FreshEd

FreshEd with Will Brehm

FreshEd with Will Brehm is a weekly podcast that makes complex ideas in educational research easily understood.

Airs Monday.

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Earlier this month, UNESCO held a high-level segment of its Global Education Meeting aimed at galvanizing political commitment towards mobilizing additional investment in education. The goal was to encourage countries to develop strong domestic systems to fund education. My guest today is Borhene Chakroun, Director for Policies and Lifelong Learning Systems at UNESCO. He has been working with UNESCO to spearhead the effort to bring conversations about financing education to the highest levels of the international community. Resources, transcript and more: https://freshedpodcast.com/chakroun/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Nov 28

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Today we think through the concept of power within the internationalization of higher education. My guest is Jenny Lee, professor at the Center for the Study of Higher Education and College of Education Dean's Fellow for Internationalization at the University of Arizona. Jenny Lee has a new edited collection entitled U.S. Power in International Higher Education, which was published by Rutgers University Press earlier this year. Resources, transcript and more: https://freshedpodcast.com/lee-2/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Nov 21

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Today we take stock of climate education, its past and its future. With me are Christina Kwauk and Radhika Iyengar, who have recently co-edited the book, "Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change." They argue that COP26 has been disappointing in terms of education and climate action, and encourage everyone to focus on local action and change. Christina Kwauk is the Research Director at Unbounded Associates and a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institute. Radhika Iyengar is Director of Education at the Center for Sustainable Development, Earth Institute, Columbia University. Resources, transcript and more: freshedpodcast.com/kwauk-Iyengar -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Nov 13

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Today we talk about UNESCO’s new report from the international commission on the Futures of Education. The report is entitled “Reimagining our futures together: A new social contract for education.” It launches on Wednesday, November 10. With me to discuss the report is António Nóvoa, who was the Chair of the research-drafting committee of the International Commission. He is also a Professor at the Institute of Education of the University of Lisbon and currently serves as the Portuguese Ambassador to UNESCO. You can find more information about the Futures of education report here: https://freshedpodcast.com/novoa -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Nov 7

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Today Steve Carney joins me to talk about his new co-written book with Ulla Ambrosius Madsen entitled “Education in Radical Uncertainty: Transgression in Theory and Method.” The book offers a major critique of the field of comparative education and asks us to dwell in experience rather than make value judgements. This is a powerful book in both form and content and demands to be read by anyone working in the field of comparative and international education. Steve Carney is a Professor of Educational Studies at Roskilde University, Denmark. freshedpodcast.com/carney/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Oct 31

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Today we talk about the 45 million people in the USA who owe $1.7 trillion in student debt. My guest is Elizabeth Tandy Shermer, an Associate Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago. Elizabeth shows in her new book that the student debt crisis today can be traced back to the New Deal. She details the changing political fault lines when it comes to federally funding higher education. Elizabeth Tandy Shermer’s new book is Indentured Students: How Government-Guaranteed Loans Left Generations Drowning in College Debt. freshedpodcast.com/shermer/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Oct 24

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Today we talk about confronting settler colonialism in higher education. My guest is Leigh Patel, Professor of Urban Education at the University of Pittsburgh, and President of Education for Liberation. In her new book, No Study Without Struggle, Leigh shows how the ability to study has always involved some form of struggle by groups historically marginalised in the USA. Her book is a love letter to study groups around the world. https://freshedpodcast.com/patel2/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Oct 17

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When foreign militaries withdrew from Afghanistan on August 31, hundreds if not thousands of researchers and civil society members were left behind. In the UK, many of these people were prioritized for evacuation under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy, known as ARAP, but they never got out. What has happened to those who were left behind? Today Brad Blitz joins me to talk about his work on the Afghan Solidarity Coalition. Brad details this unfolding human tragedy as well as reflects on his own work on migration and forced displacement. He questions the meaning of equal university partnerships when one side does not protect the other, and encourages listeners to donate to the International Civil Society Action Network, which is trying to evacuate thousands of Afghans who are currently in danger. You can donate here: https://icanpeacework.org/2021/09/15/help-at-risk-afghans-with-your-donation/ Brad Blitz is a professor of international politics and policy and head of the Education, Practice and Society department at the UCL Institute of Education. That’s the same department where I work. Brad is technically my boss. freshedpodcast.com/blitz -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Oct 10

