a picture for artwork. Each interview has a folder with notes. They also have final version files. Her producer now handles all of this stuff. She creates a bio and audio notes.  [33:59] She also has a VA. [36:07] Podcasting can be time consuming. Aimee is a fan of batching. Balancing everything is the challenge. Her solution was switching from weekly to biweekly. [39:16] A listener posted that one of the episodes changed her life. Feedback can mean so much, and it's appreciated.  [42:15] Aimee feels she can do more to help people. She wants to talk more about mental health. She wants to encourage people that they are enough. She is going to have merchandise and do more speaking. [45:58] Aimee's uncle would always teach them to give back. It was the motto for his life. He was known as the jewel of the church. [51:12] Darrell's takeaways: She makes him smile. You are enough. We need to get started and that means we are enough. We should all be looking for ways to stand out with our podcasts. Aimee sent recognition plaques to her first 100 guests. She also takes her Dream Chaser board to conferences. If you're overwhelmed, start by giving something small to a VA. Always be giving. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Aimee J.  Chasing Dreams Podcast Aimee J. on Facebook Aimee J. on Twitter Aimee J. on Instagram Aimee J. on YouTube Aimee J. on TikTok NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Haven Zoom H6 Ep. 49: Darrell Darnell – Knowing When to Follow Your Passion and Do What You Love Stephen Hart Trailblazers Podcast Ep. 100: Dr. Freeman Hrabowski – Hold Fast to Dreams Podcast Movement Calendly Ep. 86: Joe Wilner – You Have a Calling

Jan 2020

56 min 33 sec

Jodey Smith is the podcast launch specialist for Pro Podcast Solutions. This podcast is devoted to two things. Telling the stories of other podcasters and helping people who are new to podcasting or in the prelaunch phase. Jodey is a podcaster and a launch specialist, so he is the perfect guest for this end of the year show. We are taking the holidays off and will be back at the beginning of January.  Jodey is a former corporate cubicle employee. He started listening to podcasts at his desk, back in 2007, and he started his very own podcast in 2013. At one time, he even got paid to podcast about a TV show. Isn't that every kid's dream? He started answering podcaster’s questions in a Facebook group which eventually led to him being paid for podcast consulting advice. Since that time, he's launched over a hundred podcasts.  As our launch specialist at Pro Podcast Solutions, Jody is responsible for helping our customers get their podcast launched. He asks them about their goals and expectations. Then takes them through a four to six week launch cycle where he answers questions and guides them through weekly calls. He works through technical issues like sound and equipment setup. He helps them find their ideal listener. He also handles technical issues like getting feeds setup and website implementation.  Today, Jodey shares the common challenges and missteps that new podcasters are up against. He talks about the importance of sound quality and shares the best microphones for great sound at any price level. He talks about what actually moves the needle when it comes to ranking in Apple Podcasts. We discuss the benefits of podcasting, and Jodey shares some podcasts that are doing it right. We explore unique creativity, artwork, titles, and everything to get a podcast off the ground.  Show Notes: [05:21] Jodey loves guiding people through the podcast launch process. The first thing that happens is a call where Jodey finds out what success looks like to the podcaster. He wants to get an idea of their expectations and their goals. [05:59] Success looks different to different people. One person may want one hundred new listeners and another one might just want a couple of new clients. While someone else may want 10,000 subscribers and paying sponsors.  [07:59] There are certain questions and flashes of ideas that you won't even consider until you get into the process of podcasting. [08:29] Ideally we set up a podcast launch over a four to six week period. Each week Jodey gets on a Skype or Zoom call with the client and talks through any questions they may have and focuses on getting things in order.  [09:06] The focus can be on things like getting comfortable with the equipment or finding the right target audience. Jodey also sets up the feed and integrates the podcast with the website. They even do practice episodes. By the end of the launch everything is up and ready to go. [10:32] Apple podcasts is still the top directory. Spotify has grown to around 9% to 11%.  [11:44] You want to be on Apple podcasts and Spotify, and you want your feed to be indexed by Google podcasts. You also want to make a link for Android devices and Stitcher. [12:05] Most small directories poll from Apple or iTunes, so if you submitted to that directory you'll be in the others. [12:52] Google is treating podcast feeds the way they treat websites. You want to make sure that your podcast feed is set up correctly, so Google will call it. [13:27] You can also put some header code in your website. It usually takes four to six weeks for Google to index a podcast feed. [15:08] When you have a launch date, the best thing to do is submit your feeds well ahead of time. You can use a placeholder show. [17:25] New & Noteworthy has been around for awhile. Jodey advises clients not to worry about it on this point.  [19:52] You should get the best microphone that you can afford. This makes the difference between a good and great sounding podcast. [21:04] There are currently 800,000 podcast in iTunes. If you dive a little deeper and compare it to the number of blogs that exist, podcasting isn't saturated. Plus, only 41% of those are active. [22:33] People should think about podcasting as a long-term endeavor and focus on great content and consistency. [23:36] One common issue that podcasters have is the audio quality of their guests. It's always a wild card. You can try to help mitigate these issues by sending your guest some instructions to follow. [29:56] Jodey recommends dynamic microphones. It'll make podcasts sound better. Condenser microphones pick up more ambient noise, so they need to be used in more of a sound booth atmosphere. [31:35] If you've already purchased a Yeti microphone, you can get the best sound out of it by having the microphone close to your mouth. You will need a foam windscreen or pop filter to have the microphone about 6 inches from your mouth. Then turn the gain way down. [33:59] Jodey loves meeting so many creative people. We even have a couple of creative clients who decided to sell a premium holiday episode for $3.99, they had 177 purchases the first week. By trying something new, they made an extra $600 in a week.  [35:44] They just used PayPal and a downloadable mp3.  [37:33] Give your audience something and build your list. Don't ask for ratings and reviews. Amy Porterfield is a master of this. You can build deeper relationships by communicating through email.  [39:50] Subscribers are the biggest factor in iTunes ranking. [41:12] Titles are important. You can have a creative or bottom line title. This is something that tells your ideal listener that this podcast is for me. A good example is Dental Implant Practices by Dr. Phillip Gordon.  [42:45] The danger of being creative is you may not attract your ideal listener. If you don't have a following, you might want to go with the bottom line title. [44:03] You want your artwork to let your ideal listener know if the podcast is for them. You don't have to have a microphone in your artwork or include podcast in your title. [49:07] Serve the audience you have. You don't have to have a huge audience, just serve the people your podcast is meant to serve. [52:32] Darrell's takeaways: It's not a sprint, it's a marathon. What if your 300 listeners were in your living room showing up to hear what you have to say? That puts a different perspective on subscriber numbers. Serve your audience no matter how big or small. Make sure you use a good microphone. It doesn't have to be expensive, just good. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Stitcher ATR 2100 Shure SM58 Focusrite Scarlett Heil PR40 Electro-Voice RE320 Amy Porterfield 80% of Being an Entrepreneur Is What You Think and Feel with Amy Porterfield Dental Implant Practices Mindset Strategies That Go Beyond Podcasting With Cliff Ravenscraft

Dec 2019

56 min 27 sec

Rural hospitals offer jobs and much needed emergency and local healthcare. You would think with a growing population, that the number of rural hospitals would be increasing. Unfortunately, that's not the case. Rural health care is in crisis. In the last 10 years, at least 114 rural hospitals have closed in the United States. The impacts of this are far reaching. The lack of fast access to healthcare can have devastating consequences in emergency situations. The lack of healthcare resources and loss of jobs also has a negative impact on small communities.  Dr. Bill Auxier has made it his mission to prevent further hospital closures. One way he is doing this is his Rural Health Leadership Radio podcast, which helps rural hospital leaders know what other hospital leaders are doing. Not being in contact with other leaders has been one of the challenges these CEOs have faced. He also received the 2019 National Rural Health Association President’s Award because of his podcast. He is even developing a certification program for rural hospital CEOs to help increase the number of qualified candidates.  Bill grew up in the rural Midwest and began his healthcare career as a nurses aide while he was in school. He later went on to become the CEO of a surgical device company and traveled all over the world. Eventually, he decided to go back to his roots and his passion by teaching leadership and advocating for rural health care in the US. He is the CEO of Dynamic Leadership Academy and Bill Auxier Healthcare Executive Coaching. Bill is also a speaker and author of To Lead, Follow. This enlightening podcast is about leadership, rural healthcare, and how Bill’s podcast affected his work and his success.  Show Notes: [05:37] Bill feels that our core values are shaped by our experiences and the people that we've met. One of the exercises that he has leaders go through is reflecting on their upbringing.  [06:12] He grew up in a poor area of rural Southern Illinois. His dad was a Baptist preacher. It was a community that came together and chipped in when someone needed help.  [08:48] When a rural hospital closes, people have to drive further to get to a hospital, but the jobs are also lost.  [09:45] Rural hospitals closing have far reaching ramifications. Bill wants to do everything that he can to prevent further hospital closures.  [10:45] In high school and college, Bill worked as a nurses aide. This began his career in the healthcare industry.  [11:54] Bill wanted to share his passion for leadership and rural health care. If not for the close proximity of the small rural hospital, his family story would look different.  [15:37] Bill was the CEO of a surgical device company where he traveled all over the world.  [16:02] He then decided it was time to refocus on leadership and rural health care.  [16:31] Challenges that these small hospitals face is networking with other rural hospital leaders. Bill decided that he would create the Rural Health Leadership Radio Podcast to enable CEOs of rural hospitals to have a central place where they can get information and find out what other small hospital leaders are doing.  [17:35] Through his research, Bill found PPS which helped him get started, and we continue to work together today.  [18:24] He had 24 downloads his first month. He doesn't define success by downloads.  [19:14] Because of his podcast, Bill received the 2019 NRHA President's Award. The podcast has opened many doors for him, and listener's even come up to him at conferences.  [20:08] Hospital CEO turnover tops all industries. It's also hard to find qualified individuals, so Bill will be running a certification program for Rural Hospital CEOs.  [23:38] Challenges that Bill has faced with the podcast has been timing of guest interviews in time for production. Now he has the opposite problem with a bank of interviews, with experts wanting to know when the show will air.  [25:27] Some guests will write out their answers on his interview questionnaire, but then they read the answers.  [27:15] Bill targets some guests and others come to him. He uses an info packet with three segments. It has guest info, and he lets the guest have an opportunity to edit. He also sends a list of questions. He also book end questions. The third section is where the guest can add things they would like to talk about. [30:46] He now uses Basecamp and has an intern coordinate things. He also has a portable home made sound booth. Made with room dividers and plastic sheets and sound tiles. He also has a stand-up desk. He found a great voice over artist on Fiverr.  [33:51] Don't wait to start podcasting. Find a service like PPS and get going.  [36:43] He's very proud of his book To Lead, Follow. He's also a fan of What Got You Here Won't Get You There and Triggers. Bill is also a Dan Pink fan.  [37:48] Bills definition of leadership is when others follow when they don't have to.  [39:44] Darrell's takeaways: Bill's passion is fueled by how rural health care affected his family. We all need things to refuel or fill our tank. Bill defines success by how he is impacting his niche. Finding a balance between recording in advance and having too much lead time.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to get your first month free Bill Auxier Bill@BillAuxier.com To Lead, Follow Masters of Success Bill Auxier on LinkedIn Rural Health Leadership Radio Rural Health Leadership Radio Podcast National Rural Health Association What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be Books by Daniel Pink

