Now, What’s Next?

Morgan Stanley

We’re hearing a lot about supply chains right now. But how did we get here? Journalist Sonari Glinton meets the people who make and transport our stuff to find out how we’re all connected and why that matters. Now, What’s Next? explores the big, sometimes hidden forces that shape how we live, what we value and how we make choices.

Coming Soon: A New Season of Now, What's Next?
Trailer 2 min 18 sec

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Host Sonari Glinton delves into the workings of the just-in-time inventory model and how it let down millions of frontline workers at the start of the pandemic. We find out how relationships along the supply chain are deeply critical, and how new technology is provoking a rethink in healthcare manufacturing.In the episode we meet Dr. Andy Artenstein, an infectious disease specialist and Chief Physician at Baystate Health in Massachusetts who went to extremes to get PPE for his staff of thousands. Vanessa Iarocci tells us about how supply chain relationships helped save her business as she pivoted from selling uniforms to PPE. Guarav Manchanda, Director of Medical Market Development at FormLabs, describes being at the hub of a PPE supply chain solution network and what 3-D technology could mean for the future of healthcare manufacturing.Disclaimers:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Nov 17

26 min 3 sec

In March 2021, the Ever Given cargo ship got stuck in the Suez Canal and opened the world's eyes to the vulnerability of a system we rely on each and every day. In this episode we meet Jan Unander, a Swedish importer who had goods aboard the Ever Given and almost lost his business because of the delays. Jake Slinn, the owner of JS Global Cargo and Freight Disposal, takes us to the Port of Felixstowe to illuminate how much cargo went to waste as a result of the Ever Given stoppage, and the traffic jam of ships stuck behind it. Finally, we meet Port Chaplain Julian Wong, who visited the Ever Given when it docked in Felixstowe and deeply understands the stressful lives of the people who work on cargo ships. Disclaimers:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Nov 3

23 min 40 sec

The pandemic pushed parents, particularly working mothers, past a breaking point. As the U.S. begins to recover from the economic and social setbacks stemming from so many women leaving the workforce to care for their kids, we look at the history and future of childcare. Host Sonari Glinton talks with three working mothers who have lived through the ups and downs of childcare. Sonia McDaniel is an essential hospital worker and single parent to four daughters between the ages of three and 20. During the pandemic, with daycares and schools closed, she had to find creative solutions to keep her working and keep everyone safe. Ciera Maul has three kids under the age of five and if it weren’t for her company’s onsite daycare, she wouldn’t be in the workforce. Finally, we hear from Julie Kashen, working mother, and economist at The Century Foundation. She has devoted her career to finding public policy solutions for domestic workers and working moms and she feels like people are finally paying attention to childcare and the care economy. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.  Members SIPC.

Jul 21

28 min 29 sec

Willie Wright is 63 and lives alone in Cleveland, Ohio while his daughter Lauren lives over 500 miles away in North Carolina. We listen as they talk about the future and how they’ll manage as Willie gets older. Then we meet Iris Yafuso Toguchi, who relies on Kupuna Care, a Hawaiian state program for caregivers, to keep her mother, Irene, at home. Registered nurse Rudy Sukna has spent 20 years working at one of the largest nursing homes in New York. Despite staffing issues, dangerous working conditions, and losing many of his patients to COVID, Rudy still believes nursing homes are a good option for seniors. Finally, we meet Sylvia Mendoza who struggled to find her late mother, Lupe, a nursing home that felt like home... then she discovered The Green House Project.Disclaimers:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jul 7

27 min 11 sec

Host Sonari Glinton talks to Celeste Headlee, journalist and author of Do Nothing, about burnout, and how that led her to reorient her life and approach to work. Next, we meet Jomar Reyes, who worked at Danish digital marketing agency IIH Nordic as they transitioned to a 4-day work week. Finally, Jennifer Scott is a bike courier and labor activist in Toronto and her work schedule makes 9-5 look like a dream. Jennifer explains how gig workers are fighting for more sustainable careers.Disclaimers:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 24

30 min 57 sec

Host Sonari Glinton checks in with college student Jacob Sarasohn. When his art school classes went virtual, Jacob decided to put college on hold and become an Emergency Medical Technician. We find out how that experience changed him and if he’ll go back to college. At Georgetown University, we meet Bushra Shaikh and her professor, Elizabeth Grimm, who found ways to make their Zoom class meaningful and effective. Tech CEO LaShana M. Lewis had a difficult time finding her place at college and ended up leaving without a degree. She struggled for years to land a job in her field, until an apprenticeship program offered a breakthrough. Finally, Sonari speaks with Brenda A. Allen, President of Lincoln University, a historically Black university about how a shift to virtual school during the pandemic has brought home the value of the campus experience.Disclaimers: The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Jun 9