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Today we explore what it means to decolonize education. My guests are Riyad Shahjahan, Annabelle Estera, and Kirsten Edwards. Together with Kristen Surla, they conducted a literature review of 207 articles about the topic. They show that the very idea of decolonizing takes on diverse meanings and subsequently is put into practice in different ways. They argue there is no one way or best practice to decolonize curriculum or pedagogy. They also detail some of the challenges of actualizing decolonization. Riyad Shahjahan is an associate professor of higher, adult, and lifelong Education at Michigan State University. Annabelle Estera is an Advisor and Instructor in Graduate Education at Endicott College. Kirsten Edwards is an Associate Professor in educational policy studies at Florida International University. Their new co-written article is “‘Decolonizing’ curriculum and pedagogy: A comparative review across disciplines and global higher education contexts” published in the Review of Educational Research. https://freshedpodcast.com/shahjahan-estera-edwards/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Oct 3

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Today we talk about how to teach about and beyond September 11th. My guest, Ameena Ghaffar-Kucher, says 9/11 is often taught in American schools as a one day event, focused on loss and mourning, heroes and first responders. Together with a global team, Ameena has launched the Teaching Beyond September 11th curriculum to change the narrative. Ameena Ghaffar Kucher is a Senior Lecturer in the Literacy, Culture, and International Education division at the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania and the director of the international educational development program. She also hosts the podcast, The Parent Scoop, which she started with her family during the Covid-19 lockdown. https://freshedpodcast.com/ghaffar-kucher/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Sep 26

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Today we celebrate the life and work of Paulo Freire, who was born on September 19, 1921. Freire has had an enormous impact on education around the world, from his concept of freedom and praxis to this understanding of oppression and liberation. I’m sure many listeners have read his famous book “Pedagogy of the Oppressed.” With me today is Alma Flor Ada who knew Freire and was deeply influenced by his work and friendship. Alma is Professor Emerita at the University of San Francisco and author of children’s books, poetry, and novels. https://freshedpodcast.com/ada/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Sep 19

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Today we take a critical look at the idea of competency-based education. Not only is the term hard to define but also it has various political agendas depending on which organization is promoting it. With me are Kathreyn Anderson-Levitt, a Professor Emerita of Anthropology at the University of Michigan–Dearborn and Meg Gardinier, who teaches at the School for International Training’s (SIT) Doctorate in Global Education Program. They’ve recently co-edited a special issue of Comparative Education entitled “Contextualising Global Flows of Competency-based Education." https://freshedpodcast.com/Anderson-Levitt-Gardinier/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Sep 12

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Today Mari Casellato joins me to talk about her FreshEd Flux episode, which aired last week. I recommend you listen to her Flux episode before listening to this interview. It’ll make a lot more sense! In our conversation today, we talk about the history of environmental education and how it is different from education for sustainable development. Mari details youth conferences in Brazil in more detail and explains how they impacted her. She also talks about the way she approaches audio story telling from a collective standpoint. Mari Casellato recently graduated with her master’s degree from Teachers College, Columbia University. https://freshedpodcast.com/casellato/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Sep 5

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Today we air the third episode of Flux, a FreshEd series where graduate students turn their research interests into narrative-based podcasts. This episode is by Mari Casellato, a recent graduate of Teachers College, Columbia University. Mari takes us on a journey through time, revealing the potential of youth participation in environmental education in Brazil (and beyond). You might be thinking Brazil – where the Amazon was on fire just last year and the current Bolsonaro government has been routinely criticized for doing too little to prepare for the climate crisis. But back in the 1990s and early 2000s, Brazil spearheaded this idea of environmental education, which brought together a diversity of voices through national conferences and was seen as a political act. Mari was personally involved in this history. freshedpodcast.com/flux-casellato -- Today’s episode was created, written, produced, and edited by Mari Casellato. Johannah Fahey was the executive producer and Brett Lashua and Will Brehm were the producers. Voices: Narrator: Mariana Casellato History narrator: Tiago Luna English version of Joao: Alcides Ferreira English version of Mariana: Renata Penalva English version of Isis: Aline Godoy Youth voices: Ajani Stella and Kayley Chery Music in this episode (used with permission): Cacuriá – Mawaca “Temas tradicionais de cacuriá” Maranhão – Brazil/Arrangement: Mawaca Special guest: Tião Carvalho (Voice, cavaquinho and caixa) Lá na Mata da Amazônia - Seu Antonio and Grupo Cupuaçu Other music came from the Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue): Eggs and Powder and Alum Drum Solo; and Soundstripe (www.soundstripe.com) Baiao Baiao, Coco Coco, and Sambita Sambita, all by Hola Hola. Sound effects retrieved from Freesound.org: Sea sound effect by HowNotToSail and Forest sound scape by jonasrocha. Former UN Secretary-General Boutros-Ghali speech at Rio 92 audio retrieved from the UN Audiovisual Library: The Earth Summit. Special thanks to Rachel Trajber and Marcos Sorrentino for their generosity and continued work; to Clóvis, for continuing to be a reference; and to João, for the energy. To Projeto Cala-boca já morreu and all of its participants for so many years of partnership, with special remarks to Grácia for all the inspiration, to Mariana, for the insights, to Tiago, for the great voice, and, to Isis for all the support and companionship now and over the years. To Danilo Fernandes, Ajani Stella, Kayley Chery, Renata Penalva, Alcides Ferreira, Aline Godoy, Daniel Corsi, Carla Hirata, and Caio Mamede for agreeing to lend their voices for this project and for all the support. Finally, to Mawaca, to Tião Carvalho, to Neila Campos Mendes and her family, and to Grupo Cupuaçu for allowing us to use their amazing songs “Cacuriá” and “Lá na Mata da Amazônia” that gave so much life to this project. -- Learn more about Flux: freshedpodcast.com/flux/about/ Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Aug 29