Dec 2019

43 min 34 sec

Kristy Rodriguez is a mom, prenatal health coach, prenatal yoga teacher, and a hypnobirthing child birthing educator. She is also the creator of the Pure Nurture blog and the author of Pure Nurture: A Holistic Guide to a Healthy Baby and the host of the Pure Nurture Podcast. She uses several different platforms to get her message of empowering women to nurture and nourish themselves through pregnancy and motherhood to create a healthy new life for both mom and baby. One of these platforms is her podcast. Kristy’s story is a bit unique, because she wasn’t a podcast listener. When she launched her book, she had a publicist who booked her on several podcasts. She was actually a podcast guest before becoming a listener. After some doubt and “microphone fright” she realized that her guest appearances turned out better than she thought. Although as she dove further into podcasting, she realized that the editing process may have helped a bit.  On this episode, we talk about how Kristy was at first reluctant to become a mom, but then how she found her passion for holistic health, wellness, and being a birth coach. She always had a passion for teaching and now teaches live classes in the DC area along with online classes. Kristy specializes in prenatal and postpartum wellness and birth preparation through various yoga, meditation, and hypnobirthing classes. She also shares some great books and resources for birth education.  Kristy shares how her podcast has allowed her to share more knowledge from other experts. She also loves it when she gets positive feedback from listeners. She’s also pleased that her download numbers continue to go up. We also get to learn about Kristy’s podcast setup and the tools and programs she uses to make podcasting a little easier. She also shares her biggest challenge when podcasting. Which is one many of us can relate too.  Show Notes: [03:48] Kristy has had two babies and used hypnobirthing for her second birth. It opened up a whole new world to her. She is now super passionate about this topic. [04:13] She reads about healthy births and pregnancies just for pleasure.  [04:25] She teaches prenatal yoga. She's a prenatal health coach and a hypnobirthing child birthing educator. She is the author of Pure Nurture: A Holistic Guide to a Healthy Baby and the host of the Pure Nurture Podcast. [04:42] Kristy has discovered that she loves podcasting and connecting with other birth professionals.  [06:22] When Kristy was first married she wanted to postpone children because she had so much that she wanted to do. When she hit 30 her and her husband knew they needed to make a decision.  [06:37] She asked herself if she wanted to have children in her life when she was 50 or 60. She had her first daughter at 34 years old.  [08:58] At her core she is a teacher. She taught English for awhile. She loves sharing messages that inspire people to be healthy and lead healthier lives. [10:43] Podcasting is a platform that allows Kristy to create a beautiful diverse combination of teachings. [12:13] Pure Nurture is a community that consists of the podcast, classes, online classes, the blog, and the book.  [12:55] The podcast has allowed her a wider reach.  [15:33] She's not sure if the podcast has brought extra clients into the door, but she does know that the information she shares brings extra support to her clients.  [16:55] When people reach out to Kristy and thank her for the podcast, it really helps at those times that she is feeling down. [18:30] Seeing her numbers grow gives Kristy's podcast energy a boost.  [19:32] She began using Ecamm and Skype to record her interviews. She now uses Zoom.  [20:15] She then downloads the calls to garage band on her Mac. She then exports the files to Basecamp for the PPS team to do final edits and upload to Libsyn. She also has a VA to help with the show notes.  [23:33] She makes images on Canva and uses them for social media like Facebook and Instagram. She also has a weekly email where she shares her episodes.  [24:01] Calendly saves time for scheduling guests. She has a prebuilt questionnaire within Calendly.  [26:12] When her book launched, her PR person booked her on a bunch of podcasts. She was so nervous, but when she listened back, she thought she sounded good.  [27:23] A year or two later she sat in on a breakout session for podcasting. She then purchased a step-by-step course and followed it. She also heard Amy Porterfield say that she uses Pro Podcast Solutions for her editing, so she thought if Amy uses them, she could too. [29:15] The biggest challenge with podcasting is the time it takes. Kristy does pre-edits to make sure she is making the right point.  [31:28] Kristy is really working on establishing her online school and how best to serve moms. She's also consistently releasing a podcast every week. She has also got some big name guests to agree to be on her show. [32:47] She's also going to do some solo casts in 2020. [33:18] Pure Nurture is a book about healthy pregnancy.  [36:17] She loves Marc Anthony and Shakira.  [37:40] You can find Kristy online. She teaches live classes the Virginia.  [38:14] Darrell's Takeaways: Kristy said she doesn't have all of the answers and nobody does. So many of us put off starting a podcast, because we feel like an impostor on some level. Don't get bogged down in download numbers. Each download is a person. Audience feedback teaches and brings encouragement.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Pure Nurture Pure Nurture: A Holistic Guide to a Healthy Baby Pure Nurture Podcast Pure Nuture on Facebook Pure Nurture on Instagram Preparing for Birth and Breastfeeding with Molly Mills, RN & IBCLC Ecamm Skype Zoom Basecamp Libsyn Calendly Acuity  Pure Nurture: a Holistic Guide to a Healthy Baby | Kristy Rodriguez Amy Porterfield HypnoBirthing: The Mongan Method: A natural approach to a safe, easier, more comfortable birthing (3rd Edition) Magical Beginnings, Enchanted Lives: A Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth Through Meditation, Ayurveda, and Yoga Techniques Birth Partner 5th Edition:A Complete Guide to Childbirth for Dads, Partners, Doulas, and All Other Labor Companions Birth Without Fear: The Judgment-Free Guide to Taking Charge of Your Pregnancy, Birth, and Postpartum What to Expect When You're Expecting Ina May Gaskin Marc Anthony Vivir Mi Vida Shakira Chantaje

Dec 2019

40 min 53 sec

Mardi Dickinson is the founder and CEO of KymryGroup a digital media company that focuses on social marketing and photography. Mardi has decades of experience in the advertising, photography and publishing industries. She is also the owner, host and producer of BirdCallsRadio and the BirdCallsRadio podcast. This is a journalistic platform with guests that talk about wild birds and conservation.  Her practical knowledge of digital systems and culture enabled her to blend smart content creation with a promotional scheme critical to her current success. She is also a prolific and widely published photographer who has worked on the inside of the photography and publishing business. She has two master's degrees one in photography and one in marketing.  We talk about how Mardi got involved in bird watching and how podcasting was a natural transformation for her. In spite of this, she still faced challenges. She shares these challenges along with great advice for new podcasters. She also shares her world class equipment list and setup. We also get to learn about migratory birds and songbirds. Mardi shares some of her favorite birds to spot and one she is yet to find. She also shares her favorite places for bird watching. We talk about the challenges of tackling a small niche, and Mardi’s vision of overcoming that.  We also talk about photography and our nostalgia for old school film developing. Darkrooms and all. Mardi shares how she is a conservationist and historian. She uses her work to share the history of conservation with future generations. She even has a legacy podcast series of important conservationists that have passed on. All of Mardi’s guests are her favorites, but she shares a little about a couple of special guests. Mardi is doing important work that will benefit future generations.  Show Notes: [03:48] Mardi's mom was an author of children's books and a professional photographer. They lived in the country, and Mardi loved being outdoors. [04:51] Her family also went on outdoor adventures on weekends.  [05:57] She was in front of the camera a lot but preferred being behind the camera. Her first picture was published in a local paper when she was 15. [06:54] In high school, she was the editor of the yearbook and paper. She also did side projects.  [07:06] She has two master's degrees one in photography and one in marketing. She also mentored with several well known artists.  [08:21] Darrell and Mardi both miss the old days of darkrooms.  [10:04] Mardi's husband is also a photographer. On dates, they would go bird watching.  [11:39] She became fascinated at the behavior of birds. It became an obsession.  [12:28] BirdCallsRadio started in 2011. Mardi took the show over from a partner. She changed the focus and made it interview based.  [14:06] There aren't very many podcasts about wild birds and conservation. She knew that if she positioned it correctly and was patient, the podcast would get the attention it should.  [15:04] Mardi is a historian and has several very important archived calls. She wants to share the stories of those who have lived lives that we haven't known. She wants to leave information about conservation for generations.  [16:50] The podcast is about more than wild birds. It's about conservation as a whole. The purpose is to show us where we came from in order to know where to go. [18:44] One of Mardi's first legacy podcast was with Chandler Robbins. The work he did with migratory songbirds and the effect of DDT changed history. He passed away in 2016. [19:43] Jim Fowler of Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom was also one of her interviews.  [22:00] Mardi interviews in person and knows a lot about gear.  [22:22] She has a studio at her office with a Soundcraft mixer. She has monitor speakers. She has a JK audio phone connector. She has been using Skype, but is changing soon. Probably to SquadCast.  [23:18] On location, she uses a Sound Devices audio recorder. She wants to have the best content that she can have with very good audio quality. She can also use Skype and her iPhone. She also uses a Roland R-05 handheld recorder with a dynamic mic.  [24:55] She uses condenser mics in her studio.  [27:44] She wanted great sound and bought great equipment.  [29:13] A challenged Mardi faced was understanding there is a learning curve you just have to go through. She had to find her rhythm.  [30:25] It's helpful to line up 10 shows ready to go, because there is so much to do. Having an editing team like PPS saves time and money. [32:44] She is planning on adding a guest scheduler. She does like to send personalized emails. Finding guests is the most time consuming.  [35:34] In the spring, she loves to bird in Northwest Ohio. There's a migratory track there. It's on the edge of Lake Erie. She also loves Cape May, New Jersey.  [37:56] She would like to go back to Africa, Alaska, the Galapagos, and the Pantanal in Brazil.  [38:47] Atlantic Puffins are really cute. She hopes to one day see a Laysan Albatross. There are thousands in Midway Atoll.  [41:16] Mardi defines success as doing the work. Audience interaction and comments are also success.  [42:08] She's working on doing speaking engagements and covering events. She also has Sunday School bird watching for kids in the spring and the fall.  [43:18] She might be developing another podcast for her other business.  [45:24] Darrell's Takeaways: Mardi uses BirdCallsRadio to leave a historical record of those working in conservation for future generations. She uses world class gear. Mardi recommends doing test interviews before the regular production. Start with a buffer of at least five episodes.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions KymryGroup Mardi Dickinson on Twitter BirdCalls Radio on Facebook Mardi Dickinson on LinkedIn BirdCallsRadio Podcast Blackburnian Warbler BCR 112: Sidney Gauthreaux BCR 083: Chandler S. Robbins; 1st For The Record, Legacy Interview Series Rachel Carson Silent Spring BCR 111: Jim Fowler Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom Soundcraft Mixers SquadCast Sound Devices 633 Mixer and Recorder Roland R-05 Wave/MP3 Recorder Neumann KMS 105 MT Condenser Microphone Cape May Pantanal Brazil Atlantic Puffin Laysan Albatross Wisdom The Albatross, World's Oldest Wild Bird, Lays Another Egg Red Knott