29 min 58 sec

Malls were originally designed to be the centerpiece of a community. For a long time, they were. Between the boom in online shopping and over-retailing, many malls were struggling even before the pandemic. Now, experts predict every 1-of-4 malls in the U.S. may close over the next five years. For this episode, we travel around the world to figure out why we go to the mall, how to build them more sustainably and how failing malls are being reimagined.As head of the California Fashion Association, Ilse Metchek visits a different mall every week. She believes malls are no longer about shopping, they’re about experiences. To get a sense of how top-tier experience malls work, we head to Singapore, where restaurateur Howard Lo takes us inside the world-renowned Jewel Changi. Next up: Melbourne Australia, where architect Stephen Choi gives us a tour of Burwood Brickworks, a mall designed around sustainability and climate change. Lastly, we visit the Landmark Mall in Virginia, where Monise Quidley helped turn a defunct department store into a homeless shelter.Disclaimers: The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

May 26

27 min 38 sec

In this first episode of our new season, we meet Shelli Taylor, who became the CEO of Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas just weeks after the pandemic temporarily closed all their locations. Cameron Bailey, Artistic Director and Co-Head of the Toronto International Film Festival, talks about diversity in Hollywood, and how the past year is shifting the films and filmmakers we celebrate. Then we meet Vicky Ding, who runs a film sales company in Beijing, where theatres are booming as China takes the lead as the biggest box office in the world.Disclaimers:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

May 12

32 min 3 sec

After nearly two decades of reporting on culture and the economy, host Sonari Glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and elderly, to what to do with shopping malls... these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out, and where they’re finding hope.

May 5

2 min 18 sec

The pandemic has created a huge mental health crisis. We’re all feeling the strain and many of us are admitting, for the first time, that we need help. It’s ok to not be ok. In the last episode of our season, we look at how this pandemic forces us to examine our own mental health, and helps us erase the stigma around asking for help.Host Sonari Glinton hears how COVID-19 exposed how broken our mental healthcare system already was. Dr. Curtis Wittman reflects on the mental health crisis from the health care front line. Ghazal Azarbad explains why this was the year she took therapy seriously. Camesha L. Jones is a therapist who is seeing more first-time patients than ever. And Dr. Kristen R. Choi is a Registered Nurse who teaches at UCLA. She’s thinking through how this crisis creates opportunities for new approaches and technologies for managing our own mental health.If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health, the following is a list of some mental health resources: In the U.S.A. In the UK. In Canada. For Kids and Teens.The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 20201Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Feb 3

22 min 30 sec

Education was one of the pandemic’s first casualties. When schools closed overnight, students and teachers switched to virtual classrooms—a massive social experiment that hasn’t been easy on anyone. But it also revealed opportunities to rethink the ways in which we teach, and what is most valuable in education.Host Sonari Glinton speaks with students and teachers to find out how their lives have changed when it comes to school. Eight-year-old Escher Olson moved to a new country with his family, so that he could go to school in person rather than virtually. His mother, Sophie Olson, talks about why they made that decision. Olivia Clarke, a 16 -year-old student—and new author—opted into remote learning at her private girls school. She noticed that, like her, everyone else in her grade who did the same was Black. Ilana Drake and Pratham Dalal talk about what they fear losing when they can’t attend high school in person. Professor and teacher Lindy Elkins-Tanton says online learning will fail if we don’t change how we teach. And elementary school teacher Eppie Miller built an outdoor classroom to help her students through the pandemic. Special thanks to YR Media for helping us connect with the high school students featured in this episode.The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Jan 20

22 min 50 sec

Before the pandemic, about half of all Americans dined out at least twice a week. The pandemic has pushed hundreds of thousands of restaurants into bankruptcy—and the rest are struggling to stay afloat. In order to keep the lights on, many have shifted their business models, and are embracing innovations and experimentation.Host Sonari Glinton checks in with his friend Steve Lombardo in Chicago, who manages the Gibsons Restaurant Group. They’ve been hit hard by the pandemic. Colleen Vincent of the James Beard Foundation gives us a reality check on the restaurant industry at large—and explains why the stakes are so high. Executive Chef Shaun Garcia, from Soby’s in South Carolina, is teaching would-be diners how to cook his menu in their own homes. Chef Ed Hardy embraces the ghost kitchen model to cook his way out of trouble. And Chef Lex tells us what it was like to cook inside the NBA Bubble.Disclaimer Text:The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2020 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Jan 6

