The Tightrope: Reflections for Busy Catholics

Ascension

The Catholic podcast where we take three to five minutes to see and embrace the opportunities embedded in our busy, messy lives that are meant to help us move towards heaven. Together, we walk the tension between living this life fully while being on our way to the next.

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In this final episode of the Tightrope, I leave with you with a powerful scripture verse from Romans about the Fatherhood of God. When we root ourselves in our truest identity as children of God and cry out to the Father with confidence that he hears us and loves us, everything changes. Snippet of the Show We are not orphans, we are beloved children of a Father in heaven who is worthy of our trust.

ago. de 2020

7 min 57 s

When we unite our suffering to Christ and offer it all up to the Father the way Christ does, everything changes. Our joys, work, hearts, and sufferings can all be offered alongside Christ and given back to the Father. When we learn to offer it all up, we grow in holiness and experience healing. Snippet of the Show Give every part of your life back to the Father the way Christ does, it changes everything.

ago. de 2020

7 min 13 s

Although the pandemic has shifted many of our plans and disrupted our normal routines, we can still choose to rejoice because we know the Lord is close to us in our suffering. Today, I encourage you to choose joy in the midst of the obstacles we face this year. Snippet of the Show In the midst of our trials and sufferings, we rejoice because we trust that the Lord draws near to us in our darkest moments.

ago. de 2020

7 min 18 s

Sainthood is possible no matter the circumstances. Today, I am joined by a very special guest to discuss schools reopening and the gift of the diverse group of saints we have in the Catholic tradition to help us in our walk with Christ. Snippet of the Show We are all capable of becoming saints, no matter where we have been, what we look like, or what we are facing.

ago. de 2020

14 min 41 s

Research indicates that talking about faith in the family plays a critical role in our commitment to the faith as we grow up. Today, I encourage you to go deeper with your family by having intentional conversations about God and what he's doing in everyone's life. Snippet of the Show Don’t be afraid to talk to your family about faith, the Holy Spirit can move in powerful ways if you simply give him a chance.

ago. de 2020

5 min 51 s

2020 has been a challenging year for all of us. In the midst of the uncertainty and chaos of this year, there are still good lessons we can learn from our experience. Today, I reflect on 5 things that I have learned this year. Snippet of the Show “If we don't confront evil with the power of the Gospel, then we're in big trouble."

jul. de 2020

9 min 35 s

Engaging on social media with charity and clarity in 2020 is not easy. Inspired by St.Thomas Aquinas, I offer a few principles to help us respond to issues and conflict on social media in a productive and charitable manner. If we remember the humanity of those we disagree with behind the screen, we will learn to truly love our enemies as Christ calls us to do. Snippet of the Show “ It's not just about winning arguments, it’s about winning hearts and building relationships.”

jul. de 2020

13 min 45 s

What’s going to happen in the fall? Will kids be in school? What will religious education and sacramental prep look like? In this episode, I discuss the importance of remembering our goal of reaching heaven as we plan for uncertain times in the fall. Snippet From the Show: Our ultimate goal is to become who God has created us to be and to go to heaven, and this goal cannot be thwarted by a pandemic.

jul. de 2020

14 min 22 s

Freedom is tied in the very identity of God and who we as his children made in his image and likeness. Understanding the real meaning of freedom revealed to us by Christ, will help us respond to the evils of our world and build a more just and virtuous society. As Catholics, our liberty must ultimately point to the participation in the Divine life. Snippet From the Show: “Real liberty is the ability to make a gift of oneself.”

jul. de 2020

11 min 18 s

In our pursuit of holiness, we tend to overlook the little things in life. It’s the small moments in life that can either push us upwards towards heaven or pull us down towards evil. Snippet From the Show: “Little things have a great power to move us.”