Nov 2019

48 min 3 sec

Like many of us, Good Ol' Boy Mike was taking his usual Saturday morning trip to Home Depot. Thinking about home projects and necessary supplies, he wasn't aware that he was about to accidentally come across an idea that would lead to an award winning podcast and a radio show aired on over 237 stations. He was having a conversation with his good friend Jim while his favorite show Car Talk was on the radio in the background.  An off the cuff remark by Jim about Car Talk going off the air led Mike to saying that they could create a show just as ridiculous by talking about everything good in life. You know, things like whiskey, beer, and cigars. Mike even came up with the name of his award winning podcast Sips, Suds & Smokes. At this point, they were just talking but the idea was stuck in Mike’s mind. Through good luck, timing, a good connection, smart planning, and tenacity. Mike’s award-winning podcast was born.  It didn’t start out as a podcast. The first 10 episodes were a radio show. They evolved into the podcast format and have been going strong for over seven years as a podcast and radio show. This fun and irreverent show is about all the good things in life. They talk about wine, tea, coffee, beer, whiskey, cigars, and more. Mike shares the Home Depot story first hand, along with one of the best pieces of technical advice that he can give.  We get to learn about his persona Good Ol' Boy Mike. We talk about the iHeart radio podcast award the show won in May. We also talk about how the show may not be for everybody, but everybody has never been a target audience. We talk about the pros and cons of feedback and how to be a duck and let it roll off your back. Mike also shares balance of gender, local versus broad products, show length, and keeping radio and podcasts compatible. This episode is chock-full of wisdom from a seasoned pro.  Show Notes: [03:09] One Saturday morning, Mike was driving to Home Depot. He was having a conversation with his friend Good Ole Boy Jim. The radio was playing in the background.  [03:47] Jim mentioned that the show playing in the background Car Talk was going off the air.  [04:40] Mike thought someone else could do a similar show and talk about things they love like whiskey, beer, and cigars. It could even be called something like Sips, Suds & Smokes.  [05:30] The spark for Jim and Mike's radio show was born.  [05:48] The following weekend they hashed out their ideas further, and Mike knew they were on to something.  [06:54] They've been doing the show over seven years now. They started with radio, and then became a podcast later.  [07:34] The pitch for their show was a replacement for Car Talk.  [09:28] After 350 episodes, they still sometimes have technical issues. Always do a sound check before recording. [11:39] The FCC had just listed over 500 low powered radio licenses. Mike had a friend with a station and reached out to him.  [12:34] The plan was to drink and record. They recorded 10 episodes and sent them to Mike's friend. Mike was surprised, she mentioned compensation. He was surprised, but agree to give it away for free.  [13:47] She loved every entertaining moment of the show. Right from the start, they were on 10 stations.  [15:46] They are now on 237 radio stations.  [16:03] Good Ol' Boy Mike is a character or an aspect of hiding character flaws. They also use stage names and personas for security reasons.  [18:15] They won an iHeart podcast award back in May of this year.  [20:26] If you are unwilling to receive feedback, you are denying yourself key knowledge. Podcasters get more advice and feedback than they ever want.  [21:56] They adopted an NPR format for the length of the show. This is one thing that they took feedback on. It helped bring structure to their show.  [24:18] Doing quick shots about localized products was from a great piece of feedback they received.  [29:48] Mike gets tons of products from beer to cigars. He says he's drowning in cigars.  [31:04] Darrell got today's three questions from Chip the host of Tales from the Cask which is a craft beer podcast. [31:46] Mike's favorite beer is free and often. He likes hoppy beers. He likes New England IPA and Trillium Congress Street IPA.  [34:44] His magic refrigerator beer is Blackberry Farm Classic Saison. [36:55] Mike shares his first alcoholic drink experience when he was a sixteen year old server. It was Kahlua in coffee. They also made a chef's boiler maker from empty bottles. He also drank Bacardi 151 with Mountain Dew.  [40:54] Mike is blessed with two sets of parents, because he was adopted. They make up a lot of who he is.  [41:57] His key podcast example was carrying the story and character voices in his church's puppet ministry and Miss Weber. He also had a CB and talked with truckers. He also grew up doing impersonations of people like Walter Cronkite.  [46:54] Darrell's takeaways: Why not fill the void? Where are we limiting ourselves? The best thing you can do is tell someone else. Evaluate feedback but don't let it overwhelm you. They developed formats for all parts of their audience.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to receive the rest of the current month and entire next month free Sips, Suds & Smokes Podcast Sips, Suds & Smokes on Twitter Sips, Suds & Smokes on Instagram Car Talk Pacifica Radio Network WMOT Roots Radio iHeartRadio Podcast Awards Tales from the Cask Congress Street IPA Blackberry Farm Classic Saison

Nov 2019

49 min 55 sec

A big pain point for small business owners is generating enough leads. What if there was a free educational resource and a tool to help do that? Bob Sparkins is the lead evangelist for Leadpages a software platform that helps generate leads by building landing pages, campaigns, and even creating text opt-ins for podcasters. It’s Bob’s job to spread the word about Leadpages.  Bob is a speaker, webinar presenter, and marketing teacher. He is also the host of The Lead Generation Podcast a podcast that shares marketing wisdom and educates small business owners, coaches, and consultants. This podcast is the second incarnation of the Leadpages podcast. The first Leadpages podcast was called Conversion Cast and featured professional voice artist Tim Paige.  Bob was able to convince his boss at Leadpages that they needed to restart their podcast, and he was the guy to do it. The focus of his show is educating small business owners through interviews of people who have overcome obstacles in their businesses. He is also an entrepreneur, so he thought he would be the perfect host for this show.  This podcast generates leads for Leadpages, but not in the way you would think. The show is purely educational with no sales pitch. Leads are generated when interested listeners go to the podcast website to learn more. Bob is no stranger to education. He is a former high school history teacher. On this episode, he explains the evolution and purpose of his podcast, his setup, benefits of the podcast, and shares a little bit about Leadpages.  Bob is the author of Take Action! Revise Later: A Simple Guide to Success in Business, and he lives in Bloomington, Minnesota with his wife and their two kids. You may have heard of Bob through his social handle Bob the Teacher. Show Notes: [04:03] The Leadpages Podcast has always been an opportunity to share marketing wisdom and knowledge with small businesses, entrepreneurs, coaches, consultants and people doing own marketing.  [04:29] Leadpages was founded by Clay Collins. He hired Tim Paige to start the Leadpages podcast called Conversion Cast. They had 180 episodes over four years. [05:31] Tim left and Bob took over the podcast. They first went YouTube style for a studio podcast. This only lasted 12 episodes, and then they pursued other content marketing.  [06:17] In february of this year, Bob wanted to start the podcast again. He wanted to target people who are doing their best to ramp up their digital marketing knowledge. People who are their own brand. They called their core avatar the Lead Generation. They just released episode 29 of The Lead Generation Podcast.  [07:35] The podcast is promotionally adjacent to Leadpages. [08:03] Most of the guests are Leadpages clients. Some are well known like Pat Flynn and Ramon Ray and on the rise like ChihYu Smith. [10:32] They keep track of the stats and traffic generated by the podcast, and it's also an opportunity to leverage the audience.  [11:22] They do use retargeting and ads.  [12:33] Any room can give a great sound.  [13:18] Their office was a WeWork space. The glass presents sound challenges. Now it's a room in Bob's house. The microphone is on an arm and Bob can stand. He uses a Yeti mic which is prone to pick up external noises.  [16:00] The visual show took too much time and effort to pursue at the level they wanted to do it at.  [16:41] Bob is responsible for championing the software and the success that the customer's have.  [17:00] He also uses his microphone set up for webinars. He uses Leadpages for getting podcast guests. The thank you page includes a Google form and a booking calendar. He also uses Zoom and Calendly.  [19:38] The post show followup includes an affiliate link and photos for social.  [21:34] Bob pushed for restarting the podcast. He is his audiences avatar. He's familiar with what it's like to be responsible for your own revenue.  [22:58] He also was part of the making of the Lead Evangelist role. He was also customer number 43. [24:02] Being flexible in the questioning makes a good podcast host. [24:59] Bob was the logical choice to be the host of the podcast.  [26:22] Leadpages provides the software that small business owners can use to build their website, make campaigns and landing pages, and to easily generate leads from their podcast with opt-in text. [27:13] They try to keep things streamlined and function well with other software products. They are cloud based and super reliable. It's an easy way to get your web presence up and running and to create campaigns.  [29:43] The podcast generates lead, but they aren't heavily selling in the content.  [30:28] Their target audience are people who specifically need education and better tools.  [33:02] Podcasts give great content that is leverageable with show notes and transcripts for search engines and education. [33:14] Pro Podcast Solutions edits the audio. Bob gets his transcripts from Rev.com, he then edits and pulls out some takeaways and headings. They have a designer create a thumbnail, and they create an audiogram. [38:29] Bob is currently reading Superfans. He recommends Influence.  [41:19] Bob's parents taught him to be self-reliant and to do the work. [42:45] Bob's dad taught him to change oil, but he didn't need that because he was going to delegate.  [45:23] Darrell's takeaways: Keep it simple. Bob had the skill set needed to revive and keep the podcast going, and he convinced the higher ups of this. They have a unique take on using transcripts as show notes by creating subtitles and including keywords. His parents reinforced his eagerness to delegate. Do what you do best and hire out.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Libsyn Use promo code ProPod to receive the rest of the current month and entire next month free Leadpages Bob The Teacher Sparkins on LinkedIn Bob Sparkins on Twitter The Lead Generation Podcast Take Action! Revise Later: A Simple Guide to Success in Business Clay Collins on Twitter Tim Paige ChihYu Smith Pat Flynn Ramon Ray Jason Heath on LinkedIn WeWork Calendly Zoom Rev Superfans: The Easy Way to Stand Out, Grow Your Tribe, and Build a Successful Business Influence Predictably Irrational Seth Godin

