Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Alex Green Online

Hosted by Alex Green, Stereo Embers: The Podcast is a weekly podcast airing exclusively on Bombshell Radio (www.bombshellradio.com) that features interviews with musicians, authors, artists and actors talking about the current creative moment in their lives.

A professor at St. Mary's College of California, Alex is the Editor-In-Chief of Stereo Embers Magazine (www.stereoembersmagazine.com), the author of five books and has served as a Speaker/Moderator for LitQuake, Yahoo!, The Bay Area Book Festival, A Great Good Place For Books, Green Apple Books, and The St. Mary's College Of California MFA Reading Series.

All Episodes

“I’ve Always Wanted To Be Me” You might know Dave Monks from his work with his band Tokyo Police Club. Since 2005 The Canadian-bred TPC have been one of the most exciting indie rock outfits around, putting out winning albums like Champ and Elephant Shell. They played on Letterman and Craig Ferguson played festivals like Outside Lands, Lollapalooza and Coachella and though the beloved Juno-nominated band are still an ongoing proposition so is Monks' solo career. His sophomore album I’ve Always Wanted To Be Me is a nervy blast of life-affirming indie rock that’s big and crunchy, hook filled and catchy—but it’s also lyrically direct and emotionally vulnerable, making it one of the most memorable albums of the year. In this equally memorable chat, Monks talks to Alex about being competitive, the benefits of having a partner who’s also in the music business and the changing shapes of his daily practice. www.tokyopoliceclub.com www.davegoeswild.com www.bombshellradio.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Dec 1

1 hr 7 min

“Coup De Main” The category of “Things That Jude Cole Does" is pretty crowded because Jude Cole does a lot of things. A singer/songwriter, a guitarist, a band manager, a producer, a music critic, a record label founder, and a businessman—Jude Cole is a busy dude. The Illinois-born musician got his start playing in Moon Martin and the Ravens in the late 70s. In 1980 he joined the English band The Records and played on the Crashes album as well as touring with them all over Europe. After leaving the Records, Cole got his solo career going and he quickly knocked out a series of perfect pop albums like A View From 3rd Street and Start The Car. He put his solo career on hold to both manage and co-write songs for Lifehouse, then in 2003 he and Kiefer Sutherland formed Ironworks Studio and Records, signing artists like Ron Sexsmith and honey honey. He also recorded interview segments for Extra, where he interviewed The Rolling Stones and Bob Seger Over the years he’s collaborated with Dave Edmunds, Rhett Miller of the Old 97s, Beth Orton, Styx and Peter No-one. So yeah, Jude Cole is a busy guy. What’s he got going on lately besides a lot? Well, he’s got two new albums—Coolerator, which is comprised of doo-wop covers from the '50s and Coup De Main, an album that reminds us why Cole is one of the most talented and riveting songwriters on the planet. Filled with acoustic numbers, mid-tempo rockers, breezy '70s pop and an infectious synth-tinged number, Coup De Main is a poised and hook-laden collection that’s catchy, affecting and unforgettable. In this chat, Cole talks to Alex about playing the banjo, why not everyone is a champion and what it was like to be a young man in a band in England in 1980. www.judecole.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Nov 24

41 min 32 sec

“You Are Magic” Alison Faith Levy is super busy. She was in the post Game Theory outfit the Loud Family, she’s one half of the McCabe and Mrs Miller duo, the other half being Camper Van Beethoven’s Victor Krummenacher, and you might also know her from the alt rock for kids outfit the Sippy Cups. So yes, Alison is always busy, but somehow between the music and raising a family with her husband Danny Plotnick, she went on to receive a master's degree at Boston's Hebrew College in 2020. She now serves as a cantorial soloist and educator at two Bay Area synagogues. And she has a new album. Her third solo effort, You Are Magic is a joyful blast of effusive and thoughtful pop for adults and kids alike. The album’s mission statement is to open up dialogue in families about all sorts of stuff that families should be talking about in the first place: morals, ethics, expression, mindfulness, creativity and connectivity. It’s a brilliant and refreshing collection that’s inspiring, heartwarming and rousing. And so is this chat! In this conversation, Alison talks to Alex about….well, about everything: Game Theory, XTC, Judaism, teaching and raising a son who loved John Fahey at age eight. www.alisonfaithlevy.com www.alisonfaithlevy.bandcamp.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast

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Nov 17

1 hr 9 min

“Kiss Off, Kiss Off” Erin McKeown is best categorized as un-categorizable. Whether the Virginia-born musician is playing guitar with the Mountain Goats, tearing through big band music in a tailored suit or writing an off-Broadway musical, McKeown pretty much does it all. A graduate of Brown, McKeown, over the course of her over 20 year career, has put out almost 15 solo albums, toured with Andrew Bird, Thea Gilmore, Josh Ritter and the Indigo Girls, played Bonnaroo and Glastonbury, had her music appear in commercials and TV shows, was a resident artist at Providence, RI’s revolutionary community arts organization AS220 and she was the 2011-2012 fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center For Internet & Society. Yes, she’s busy. The recipient of a 2016 writing fellowship from The Studios of Key West and a 2018 residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. McKeown is currently a 2020-21 Professor of the Practice at Brown University. Her new album KISS OFF KISS OFF is a raw blast of nervy rock and roll that’s got street smart grooves and real poetic grit. It’s fast and catchy and it swerves with all the lippy snarl of early Joan Jett. In this chat, McKewon talks to Alex about sports, creativity, self-preservation and why she won’t answer emails after 6pm. www.erinmckeown.com www.bombshellradion.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers Twitter: @emberseditor IG: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Nov 10

1 hr 10 min

“The Police: Deranged For Orchestra” Born in Virginia and raised in Cairo and Beirut by a Scottish archoeolist mother and an American father who founded the CIA, Stewart Copeland has had quite a life. So much so, that his biography deserves its own podcast but for the sake of time, let’s go with the expurgated version. Copeland started playing drums at 12 and after finishing boarding school in England and college at UC Berkeley, he returned to the UK to play drums for Curved Air. In 1977 he founded The Police with Sting and after recruiting guitarist Andy Summers to replace Henry Padovani, the new wave power trio locked in and the rest, as they say, is history. But in the case of the Police, let’s go with history to the 10th power. The Police are one of the best selling bands of all time, with record sales heading close to 100 million worldwide. They put out five albums from 1978 to 1983 and by the time their last one hit shelves, they were arguably the biggest band in the world. Their legacy is safely enshrined in the rock and roll hall of fame and Copeland is considered one of the greatest drummers to ever sit behind the kit, but his legacy doesn’t stop there. He’s scored movies like Rumble Fish, Wall Street, and Talk Radio; TV shows like The Equalizer, Dead Like Me and Star Wars: Droids. He’s also scored ballets that were commissioned by everyone from the San Francisco Ballet Company to the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. He’s collaborated with Tom Waits, Peter Gabriel, Les Claypool and Adam Ant; he played in other bands like Animal Logic and Oysterhead with Trey Anastasio of Phish. He’s scored video games, done voices for movies like South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut, he put out his memoir Strange Things Happen: A Life with the Police, Polo and Pygmies and he collaborated with the Long Beach Opera on a production of Edgar Allen Poe’s The Telltale Heart. Well, the always busy Copeland’s new project is called The Police: Deranged for Orchestra. It’s basically a fresh take on The Police songbook, by way of the 28 member ReCollecitve Orchestra. They reimagine songs like Roxanne and Don’t Stand So Close To Me and the results are captivating and spellbinding. In this conversation, Copeland talks to Alex about rock and roll bands as democracies, the elasticity of the Police’s compositions and why he speeds things up when Sting is in the audience. www.stewartcopeland.net www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Nov 3