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Next week we will air another episode of Flux, our series where graduate students turn their research interests into narrative-based podcasts. In fact, it’ll be the last episode of Flux for the year before we launch the application period for the next round of fellows. Next week’s episode will be about environmental education in Brazil. Environmental education is different from education for sustainable development, the common phrasing used by UNESCO and others today. So, in preparation for the Flux episode, I’m going to replay an interview about education for sustainable development. It’ll be good background for next week’s episode. -- Climate change and its effects aren’t some future possibilities waiting to happen unless we take action today. No. The effect of climate change is already occurring. Today. Right now. Around the world, people have been displaced, fell ill, or died because of the globe’s changing climate. These effects are uneven: Some countries and classes of people are more affected by global warming than others. Still, the United Nations estimates that catastrophic consequences from climate change are only a decade away. That’s the year 2029. [Editor’s note: The IPCC report is from 2018 and gave a 12-year prediction, so it should read 2030, not 2029.] What is the role of education policy in an era of detrimental climate change? My guest today is Marcia McKenzie, a professor in the Department of Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan and director of the Sustainability Education Research Institute. She recently has been awarded a grant to research UN policy programs in relation to climate change education and in June will release a report for the United Nations that reviews country progress on climate change education and education for sustainable development. In our conversation, we talk about what countries are doing or not doing in terms of education and sustainability, and we reflect on some of the existential questions that climate change brings to the fore. https://freshedpodcast.com/mckenzie/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Aug 22

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Today I’m going to play an old episode that has taken on new meaning now that we’ve aired Yardain Amron’s Flux episode, “Education is not the silver bullet.” If you don’t remember or haven’t listened, Yardain brought together multiple stories of student activism in India and Puerto Rico to paint a picture of how the privatization and marketization of higher education is a violent act. Back in 2017, I interviewed David Harvey, the Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York. In that episode, our 100th, Harvey gave a Marxist interpretation of higher education. He touched on student debt, living through contradictions of capitalism, and resistance movements internal to our neoliberal system. Much of what he said provides excellent background to Yardain’s episode. It’s also nice to think that Yardain is studying Geography and Harvey is a Rockstar in the field. They make for an excellent pair of FreshEd episodes. So here it is, David Harvey on Freshed from December 2017. https://freshedpodcast.com/davidharvey/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Aug 15

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Today Yardain Amron joins me to talk about his FreshEd Flux episode, which aired last week. I recommend you listen to his Flux episode before listening to this interview. It’ll make a lot more sense! https://freshedpodcast.com/flux-amron/ In our conversation today, we talk about his process of creating podcasts and telling stories. He says he dwells on contradictions that often go unnoticed. Yardain also talks about the connections and tensions between his approach to storytelling as a journalist and his approach to academics as a master’s student. He worked through some of these tensions developing his Flux episode, which brought together many different stories into a coherent narrative connected to theory. Yardain Amron is a freelance journalist and master’s student at the University of British Colombia. www.freshedpodcast.com/amron/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Aug 8