Nov 2019

49 min 27 sec

Many people dream of taking that leap and going into business for themselves. When it’s time to take that leap, even the most competent people frequently start second guessing themselves and having doubts. My guest today is someone who was so confident that she didn’t let doubt slow her down. In fact, she knew that if her freelancing didn’t work out, she could always get another job.  Of course, it worked out so well for her that she started a podcast to help other freelancers do the same. Melanie Padgett Powers is a freelance writer and editor in the Washington DC area. She is also the owner of MelEdits where she primarily works with membership associations and healthcare organizations. She is also the host of the Deliberate Freelancer Podcast which focuses on the business side of freelancing.  While she's not unique in her approach to podcasting, she does stand outside of the norm as she has a very interesting story that we all can learn from. Her story is that she doesn’t podcast to get more clients. Instead, her focus is to help people just like her. There are advantages to having a podcast. It does have an impact and make her look like more of an expert, but her podcast focus is helping people and building a community of like minded freelancers.  In this conversation, Melanie shares her background and how she finally got the nudge to take the freelancing leap. We talk about why and how she started her podcast. She shares inspiration from her parents, some of her future plans (which may revolve around podcasting) and a reading list that will be making you hit your buy button on Amazon. Anyone who has started or thought about starting their own business or podcast will benefit from this episode.  Show Notes: [02:39] Melanie's podcast is about helping other freelancer's become successful.  [03:07] Melanie has always been into writing and loved English class. She was on the high school newspaper staff when she was 14. She went to journalism school and became a newspaper reporter. She liked things to be planned out, and became a freelancer completely by accident. [04:16] She was a newspaper reporter in Indiana and then moved to Washington DC and landed a job at a membership association. [04:49] There is a membership association for everything. It paid better than working for a newspaper, and Melanie loved doing it. [05:31] She was at a job that she didn't like about six years ago. She was finally fed up with having bosses and decided to do it on her own. [06:06] She had work right away because of her network that she had already built.  [06:39] Her photo on her website was an out take of a website photo shoot.  [07:54] She is a healthcare writer and editor, and she also writes about membership associations in general.  [10:27] Melanie loves language and science and healthcare.  [11:30] Her parents are retired teachers. Growing up it was all about reading and education.  [12:59] She taught English in Prague and traveled a lot. [14:28] Melanie looks giving advice about how to run a freelance business, so the podcast was a natural progression. [15:06] Having a podcast makes an impact and helps Melanie look like more of an expert, but her podcast doesn't directly focus on her client base. [16:13] Melanie's podcast is about helping others be successful freelancers. There are financial possibilities down the road, but that's not why she started her podcast.  [17:36] A lot of her listeners are editors and writers. She is also active on Twitter. She is also looking into ways to purposefully grow her community.  [19:24] Melanie was a fan of podcasts after listening to Serial, but she spent time waiting to find someone to do all of the podcast chores that she didn't want to be bothered with. She's a content person but wanted someone to set everything up for her. [22:19] She is a fan of Excel spreadsheets to keep track of topics, episodes, and checklists. She also creates templates to speed things up. [26:00] Melanie is trying to build a community. Some day she would also like sponsors, but right now her focus is growing her community. [27:09] She has Twitter superfans who are amazing. She always replies and thanks them.  [28:52] Melanie suspects her listeners are people like her. She wants to narrow down the demographics with surveys.  [32:15] If taking the plunge to freelance doesn't work out, you can still find another job. Have a plan and save money. It takes bravery to make the jump. You can also control what you do with your business and who you work with.  [35:08] Books Melanie recommends include The Freelance Content Marketing Writer, Atomic Habits, the Company of One, and Make Time. [37:43] Melanie is very close to her parents. Her mom showed her and her brother to always fight for the underdog. Her dad taught her that she is smart and strong and that boys or teachers shouldn't talk over her.  [40:16] A big goal for Melanie is to start another podcast that is more client focused.  [42:39] Darrell's takeaways: I like how Melanie keeps things simple. Her podcast success is defined by building a community of freelancers. That's what comes first. She keeps a list of goals and ideas for the future, but is mindful to take things as they come and not get too far ahead of herself. I could really identify with her story of making the transition to becoming a freelancer. She also knew she wouldn't be trapped if it didn't work out. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions MelEdits Deliberate Freelancer Podcast MelEdits on Facebook MelEdits on Twitter Melanie Padgett Powers on LinkedIn MelEdits on Instagram Podcast Movement The Freelance Content Marketing Writer Atomic Habits Company of One Make Time

Nov 2019

45 min 29 sec

What happens when the most prolific thought leaders and icons in the wedding and event industry get together for a conversation with the super creative Andy Kushner? You get The Wedding Biz Podcast. It’s Andy’s goal to elevate the wedding and event industry by interviewing top professionals in the industry.  His podcast has been a runaway success with his authentic interview style and iconic guests. He even puts his own spin on things by creating The Next Level where he pulls a couple of main topics from a previous show and invites a former guest to be a co-host and discuss that topic. This unique co-host strategy has enabled Andy to form deeper connections with his co-hosts and grow his audience.  Andy graduated from Boston University with a degree in Business Management. He spent several years at IBM in the corporate world. Eventually, he felt his career was paying the bills, but not feeding his heart. He went back to his original love of music and formed Kushner Entertainment where he designs custom event experiences through bands and music.  Andy has always had a love for the spoken word, and once he discovered podcasting, he knew it was something he wanted to do. Now he is the host of The Wedding Biz, The Next Level, Extraordinary Ordinary People, and he is starting his own podcast network. In my conversation with Andy, we talk about his journey, his love of music and creativity, and how he found his passion with podcasting. Andy has been able to take an event niche like weddings and turn it into amazing stories, life lessons, and a show about business.  Show Notes: [03:19] Andy spent many years at IBM and also has a background in the music business.  [03:45] He majored in music, but at the time computers were starting to get big.  [04:30] Andy worked at IBM, but he missed music. He started a cover dance band to play weddings, and it got big very quickly.  [04:59] Now Andy runs Kushner Entertainment. He has several bands and produces stuff around the world for corporate events, weddings, and all kinds of things that involve music and entertainment.  [05:18] Andy has always been interested in the spoken word and listening to great speakers. He then discovered podcasts and started listening to people like Tim Ferriss, Brian koppelman, Marc Maron, and Howard Stern. [06:18] Andy had a gut feeling that his knowledge of business, music, and events would translate into a great podcast.  [06:52] He decided to niche the event industry down to mostly weddings. There were no shows in that segment who interviewed the icons of the business.  [07:27] There was no one interviewing the icons of the business, and Andy somehow knew that he would be able to get to those people. [07:44] He started interviewing the big hitters, and it started working. He's been doing The Wedding Biz podcast for two years now. [08:25] Andy custom designs the music for events. He has done some glamorous stuff and also a lot of weddings in the DC area. [08:46] He provides a party and a great experience for his customers. [09:09] Andy looks at the podcast business like a business. The best podcasters know how to entertain and engage an audience. [10:40] There is a level of improvisation with playing live music that also applies to podcasting. [12:22] Andy does in depth interviews. He wants to find out who these people are. He still listens and reads the guest.  [14:29] Andy releases his main interviews on Mondays. He also has a second shorter show where he summarizes some of the highlights from the Monday show.  [16:03] His download numbers show that this strategy is working. He also has his prior guests become co-hosts on The Next Level or second show.  [18:44] A podcast is a marketing tool to promote goods and services. Having guests as co-hosts really increases his relationship with them.  [20:50] Podcasting success for Andy is increasing relationships, possible monetization, and he loves doing it.  [21:43] Andy took out a loan to produce his podcast at a certain level, and he does in-person interviews. He did have to cutback on how he worked with various team members. He now spends less, and the show is better than ever. [23:24] Andy felt he could make more money paying someone else to edit.  [24:49] He has a partner for his music business. Andy gets to focus on creative.  [26:05] Andy is interviewing the best people in the world, and he's learning so much about the event industry. [26:32] Pat Flynn suggested that Andy read Rocket Fuel. [28:09] Using PPS for audio editing and production is the system that helps Andy with all of his podcasting obligations. Our system helps keeps him organized, so he can host multiple shows. [31:14] A couple things that Andy learned while podcasting is love the business side as much as the creative from Bryan Rafanelli and putting together a business structure is a creative act from David Starr.  [32:17] There's creativity to how you do your business. It's just perspective that's all. [33:04] Andy's mother was an entrepreneur and worked in the childbirth field. She taught him that anything was possible. His father was an anthropologist. Andy grew up feeling like anything was possible, he could have his own thing, and stand up for himself. [34:52] Andy's big future goal is to build his podcast network where he produces shows for other people in the industry and charges them for that. [35:28] He also has a large amount of valuable content, and his future goals focus around monetization. [36:28] Andy is blown away by Santana's new album Africa Speaks.  [38:19] Darrell's takeaways: his two episodes per week strategy is very unique. He builds a deeper relationship by having a guest be a co-host. He over-invested early on. Over time, he realized he can achieve the same or better results by scaling back. The money didn't roll in as fast as he thought it would. He's worked hard on finding a business partner and a team that allows him to focus on what he does best. Business is a creative act. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Kushner Entertainment The Wedding Biz Podcast Andy@theWeddingBiz.Com The Wedding Biz on Instagram The Wedding Biz on Twitter Extraordinary Ordinary People Andy Kushner on LinkedIn Tim Ferriss Brian Koppelman Marc Maron Howard Stern Podfest Podcast Movement Pat Flynn Rocket Fuel Bryan Rafanelli Santana Africa Speaks