jun. de 2020

16 min 39 s

Navigating social media with love is a challenge we all face today. Looking at the lives of the saints and Jesus himself, Colin and Aimee MacIver discuss why cancel culture is incompatible with the Gospel and how to use social media in pursuit of holiness. Snippet From the Show “Our goal is not just to share truth but ultimately to love each other”

jun. de 2020

15 min 32 s

Solidarity is the idea that we are one, we are together. It is rooted in empathy for the person or groups who may not have advantages we have. GoFundMe Campaigns are an example of people living out solidarity. It is a way to live out our faith and helps us know we are not alone. Subsidiarity is the idea we are most effective when we start closest to home and heart. From there we can transform our state and our nation. Colin believes that real subsidiarity starts in the heart with virtue. Subsidiarity is to integrate virtue in our own hearts and to live it out in the spaces closest to us. These two, solidarity and subsidiarity, are the way we will fight against injustice, hate, and have an abundant life.

jun. de 2020

11 min 4 s

Near a spot where Colin takes his son fishing, there is graffiti on the side of a building. There was a new one however, which caught his eye. "Seen everything but Christ." Snippet From the Show _For the world to see Christ, we must to make him visible by our words and actions. _

jun. de 2020

8 min 39 s

Racism is present in our nation, and there is tension between races and classes. There is a danger of the center not holding politically. When Walker Percy wrote, "the center did not hold," in Love in the Ruins, he wasn't speaking just politically, but the interior state of the person. In today's podcast, Colin gives some pointers on where we can find our center. _Snipped From the Show The center is only found in Jesus Christ's grace and mercy. Our minds and hearts must be fixed on him. He is the only one who will save us._

jun. de 2020

6 min 19 s

Today, Colin shares how the basics of conversation from his son’s perspective, sharing good news and asking good questions, are the basics to evangelization. _Snippet From the Show Perhaps part of the reason we experience good things is so we can share them with others._

may. de 2020

5 min 24 s

This week, we pause to meditate on our identity, purpose, and desires. Identity: We are the children of God. It’s who we are at the center of who we are. Ask God, who am I? Purpose: If we are the children of God, then our purpose is to love and live as God does. There might sense of purposelessness, so we dive deeper into screen time. If so, then there’s a need for restoring the sense of purpose by doing chores and cultivating your relationships with others. Desire: What do you really want? What do you seek? *Snippet From the Show * When we act poorly, it’s often because we’ve forgotten who we essentially are; children of God.

may. de 2020

11 min 56 s

There’s likely going to be two types of people who will need to be reached once the churches reopen. Those who have become used to not going to Mass and won’t come back to church once the doors reopen. Then there’s some who have been doing some soul searching during quarantine. For the former, we will have to work pretty hard to get them back into the pews because they have found they are just fine without Jesus and church. The latter are more spiritually sensitive than before quarantine. They will be looking for churches, looking for God for clarity, purpose, and hope. They will be right there when the doors open again, hungry and thirsty for the Word. This means there will be new faces to welcome and opportunities to evangelize. Either way, we need to preach the gospel with such clarity and conviction that it cuts to the heart and brings people back to Jesus.

may. de 2020

7 min 9 s

If the world is a ship, then right now it’s taking in water. We’re pulled apart right now, keeping in touch through virtual means, but we must acknowledge that we cannot maintain a digital existence in perpetuity. This cannot be the new normal. As a Church, we need to be able to return to the sacraments at some point. It’s wonderful that we’re able to connect online right now, but it’s not something we can continue with forever. This is not where we ought to be, but it’s where we are. Let’s offer up our suffering, and have hope in being reunited with each other, and with the sacraments.

may. de 2020

9 min 51 s

Colossians 1:24 indicates that Jesus left some things undone, not in himself, but in each of us. St. Paul says, ““I am now rejoicing in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church.” Another way of saying it is that God invites us to participate in the salvific action of Jesus through our own suffering. Jesus forever transformed the meaning of suffering through his passion. No longer is suffering meaningless pain, but it can be offered up and joined to the work of Christ to intercede for the good of others. This is why we can rejoice in our sufferings. As we enter into yet another week of quarantine and separation, we can unite our suffering to the cross of Christ. Check out my talk with Fr. Mike on Baptism and Belonging to the Family of God (https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=2722069214740846&ref=watch_permalink).