37 min 4 sec

“Psyche" Reb Fountain is one of the most beguiling, affecting and captivating musicians out there. And people are catching on. The California-born, but New Zealand raised Fountain has won the esteemed Taite Music Prize, she was shortlisted for the Silver Scroll award for her track "Don’t You Know Who I Am" and she was nominated for five New Zealand Music Awards, including Album of the Year and Best Solo Artist. She’s played sold-out shows across New Zealand, she opened for Crowded House on their To The Island Tour and she played a spellbinding set at the Splore music festival. Spellbinding is a great way to describe Reb Fountain’s music. Or at least it’s a good place to start because one word does not do the trick. Her songs are dark blasts of gothy noir infused with punk, folk and indie rock. And her new album Iris is as captivating as it gets—lush, jagged, and cinematic, Iris is stirring, hypnotic and unreasonably beautiful. In this conversation, Reb talks to Alex about how she ended up in New Zealand, what it was like working with the Finn family and why she’s happy to be an honorary Californian. www.rebfountain.com.nz www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com STEREO EMBERS THE PODCAST Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Oct 30

1 hr 6 min

“The Ghosts” Kira Roessler, who was just known back in the '80s as KIRA, was the bassist for the legendary Black Flag from '84 to '86. A ferocious outfit that played a physical and fiery brand of blistering and punishing punk rock, Kira was no stranger to getting in the van and tearing from town to town with her bandmates. After leaving Black Flag, the UCLA educated Roessler who had also played with DC3, the Monsters, the Visitors and Twisted Roots, formed the bass-led duo Dos with her husband Mike Watt. Dos put out a couple of great albums and then Roessler retreated a bit from music and focused on her day job as dialog editor in the film industry. With a few Emmys under her belt and contributing to two Academy Award- winning films, Kira has done dialog editing on Game of Thrones, Joker, Mad Max Fury Road and A Star is Born. Her debut self-titled solo album is an intricate and instrumentally complex album. With vocals that bring to mind a blend of Kim Deal and Hope Sandoval and bass-fueled arrangements that provide a perfect foundation for the compositions, KIRA is a moving and stirring debut. In this chat, Kira talks to Alex about carving out time for the creative process, the power of musical minimalism and memories of d. Boon. https://kittenrobot.com/records www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com www.stereoembersmagazine.com Stereo Embers Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Oct 27

1 hr 22 min

“Her Favourite Hitchcock Films” A native of Northern California, Jerry Vessel was the bassist for the beloved San Francisco outfit Red House Painters. The band, who formed in 1989, put out four albums on 4AD and toured all over North America and Europe before calling it a day in 2001. Post-Painters, Vessel played drums for the Muons and bass for Six Eye Columbia and he also put out two solo albums under the moniker Heirlooms of August. Heirlooms' sophomore album Down at the 5-Star found one of the songs featured in the TV series Parenthood. Vessel’s third effort is under his own name this time around and it really makes sense. A stripped down affair that’s stark, spare, personal and unflinchingly honest, Her Favorite Hitchcock Films was written about his relationship with fashion designer Alexis O’Connell and it not only details their time together, it also confronts dealing with her sudden loss. Punctuated by piano violins, cellos, and atmospheric production courtesy of American Music Club’s Bruce Kaphan, the compositions on Her Favorite Hitchcock Films are as poetic as they are conversational. Beautifully constructed, they’re parenthetical, interstitial, referential and emotional. Name-checking Darby Crash, David Lynch, aluminum boats, Thelonious Monk, druid forts and Townes Van Zandt, the songs that make up this album are filled with lyrical intensity in that they conjure the world Vessel and O’Connell built and occupied together. When you’re close with someone you construct universes that are made up of the things you mutually love and this is a stirring homage to those universes. Yes, there’s darkness and of course, there’s pain here, but every song is charged with love. It’s vulnerable but in that vulnerability there’s tremendous life-affirming strength. It’s quite an album. And this is quite a conversation—Vessel talks to Alex about grief, his friendships with his former Red House Painters bandmates, Townes Van Zandt, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jack London and why the piano was his go-to instrument this time around. www.jerryvesselmusic.bandcamp.com www.jerryvesselmusic.com www.bombshell radio.com www.alexgreenonline.com