Oct 2019

40 min 47 sec

Have you or has someone you know been in a job that you or they are really good at, but it just doesn’t feel like you or they are making the biggest possible impact? Most people will answer yes to this question. The difference between a career of passion and impact and a career of being good at something comes down to taking the time to discover what that passion or zone of genius really is.  Today’s guest took the time to discover what she really wanted to do and what she felt passionate about. Dr. Robin Jackson felt called to teach and started out as a high school teacher, she then became a middle school administrator, and then put in her resignation instead of accepting a promotion as principal. Even though, it would be a great promotion, she knew she was called to do something else.  Dr. Robin Jackson is the founder of Mindsteps Inc. an educational consulting firm that helps educators turn their schools into success stories using the resources they already have. She is also the author of 10 books including the best-selling Never Work Harder Than Your Students and Other Principles of Great Teaching and Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom.  She has been sending out a newsletter since 2006, but she wanted to have more intimacy with her audience. She started her School Leadership Reimagined Podcast in 2018, and discovered she not only had that intimacy and better connection with her audience, but the podcast helped her explain complex topics better and helped better prepare clients for her Builder’s Lab workshop. Robyn is so smart. Her podcast not only offers methods and tips to create better school leaders but better leaders overall. I found this conversation insightful, motivating, and inspiring, and I think you will too. Show Notes: [03:42] Robyn started out as a high school English teacher. She then became a middle school administrator. [04:08] She began to feel that she was called to do something else. She was about to be promoted as principal when she realized she wanted to quit her job and write a book. [05:15] She didn't know how everything would work, but she started a newsletter, Mindsteps Inc. and consulting. She had everything set up by the time she quit her job.  [06:07] Robyn had learned a lot working in schools about what to do and what not to do.  [06:20] Her work has crystallized with the idea that you can transform your school with the resources and people that you have. [06:37] She created a model for organizational transformation focused on schools. You can transform your teachers. The underlying principles were based on business principles. [08:51] If a school is struggling, it usually starts at the leadership or principal level. Mindsteps needed to help leadership, so that they could truly transform their schools.  [09:28] They worked their way backwards from the results they wanted to see with the kids. [10:57] In high school, Robyn realized it was her calling to be a teacher. That's what she was meant to be. [11:31] Different teachers come into your life at different times when you need them. [11:53] In college, an English teacher gave Robyn a copy of Toni Morrison's Beloved, and it was the first time Robyn had read a book by an African American Author.  [12:29] She has been blessed to have teachers who show up throughout her academic career and business.  [13:35] Robyn has been doing a newsletter since 2006. She felt intimacy was missing.  [14:38] She began podcasting to provide intimacy and a deeper experience. [15:41] Podcasting also allowed Robyn to fill a void that she saw in the education space. She wanted her podcast to be educational and transformational. [16:10] The podcast has helped Robyn to develop a deeper relationship with her clients. She can connect more with her audience, because they've been having a conversation every week. It also allows people to understand the work that she is doing in a way that enables them to buy in. [17:10] Listening to the podcast creates primed and ready to work clients. [17:33] The podcast also enables Robyn to reach a wider audience and people who may not necessarily read things like newsletters. [18:28] Robyn shares a story of a Builder's Lab member who came from the podcast and had a huge breakthrough because of the podcast.  [20:10] When people listen to your podcast, they become transformed by what you are saying.  [21:13] She started thinking about a podcast in 2017, but she didn't have the team. She decided to commit for a year. She then found the PPS team to help kick things off and help with production. [23:29] Robyn defines success on impact and the difference the show makes in people's lives not download numbers. Her focus is to help schools turn into success stories.  [25:12] She travels a lot, so needs to take breaks or have seasons. It also helps her focus on a small amount of episodes at a time and then take a break and travel. Educators also have seasons.  [26:19] They do a fall season and spring season which corresponds with the educators seasons.  [29:06] Your zone of genius is what serves others and truly serves you. Robyn took time to think about what she wanted to do, and she started doing the morning pages. She discovered her dream and was brave enough to follow it. [32:58] She is safer and happier in her zone of genius.  [33:48] Mindset is a family business, and their big goal is to have a wider impact and not have everything revolve around Robyn.  [36:06] Darrell's takeaways: Get The Big Leap. Listen to your calling and pay attention. Find your zone of genius. Podcast about what brings you joy. Pause and evaluate what you are doing. Journal and think about your zone of genius. Podcasting provides a level of intimacy and professional development that was missing from the written word. It also helps create better prepared clients.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Mindsteps Inc. Builder’s Lab School Leadership Reimagined Podcast Robyn R. Jackson on Twitter Robyn Jackson on LinkedIn Books by Robyn R. Jackson Never Work Harder Than Your Students and Other Principles of Great Teaching Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom Beloved The Big Leap Morning Pages

Oct 2019

39 min 14 sec

Rebekah Scott is the founder of Rebekah Scott Designs. This is a business she created to allow her to do what she loves at home with her kids and still make a living. She says that all she ever wanted to do was sew in her happy place and raise kids. It turns out, she not only designs amazing bags and purses, she also was able to design the exact life she wanted to live. She even put a unique spin on creating a giant studio in their farmhouse that is large enough for the entire family to use as a studio.  She’s also the host of The Encourager Podcast which is about helping women to be successful moms and business women without all of the guilt that moms often have when trying to focus on their businesses or work. Rebekah believes that it’s possible to be a successful mom and a successful entrepreneur, and she encourages other women to do the same. Having the right systems in place is what enables Rebekah to do so much. She has a system for food, work, family, and me time. She regularly shares her systems and experiences on her podcast.  Rebekah has also learned to make her podcast work for her by reducing the number of episodes she does per season. Her focus is on high quality but fewer episodes. She also shares some great tips for finding what your audience wants and asking the right questions. She even shares a story that will hit home to many of us that was the inspiration for starting her podcast and sharing what she has learned. She has done all of this while building and running a successful business and sharing it with her kids and family. She is also the author of Equipped to Execute, and she runs an Encourager Community Group to reach and help more women.  Show Notes: [04:47] When Rebekah was starting who podcast, she asked friends and family what one positive word would best describe her, and The Encourager Podcast was born.  [05:04] Being encouraging is also a spiritual gift for Rebekah. [06:05] It'a not uncommon for Darrell to have to edit Rebekah's kids out of her podcast. Although, he leaves in some of the fun parts. Rebekah believes in home and work harmony, so kids in the background is normal.  [07:25] Rebekah originally started her business because she wanted to stay home and have an army of children. The army became less, but her business grew.  [08:47] Rebekah wanted to keep her business growing, so she started building systems. She built a work system, a food system, a me system, and a family system. She talks about these on almost every podcast. [09:13] The systems helped her nurture her family and run her business. She's always asking how to incorporate her family into everything that she does.  [10:20] She wanted her studio to be huge, so it would be owned by everyone in the family.  [11:08] Rebekah's mom is a master seamstress. When her mom would sew, Rebekah would grab scraps and try to make stuff, so her mom taught her to sew. [12:11] She started sewing purses for gifts and then ended up selling them. [12:36] She now has twenty stay at home moms on her team. Her mom is also part of the team.  [13:44] Most podcasters have shows aligned to grow their businesses. Rebekah's is about helping women be successful in their lives and equipping them with systems and the right mindset. It's not created to bring business to her design business.  [14:33] She really serves as an encourager or coach to people.  [16:12] Rebekah shares the catalyst for beginning her podcast. She has it together, even in the mornings and wanted to share that.  [16:39] People don't have to feel chaotic or not feel successful. God told her this was teachable, and she needed to tell others about it. [18:17] When Rebekah started her podcast, she began sharing everything she learned from running her business. Then she moved to helping build businesses and overcoming obstacles. Her podcast keeps evolving, but she mostly shares the lessons she's learned.  [20:02] In season eight, she has had to reflect on how she wanted the podcast in her life. She now does six episodes each series and once a month coaching.  [22:28] She hasn't found a great way to monetize the podcast. She tried a day with Rebekah, but wanted to have more access and be flexible, so she has a once a month Encourager group.  [24:53] Listener's should try different avenues and see what is best money and time wise. [25:44] Shorter quality podcasts are better than more shows. Not every method works for every audience. Ask the audience what they want.  [26:55] She has a Facebook community and sends twice a month emails to the list.  [28:31] Tech is not Rebekah's thing, but she has a Monday through Sunday agenda. It has what she needs to plan for including lunch, snack, and supper. It also includes her other tasks for the day and has blank lines for things she wants to add. [29:36] She uses paper and then tears it up and throws it away at the end of the week. She also has a small calendar. [31:59] Rebekah shares her book recommendations and talks about working from her zone of genius. Reading John Grisham also helps her creative brain relax. [34:00] Her mom says life is a journey not a destination. Her dad is a hard worker. Ranchers are entrepreneurs. He also said this too shall pass.  [36:09] Play the best case scenario and a worst case scenario. If the worst-case scenario isn't going to kill you, give your idea a try. We often lack execution. [37:14] A podcast is the simplest and cheapest form of getting your voice out there. [37:46] She would like to reach a hundred thousand downloads, and she's working on her second book. She would also like to coach  more women. [38:49] Don't ask the wrong people the right questions. Don't be afraid of feedback. [40:38] Rebekah shares a lesson she learned after losing her brother. Be in the moment.  [44:32] Darrell's takeaways: Rebekah developed systems for work, food, family, and me. These helped her find harmony and success. Her podcast has a seasonal format, and she continually adjusts the number of episodes. She's found other ways like her encourager group to help other moms find harmony. Ask your audience what they want. Be in this moment.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions The Encourager with Rebekah Scott Equipped to Execute Rebekah Scott Designs Rebekah Scott Designs on Twitter Rebekah Scott Designs on Facebook Rebekah Scott Designs on Pinterest Rebekah Scott Designs on Instagram The Big Leap Secrets of The Millionaire Mind The Entrepreneur Roller Coaster John Grisham Saying No to Worldly Success Episode 2-61

Oct 2019

47 min 22 sec

What is behavioral economics and why does it matter to you? Melina Palmer, the host of The Brainy Business Podcast, has dedicated her career to seeking answers to these questions for herself and for her clients. Melina always thought she would be a singer, but decided to major in something more practical. After getting a degree in business, she discovered behavioral economics and is the founder of The Brainy Business.  Her business is all about branding, pricing, communication, and the psychology of how we make decisions. She uses her business and marketing background to help businesses with pricing, branding, and conveying their message in the best way possible. Melina started her podcast about a year ago, and it has been a huge factor in growing her business, reputation, and making connections. She shares some insights into her amazing podcast and teaches us a thing or two about business and behavioral economics.  Show Notes: [03:26] Melina has some amazing artwork for her podcast and website.  [03:46] Melina has a background in marketing and branding. She wanted artwork that would showcase fun.  [04:33] Melina's artwork includes a rocket and a brain.  [05:33] Melina has two brains in her office, but the third glitter brain is coming.  [05:57] The brainy business is about behavioral economics, which is rooted in psychology, but marketing is prevalent in every episode that Melina does. It's also about branding, pricing, and communication. It's about the psychology of how we make decisions.  [07:02] Framing is so important. Think of 90% fat free compared with 10% fat. Messaging matters. [08:20] Melina started her podcast because she wanted to help people understand what behavioral economics is and share it in a way that is useful to people. [10:02] Podcasting takes a lot of time, you need to know that you are ready and willing when you commit to it.  [11:09] Melina already had a lot of ideas, so starting the podcast was the right move for her. She also wanted to be the first behavioral economics podcast. [11:44] She was also shifting from doing really hands on work with clients to more strategic work.  [12:34] Melina's podcast has been out for about a year now. It has helped so much more than she expected.  [13:08] A big connection Melina made through the podcast was the Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab who is using the podcast to supplement their learning. Other people are using it to teach their students. [14:03] She is building research with Texas A&M and multiple corporations have reached out for possible projects.  [14:17] This year she is working on transitioning her time out of the business.  [14:57] Melina looks at her download numbers. Reach is important for her, because she wants to become an influencer in her space.  [15:46] Multiple open doors and speaking engagements have come from the podcast. It also adds credibility.  [16:41] She intentionally built her podcast to be ingrained in her business. [18:17] Melina can't use a script for public speaking, but she uses one for the podcast.  [19:36] She also started condensing her intros after they were getting longer and longer.  [20:13] She also looks at reviews.  [21:59] The most common thing people say to her in person is that it's weird to watch her mouth move while talking. It's not about the cookie and cotton candy grapes are also popular topics brought up.  [24:00] Melina makes hand written notes and checklists. She likes how PPS uses Basecamp to make uploading the audio easy. She does all of her art herself and uploads the podcasts to YouTube. She uses Canva for artwork and Headliner for audiograms. She also uses Active Campaign and Audacity.  [26:33] When Melina was young, there was no question that she would be anything other than a singer/actress. She still sings and is singing the national anthem for the Seattle Storm game tonight.  [27:44] In college, she thought she would major in something more practical like business and that is where she discovered psychology and behavioral economics. [29:12] Her favorite book is A More Beautiful Question by Warren Burger. [30:40] Melina is hopeful that one of her near future book recommendations is her own. She's also working on small focused courses on one topic.  [33:55] Darrell's takeaways: Lack of existing podcasts on Melina's topic encouraged her to start sooner rather than later. She considered her own optimism bias when it comes to content creation. She defines success by download numbers, revenue, and credibility. She listens back to her own episodes to refine and improve.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions The Brainy Business The Brainy Business Podcast The Brainy Business on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on YouTube BizChix Podcast Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make Competition Irrelevant Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab Basecamp Canva Headliner ActiveCampaign Audacity Seattle Storm A More Beautiful Question Freakonomics Predictably Irrational Nudge Thinking Fast and Slow