abr. de 2020

7 min 51 s

As stay-at-home orders extend, we’re relying more and more on screens. They’re one thing that keeps everyone pacified, and it’s especially tempting to keep kids entertained in exchange for a few hours of quiet. There are definitely positive uses for screens, like education, communicating with friends and family, and spiritual devotions, but we have to be careful when it comes to mindless entertainment. Here are some ideas to keep a balance in your home: * Pray - Pray the St. Michael prayer often. Keep the Rosary going in your home. * Keep to a schedule - Don’t panic if it doesn't hold, but having some train tracks is a good thing. * Seek a balance of screentime - Find other ways to entertain yourself, and your kids will be likely to follow suit. * Have a list of alternate activities for children. * Filter your internet for porn and bad content. * Make rules about screens in bedrooms and in private spaces. * Don’t let up. Be a force for positive interaction.

abr. de 2020

13 min 57 s

As we enter into this Easter season, we see that the Resurrection is not just a reason for joy and hope, but invites us to go on a mission to spread the good news and make disciples throughout the world. Snippet from the Show For us, in this unprecedented time, we will be empowered for a mission by the resurrected Christ.

abr. de 2020

5 min 56 s

If this Lent didn’t go the way you wanted it to, you are not alone. But God can take our disappointments and failures, and use them to do something good in our lives. One good thing is to humble ourselves and realize that we are deeply in need of a savior. We can’t save ourselves, and luckily we don’t have to. Jesus is our hope and our salvation. As we enter into Holy Week, I’m praying for you and your family to experience fully the saving power of Jesus’ sacrifice.

abr. de 2020

7 min 38 s

The extraordinary “moment of prayer,” the Urbi et Orbi blessing of March 27,2020 was the first ever of its kind offered apart from the election of a pope, Christmas, or Easter. On a bleak Friday during Lent and in the midst of worldwide pandemic and upheaval we witnessed the Vicar of Christ express the eloquence of his office. He pleaded, intereceded, and blessed. He taught with authority and spoke to weary hearts words to rouse.

mar. de 2020

6 min 38 s

Catholic parents have become the abbots and abbesses of 1000’s of domestic monasteries. Like all good monasteries yours needs a workable schedule and a focus. Unlike most monasteries, yours may or may not include brooding teenagers, sassy six year olds, or active nine year olds who have just had all of their team sports cancelled. In our home—so far—we’ve experienced lots of trial and error and reset. I’ve learned about weaknesses in my own leadership and have witnessed God’s grace bringing me along day by day. The elements we are trying to balance are: prayer, work, study, and community.

mar. de 2020

12 min 58 s

As many of us are practicing social distancing, we’re confronted by the things right in front of us. For me this brings to mind this line from The Little Prince, “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.” This line shows us that while we’re preoccupied with statistics and never-ending news cycles, what’s most important is what’s right in front of us: Our communities, our families, and our God. Snippet from the Show “It’s hard to make sense of everything that is happening, and yet we believe that the God who made the stars made each and every one of us individually.”

mar. de 2020

6 min 17 s

“What does Lent mean to you?” This question really made me think about why Lent exists. We know it’s derived from Jesus’ forty days in the desert, but what caused Jesus to go there in the first place? Matthew 4:1 says, “Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.” So the origin of Lent, the reason Jesus went into the desert in the first place, is because he was led by the Holy Spirit. We too, are prompted by the Holy Spirit to fast, pray, and give alms for these forty days. These practices help us empty ourselves so we may be strengthened by the Holy Spirit as Jesus was. Snippet from the Show “Come Holy Spirit, come and breath into our fasting, prayer, and almsgiving so that what we do this Lenten season would unite us deeply and firmly to Christ.”

mar. de 2020

7 min 22 s

If you’re struggling with your Lenten commitment already, that may be a good thing because the purpose of Lent isn’t to do it perfectly, it is to reveal the things we’re putting before Christ. When we realize that there are things we prefer to Christ, we can go to the root of the problem and ask God to enter into that temptation. St. Benedict recognized this when he established his rule for monks. The rule ensured that their ascetic practices pointed to their ultimate goal of preferring nothing to Christ. If we employ this balance in our own Lenten fast, we find that by the end of Lent, our hearts will be ordered properly, with Christ first. Snippet from the Show “The whole goal of Lent is to orient ourselves so that we prefer nothing to Christ.”