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Oct 22

1 hr 28 min

“Starting Now” The Santa Barbara bred Toad The Wet Sprocket got their start in the late ‘80s when high school pals Glenn Phillips, Dean Dinning Randy Guss and Todd Nichols decided it was time to form a band. Cut to 1989 and the band’s demo Bread and Circus which came out on their own Abe’s Records label, was re-released by Columbia Records. From there, Toad pretty much owned the '90s, putting out albums like Pale, Fear, Dulcinea and Coil. They had massive hits with All I Want, Walk On The Ocean, Something’s Always Wrong and the Number One Modern Rock chart topper Fall Down. But as the story goes, owning the '90s was exhausting and citing creative differences, the band took a break from being a band for a long time. They played sporadic shows here and there, but for the most part, Toad The Wet Sprocket were kind of on ice. The band members went on to do different projects, Phillips had a busy solo carer and that was that. That ice melted in 2009 and the band reactivated themselves from hiatus, putting out their first new album since 1997. New Constellation was a blast of West Coast pop that reestablished Toad as a force to be reckoned with. Eight years later, we have Starting Now, the band’s 7th full length effort. A stirring platter that’s melodic, joyful and undeniably catchy, Starting Now is as rousing as it is hopeful. The band is down an original member—drummer Randy Guss left in 2020, but Josh Daubin is behind the kit now and he’s crushing it. In this conversation Phillips talks to Alex about his relationship to alcohol, vaccines and learning to not be so hard on himself….. www.toadthewetsprocket.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com STEREO EMBERS THE PODCAST Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Oct 20

1 hr 6 min

“The Last Of The Gentleman Adventurers” Over the course of a 40-year career that started in 1982, the London born and Northampton raised and Oxford educated Pat Fish fronted the Jazz Butcher Conspiracy. The JBC was shortened to the Jazz Butcher and Fish, along with co-conspirator and guitarist Max Eider, had a rotating cast of characters in his band, varying from guys like David J of Bauhaus or Rolo from the Woodentops, The Jazz Butcher put out close to 15 studio albums, several live albums, a handful of compilations, box sets, singles—you get the idea. If you’re a collector—the Jazz Butcher is the band for you. They put our records on Big Time, Creation, Fire and Glass, and they played with R.E.M., Jonathan Richman and the list goes on and on. "She’s on Drugs" was the closest they came to a mainstream hit and by the late 90s, things had slowed down a bit for the band. Pat owned a bookshop, played locally a great deal, hosted the Masters of Budvar live series, and kind of just chilled out after nearly two decades of frantic touring, late night drinking, hotel staying and rock and roll mayhem. He was adored and never far from those who did all that adoring. He loved his cat, he loved to read, he loved to drink, he loved to smoke and he loved to play music. Recorded in 2009 as the Jazz Butcher’s The Last Of The Gentleman Adventurers album hit shelvers, this interview finds Fish in fine form, talking about the new record, Roddy Frame, The Blue Nile, his long-standing relationship with Eider and why it’s so hard to age in rock and roll…. www.thejazzbutcher.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast

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Oct 13

1 hr 3 min

“I’ll Meet You Here” The New York-born Dar Williams has been crafting some of the most engaging music of the last 30 years. A graduate of Wesleyan, Williams got her start in the early '90s in Boston. She had moved there to pursue a career in theater, but inspired by contemporaries like Throwing Muses and Melissa Ferrick, Williams starting writing songs of her own and she hit the ground running, knocking out cassette-only efforts like I Have No History and All My Heroes Are Dead. Her proper full length debut The Honesty Room came out on her own label Burning Field Music and found her a fan in Joan Baez who not only later recorded some of Dar’s songs, she invited Williams to tour with her. With almost 20 albums under her belt, including The Green World, Mortal City, My Better Self and her new one I’ll Meet You Here, Williams has established herself as one of the most enduring and endearing songwriters out there. She’s toured with Patty Griffin, Shawn Colvin and Ani Di Franco, recorded with everyone from John Prine to Clifff Eberhart and she formed the group Cry Cry Cry along with Richard Shindell and Lucy Kaplansky as vehicle to honor their favorite folk numbers. An environmental activist, an educator and an author of several books ranging from YA to urban planning—her book The Tofu Tollbooth is an essential directory of natural food store-- Dar Williams kind of does it all. I’ll Meet You Here is her first new album in 6 years and it’s a refreshing blast of rootsy rock, introspective folk and horn-tinged Americana. This record is a melodic blast of utter musical joy. A playful lyricist who can also be so emotionally exact it’s like a direct sucker punch, Dar Williams is one of our very best.

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Oct 6

1 hr 11 min

“Really Great” Since 1984 The Connells have been crafting some of the most compelling, infectious and riveting pop music around. The North Carolina outfit have just put out their first new album in 20 years. Called Steadman’s Wake, the album is another winning entry into an already winning discography. The band sounds reinvigorated and the songs are brimming with intelligence, grace and some of the catchiest hooks of the year. Singer Doug MacMillan sounds as youthful as ever and he sings with some of the most inventive phrasing you’ll ever hear. The tracks jangle away mightily and the Connells are at the top of their game. In this chat, Doug talks to Alex about TVT Records, The Replacements, and how being a collegiate athlete informed his life in a rock and roll band. www.theconnells.com www.bombshellradio.com Stereo Embers: The Podcast Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 29

2 hr 4 min

“Precious Time" The Sheffield born Paul Carrack’s voice is one of the worlds great superpowers. Carrack got his start at 19 playing keyboards in Warm Dust for a handful of albums. From there, he formed ACE who had the massive international hit "How Long." After they broke up in 1977 he played with Frankie Miller and joined Roxy Music as their keyboardist. He put out a solo album in 1980, then joined Squeeze who had a rather massive hit with “Tempted" that featured Carrack on lead vocals. Around the same time he had a band called Noise to Go with Nick Lowe. That band became Nick Lowe and His Cowboy Outfit who not only put out two albums, they were John Hiatt’s backing band for Side Two of his Riding With The King record. Carrack did session work for the Pretenders and The Smiths for their debut album then he joined Mike and the Mechanics, logged a few seismic hits with them—you know, "The Living Years" and "Silent Running." He became a member of Roger Waters’ touring band, put out another solo record, had a hit with "Don’t Shed A Tear"—then formed a band with Rupert Hine, rejoined Squeeze for the Some Fantastic Place record, had a song he co-wrote with Don Felder and Timothy B Schmitt of The Eagles covered by the Eagles and that track ended up being the most played song in the United States in 1995. Carrack kept up his solo career, but still had time to join Ringo Starr’s All Star Band, collaborate with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and join Eric Clapton’s band. Over the years he’s also played with Simply Red, BB King, Elton John and the list goes on and on. There’s actually a great BBCFour documentary about Paul called "The Man With The Golden Voice.” Paul’s new album One On One is his 18th solo album and it’s fabulous. A stirring collection that’s about as soulfully precise as it gets, Carrack’s voice is filled with a timeless blend of warmth and groove and this album proves that time can’t touch him. He sounds as effortless and as affecting as ever. It’s yet another winning entry into a pretty flawless discography. In this conversation, Carrack talks to Alex about staying creative during a pandemic, what he learned about leading his own band from watching Clapton, and why his son think he’s cool for playing on The Smiths’ debut. He also talks about his new album, wanting to make a country record, and how Elvis Costello had the idea for him to sing “Tempted.” www.paulcarrack.net www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 22