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Today we air the second episode of Flux, a FreshEd series where graduate students turn their research interests into narrative-based podcasts. In this episode Yardain Amron crafts a narrative that shows complex theories in action. He doesn’t simply tell his listeners what these ideas are or name them explicitly. He takes us to disparate places–from universities in India and Puerto Rico to Occupy Wall Street–and makes a connection between them by embedding stories within stories. Through this nested narrative, he shows us how the streets are schools by exploring spaces of activism as educative sites, while leading us to the core idea at the heart of this episode: the relationship between debt and violence. Yardain Amron is a freelance journalist and master’s student in Geography at the University of British Columbia. freshedpodcast.com/flux-amron -- Today’s episode was created, written, produced, and edited by Yardain Amron. Johannah Fahey was the executive producer and Brett Lashua and Will Brehm were the producers. Flux theme music was composed by Joseph Minadeo of Pattern Based music. Music in this episode came from Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue): Tiny Bottles ShadowPlay The Bus at Dawn Kvelden Trapp David Graeber clip from "Debt: The First 5000 Years — Extended Interview" by Uprising with Sonali. Special thanks to Eleni Schirmer, Jose Laguarta, Banojyotsna Lahiri, Alessandra Rosa, and the many other student- and scholar-activists across the globe whose experiences and expertise, if not voices, underpin this story. -- Learn more about Flux: freshedpodcast.com/flux/about/ Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Aug 1

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Today we explore the language of instruction in refugee education. Although learning in a home language is important, often it’s impossible for refugee children. Such tensions have important implications for refugee futures which are often unknowable. My guests are Celia Reddick and Sarah Dryden-Peterson who have recently co-written a new book chapter entitled “Refugee Education and Medium of Instruction: Tensions in Theory, Policy, and Practice.” Celia Reddick is a PhD Candidate in Education at Harvard where Sarah Dryden-Peterson is an Associate Professor and Director of REACH. www.freshedpodcast.com/reddick-dryden-peterson/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jul 25

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Today we look at some of the tensions implementing Sustainable Development Goal 4, which aims to “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.” My guest is Antonia Wulff who has closely followed the development, adoption, and implementation of the SDGs for nearly a decade. She even edited an open-access book about it, which was published last year. That book is Grading Goal Four: Tensions, Threats, and Opportunities in the Sustainable Development Goal on Quality Education. In our conversation today, she details some of the tensions in the SDGs, from its lack of an accountability framework to limited financing to problems balancing a broad and inclusive conception of quality with one that is narrow and based on global learning metrics. Antonia Wulff is the Director of Research, Policy and Advocacy at Education International (EI), the global federation of teacher unions. She coordinated EI's advocacy and engagement in the intergovernmental negotiations on Agenda 2030. www.freshedpodcast.com/wulff/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jul 18

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Today we take stock of the first human rights guiding principles for education, known as the Abidjan Principles. Adopted in 2019, these principles provide guidelines for State obligations to provide quality public education and the role of the private sector in education. My guest is Frank Adamson, Assistant Professor at California State University, Sacramento. Together with Sylvain Aubry, Mireille de Koning, and Delphine Dorsi, he’s recently co-edited the open-access book, Realizing the Abidjan Principles on the Right to Education: Human Rights, Public Education, and the Role of Private Actors in Education. www.freshedpodcast.com/adamson/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jul 11

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Today we look at the way in which dissertations in the early 20th Century produced and governed the emerging field of education and how these new knowledges moved across the world. Our focus is on Teachers College, Colombia University. My guest is Daniel Friedrich, an Associate Professor of Curriculum and Director of the Doctoral Program in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Teachers College, Columbia University. Together with Nancy Bradt, he recently published in the latest issues of Comparative Education Review “The Dissertation and the Archive: Governing a field through the production of a genre.” www.freshedpodcast.com/friedrich/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jul 4

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Elite schools help reproduce the capitalist class. The sons and daughters of the wealthy go to elite schools to gain networks and receive education that helps maintain their social status in the future. My guest today, Karen Lillie, has looked at this process in an elite school in Switzerland that enrolls children from around the world. She finds that students are in the process of becoming part of the transnational class while also maintaining their national identities in interesting ways. Karen Lillie recently finished her PhD at University College London, focused on the processes of transnational class formation. Starting in October, she will be a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne, Germany. Her latest article is “Multi-sited understandings: complicating the role of elite schools in transnational class formation,” which was published by the British Journal of Sociology of Education. www.freshedpodcast.com/lillie/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jun 27

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Today I replay my conversation with Julie Mead from August 2019. We speak about her co-written report with Suzanne Eckes for the National Education Policy Center entitled: How school privatization opens the door for discrimination. In our conversation, we touch on a range of issues related to voucher programs and charter schools. Julie reminds listeners that the dictionary definition of discrimination is not the same as the legal definition. Julie Mead is the Associate Dean for Education and Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She is a member of the Education Law Association. Julie Mead is the Associate Dean for Education and Professor at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Her latest report is How school privatization opens the door for discrimination. www.freshedpodcast.com/juliemead/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jun 20