mar. de 2020

6 min 34 s

A face-to face encounter can be a powerful thing. I experienced this with my own son while praying for someone who was sick and suffering. His sincere prayer for their deliverance brought me to tears. It’s something we can all do. Before Lent, come face-to-face with Jesus, and make a sincere offering. Snippet from the Show “An encounter that’s face-to-face is really the heart of the spiritual life. We seek to look into the eyes of Christ.”

feb. de 2020

5 min 54 s

How should we be preparing for Lent? By enjoying the good things God has made (celebrating Carnival/Mardi Gras) and planning out our fasting, almsgiving, and prayer for the forty days of Lent. Here are some resources to help you plan for Lent! * 25 Weird Things to Give Up for Lent (http://media.ascensionpress.com/2019/03/04/25-weird-things-to-give-up-for-lent/) * 20 Out-of-the-Box Things to Do for Lent 2020 (http://media.ascensionpress.com/2020/02/14/20-out-of-the-box-things-to-do-for-lent-%ef%bb%bf2020/) Snippet from the Show “In fasting, we say ‘no’ to things not because they’re bad, but because we love God more. They’re things we hold back from so that we can be empty and God can fill us.”

feb. de 2020

7 min 15 s

What is love? It’s seen as a feeling, but more than that, it’s two things: Desire and willing the good of another. The first part craves unity with the beloved, and the second part wants the best for the other. When we love others using both parts of this definition, we are able to do so much more in our relationships. Here are three guidelines to make sure we’re living out the right definition of love. 1. Give, don’t assert. 2. Don’t use people. 3. Surrender to God. Snippet from the Show “Fulfillment is never found when we assert ourselves, it’s only found when we make a gift of ourselves.”

feb. de 2020

8 min 15 s

What is pettifogging? It’s what happens when we put undue emphasis on petty details—which many of us do a lot in our spiritual lives. Pettifogging is the first thing St. Ignatius of Loyola warns against in The Spiritual Exercises. He reminds us that we are made to know, love, and serve God. All other things are minor in comparison. Snippet from the Show When we’re anxious sometimes it’s because we’re fixed on some minute detail and we’ve lost sight of the grander scheme of God’s great providence over our lives.

feb. de 2020

6 min 31 s

You’ve repeated yourself multiple times, you’re getting frustrated and flustered, you’re raising your voice—you’re just not getting through to other people. We’ve all been there. By looking at the reasons why we’re not getting through, maybe we can approach these situations differently in the future, both in our homes, and with others. 3 Reasons We’re Not Getting Through 1. The person we’re trying to talk to isn’t in a position to hear us. Maybe they’re tired or hungry or extremely preoccupied, and the present moment just isn’t a good time to talk to them. 2. The person we’re talking to doesn’t understand us. Maybe the language we’re using isn’t ubiquitous and trying a different way of explaining would help. 3. You’re perceived as an adversary, and therefore nothing you say is affective. Anger is a sure way to get someone to shut down.

ene. de 2020

7 min 17 s

Of course parents love their kids, but we may not realize how little we communicate that love to them. Using the five love languages, we can uncover the most effective way to show our love. Whether that’s writing a letter, or sharing a hug, or saying “I’m sorry” for something we’ve done wrong, it’s important to find out what your children respond to. Here are the five love languages: Words of affirmation Quality time Gifts Touch Works of service How do you show love to your family?

ene. de 2020

5 min 13 s

Epiphany is the feast where the Magi come to pay homage to the infant Jesus, but it can also be used to describe a moment of sudden revelation or insight. In the life of Jesus, there are three epiphanies, and each one reveals a truth about ourselves and how we can grow toward God. 3 Epiphanies and What They Mean for Us: 1. The Magi - the Magi are instructed to go back a different way. * We turn toward Christ and follow his teachings, and follow a different path. 2. Baptism of the Lord - Jesus’ identity as Son of the Father is confirmed. * We recognize our own identity and dignity as sons and daughters of God. 3. Wedding at Cana - Christ is revealed as bridegroom and Mary says, “Do whatever he tells you.” * We follow the commands of Christ. Snippet from the Show “The three epiphanies are three ways in which Christ dawns upon the human condition.”