24 min 5 sec

Thanks to the pandemic, some 40% of Americans no longer head into the office to get work done. For many, the shift to remote work could be permanent, and yet millions of others do not have that luxury. This trend exacerbates the fault line between those who can, and those who can’t. But as much as experts tout “the end of the office”, a few with years of remote work experience argue that there’s a shelf life to this new way of working - and downsides that must be considered. Host Sonari Glinton hears from NASA astronaut Jessica Meir on her extreme remote work experience stationed aboard the International Space Station during the outbreak. Over in the UK, Ashley Mitchell sold everything he owned and moved himself - and his job - to a tropical paradise. In Mexico, Ali Darwich has worked remotely for years with Modern Tribe. Along with Shane Pearlman, the company founder, they advise us on the benefits and risks of shifting to a distributed workforce. And finally, Michelle Lee is an office workspace designer; she hopes the post-pandemic office is more than just plexiglass and cubicles.The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2020 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Dec 2020

22 min 40 sec

Barren airports, anchored cruise ships, vacant hotels—it’s impossible to run a tourism business when international borders close and most of the world shelters in place. There is no doubt the pandemic has pushed the travel industry into a corner: one estimate suggests the industry will lose a trillion dollars in 2020 alone. How do you come back from that? For the time being, it feels like travelling for pleasure is a thing of the past, but the urge to leave home for a little while and explore something new is strong. And pent-up demand from locked-down, would-be tourists could flood the world again soon—but at what cost? What opportunities exist to rebuild a healthier, more sustainable industry?Host Sonari Glinton explores how travel could change. Sound designer Shawn Cole takes his family on a staycation adventure and Brian Hazelton of Winnebago tells us it’s been a record sales year. Meanwhile, Jessica Nabongo, the first Black woman to travel to every country in the world, is stuck at home, and she questions why she travels. In Barbados, Valerie Workman mourns the loss of an industry her island nation is nearly wholly dependent on, but also welcomes the break from the crowds. Traveler and writer Pico Iyer believes travel is about much more than visiting a new place—he says it’s fundamental to being human. And journalist Elizabeth Becker believes it’s time to rethink how we travel when we inevitably do so again.The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2020 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Dec 2020

25 min 58 sec

At the height of the pandemic, headlines around the world proclaimed an exodus of people from urban centers toward smaller, and possibly safer, communities. The sudden mass shift to remote work—for those who could—helped fuel this rush to more pastoral, or at least less congested, environs. Pundits immediately declared that metropolises like New York City were dead. But are city communities truly at risk of collapse? Or could this moment instead usher in a long awaited renewal for the world’s most populous places?In this inaugural episode of the Now, What's Next? podcast, host Sonari Glinton introduces us to a host of folks all grappling with their relationship to the city. Helen Lummis left San Francisco and moved to a small cabin in Soda Springs, California. Lee Peart lost his job and had to leave London. He moved back in with his parents in a tiny seaside British town. Author Kevin Baker worries that his beloved New York City is being hollowed out for reasons that aren’t Covid-related. Tiffany Smith has long witnessed thousands of black families fleeing Chicago — but she’s staying put. And amidst all this worry and uncertainty, hip hop ballerina Allison Harsh was asking herself whether moving to the ‘big city’ to jumpstart her career is worth the risk.The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2020 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Nov 2020

25 min 49 sec

The world is changing in ways we never expected. And the Morgan Stanley Ideas podcast is changing alongside it. Our new podcast looks at life AFTER the global pandemic. Sonari Glinton makes sense of how the world continues to evolve in the face of a global crisis and the rare chance it’s given us to rethink our assumptions. This may be a once-in-a-lifetime challenge, but it’s also an opportunity to create real and lasting change.Morgan Stanley Ideas is becoming Now, What’s Next? A new podcast starting November 18th.

Nov 2020

3 min 20 sec

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. In 1969, Neil Armstrong’s first steps inspired advancements that led to everything from modern kitchen appliances to the Internet. But 50 years later, space exploration isn’t limited to government-funded missions, launches, and astronauts. Now, private companies are leading today’s “space race” and will help us enter a new era of growth—with satellites. In our season finale, we look toward the stars to see how the satellites of the future could help improve life here on Earth. We start in Washington State with Chris and Libie Cain, a husband and wife fishing team, whose albacore tuna business is strained by illegal fishing practices — one of the many problems that may soon be solved by satellites. Then, we talk to Mike Safyan, the V.P. of Launch at Planet Labs, a start-up that’s revolutionizing how satellites scan the Earth. Planet currently has over 150 satellites capturing data that it licenses to scientists and industry leaders who want the latest information on everything from forest fires to fish migratory patterns. David Kroodsma, an environmental data scientist with Global Fishing Watch, is one of the beneficiaries of the satellite data. He explains how satellite technology can help prescribe preventative medicine for the seas ​and h​elp people like the Cains, who rely on the economy of the ocean. Morgan Stanley Managing Director of Equity Research Adam Jonas tells us that satellites may soon disrupt the economy of data, shifting information away from some of the largest tech companies in the world to some of the smallest. Along the way, he helps us understand why we should all be excited about the new focus on the humble satellite, and what a booming New Space Economy will mean for Planet Earth. The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media.  The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.  Members SIPC.