Oct 2019

36 min 12 sec

Carrie Allen Tipton is a writer, editor, lecturer, and academic with a PhD in Musicology, MM in Piano Performance and BME in Music Education. She also served as the Director of the Lecture Series for the Bach Society Houston and too many prestigious academic accomplishments to mention. She is also the host of the Notes on Bach Podcast. A podcast that shares scholarly information about Bach to the general public.  We talk about how she got the idea to start her podcast. What shows she was influenced by and her love of radio. Carrie also shares the smart way that she created a proposal for the Bach Society of Houston, so they could form a strategic partnership and sponsor the show from the start. Without financial constraints, she was able to put the time in to produce the quality show she wanted to make. They even helped with promotion and creating a professional logo.  Show Notes [03:20] Carrie was doing work for the Bach Society in Houston. She discovered that people enjoyed learning about Bach from scholars, but they had no place to find the information on their own.  [04:19] As a music scholar, Carrie knew that there was a whole world of information about Bach that these enthusiasts weren't being exposed to.  [04:42] Carrie also discovered how the Ben Franklin's World podcast connects people with scholars that write about the colonial period. Carrie thought this was so cool, and she knew that no one in the music world was doing something like this. [05:17] She approached the Bach Society about sponsoring a podcast that would connect Bach fans with scholarly information.  [06:01] She wanted a podcast about musicology. She also wanted the strength of an organization behind it. The Bach society provides funding, helps promote, and even generated a logo for the show.  [08:34] Carrie has had a long standing relationship with radio. Radio allowed her to listen to classical music as a child. [09:41] She always loved the mission of public radio, and she had the voice for it.  [10:20] When Carrie discovered podcasting, she thought it was people taking radio into their own hands. She knew that was something that she wanted to do. [10:42] She then thought it was worth writing a budget proposal for the Bach Society Houston.  [10:57] Carrie writes a lot of articles for the general public about music, culture, history, religion, and the arts. She also does a lot of freelance editing and lecturing.  [11:23] 80% of the work that Carrie does have a public facing component, so podcasting fit in beautifully with that. [13:01] Carrie releases episodes according to the academic calendar or artistic year from August to May.  [15:01] Nonprofits are always looking for new ways to meet a new audience. A podcast was not a big stretch for the Back Society. [16:36] To educate a potential partner, give them a link to a similar show. For Carrie that was Ben Franklin's World.  [17:23] Emphasize how your expertise could be showcased in a podcast and emphasize your background and show communication experience.  [19:12] Carrie shares success defining moments like when the Oxford University Press tweeted out a link to her show. Some others have embedded her podcast on their websites. Seeing her numbers grow also represents success. [23:41] To prepare for her show, Carrie will read the book three months in advance. She has an elaborate note taking process. Most of the books on the show are argument driven. She scrutinizes the argument and the evidence. After spending two or three weeks reading the book, she puts it away. She then pulls out her notes and hashes out an interview outline. She gives the guest the outline two weeks before the show. She also asks for feedback.  [26:23] She needs to improve technology preparation with the guests.  [30:35] Make sure the guest has USB headphones and a quiet room. Don't overwhelm them.  [31:41] Carrie uses Trello for keeping organized with her podcast. [35:19] Carrie learned that ideas and thinking are important from her parents. Her dad said that it's good to be a thinker. [36:15] Carrie reads self-help, mysteries, and everything in between. She's currently reading Virgil Wander.  [37:42] Her radio songs are late 90s country.  [38:47] She likes Dax Shepard's Armchair Expert podcast and the BBC's In Our Time.  [40:31] Takeaways from Darrell: She partnered with Bach Society Houston from day one. Carrie was intentional about finding that partner. She presented a strategic vision. Show how you are a content expert, show communication background, and share similar examples. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Carrie Allen Tipton Notes on Bach Podcast Carrie Allen Tipton on Twitter Carrie Allen Tipton on LinkedIn Bach Society of Houston Ben Franklin’s World Virgil Wander Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard In Our Time Podcast

Oct 2019

42 min 36 sec

Amy Porterfield is the host of the top-ranked business podcast Online Marketing Made Easy. Amy is an entrepreneur, speaker, author, and course creator. Amy specializes in teaching list building, online course creation, and webinars. She has been so successful that she has made a huge financial goal of $10 million this year and so far is on track to hit that.  An interesting thing about Amy’s podcast is that it’s the number one driver of audience growth. Her podcast allows her to reach a much larger audience. Amy shares how her business has evolved and how it is normal to pivot. She also talks about her listener first strategy and how she is always focused on adding value for her audience.  Amy shares her approach of putting her customers first and why she is willing to be vulnerable and authentic when she connects with her audience. She also shares some wisdom she learned from her dad that she still uses today. We also get a little peek into her business and her marketing approach and how she is able to get so much done.  Show Notes [04:01] When just starting out, it's important to get clear on what you really want to do and who you want to serve. [04:53] Amy believes that Catholic guilt is real and she would always tell on herself when growing up. As an adult, she believes that not sharing vulnerabilities is not being totally honest.  [05:48] Amy wants to come from a place of honesty and share her scars not her scabs.  [07:20] Sharing insecurities allow Amy's audience to connect on a deeper level beyond just business.  [07:56] Amy's dad was a firefighter, but always told Amy to find a way to be her own boss. Her dad also told her that it's better to listen than to talk.  [10:21] Before Amy created her business, she worked for Tony Robbins and worked on his on stage content and course content. She learned how to be incredibly resourceful from working for Tony.  [12:10] Amy teaches step-by-step list building, course creation, and webinars. Now she talks about mindset and what people are thinking in order to get them to the finish line.  [14:39] After leaving Tony Robbins, Amy became a social media consultant. She discovered that the way a business looks on day one and in a couple of years is completely different. Just put your head down and start doing the work. You are allowed to pivot and change. [15:47] She then started to be known for Facebook marketing. She then made a pivot to what she does now. [18:37] Amy uses content upgrades in all of her podcasts. This could be a guide, cheat sheet, or process. It's something that will ignite action. This helped grow the list with quality subscribers. [20:00] She would mention the freebie in the podcast. It has to be thought of in advance and the team helps create it.  [20:59] Now Amy batches her podcasts with six episodes. She then adds one or two freebies in the batch.  [22:08] Amy emails her list every week. She shares the episodes that are live. Create one piece of original content each week. This is one blog, podcast, or video.  [24:34] John Lee Dumas told Amy to podcast weekly on a consistent basis, and it made a huge difference.   [25:54] The podcast allows Amy to reach more people and grow her audience. The podcast is the top of Amy's funnel. Now they run ads to specific podcasts.  [27:02] Amy tracks downloads every week. They want the numbers to go up. If not, they brainstorm. She also looks at the iTunes charts. You can also download promotions within your podcast. [28:52] She doesn't send people directly to a sales page from a podcast. She likes to lead with value, give something away for free, and then promote through email.  [31:22] Darrell shares how popular Amy is at Social Media Marketing World and how it's worth waiting to get to speak with her in person.  [32:37] Amy shares a couple of heart warming stories about her listeners that really touched her. [34:29] Some people can get in and do the work just from listening to the podcast.  [35:13] Amy and her team use Asana for project management and Slack for communications. She recommends templates in Google Docs for people just starting out. Keep it as simple as possible and get fancy later.  [37:33] Amy tackles some fun rapid fire questions from Darrell.  [38:21] Amy is on a mission to make $10 million this year. She loves that she has set a huge financial goal.  [40:28] Darrell loves what Amy's dad taught her. It's better to listen than to talk. 80% of being an entrepreneur is what you think and feel. 20% is the mechanics. Start now, your business will look different one, two, or three years after you start. It's okay to pivot. Create one original piece of content each week. Create a content plan template.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Amy Porterfield Online Marketing Made Easy Podcast Amy Porterfield on Facebook Amy Porterfield on Twitter Amy Porterfield on Instagram Amy Porterfield on LinkedIn #179: The Real Truth Why I Hate Video (Hint: It's My Weight) Facebook Marketing All-in-One For Dummies John Lee Dumas Social Media Marketing World Asana Slack Rework