ene. de 2020

5 min 17 s

One of the biggest witnesses to the gospel in my life is Leo, my nine-year-old son. His strategy for growing closer to Jesus in 2020 is to pray, listen to his parents, go to Mass, and go to Adoration, which sounds like a great plan. He also says that confession is easy because all you have to do is ask a priest. The things Leo talks about in this episode (Mass, confession, Adoration, reading scripture, and evangelization) are cornerstones of our Catholic faith, and worthy of a special devotion this year. What’s your 2020 resolution to grow closer to Jesus? Snippet from the Show “I like being Catholic because you get to receive Jesus, go to confession, and go to Mass.” -Leo, nine-year-old

ene. de 2020

6 min 55 s

This January, don’t just make a list of goals for the new year—try developing a vision. I don’t mean a vision for your career, your finances, or even for your family. I'm talking about a deeper, more integrated vision that encompasses the entirety of who you are and who Christ is. Developing a vision like this is only possible if you understand where you come from, who you are, where you’re going, and how you can get there. If you’re clear on all four of these questions, I guarantee you’ll be clear on what’s important for you in 2020. Snippet from the Show _If you begin this year rooted in the sacraments, rooted in the Scriptures, and rooted in a confident awareness of your identity as a beloved son or daughter of God, God will give you a clear vision for 2020. _

dic. de 2019

3 min 29 s

The Nativity is an invitation to learn more about Scripture and ponder it as Mary did. The excitement, beauty, and power of Scripture can be lost on us Catholics if we only hear the Bible at Mass. Let’s dive deeper into the Word this Christmas, and continue through the new year. How is God calling you this Christmas? Snippet from the Show “The Nativity itself is an invitation to study Scripture and to reflect more deeply, as Mary did.”

dic. de 2019

7 min 49 s

If you’re struggling with stress and anxiety as we get closer and closer to Christmas, you’re not alone. There are stressors that reemerge for each of us this time of year, from family struggles, to holiday preparations, to aches connected to the past or uncertain future, but we don’t have to just push them aside and put on a happy face. We can bring it all to Christ. Here are some ways to actually find joy this Christmas: Make time for prayer 1. Go to confession before Christmas 2. Go to Adoration 3. Do an Advent reflection. Here’s an Advent series from Fr. Mark Toups. (https://youtu.be/XPok8oKw0BM) Snippet from the Show “If we’re not rooting ourselves in Christ, then things will be a drain.”

dic. de 2019

6 min 29 s

As the feast of the Immaculate Conception passes, we turn to Mary at this point in Advent. Her sinlessness, virginity, and virtue are especially important to us as we look to grow in holiness. Our Lady has many things to teach us, but here are three things that come to mind as we meditate on the immaculate conception. Sinlessness is not boring. We think sin is interesting, edgy, and fun, but in reality it just makes us enslaved. Holiness is what sets us free. Our bodies and souls are united. What we do with our bodies affects our souls, and what we do with our souls affects our bodies. Chastity is not devoid of intimacy. The fulfillment of human life is not dependent on physical intimacy. Snippet from the Show “Mary, in her perpetual virginity, shows us that the fulfillment of human happiness is not dependent on physical intimacy.”

dic. de 2019

7 min 30 s

Advent brings forth this image of the perfect family (Jesus, Mary, and Joseph) that few of us can relate to, but we forget the the family tree of the Holy Family is actually pretty messy. If you go back in Scripture, there is a lot of sin and suffering in the lineage of Christ on earth. But God can use our broken family stories to bring about his salvation. In this Advent season, let us pray and hope and invite Emmanuel into our lives. Snippet from the Show “The God who saved us through the blood of his son is not unaware of how terrible the reign of sin and suffering and death is. God is breaking into the brokenness of our family situations, into the mess of the Church.”