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Today we celebrate the life and work of Aziz Choudry, who died suddenly on May 26, 2021 at the age of 54. Aziz was a scholar-activist who fought injustice worldwide. He appeared on FreshEd twice, so to honor his legacy here is his first appearance from February 8, 2016. -- Social movements produce a huge amount of intellectual knowledge. Yet, in many academic circles, this knowledge is overlooked. My guest today, Aziz Choudry, has spent most of his life working with social movements around the world. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University and visiting professor at the Centre for Education Rights and Transformation at the University of Johannesburg. His newest book Learning Activism: The Intellectual Life of Contemporary Social Movements was published in 2015 by the University of Toronto Press. All book proceeds will be donated to the Immigrant Workers Centre in Montreal. Learning Activism is designed to encourage a deeper engagement with the intellectual life of activists who organize for social, political, and ecological justice. Professor Choudry is concerned with “making visible the dialectical relationship between ‘Research’ and ‘organizing.’” I spoke with Aziz Choudry in mid January about his new book. https://freshedpodcast.com/azizchoudry/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jun 13

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Today the journalist, author, and academic, Gary Younge, joins me to talk about race, identity, and education. Our conversation starts with his reflections on the UK Government’s Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, which published its report in March. We then touch on a range of issues from across his career. Gary Younge is a professor of sociology at the University of Manchester. He worked for the Guardian newspaper for two decades and has written five books. His book Who are We – and should it matter in the 21st century? was recently re-released with an updated introduction. In May, he released his latest BBC radio documentary called Thinking in Colour. https://freshedpodcast.com/younge/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Jun 6

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Today Daniela Hernández Silva joins me to talk about her FreshEd Flux podcast episode, which aired last week. Spoiler alert: we talk about her Flux episode in depth in today’s show. So, if you haven’t already listened to her flux episode, I recommend you hit pause now before continuing with this episode. In our conversation today, Daniela details how podcasting allowed her to combine her creative and academic sides into one. She also provides additional context on education in rural Colombia. She argues that the Escuela Nueva model of rural education has had a lot of success increasing access to education across Colombia, but it does not fit the country’s context today. Either the model or the context needs to change. Daniela Hernández Silva recently finished her Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree in Education Policies for Global Development (GLOBED). She is the first FreshEd Flux fellow to air her episode. https://freshedpodcast.com/Hernandez-Silva/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

May 30

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Today we launch the first episode of Flux, a FreshEd series where graduate students turn their research interests into narrative-based podcasts. In the first episode of Flux, Daniela Hernández Silva takes listeners to a faraway place in the Colombian countryside. Here, reality is transformed. She uses magical realism to create a composite character called Jose. Jose gives voice to the hundreds of people Daniela spoke with during her five-years of ethnographic fieldwork. By raising Jose’s voice and listening to what he has to tell us, Daniela offers an alternative reading of Escuela Nueva, the award-winning rural education program founded in Colombia. She challenges policy assumptions about rural education in Colombia as a way to begin to change the narrative. Daniela also questions academic conventions and critiques the legitimacy of academic knowledge over local experience. The episode is a sonic journey unlike anything we’ve ever aired. https://freshedpodcast.com/flux-silva -- Today’s episode was written, edited, and produced by Daniela Hernández Silva. Senior producer was Johannah Fahey. Producers were Brett Lashua and Will Brehm. Flux theme music by Joseph Minadeo of Pattern Based music. Voices: • Narrator and Researcher: Daniela Hernández Silva • Young Jose: Pablo Rivas • Adult Jose: Guillermo Rivas • Gabriel García Márquez: Gustavo Fischman Music and Sounds used with permission: • Bamboo Flute by Carlos Carty • Bass track by Daniela Hernández Silva • Bittersweet by Matteo Galesi • Book Sound Effect by All Sounds • Bomb Sound Effect: Free Sound by ERH • Burning Fire Sound Effect by Hadwin Channel • Cash Register Sound Effect by Kiddpark • City Skyline Sound Effect by Audio Library • City Traffic Sound Effect by RoyaltyFreeSounds • Clapping Sound Effect by Audio-without-Copyright • Colombian Cumbia by Vodovoz Music Productions • Handwriting Sound Effect by Nagaty Studio • Keyboard Typing Sound by zrrion_the_insect • Kids playing: Recording by Daniela Hernández Silva • Magical Rising Wind by Jason Shaw • The Arctic by Gold Coast • People talking: Recording by Daniela Hernández Silva • Record Scratch Sound Effect by SONIDOS-NoCopyright • Shots Sound Effec by No-Copyright-Music-Vloggers • The Reflecting by Birds of Norway • Throwing Away Glass Sound Effect by Qubodup • Truck: Recording by Daniela Hernández Silva • Woman Crying Sound Effect by ARRNNOO -- Learn more about Flux: https://freshedpodcast.com/flux/about/ Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