Jul 2019

23 min 15 sec

The summer bestseller you read on the way to work, a flower delivery for your sister’s birthday, dinner made fresh from your weekly meal kit— today you can have every part of your day ordered online and delivered to you without ever leaving your home. But what about your favorite shop around the corner or even the malls of your childhood? With the growing convenience and efficiency of online shopping come questions about the future of traditional retail. Are brick-and-mortar stores fated to crumble under the weight of the e-commerce boom? Or will online and traditional stores find ways to coexist?On this episode of the Ideas Podcast, we’re going to one place where the future of retail is already in full swing: Tokyo. Akira Ito, CEO of Itoya, takes us on a tour of the stationery company’s 115 year-old flagship location. As we explore Itoya’s twelve-story playground of paper, we learn how Japan’s oldest stationery company has continued to thrive by curating experiences that keep customers shopping in their store. Then, Masahiro Ito, an executive director at ZOZO, Japan’s largest online apparel retailer, brings us into a future where that personalized, face-to-face shopping experience will be replicated on the Internet. And we visit Topdrawer, a store in Brookline, Massachusetts, where the best of both worlds has made its way into the American retail experience. Along the way, Morgan Stanley’s Managing Director of Retail Research, Kimberly Greenberger, highlights the power of the shopper’s rising expectations in shaping the future of retail.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 2019

27 min 56 sec

On this preview episode of the new Morgan Stanley podcast "Thoughts on the Market", Chief Investment Officer Mike Wilson says markets are typically savvy on how and when to price news events. But are markets overlooking some potential bad news?

Jun 2019

3 min 40 sec

In the future, we’ll all still need a place to live. But as rents continue to rise and the housing market changes, we might need to adjust our vision of home. Instead of living in a tiny, expensive apartment or funneling our savings into a down payment for a single-family home, we might choose to live together for the sake of space, money, and, above all else, community. This type of housing model, known as co-living, has existed throughout history, but new iterations of co-living are becoming real housing options for all different types of people across the globe. In this episode of ​Ideas, ​we’re going to explore different versions of co-living to understand why it might help solve some of the housing market’s greatest challenges.We’ll start in London at The Collective: Old Oak, the world’s largest co-living complex, where young, mobile workforce is learning “how to have it all”—community, leisure, and an apartment in one of the world’s most expensive cities—by trading in personal space for communal luxuries. But, as history has shown, communal living isn’t just limited to one demographic. We’ll also travel to Portland, Oregon, for a tour of PDX Commons, a co-housing community for 55-year-olds and older, to see how some members of the Baby Boomer generation will participate in the housing market of the future and, simultaneously, combat some of the stigma attached to aging. Finally, we’ll make our last stop in Copenhagen, Denmark, where Almenr, a startup that matches co-living tenants with financial advisors, architects, and designers, is helping niche communities create the co-living spaces of their dreams. Along the way, we’ll hear from Richard Hill, the head of commercial real estate research a Morgan Stanley. He’ll explain some of the fundamental changes in the traditional housing market, the challenges within the current market, and why co-living might be a viable housing solution for all.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media.  The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 2019

23 min 52 sec

Have you ever tasted a habanada pepper? An upstate abundance potato? A Robin’s Koginut squash? These new vegetable breeds, all created by Row Seven Seed Company, are bursting with new flavors that come straight from the earth. But what about those wasabi seaweed snacks? Or something like beer chips? Or crazy ice cream flavors that seem to come from natural sources but are most-likely made in a lab? The flavor industry is worth billions of dollars, but with new technology, our changing environment, globalization, and a better understanding of how to invent new types of food, the future of flavor is being pulled in two very different directions. As different players the food industry invent new flavors, consumers will have to make new choices about what flavors they want: flavors from the farm or the lab.In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we explore these two different locations to understand the future of the flavor industry. First, we travel to the Fingerlakes region in upstate New York, where we’ll tag along with Michael Mazourek, a plant breeder and co-founder of Row Seven Seed, as he delivers his produce and spreads Row Seven’s mission: to change our agricultural system by breeding for flavor. We then head to a lab across the country in Portland, Oregon, where we’ll meet Sarah Masoni, a flavor designer with a “million dollar palate.” There, Sarah will tell us why the future of flavor isn’t as subjective as we might think. And, finally, we’ll hear from Vincent Sinisi, a food retail analyst at Morgan Stanley, about how both consumers and food retailers are creating new opportunities for both farm and lab-made flavors to appear on your supermarket shelves.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