Sep 2019

42 min 47 sec

Kate Ahl is the founder of Simple Pin Media and the host of The Simple Pin Podcast. She launched her business in January of 2014, and by November, it was a full-fledged marketing agency. She now has a team of 40 and services hundreds of Pinterest accounts. According to statistics that Kate shared 93% of Pinterest users are looking to buy. Getting your content or product in front of those users is what Kate and her team do best. Kate began her podcast in 2016 to teach, share her voice, and market her service. She interviews other people who are using Pinterest in creative ways to build their lists and increase revenue. Today, she shares her business journey including the results and lessons from starting a podcast. She also shares pinterest tips that others can use for their podcasts and enlightens us about Pinterest marketing and some of the benefits of Pinterest marketing.  Show Notes [03:08] We met in person at Social Media Marketing World in 2018. [03:50] Kate's podcast is The Simple Pin Media Podcast. [04:21] Kate was doing Facebook marketing for a friend in 2013, when an algorithm change led to lost traffic. Kate and some of her friends migrated over to Pinterest with the hopes of long-term traffic.  [05:16] Kate enjoyed marketing on Pinterest and the long-term stability of the platform. [06:09] One of the main misconceptions about Pinterest is that it's only for women. Pinterest warms up potential customers. Pinterest marketing is part of the awareness stage, because it is where people go to plan things. [07:24] The leap from Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn is a very hard mindset shift to make for some marketers.  [08:58] It can be more difficult to keep track of ROI with Pinterest.  [09:46] For Kate, her Pinterest goal is to get people to her podcast and blog. Her ROI is based on a lead, but it's different for everyone.  [10:43] Kate converts her podcast content into blog posts and sends her Pinterest traffic to those posts. Pinterest users are searching for content, so you could send them to a review or a tip.  [11:37] Pinterest likes vertical images. Use that as billboard advertising or a hook.  [12:04] Pinterest users have two habits. They either scroll mindlessly through the main home feed that they arrive on or they search for a specific phrase. [13:45] Simple Pin was originally designed to be a side hustle. Things started to grow and Kate was building her voice. In 2016, she decided to podcast. [15:45] She wanted to have good systems in place and outsource everything but recording. Knowing Pro Podcast Solutions was taking care of everything else gave her peace of mind.  [16:35] Tools that Kate uses include PPS for editing, a spreadsheet for content management and their Facebook group to help surface content.  [17:32] She tries to stay ahead and usually records on Thursdays. She also hired a podcast writer who makes the blog post.  [18:39] Kate has a team of 40. The biggest part of her team is organic management for clients. She also has a small part of the team for marketing, affiliates, and launches. She has a community manager, herself, and an operations manager.  [19:44] This year Kate is investing more into marketing and the podcast.  [20:29] The scariest part of podcasting for Kate was just doing it and seeing how it would be received. She asks our team about stats and things like that.  [23:18] Things that held Kate back were wondering if people would like the sound of her voice. Her and her husband also got sick and pushed the start back.  [25:05] It's normal to not go back and listen to your podcasts.  [26:05] Kate's parents are both entrepreneurs. She set a great example for them. She was impressed by their follow-through and perseverance. They also taught her great customer service.  [29:37] Kate always thought she would be a teacher. She finally discovered her gift was in leadership and leading a team and building a business.  [33:37] For Kate, her business shapes her podcast.  [35:23] She defines success when her listeners actually put her tips into practice and then eventually come on as clients. Her goal is to empower clients to grow their business using Pinterest, so that they can afford to hire her team. [36:29] The podcast has three goals new customers, new Pinterest professionals, and teaching people Pinterest marketing.   [37:33] At a conference, a listener gave Kate a picture that her daughter drew while they were listening to Kate's podcast together.  [38:45] Your voice is being projected into people's lives with a podcast.  [40:31] Kate is reading Dave Ramsey's Legacy Journey right now. [41:10] One of Kate's future goals is to do corporate consulting for big brands.  [41:43] She has stopped comparing her business to others and stopped being afraid of making mistakes.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Simple Pin Media The Simple Pin Podcast Simple Pin Media - Marketing on Pinterest Simple Pin Media on Facebook Simple Pin Media on Twitter Simple Pin Media on Instagram Social Media Marketing World Traction Entrepreneurial Operating System  Dave Ramsey's Legacy Journey Living Forward: A Proven Plan to Stop Drifting and Get the Life You Want Principles: Life and Work

Sep 2019

46 min 5 sec

Jen Briney is the host of the Congressional Dish podcast where she breaks down what is happening in Congress that most Americans don’t know about. Jen’s perspective for the show is a fed-up taxpayer with no allegiance to any political party. Jen has designed Congressional Dish so that it will fill you in on the must know information about what our Representatives do after the elections and how their actions can and will affect our day-to-day lives.  Jen shares her varied work journey and how she started paying attention to world events while living in Germany in 2003. Her questions led to more questions, and she shares the final catalyst that prompted her to start her show. She also shares some really interesting podcasting information such as why she chose the value for value model, how she structures such a research intensive show, the true meaning of success for her, and her close relationship to loyal listeners. We always have a great time together, and you will get a lot out of this fun and informative episode. Show Notes [02:54] It's a pleasure working with Jen. She says working with Pro Podcast Solutions has been seamless from the beginning.  [03:39] Jen is the host of Congressional Dish a podcast that takes a look at the often ignored side of politics.  [04:36] In high school, Jen went to a private school and on the commute, her and her mother listened to conservative talk radio. [05:33] In 2000, Jen voted for George W. Bush.  [05:53] She lived in Germany in 2003, when the Iraq war started. She was embarrassed when asked about the war, because she didn't have any of the answers.  [06:21] This is when she started paying attention, asking questions and looking for answers. [06:29] She became obsessed with looking for answers and the podcast was her way to get it out of her system.  [06:55] Jen was watching C-Span, because her husband was a solar engineer and an energy and water bill was being debated. She saw Tom Cole brag about sneaking a provision into the water bill that protected campaign contributions.  [07:38] She looked it up in the Congressional Record to make sure she had it right. To Jen this seemed like a big deal, yet nothing was said about it on the news or the Internet.  [08:17] This inspired Jen to start her podcast to share what is happening in Congress. [09:27] Congress makes the laws. Jen's biggest struggle is that she could do a show a day and still never run out of material.  [10:27] Jen isn't concerned with politics, she is concerned with the governing part.  [11:42] Jen toured with AVP Pro Beach Volleyball. She went all over the country and took care of the catering services, dsl installation in the sand, and did some on air work with the sports networks.  [12:50] She then worked at an apartment complex. She then worked at several different jobs and tried waitressing. She was looking for something that made her feel good.  [16:12] Jen enjoys nature and likes to avoid screens for breaks. She went camping over the 4th of July.  [16:59] When Jen started the podcast, she wanted it to be a job that came with her, made her feel good, and paid some of her bills. She has a fully functional business that pays her bills, but she is going where the job wants her to go.  [17:31] Jen is on a mission to flip the podcast back where it compliments her life and not the other way around.  [19:02] Jen decided to spend one year podcasting and not worrying about money. She was able to focus on the creative part. [19:57] She then put up a PayPal button to ask for donations. In 2015, Jen did a Reddit AMA. Her AMA made it into the top of Reddit. This blasted several doors open. Her listeners are in the thousands, but she chose not to go the advertising route.  [22:48] Jen didn't want any outside influence on her content.  [23:47] The hardest part of the journey was staying focused once she was offered so many new opportunities.  [24:01] She wants a job that she loves that comes with her.  [24:42] Value for value was an idea by Adam Curry and John C. Dvorak. This is where listeners donate and sustain the show.  [27:38] Bud Johnson was one of her first listeners. He would send her cards with checks in them. She would read his notes online. He was one of the first supporters and has been there over the years. He recently passed away and Jen is crushed.  [29:07] Jen has some listeners who she has been connecting with for years.  [33:19] Jen has a thank you session at the end of the show. These make her show long, but she appreciates the 2% who really support her show.  [35:08] She tries to keep the show compact.  [35:42] Jen has success with Congressional Dish. It's a job that travels with her and pays her bills and does good in the world. [37:15] Her new definition of success will be hitting episode 500 of Congressional Dish. [40:31] Jen documents everything that she puts in the episodes.  [41:07] She releases episodes every two weeks. First, she digs through the Daily Digest, listens to the sound clips, and researches whatever needs to be researched.  [42:55] She then uses Scrivener to put everything together. She also puts the links in Evernote and her VA makes the notes and puts everything in WordPress.  [44:06] She also has a volunteer who takes care of the art and the store. She spends a lot of time on recording the show either free flow or scripted. Then she gives the editors at least 48 hours to work on the show.  [45:12] On Sundays, she makes sure everything is okay and then hits publish. She doesn't batch but would like a way to do so. [46:40] Darrell and Jen have some fun with the rapid fire questions. [46:57] She learned work ethic from her parents. [47:57] Her favorite song was Wagon Wheel when running. Hold On by Wilson Phillips is her go-to Karaoke song.  [54:19] Darrell's takeaways: Jen has been on a lifelong journey to find a way to earn a living, travel, and do good in the world. She had a major turning point on a Reddit AMA. Saying yes to everything took her focus off of her show. She uses the value for value model to fund her show. 2% or her listeners support her show, and her relationship with them is truly moving.  Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Congressional Dish Congressional Dish on Facebook Jennifer Briney on Twitter Jennifer Briney on Instagram Jennifer Briney on LinkedIn Tom Cole Congressional Record No Agenda CD195: Yemen CD186: National Endowment for Democracy CD174: Bank Lobbyist Act CD155: FirstNet Empowers AT&T Congressional Record Daily Digest Scrivener Evernote Wagon Wheel Hold On

Sep 2019

56 min 25 sec

Liz Covart is the Creator and host of Ben Franklin's World a podcast about early American history and winner of the Best History Podcast Award in 2017. As the digital projects editor at the Omohundro Institute of early American history and culture, Liz practices a blend of scholarly history, public history, and digital humanities.  The OI's primary focus is supporting scholars and scholarships related to early America. Liz experiments with social and new media to recreate scholarly history to large public audiences. Liz's work makes scholarly history readily available to the public in hopes of making the public more interested in history. Liz earned her PhD in History from the University of California Davis.  Liz and I have been working together for quite awhile now, and it’s a joy to watch her podcast grow and reach continued levels of success. Liz’s story is a perfect example of how even careful planning can’t prepare you for the twists and turns of opportunity along your journey.   Show Notes [03:11] Liz and Darrell met a long time ago. They were even in a mastermind together about five years ago.  [04:29] Darrell loves working with Liz and has learned so much from her podcast. [05:05] Liz was meticulous about her podcast launch. She was listening to podcasts about writing and social media. She fell in love with podcasting, but couldn't find a good history podcast to listen to. [06:01] She decided to create an in-depth history podcast and then proceeded to research podcasting for 18 months. She wanted to know what made the media tick, and that's still something she studies today. She spoke about the history of radio at last year's podcast movement.  [09:32] Growing up, Liz's parents gave her an allowance in books, so every week she could go to the library or bookstore an pick out a book.  [10:01] In 7th grade, she decided that she wanted to learn about history. She took a chronological approach and started in the Colonial period.  [10:52] She lives in Boston and grew up in the area.  [12:11] Each historian has a different take. They go to the archives and look at documents, objects, and oral histories to get information about the past. Then they use their evidence to create a picture of the past and what happened and why it happened. [13:14] There are always different discoveries, and history is a reflection of our present as well as a reflection of our past. [15:27] Her original vision was a public outface for her work where she could connect people with books and scholarly work. She had a strong history background and loved historical research.  [17:21] After three months, her podcast was averaging 25,000 to 30,000 downloads a month. Eventually, well known podcasters started pointing out that she had a media business, and then she started working on that side of the business.  [20:03] Liz's musical training helps her everyday with her podcast from pacing to flow. It also gave her discipline in college with time planning.  [23:26] Consistency is the key to podcasting. Her show requires prep, and they give guests the questions in advance, so they can come up with great answers.  [24:45] Liz went from podcasting as a hobby to professional podcasting. She hired Pro Podcast Solutions and upgraded her equipment. Her podcast also created a job for her at Omohundro Institute, she now works with a small team.  [26:14] Holly White her producer helps with the reading. They use Trello to coordinate communication. Liz also uses Fantastical calendar for her Mac.  [28:29] Liz believes in consistency in publishing and always works ahead. One time she accidentally published late, and listeners were messaging her to see if she was alright.  [29:04] Liz sends a physical microphone to her guests, and her audio quality has really jumped. She sends Sennheiser headset microphones that are simple and easy to use. The she uses SquadCast as a simple high quality audio way to connect with her guests.  [32:34] Sending the mic to keep is cheaper with overseas interviews. They bought 12 Sennheiser PC8s and pop filters. Postage round trip is about $10, and only one person so far hasn't sent the mic back.  [35:06] Liz loves interacting with listeners. She has meetups to connect with her audience.  [36:38] She had a meetup in Denver with over 20 people. Some had driven two or three hours. It was a great way to get feedback.  [41:05] Liz's parents taught her the value of people and being there for them.  [41:48] She is currently reading Merchants of Truth.  [42:53] Liz would like to write a history on the Articles of Confederation and why it was ratified. It would be a multimedia project.  [46:54] Darrel takeaways: Liz's podcast became so successful that it was a media business. Her first focus was the content and the audience. This is what turned it into such a success. Her background in music helped with rhythm and flow. Listeners count on consistency. She sent mics to her guests. Meetups helped clarify her avatar. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Ben Franklin’s World Ben Franklin’s World on YouTube Ben Franklin’s World on Facebook Ben Franklin’s World App Liz Covart Liz Covart on Twitter Liz@BenFranklinsWorld.com Omohundro Institute Zone of Genius Mastermind Podcast Movement Mindset Strategies That Go Beyond Podcasting With Cliff Ravenscraft Natalie Eckdahl BizChix Ryan Gray Medical School Headquarters Holly White Trello Fantastical SquadCast Sennheiser PC8 Headset Microphones Meetup Merchants of Truth The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union — 1777 George Rogers Clark