May 23

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It’s common to believe that education makes people socially mobility. The more education one receives, the more job prospects one will have. There are whole economic theories that explore the relationship between education, productivity, and earnings. Because of this commonplace assumption, education is believed to reduce inequality. But what if the power we commonly place on education is misplaced? What if the story is more complex than what our neat theories of the economy and society tell us? This is where history comes in. My guest today is Cristina Groeger. She’s recently written The Education Trap: Schools and the Remaking of Inequality in Boston. Cristina explores the history of work and education in Boston between 1880 and 1930 and finds legacies that continue into the present. Cristina Groeger is an Assistant Professor of History at Lake Forest College. https://freshedpodcast.com/groeger/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

May 16

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Today we explore the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and its work in education. My guest, Christian Ydesen, looks at the history of the OECD to show how the international organization has shaped-shifted overtime. From this perspective, the OECD is dynamic and includes far more products and viewpoints than its famed PISA examination. Christian Ydesen is a professor at the Department of Culture and Learning, Aalborg University in Denmark. He’s recently co-edited (with Tore Sorensen and Susan Robertson) a special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education called “Re-reading the OECD’s roles in education: the becoming of a global governing complex." https://freshedpodcast.com/christian-ydesen/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

May 9

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Today we take an inside look at Low Fee Private Schools. With me is Joanna Härmä who has recently published the book Low-Fee Private Schooling and Poverty in Developing Countries (Bloomsbury 2021) Joanna Härmä is a writer and researcher on education and development. She also owns and operates a low fee private school in India. Joanna is a visiting research fellow at the Centre for International Education at the University of Sussex and a teaching fellow at the University of Edinburgh. https://freshedpodcast.com/harma -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

May 2

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Today we explore the interconnections between the fields of peace education and human rights education. With me are Maria Hantzopoulos and Monisha Bajaj, authors of the new book Education for Peace and Human Rights: An Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2021). Their book launches a new book series by Bloomsbury Academic on Peace and Human Rights Education, which brings together cutting-edge scholarship from scholars and practitioners in the field. It will provide a cross-section of scholarly research as well as conceptual perspectives on the challenges and possibilities of implementing both peace and human rights education in diverse global sites. Maria Hantzopoulos is an Associate Professor of Education at Vassar College and Monisha Bajaj is Professor of International and Multicultural Education at the University of San Francisco. Discount Code: 30% off with code EDU21 https://freshedpodcast.com/Hantzopoulos-Bajaj -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Apr 25

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Today we think about the power of ideas and imagine what life might look like after capitalism. With me is Tim Jackson. In his new book, Post Growth: Life after capitalism, Tim shows the limits of the dominant metaphors used to explain our current world and argues for new metaphors to help imagine a sustainable, just, and creative future. Tim Jackson is the director of the center for understanding of Sustainable prosperity and professor of sustainable development at the university of Surrey. https://freshedpodcast.com/jackson -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Apr 18

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Special Note: Check out FreshEd's new Portuguese-language podcast called Eduquê, which launched today! https://freshedpodcast.com/eduque/ -- Climate change and its effects aren’t some future possibilities waiting to happen unless we take action today. No. The effect of climate change is already occurring. Today. Right now. Around the world, people have been displaced, fell ill, or died because of the globe’s changing climate. These effects are uneven: Some countries and classes of people are more affected by global warming than others. Still, the United Nations estimates that catastrophic consequences from climate change are only a decade away. That’s the year 2029. [Editor's note: The IPCC report is from 2018 and gave a 12-year prediction, so it should read 2030, not 2029.] What is the role of education policy in an era of detrimental climate change? My guest today is Marcia McKenzie, a professor in the Department of Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan and director of the Sustainability Education Research Institute. She recently has been awarded a grant to research UN policy programs in relation to climate change education and in June will release a report for the United Nations that reviews country progress on climate change education and education for sustainable development. In our conversation, we talk about what countries are doing or not doing in terms of education and sustainability, and we reflect on some of the existential questions that climate change brings to the fore. www.freshedpodcast.com/McKenzie -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Apr 11

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Today we explore the response of the Finnish education system to the Covid-19 pandemic. Unlike many countries with children out of school, the narrative of “learning loss” never emerged. In fact, as Pasi Sahlberg tells me, the opposite happened. Pasi Sahlberg is a professor of education policy at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He’s been a regular on FreshEd for the past five years. His latest books include Finnish Lessons 3.0: What can the world learn from educational change in Finland (2021), and In Teachers We Trust: The Finnish way to world-class schools, which was co-authored with Tim Walker (2021). Today we discuss these books in relation to the pandemic. freshedpodcast.com/sahlberg-2 -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Apr 4