May 2019

23 min 55 sec

As you walk down the street, sit in your office, or even make yourself a cup of coffee, take a look around and consider what everything is made of. ​More often than not, the answer will be: plastic. Our world is made of plastic. It’s one of the most affordable, versatile and indestructible materials we have. But the very properties that make plastic perfect for so much have also made it problematic. Most of that plastic is still here, and it will be for hundreds of years. But in the future, we might be able to replace the plastic we’ve come to rely on with a plant-based material that holds all the promise of plastic, without the environmental costs. We're talking about something called "bioplastics."In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we take you to a laboratory in England to see these bioplastics in action. First, Vincent Andrews, Chemicals and Agriculture Equity Research Analyst at Morgan Stanley helps us understand how traditional plastic has become an integral part of both the economy and our daily lives. Next, Cole Rosengren, Senior Editor of ​Waste Dive ​explains how a little-known international policy has thwarted our the recycling system as we know it. We then sit down with David Rachelson, the Vice President of Sustainability at Rubicon Global, a startup that connects plastics producers, consumers, haulers and cities to tackle some of the inefficiencies of the current recycling model. Finally, we travel to a laboratory in Southampton, where we meet Paul Mines, the CEO of Biome Technologies, a company that is using materials such as cornstarch, potatoes and algae to create a sustainable, compostable plastic of the future.  The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Apr 2019

22 min 24 sec

You many have imagined a future of transit where we all blast off to work strapped into personal jetpacks or shuttle our kids to and from school in flying cars. But the future is now, and the innovative transportation systems of today are surprising in their own right. The best among them are reimagining infrastructure design and project funding to get people moving across town and around the globe. In this second episode of the new season of the Ideas podcast, we head to a place where the future of transportation is already in motion: Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. There, we ride a DART bus, one of the most advanced bus rapid transit systems in the world. Steven Higashide, Director of Research for TransitCenter, helps us understand the road blocks between U.S. cities and better public transit, and we learn from Sarah Kaufman, of the Rudin Center Transportation at NYU, about ways to move beyond ride sharing and fill the gaps that existing transportation can’t cover. Finally, Michael Zezas, Managing Director and Chief US Public Policy & Municipal Strategist at Morgan Stanley, helps us imagine a future of interconnected services—autonomous vehicles linking riders to mass transit on rails and roads—that respond creatively to the city’s existing infrastructure challenges.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media.  The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.Morgan Stanley and its affiliates do not currently offer the services provided by Umbrella or Score, which are  not affiliates of the Firm. Morgan Stanley has not conducted a review or diligence of these companies. This should not be considered to be a solicitation or endorsement by the Firm of Umbrella or Score or their services.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.  Members SIPC.

Apr 2019

23 min 40 sec

Rummaging through your pockets in search of change and crumpled bills to pay for your morning coffee may still feel routine, but in some parts of the world, this familiar scene is just a memory. The cashless economy is already starting to take shape, and as we continue to create innovative ways to exchange money without pulling out our wallets, cash might become a thing of the past. And while some countries struggle with questions of fairness and inclusivity as governments and businesses forgo cash, others have already stepped into a cashless future where digital transactions are the only way to pay.In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we travel to Sweden, a country where cash makes up just one percent of the entire economy. First, we hear from Charlie Warzel, a senior technology reporter at Buzzfeed News, who literally puts skin in the cashless game while on a trip to Stockholm and receives an RFID chip implant that allows him to pay for anything with his hand. We also follow Swedish journalist, Asa Secher, as she navigates her daily routine in a society that has already embraced a nearly-cashless economy. Next, we go to Lisa Servon, the chair of the City and Regional Planning Department at the University of Pennsylvania, to understand the potential impacts of going cashless here in the U.S.: who wins, who loses, and who gets left behind. And James Faucette, leader of Morgan Stanley’s Payments and US Comm Systems research efforts, explains what it takes for a country to go cashless, and how such a dramatic shift will affect more than just our bank accounts.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. Certain guest speakers may be neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC or its affiliates (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein by non-affiliated speakers do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein may have been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. The content of this podcast is solely for informational purposes and based on information available when created. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Mar 2019

20 min 39 sec

Ever wonder what your life might be like 5, 10, 20 years from now? This season, we’re taking you around the globe -- everywhere from Tanzania to Sweden to Japan -- to catch a glimpse of what the future might hold. Because the future ​is ​happening somewhere. It’s just a matter of knowing where to find it. New season starts the first week of March.