Sep 2019

49 min 44 sec

Cliff Ravenscraft is a business and life coach who is very well known in the podcast community. Cliff has created several podcasts and has also helped many successful people with the launch of their podcasts. For years, Cliff was known as The Podcast Answer Man, he has now evolved into The Mindset Answer Man. It’s his goal to help people live the life of their dreams and do the work they feel inspired to do.  He is also the host of The Cliff Ravenscraft Show and the creator of the Free the Dream Conference. I discovered Cliff in 2006 when I started listening to Cliff's podcast about the TV show Lost. I then started my own show about the TV show Fringe in 2008. Cliff helped me choose the right equipment, and we are cherished friends to this day. This podcast normally features the podcast stories of our clients at Pro Podcast Solutions, I knew I wanted to make some exceptions to that rule, and Cliff is the first exception. Mindset is our biggest single factor in achieving success and every other factor pales in importance. This episode is packed with inspiring information for everyone including aspiring podcasters.  Show Notes [03:06] Cliff is excited that Darrell is finally podcasting about podcasting.  [04:22] Cliff gives Darrell a mindset adjustment right out of the gate.  [04:56] If you want to start a podcast, keep in mind that there has never been another podcast out there with your thoughts and feelings being shared. [06:39] Darrell wanted to have a message that was different in this podcast.  [07:47] Cliff fell in love with podcasting in 2005. He listened to tech podcasts and faith based podcasts and podcasts about Lost.  [09:44] He thought he would call his very first podcast episode Generally Speaking. After his intro, he made the first episode about the TV show Lost. It took off, and he stuck with the topic.  [11:35] Cliff ended up starting some other shows after his Lost podcast. He never considered the content produced by other people and how his content needed to be different.  [12:42] Cliff focused on topics that he couldn't stop talking about. All of his content is about topics that he had passion about. [14:49] He has never tried to figure out what his target audience wanted to hear in order to focus on that, except for a couple of business podcasts where he ended up hating the show.  [15:48] Cliff focuses on what he feels led to create.  [16:51] He changed his brand from Podcast Answer Man to Mindset Answer Man. Even though he lost about 70% of his subscribers, he feels it's the best thing that he has done. [19:42] Cliff talks about his definition of success. When he first began podcasting, he wanted to be famous.  [20:51] Feedback from his listeners helped change his definition of success. He and his wife Stephanie talked openly about their faith while talking about Lost. It took about 50 episodes in for him to realize how powerful it was. The things they were saying was having a positive impact on people.  [23:20] Success for Cliff is creating content that is entertaining, educational, and inspiring.  [26:33] Darrell attended Free the Dream last year and it was magical, inspirational, and amazing.  [27:35] Helping people dream is where Cliff always begins with mindset work. Exploring what people want always ends up at limiting beliefs.  [31:19] We have what we have because of actions we have taken in the past. Refusing to do something is also an action. Every action we take is based on what we believe.  [33:32] Once you decide you believe something, you will find evidence to support it.  [36:05] He begins with the questions of: What do you want? and Why don't you already have it? Then he goes into the beliefs behind it. You can toss aside limiting beliefs and replace them with empowering beliefs. [38:06] Find what you want and believe that it is possible. Write things down, and you have a 42% more likely chance to reach it.  [40:54] Psycho Cybernetics teaches all of the principles that Cliff learned.  [42:04] Cliff thinks about what he wants, writes it down, and tells others. Sometimes other people are the key to getting to that goal.  [43:47] Why do you want what you want? This is the most important key. Leverage is having a big enough why. If you have a big enough why, you'll always find a way.  [49:52] You can learn how to bring must to your dream or goal. Then you decide and take action.  [51:01] When you decide something, you kill other outcomes. What can I do in the next 24 hours, 7 days, and 30 days to get me one step closer. [55:24] To learn more about Cliff subscribe to the Cliff Ravenscraft Show. Get a free 60 minute session with Cliff. Listen to Episode 597 featuring Darrell talking about the Free the Dream Conference.  [59:13] Cliff has had a huge impact on Darrell's life from helping him get started in podcasting to developing Pro Podcast Solutions.  [01:01:29] Takeaways: Podcasting is about passion. Am I creating content that is entertaining, educational, encouraging, and inspiring? If one person has reached out, he is successful. Take time to dream and think about what you want in life. Read Psycho-Cybernetics. If you have a big enough why, you'll always find a way. Links and Resources: Pro Podcast Solutions Get a Free 60 Minute Session with Cliff 597 – How Dreams Become Reality Free the Dream Conference Cliff Ravenscraft Cliff Ravenscraft on YouTube Cliff Ravenscraft Show Cliff Ravenscraft on Twitter Cliff Ravenscraft on LinkedIn Daniel J. Lewis Dave Jackson Cliffs First Podcast 001 LostCast 12-16-2005 Psycho-Cybernetics: Updated and Expanded How To Win Friends and Influence People Think and Grow Rich: The Original, an Official Publication of The Napoleon Hill Foundation The Big Leap

Aug 2019

1 hr 4 min

Since 1993, Alex Mandossian has generated nearly 417 million dollars in sales and profits for his marketing students, clients, and joint venture partners. His marketing strategies helped convert his personal annual income in 2001 into his monthly income by 2003. Then by 2006, this number became his hourly income. He also generated 1.2 million dollars in less than 29 minutes during a product launch.  He is an author and speaker who has appeared on stage with Tony Robbins, Suze Orman, two presidents, and other influential people. He is the CEO of MarketingOnline.com where he helps business owners and serial entrepreneurs grow their skill sets, mindsets, and balance sheets.  Alex knows marketing and shares a lot of great info today. He is also the host of the All Selling Aside Podcast. Alex’s marketing passion and knowledge is contagious, but we also explore why he started his podcast and how it has benefitted his already rock star business status.  Show Notes [04:06] Alex was born in Hollywood and lived in California most of his life. He did take an eight year stent in Manhattan where he cut his teeth on marketing. [04:38] In 1995, he started consulting online. He is a BG (before Google) marketer. He's had a lot of success and made a lot of money. [05:27] In 1991, he marketed Tony Robbins Personal Power. He worked for a media company that represented similar clients, and he got a behind the scenes look into their successes and failures.  [06:38] He moved to Marin County and launched an online product in 2000. He sold a how-to course called Marketing with Postcards for $247. [07:26] He continued to create more products. He built a funnel and had a SaaS product.  [07:59] He also wrote a course with Paul Colligan of Podcast Secrets and jointly published the The Business Podcasting Bible in 2007. [08:15] All of this taught Alex about the importance of repurposing content.  [08:50] He then launched his All Selling Aside Podcast in 2018. [10:02] The single biggest mistake that Alex has seen is people not choosing who to lose with their target audience. You have to let people go before letting people in. Tell your audience who you are not for.  [11:06] Tightly target your audience.  [13:11] Alex learned to tell people what he believes in instead of having an about page. His friend Roy Williams taught his this.  [16:36] If your beliefs are in alignment, you will always have a match. Knowing your beliefs are better than core values, because they are yours.  [18:26] Alex believes that seeding through storytelling is the new selling. [20:29] Alex speaks overseas and trains people overseas in digital marketing. He supports these emerging nations.  [21:45] His podcast is his legacy to get all of his stories out there. He uses an editorial calendar and does several episodes at a time.  [22:39] He has got tens of thousands of downloads. He looks more professional. He loves the quality, the audio, and how professional it looks. He will also probably repurpose the content into a book at some time.  [24:15] The podcast allows him to chronicle his stories, and people love them. He didn't realize that he could get a $100,000 client from a podcast, but he did about a month ago.  [25:09] His life has changed from the podcast. He is even going to bump up to two episodes a week. [26:56] A podcast is so much more intimate than the written word.  [27:55] Alex defines success for his podcast as never missing a week as long as he is recording.  [31:04] Alex's parents were teachers along with a lot of his family. Alex has learned from his family to become an effective teacher one listener at a time and clearly focusing on one listener.  [34:19] Alex always tells his audience what to expect in the next episode and gives them the title to it.  [36:14] Alex doesn't ask for a rating and review, he asks listeners to rate and share a takeaway from the show.  [41:33] Alex uses spreadsheets to keep himself organized. He has a title column and a story column and a call to action. He prepares his shows in advance and knows exactly what he is going to do.  [42:59] Planning and preparation make life less stressful.  [44:35] When Alex gets an idea, he just puts it in his iPhone memo app. [46:36] To learn more about Alex and his podcast, check out the notes on All Selling Aside.  [47:46] Darrell's takeaways: Follow the platinum rule. Do unto others what they want to be done. Choose who to lose. Tell people who you are not for. Then tell them who you are for. People hate to be sold, but they love to buy. Trust is to be experienced, not expressed. Creating a legacy with a podcast and being consistent. Focus on a single listener.  Links and Resources: MarketingOnline.com Alex Mandossian on YouTube Alex Mandossian on LinkedIn Alex Mandossian on Twitter Alex Mandossian on Instagram Alexisms: Useful Life Lessons from a Recovering Serial Entrepreneur All Selling Aside Podcast The Business Podcasting Bible: Wherever My Market Is... I Am Jeff Brown Read To Lead Podcast The Monday Morning Memo 21 Core Beliefs  Start With Why Stephen Covey

Aug 2019

49 min 51 sec

Patrice Washington is a number one best-selling author, highly sought after and inspirational speaker, and the host of the Redefining Wealth podcast.  Today Patrice will share her story of why she wanted to become an entrepreneur, how she developed a 7-figure business by the age of 25 and then lost it all.  She will share an incredible story of how she totally shut down a successful and money-making brand so that she could pursue what she was truly passionate about.  And, of course, Patrice will share some fantastic nuggets of wisdom about her podcast that will definitely help you on your podcast journey.

Aug 2019

42 min 18 sec