dic. de 2019

7 min 18 s

We know we should “Give thanks in all circumstances” (1 Thessalonians 5:18) but what does that look like from day-to-day? It’s one thing to practice gratitude one day a year, but let’s carry this practice in our families, workplaces, and communities. Here are three ways to get in the habit of thanksgiving: Conversational gratitude - talk to others about what you’re thankful for every week. A good way to do this is by talking about the highs and lows you’ve had throughout the week. You can also get in the habit of singling out one person everyday and sincerely thank them for being a gift. Interior gratitude - cultivate an interior practice of thankfulness everyday, especially when it comes to hardships and challenges, because God gives us everything for a purpose—to sanctify our souls. Eucharistic gratitude - “eucharist” literally means “thank offering.” Offer up your gratitude to God at each and every sacrifice of the Mass. Snippet from the Show “As soon as an intentional practice of gratitude becomes a prayer, it becomes apparent to us that our very existence is a gift, that we are loved, and that everything we are going through is an opportunity to be more united with Christ.”

nov. de 2019

7 min 46 s

The title of Jesus as Christ the King has been at the forefront lately with the release of Kanye’s album, Jesus is King. But Kanye isn’t the first to proclaim the kingship of Jesus. As we look forward to celebrating the Solemnity of Christ the King this Sunday, let’s take a look at a couple of great martyrs who offered their lives up for Jesus Christ: St. José Luis Sánchez del Río and Blessed Miguel Pro. St. José Luis Sánchez del Río was a fourteen-year-old boy who was tortured because he proclaimed Christ to be King. They told him they would stop and let him go if he would just deny Christ, but he refused, even unto death. Blessed Miguel was a Jesuit priest who operated in secret and refused to stop offering the sacraments to his flock. He was caught and executed while crying out, “Viva Cristo Rey!” or “Long live Christ the King!” This Sunday, remember those who so believed in Christ the King that they offered up their very lives for the sake of his kingdom. Snippet from the Show “Proclaiming Jesus to be the king of our lives and our hearts means that our salvation, our power, and our strength come from him.”

nov. de 2019

5 min 46 s

It’s difficult to protect our kids from everything online, but there’s a simple thing you can do that can have an impact: check their phones. This will 1.) reinforce the fact that nothing posted online is anonymous and 2.) give them an excuse to opt out of questionable sites and behaviors because they know their parents will be periodically checking up on them. This goes for apps like TikTok, YouTube, Instagram, and even gaming platforms. Just having eyes on what your kids are up to on their phones can have a big impact on their online habits. Snippet from the Show “What happens online is not anonymous.”

nov. de 2019

5 min 40 s

Many of us are familiar with “The Talk”—the extremely awkward conversation you had with your parents where they vaguely referred to birds and bees and flowers and everyone avoided eye contact. It doesn’t have to be that way! By rooting “The Talk” in JPII’s Theology of the Body, we can hopefully change the conversation to be less about sex, and more about the beauty of God’s plan for men and women. More than a single conversation. Don’t wait until your kid is in high school to begin talking about this. There are ways to talk about the goodness of the body and marital love in age-appropriate ways. Call it like it is. Refer to body parts by their actual name. Let them know that these things are not bad things, they are private things, deserving of respect. Reinforce that the body is a good. What we do with our bodies is how we express love. Sex is an extension of what we are and who we are. We were made for love, and union, and sex gives us the opportunity to partake in the creative power of God. That is a very good thing. Pay attention to the questions. If your kids have questions, and don’t get satisfactory answers from you, they will look elsewhere. Be aware of your own views and past experiences of sex. If you have been hurt in this area, acknowledge your brokenness and seek healing and help. Seek advice when needed. Talk to other parents about how they approach this topic. You may find support and ideas that would be helpful.