Mar 2019

2 min 18 sec

Season four of the Ideas Podcast will be starting soon, but in the meantime, we’re kicking things off with a bonus episode in honor of Climate Week NYC: an annual summit where scientists, government officials, and CEOs come together to showcase innovations, programs, and policies that are leading the fight against climate change. But for many key players in today’s financial world, the future of climate action isn’t relegated to one week. At Morgan Stanley, there is a whole team of researchers and financial analysts dedicated to helping investors and consumers make environmentally-sustainable, lucrative financial decisions. In this bonus episode, we sit down for an exclusive interview with Jessica Alsford, Managing Director and the head of Morgan Stanley’s Sustainability Research team. Alsford reveals how environmental, social and governance factors -- or ESG -- impact the way businesses in every sector are thinking about the future of investing. But these aren’t just concerns for investors. Alsford explains why purchasing everything from a t-shirt to a tomato means climate change is not just an ESG issue, but an everybody issue.DISCLAIMERThe host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.Morgan Stanley and its affiliates do not currently offer the services provided by Umbrella or Score, which are not affiliates of the Firm. Morgan Stanley has not conducted a review or diligence of these companies. This should not be considered to be a solicitation or endorsement by the Firm of Umbrella or Score or their services.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Sep 2018

11 min 22 sec

The word “sports” may conjure images of athletes barreling down a football field or burying a three-pointer, but the latest stadium-rousing athletes rarely if ever have to leave their chairs. Welcome to the world of professional video-gaming, or eSports. Around the world, eSports is looking more and more like any big-league sport, complete with sponsorships, merchandising, and arenas full of fans. And now, eSports is on track to become a multibillion-dollar industry.In this episode of the Ideas Podcast, we explore how a hobby that may not seem like a “real sport” became a very real market. Jacob Wolf, an ESPN journalist, helps us understand why eSports playoffs are topping the attendance to MLB and NHL games. Then, Brian Nowak, a Managing Director at Morgan Stanley, explains how that popularity launched an entire market that may one day include dedicated eSports arenas, fantasy eSports leagues, and team jerseys made of pixels. And along the way, some eSports superfans invite us to a watch-party to feel the rush of a brand new sports experience.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is an employee of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jul 2018

18 min 7 sec

After long careers and years of saving, many of today’s retirees have decided not to set sail on an exotic cruise or spend their days on the golf course. They’re changing what it means to retire by re-entering the workforce—and creating an entirely new market in the process.In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we look at the tech startups, nonprofits, and even the baby boomers themselves who are shaping the newly retired market. Steve Records, the Vice President of Field Operations at SCORE, explains how connecting young entrepreneurs with retired mentees has shown him that 70 is the new 40. Dan Hunt, Managing Director and Senior Investment Strategist at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, explains how shifts in financial planning are changing the way we see retirement. And Sam Gerstenzang, the co-founder of Umbrella, a company that hires recent-retirees to help older seniors with odd jobs, introduces us to two of his clients: Cathy and Yariv, who embody why this market has the power to bring both younger and older generations unprecedented joy.We’ll be taking a break for next week’s holiday, but we’ll be back soon with our season finale of the Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast.DISCLAIMERThe host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.Morgan Stanley and its affiliates do not currently offer the services provided by Umbrella or Score, which are not affiliates of the Firm. Morgan Stanley has not conducted a review or diligence of these companies. This should not be considered to be a solicitation or endorsement by the Firm of Umbrella or Score or their services.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.CRC 2163452  6/2018

Jun 2018

16 min 12 sec

For the past 40 years, Major League Baseball’s off-season has been dominated by a frenzied bidding war to sign available free agents. But this year, everything changed—the free-agent market froze. For months, almost none of the 200 free agents were signed. So what happened? And what does the market shift mean for the future of America’s pastime?This season on the Ideas Podcast, we’ve been exploring unexpected markets. In this episode, we’ll look at what happens when a seemingly healthy market unexpectedly collapses. We talk to Ben Reiter, a journalist at Sports Illustrated who made a crazy prediction in 2014—that the Houston Astros, the then-worst team in baseball, would win the 2017 World Series. That Ben’s call came true wasn’t just a fluke—but reflected how teams now approach hiring players, particularly free agents. Then, J.C. Bradbury, a professor at Kennesaw State University in Georgia, takes us deep into the economics of baseball to explain why it suddenly has become good business to field a losing team. And Lou Pirenc, the Global Head of Research Data at Morgan Stanley, tells us about how baseball’s longstanding obsession with player statistics, and more recent expansion of data analysis into every aspect of the game as a business, has enthusiastic adherents and practitioners in every corner of the global market. For more, visit: https://morganstanley.com/podcast The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is an employee of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 2018