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Today we explore the relationship between UNESCO and the World Bank from the 1960s through today. My guest is Maren Elfert. She has recently published in the International Journal of Educational Development an article entitled “The power struggle over education in developing countries: the Case of the UNESCO-World Bank Co-operative program, 1964-1989.” Maren Elfert is a lecturer in education and society in the school of education, communication and society at King’s College London. freshedpodcast.com/elfert -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Mar 28

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Today we explore the global education architecture and its failures to ensure quality education. My guest is Girindre Beeharry. In a new article in the International Journal of Educational Development, he calls on the international community to focus on foundational literacy and numeracy and says it is high time for the global education community to hold itself accountable. His article is entitled "The pathway to progress on SDG 4 requires the global education architecture to focus on foundational learning and to hold ourselves accountable for achieving it." Girindre Beeharry is a senior advisor on Global Education at the Gates Foundation. He advises on the foundation’s efforts to support partners that focus on improving foundational literacy and numeracy in sub-Saharan Africa and India , having initiated and led the program for four years. freshedpodcast.com/beeharry -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Mar 21

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Today we flip the script. Susan Robertson interviews me as part of her weekly Ideas Lab seminar at Cambridge University. We discuss the creation and evolution of FreshEd and what the podcast’s impact has been on higher education. We recorded this interview in front of a live Zoom audience. freshedpodcast.com/brehm -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Mar 13

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Does more schooling always lead to a better life? Is this optimistic view a certainty everyone around the world can expect? My guest today, Fran Vavrus, has recently written a new book that weaves together her 30 years of work in Tanzania with her own biography as an academic, mother, and development practitioner. She details the tension between the certainty and uncertainty inherent in education. Fran Vavrus is a Professor of Comparative and International Development Education at the University of Minnesota. Her new book is Schooling as Uncertainty: An ethnographic memoir in comparative education. https://freshedpodcast.com/vavrus/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Mar 7

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Shadow education is private supplementary tutoring. East Asia is often assumed to be the center of private tutoring. But it’s actually a global phenomenon. Today Mark Bray joins me to talk about shadow education in Africa. Mark Bray is the Director of the Centre for International Research in Supplementary Tutoring (CIRIST) at East China Normal University in Shanghai, and UNESCO Chair in Comparative Education at the University of Hong Kong. His latest book is Shadow Education in Africa: Private Supplementary Tutoring and its Policy Implications. freshedpodcast.com/markbray-2/ ‎ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Feb 28

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What does it mean to be both an activist and an academic? With me today are Colette Cann & Eric DeMeulenaere. They have spent their careers wearing both of these hats. They’ve found ways for their activism to create social change in the academy and for their academic pursuits to inform their activism. In their new co-written book titled The Activist Academic: Engaged Scholarship for Resistance, Hope and Social Change, they present their own journeys as a guide for merging activism and academia. Colette Cann is an Associate Dean and Professor in International and Multicultural Education in the School of Education at University of San Francisco. Eric DeMeulenaere is an Associate Professor in Clark University’s Education Department. https://freshedpodcast.com/cann-demeulenaere/ ‎ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Feb 21

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Vietnam has been herald as an education superstar. In just a few years, it both increased access to education and improved student learning outcomes. What explains Vietnam’s success, and can other countries learn anything from the Vietnam experience? My guest today is Jonathan London, Associate professor of Global Political Economy at Leiden University. He has a new working paper for RISE, which stands for Research on Improving Systems of Education, entitled “Outlier Vietnam and the Problem of Embeddedness: Contributions to a critique of the political economy of learning.” In our conversation, he details the history of Vietnam, its system of decentralization, and the process of household co-payments to education. www.freshedpodcast.com/london -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Feb 14

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To kick off the year, Professor Marie Lall joins me today to talk about education reform in Myanmar. Marie Lall has recently published a new, Open-Access book entitled Myanmar’s Education Reforms – a pathway to social justice? I’ve posted a link to the book on our website. Check it out! She is a professor at the UCL Institute of Education and has over 25 years of experience in the region. www.freshedpodcast.com/lall -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