nov. de 2019

12 min 26 s

The body of Christ stretches throughout time and space, and the Feasts of All Saints and All Souls Day remind us of that supernatural reality. One of the ways we know the saints are in heaven is because of their good work on earth. On All Saints Day, we praise God for the example of the saints and we ask them to intercede for the souls on earth and in purgatory. On All Souls Day, we pray for the “saints-in-waiting”—the souls who are in purgatory. These souls wait to behold the face of God, but the pain they experience in purgatory is productive, perfecting them and preparing them to meet their creator. Those of us on earth who hope to be saints deal with difficulty each day, but there is nothing we go through that is wasted suffering. Our striving on earth can be offered for our salvation and for the salvation of those suffering in purgatory. Let’s all strive to be saints. Let’s offer everything we experience in union with the Mass so we can become the saints we were created to be. And if you think you can’t be a saint, remember: your mess is not more powerful than the power of the death and resurrection of Christ. Snippet from the Show: “There is only one tragedy in the end, not to have been a saint.” -Leon Bloy

oct. de 2019

6 min 7 s

Reflecting on Pope John Paul II’s encyclical Redemptor Hominis, Colin reminds us that Christ the redeemer is the center of the entire universe and all of human history. But is he the center of your own personal universe and your own personal history? As Catholics, we need to re-situate Jesus Christ as the center of our reality. Everything we do, say and believe should orbit around him. The devil is looking to sidetrack us and lead us to focus on anything other than Christ the redeemer. For Catholics, it might be Church politics, our families, our work— even a specific spiritual practice— but if we place any of these at our center, we need to re-calibrate our lives and put Christ back in his rightful place. Only when our lives are reordered around him will we be fully redeemed. _ Snippet from the Show:_ Christ the Redeemer is the center of the entire universe and of human history, but is he the center of your universe?

oct. de 2019

7 min 19 s

If you were baptized, you are called to be a prophet. That doesn’t mean that you’ll be predicting the Second Coming, but you are called to speak the truth with clarity and charity. This means comforting the afflicted, and afflicting the comforted. Comforting the afflicted often mean reassuring people of God’s love for them, and his plan for their life. Afflicting the comforted often means speaking harsh truths that people don’t want to hear. 3 Steps to Afflicting the Comforted 1. Make sure you’re actually speaking the truth of God, and not just your personal opinion. 2. Be willing to be rejected and even ridiculed. 3. Be genuinely charitable. Snippet from the Show “A prophet doesn’t speak their own words, they listen to the Word of God and then speak it with clarity and charity.”

oct. de 2019

7 min 47 s

Jesus used parables to explain the Kingdom of God to his disciples to help them understand supernatural truths by relating them to everyday occurrences. So what would a modern-day parable look like? Maybe it would involve a backpack, lost in a field, that is finally restored after much searching and anxiety. Perhaps there is more joy in finding one lost backpack than in having 99 at hand. Snippet from the Show “When Jesus taught about the Kingdom of God, he used familiar things.”

oct. de 2019

6 min 2 s

Isn’t it funny how the things that we consider good for us are also in line with Church teaching? Trendy wellness practices like daily gratitude, fasting, and meditation are all things great Catholic saints have been doing for centuries. St. Thérèse of Lisieux’s Little Way is a great example. By focusing on heaven, St. Thérèse was able to radiate joy in this life. Here are three good practices for wellness and heaven from St. Thérèse. * Gratitude - not just gratitude for the good things in life, but also for our suffering. * Acts of love - looking for opportunities to serve others throughout the day, no matter how small. * Building up others - going out of our way to seek the company of those who are on the margins. Snippet from the Show “Those who live for heaven are far more joyful than those who are looking for satisfaction here on earth.”

sep. de 2019

8 min 17 s

St. Padre Pio suffered from the stigmata for years, but he’s also the saint who said, “Pray, hope, and don’t worry.” How can a person who suffered from open, bleeding wounds for fifty years just say, “don’t worry”? In uniting his suffering to the cross of Christ, St. Padre Pio was able to find peace. Suffering is inescapable, but this great saint showed us how Christians are called, not to try and avoid suffering, but to use it as a way to grow closer to Christ. So bring all your sufferings, from the inconvenience of a messy kitchen, or bigger problems, like illness and injury, to the altar, and offer them up like Padre Pio. St. Padre Pio, pray for us—and happy feast day! Snippet from the Show - “The experience of Christianity is not to find a way out of suffering, but to find a way through suffering.”

sep. de 2019

8 min 1 s