18 min 39 sec

Virtual reality is popping up in almost every industry, doing things that were once unimaginable. How did it grow from the stuff of Sci-Fi into a real world revolution? As with so many things, it began with a language. In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we explore the virtual future by looking at one of the earliest VR worlds. Bryan Carter, a professor at the University of Arizona, guides us on a tour of Virtual Harlem, an early VR world that allowed his students to walk the streets of the Harlem Renaissance. Then, Alexis Macklin, an analyst for Greenlight Insights, takes us to the future—one filled with virtual coffee dates, schools, and vacations. Along the way, we explore the coding language at the root of the VR explosion: C++. Morgan Stanley Managing Director Bjarne Stroustrup, who created the C++ programming language more than 30 years ago, tells us what it took to build a near-universal coding language that took on a life of its own, and has become the source code for everything from web browsers and video games to financial modelling and space exploration. For more, visit http://morganstanley.com/ideas.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is an employee of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 2018

15 min

Tech promised us more productivity and better lives via perpetual connectivity. Now, it seems impossible to stop looking at our screens. Can we disrupt distraction? In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we’re diving deep into the solutions-to-digital-distraction market. We talk to Suze Yalof-Schwartz, the founder of Unplug, a meditation app that helps people, well, unplug from technology by plugging in. Manoush Zomorodi, a technology journalist, shows us that the way we interact with our screens now might change how our kids will interact with each other. And Louella San Juan, a Managing Director and the Global Head of Client Technologies at Morgan Stanley, takes us to what she believes is the root of our unending dependence on technology: the ubiquity of the smartphone.For more, visit http://morganstanley.com/ideas.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is an employee of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Jun 2018

15 min 51 sec

As our lives become more digital, our money is becoming increasingly digital too. There are more than a thousand cryptocurrencies floating around and new ones seem to launch every day. But is this new form of money, one that only exists online, even a currency? What exactly gives cryptocurrencies value?In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we head to the Berkshires to see what a local currency, the BerkShare, can teach us about the value of alternative currencies. We speak with the creator of BerkShares, Susan Witt, about creating a brand new currency, and we turn to local business owners to see that currency in action. How did BerkShares go from a crazy idea to a real form of money? And will the same ever happen for cryptocurrency? James Faucette, a Morgan Stanley Senior Research Analyst, looks at the similarities between cryptocurrency and BerkShares to question whether cryptocurrencies will ever be the new normal.For more, visit http://morganstanley.com/ideas.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is an employee of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

May 2018

19 min 53 sec

Get ready, the new season of the Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast is almost here! This time around we’re making sense of a slew of surprising markets: cryptocurrency, virtual reality, baseball free agency, and many more. New episodes start in June!

May 2018

2 min 4 sec

On this special episode of the podcast we visit an exciting new exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Along the way we talk with Art Historian Diana Gisolfi of the Pratt Institute, and with Morgan Stanley’s Ferdousi Islam, an employee guide for company clients and employees at the exhibition, to look at the value of art in all its aspects, not only the monetary.Eight years in the making, Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer is sponsored by Morgan Stanley and open to the public at The Met in New York City through February 12th.For more, visit morganstanley.com/ideas.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. © 2018 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.CRC 2008801 01/2018

Jan 2018

13 min 55 sec

A rapid shift in the auto industry is coming. Electric vehicles, the long-anticipated cars of the future, are poised to dominate global markets in the next few decades. What impact will they have on how we live our lives?In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we wonder what an electric-car-powered future will look like. Will the internal combustion vehicle go the way of the horse and buggy? Will it mean the revival of the drive-in theater? Or the drive-in home? We speak with urban designer Marshall Brown who looks ahead at a world where electric vehicles will approach 90% of the market. Along the way, Simon Lonsdale of Chargepoint, an electric vehicle charging company, discusses how the driver of the future will fill-up. And Morgan Stanley Research Analyst Harald Hendrikse, an author of our recent Bluepaper on the bright future of the electric vehicle, introduces us to some ideas that may be as surprising as the flux capacitor.For further information, visit morganstanley.com/ideas The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.© 2017 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

Dec 2017

14 min 46 sec

We know to make sure our heirs can access our online bank accounts, but what about the rest of our digital selves? As more and more meaningful parts of our lives enter the virtual world, how do we value the assets we leave behind online? What are they worth and to whom?In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we wonder: What’s a good way to pass on 10,000 photos from all those family vacations? Does a viral social media account have real-world value after you die? Could our endless streams of online consciousness become the stuff of meaningful memorials? These are questions for the digital age we all inhabit, whether we’re 8 or 88. And they’re questions for the usually old-school world of estate planning, which Beth Smith, of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management’s Strategy and Advisory Solutions, knows well.For further information, visit Morgan Stanley Wealth ManagementThe host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“Morgan Stanley”), its affiliates and Morgan Stanley Financial Advisors and Private Wealth Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice. Clients should consult their tax advisor for matters involving taxation and tax planning and their attorney for matters involving trust and estate planning, charitable giving, philanthropic planning and other legal matters.© 2017 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.CRC 1948170 11/2017 