Feb 7

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Special note: New episodes start next week! School students all over the globe have declared a “Climate Emergency.” For some time now, youth have been striking for immediate and effective action to stop global warming and secure the habitability of our planet. Greta Thunberg is perhaps the most recognizable student protesting. You’ve probably seen her moving speech at the United Nations. In the context where students skip school to protest, what role do teachers play? More broadly, what is the role of education in times of climate crisis? One group of university professors and activists have thought deeply about these questions. They have recently launched a “Call to Action” for educators, asking signatories to transform their pedagogies and curricula, realign research agendas, and reformulate policy frameworks – all in line with the climate crisis and other environmental challenges. In short, signatories are asked to voice their concerns any way they can in their professional work in and outside the classroom. Today’s show takes you behind the scenes of this Call to Action, connecting the student protests and the climate crisis to the Sustainable Development Goals and Global Learning Metrics. Sign the call to action here: https://educators-for-climate-action.org/petition/ Photo credit: https://unsplash.com/s/photos/climate-change -- www.FreshEdpodcast.com/climateaction Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Jan 31

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Today we take a critical look at human rights. My guest is Radha D’Souza. Radha has a new book entitled: What’s wrong with rights? Social movements, Law, and Liberal Imaginations. In our conversation we discuss why there has been a proliferation of human rights since the end of World War II and how these rights have actually furthered the interests of the transnational capitalist class. Radha also discusses education as a human right and the challenge it has for social movements and unions such as education international. Radha D’Souza teaches law at the University of Westminster, London. www.freshedpodcast.com/radhadsouza/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Jan 24

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On Wednesday, the Trump presidency comes to an end. To look back at the past four years, we are going to replay this episode with Julian Vasquez Heilig. In this episode, we explore the schooling received by children affected by the Trump administration’s immigration policy of family separation. This was one of the most sinister policies of the Trump era, one in which the incoming Biden administration promises to reverse in the first days in office. Julian Vasquez Heilig is the Dean of the College of Education at the University of Kentucky. When I spoke with him, he was a professor of educational leadership and policy studies at California State University Sacramento. Julian writes a blog entitled “Cloaking Inequity”. In the post discussed in this episode, he reported on a Texas-based detention center forcing children to use an online, for-profit charter school. www.freshedpodcast.com/heilig -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Jan 17

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In the aftermath of the riots in America, I thought it would be timely to replay my conversation with Cynthia Miller-Idriss. Our conversation focused on her book, The Extreme Gone Mainstream, which looks at far right youth subculture in Germany. Many of the insights she reveals about extremist groups in Germany can be applied to the groups that stormed the Capitol building in America. Cynthia Miller-Idriss is Associate Professor of Education and Sociology at American University. Her book "Extreme goes Mainstream?: the Commercialization of Far Right Youth Subculture in Germany was published by Princeton University Press. https://freshedpodcast.com/cynthiamilleridriss/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Jan 10

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Many students move across national borders to attend university. Although the number of these globally mobile students is small compared to the total number of students enrolled in higher education, there numbers are increasing. But the patterns are changing, with more regional and south-south mobility. The role of scholarships in promoting these new patterns of student mobility is gaining attention by researchers and development aid alike. My guests today, Joan Dassin and Aryn Baxter, have recently contributed to a new edited collection entitled International Scholarships in Higher Education: Pathways to Social Change, which was edited by Joan Dassin, Robin March, and Matt Mawer. Joan Dassin is a Professor of International Education and Development and Director of the Masters Program in Sustainable International Development at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Aryn Baxter is an Assistant Professor in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College and Director of the Mastercard Foundation Scholars Program at Arizona State University (ASU). https://freshedpodcast.com/dassinbaxter/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Jan 3

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Note: FreshEd is on holidays. Since the pandemic continues to rage worldwide, I wanted to re-air an interview from March. Much of what Yaneer Bar-Yam mentioned then is still true today, 9 months later. -- Blaise Pascal, the 17th Century French mathematician and physicist, once wrote “All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” As people and governments around the world are wondering whether or not to self-isolate to stop the spread of covid-19, Pascal’s adage has become more pertinent than ever. As we grapple with our new world, I wanted to bring you a special episode of FreshEd. With me is Yaneer Bar-Yam, a physicist, systems scientist, and founding president of the New England Complex Systems Institute. Yaneer has spearheaded endcoronavirus.org, which aims to minimize the impact of Covid-19 by providing useful data and guidelines for action. In our conversation, Yaneer discusses what different countries are doing in response to the virus and talks specifically about children and whether or not they should be in school. www.freshedpodcast.com/bar-yam/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Dec 2020

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Today Susan Robertson and Mario Novelli join me to review the year. And what a year it’s been! Covid-19 has upended the world. But how has it upended research on education and globalization? Has it changed how we think about and teach comparative and international education? Susan Robertson is a professor of education in the Faculty of Education at the university of Cambridge. Mario Novelli is Professor in the Political Economy of Education at the University of Sussex. They are co-editors of the journal Globalisation, Societies, and Education. https://freshedpodcast.com/2020inreview/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com

Dec 2020

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