Nov 2017

18 min 30 sec

Finding the rare unicorn startup that both disrupts an entire industry and changes the world for the better has been the mission for Nancy Pfund of DBL Partners. These double bottom line businesses are changing the way many are thinking about sustainability. In this episode of the podcast we learn what Nancy values in these companies, visit a transformative soap factory in a struggling Chicago community, and hear from Hilary Irby, Morgan Stanley’s co-head of Global Sustainable Finance, about how this approach works and what potential investors should keep in mind. For further information, visit Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this podcast may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives.This podcast may contain forward-looking statements and there can be no guarantee that they will come to pass. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.The returns on a portfolio consisting primarily of Environmental, Social and Governance (“ESG”) aware investments may be lower or higher than a portfolio that is more diversified or where decisions are based solely on investment considerations. Because ESG criteria exclude some investments, investors may not be able to take advantage of the same opportunities or market trends as investors that do not use such criteria.Source for Morgan Stanley’s survey: Morgan Stanley Institute of Sustainable Investing’s Sustainable Signals: New Data from the Individual Investor, August 2017© 2017 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC. CRC 1934662  10/2017

Oct 2017

16 min 9 sec

When businessman Ron Harrington turned his attention and considerable fortune toward philanthropy he, like many others, confronted the issue of how to make the biggest impact. In this episode we explore the challenges of effective philanthropy, hear stories from Bill and Melinda Gates, talk about the importance of failure, discuss the solution the Harrington project is putting in place and get some tips from Melanie Schnoll-Begun of Morgan Stanley Philanthropy Management.For further information, visit Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management. The examples presented in this podcast are provided for illustrative purposes only. It represents general ways that philanthropy management can help philanthropists with similar circumstances. Each philanthropist's specific situation, goals, and results will differ.The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speaker is neither an employee nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it. The strategies and/or investments discussed in this material may not be suitable for all investors. Morgan Stanley Wealth Management recommends that investors independently evaluate particular investments and strategies, and encourages investors to seek the advice of a Financial Advisor. The appropriateness of a particular investment or strategy will depend on an investor's individual circumstances and objectives. Morgan Stanley Wealth Management is a business of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.© 2017 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC 1922879 10/2017

Oct 2017

15 min 40 sec

Can consumers get the same quick turnaround on new styles from the sneaker industry that they’ve come to expect for sportswear? This episode, we travel from a sneakerhead haven on New York’s Lower East Side to a state of the art robotics workshop outside Atlanta. Along the way we talk with Jay Sole, Morgan Stanley’s Branded Apparel and Footwear Analyst, about the future of the sneaker industry.

Sep 2017

15 min 39 sec

Can a building be great for the environment, great for the people inside, great for the bottom line and even great for the economy? In this episode, we visit Seattle's Bullitt Center, one of the greenest commercial buildings in the world. Morgan Stanley analyst Faty Dembele shares her research on the opportunities and impacts of sustainable building solutions, while University of Washington researcher Heather Burpee explains what it takes to design a building that goes far beyond a LEED certification.

Sep 2017

17 min 17 sec

You might assume that building great teams only requires hiring smart people who get along and can work toward a common goal, but that isn’t necessarily what the data tells us. Carnegie Mellon professor Anita Williams-Woolley shares her research on how to maximize collective intelligence, or the type of intelligence that emerges from effective collaboration. We learn about the importance of having cognitive diversity on a team, and the critical step of creating the right environment for such teams to flourish.

Aug 2017

12 min 37 sec

Smart decision-making takes more than intelligent people and good data. The theories of behavioral economics inform how businesses, and the rest of us, can try to avoid the irrational responses that may work against our best interests.

Jul 2017

16 min 31 sec

This week we're focusing on what may be a blind spot in all the excitement over autonomous vehicles: the future of car insurance. How will it work if there are no actual drivers to insure? We get a glimpse of the not-too-distant future by traveling to Mcity, a leading self-driving car test site at the University of Michigan and we hear from Jon Hocking, who covers the auto insurance industry for Morgan Stanley Research, as well as Hilary Rowen, a legal insurance expert who keeps close track of emerging technologies in Silicon Valley.

Jul 2017

15 min 14 sec

This week we're looking at gender diversity in the workplace. Ashley talks with Jana Rich, an executive recruiter in Silicon Valley, who has spent years working through the thorny issues of changing the gender mix in big firms. Plus, you'll hear from Eva Zlotnicka, whose work on the Sustainable + Responsible Investment team within Morgan Stanley Research has produced results that have even the quants paying attention to how workplace gender diversity can impact investment results.

Jun 2017

17 min 53 sec

This week we travel to Arizona to see how alternative energy, solar power investment, and utilities are taking what was on the fringes of science 30 years ago and turning it into the norm.

Jun 2017

20 min 58 sec