1 hr 12 min

“Full Grown” The California-born singer/songwriter Gregory Ackerman’s marvelous new album Still Waiting Still is shimmering with delicacy and strength. Buoyed by shadowy backbeats, sneaky melodies and Ackerman’s inimitable and unforgettable delivery, sonically Still Waiting Still falls somewhere between the work of Nick Drake and Elliott Smith. The album is as breezy as it is riveting–it’s a brilliant meditation on the quotidian life and its daily comforts and disruptions. Ackerman’s work is intimate and confiding and played with the kind of commanding interior strength that gives it an instantly timeless quality. It's a rich and seamless collection of woebegone West Coast loneliness that perfectly contrasts the sunrises and sunsets of Southern California with the corresponding highs and lows of the human heart. Woven through the waves of subtlety, the quietly rushing choruses and harmonic intricacy is a true sense of optimism—that things will get dark, sure, but that darkness will lift and let’s face it: we live for that lifting. In this conversation Gregory talks to Alex about handling self-doubt, transcending the fear of being judged and the never-ending pursuit of making art. www.gregoryackermanmusic.com Instagram: @ackermon www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com www.stereoembersmagazine.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 17

1 hr 16 min

“Tales From The Terramar” The San Diego born C. Gibbs sounds like the surf. But not the sunny part--the deep, dark part. The part that twists through fathoms and moves with a silent, but potent current under the waves. The singer-songwriter’s music is a dreamy blend of California darkness and coastal soul. With a delivery that falls somewhere between Nick Cave and Simon Aldred of Cherry Ghost, Gibbs is a mesmerizing talent. His CV has quietly gotten pretty crammed, playing with both Foetus and Modern English, fronting his own band the Morning Glories and forming the chamber rock outfit Lucinda Black Bear. Since the late 90s he’s put out close to 15 solo albums, all of them fantastic. From 29 Over Me to Sleep The Machines to He Arrived By Helicopter: The Shiny Hostel, Gibbs’ work is always compelling and marvelous. His new album falls perfectly into that category. Tales From The Terramar is one of 2021’s very best. A stirring collection that showcases Gibbs’ gifts as a songwriter, Tales From The Terramar is about the ocean, about going home, and it’s about the juxtaposition between the industrial and the natural world. Gibbs sings with precision and finesse and his compositions are the perfect example of how subtlety can be absolutely riveting. In this chat, Gibbs and Alex talk about his foray into the major label world, carving out time to be creative and what it was like to return to San Diego with a young family. C Gibbs On Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/c-gibbs/288726840 Bandcamp: https://cgibbs.bandcamp.com/track/tales-from-the-terramar www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 15

1 hr 10 min

“We’re Trying Our Best” It’s hard for us to think of a more charming pop band than Sweet Nobody. The Long Beach quartet's new album We’re Trying our Best is the follow up to their debut Loud Songs For Quiet people and it’s a confident step forward that proves this is band to keep your eye on, Filled with infectious hooks, rushing, spry melodies, prowling bass lines, a touch of surf guitar and heartbeat perfect drum fills, the music of Sweet Nobody is at once familiar and intimate. So much so that when you hear their songs, you feel like you already know them. The key is the voice of Joy Deyo—her sonorous delivery is smooth and steady and she knows how to take the corners in a pop song and glide around them with dexterity and ease. Life has not been easy for Joy in the past few years and she talks about that at great length in this interview—the bliss of pop music and the physically taxing task of living with daily chronic pain are two dominating elements in her life and she speaks about that combination. We’re Trying Our Best is a stone cold pop wonder. It’s spry and fast and thoughtful and smart and the lyrics are diaristic and personal, but at the same time decidedly universal and inviting. Pain is personal, of course, but it’s also omnipresent and it includes every living person on this planet. And let’s face it—we’re all trying our best to get through it, aren’t we? In this chat, Deyo talks to Alex about living with Ehlers-Dalos Syndrome, what it’s like being in a band with ones’ spouse and how she made the move from Minnesota to California. https://sweet-nobody.bandcamp.com/track/five-star-diary https://www.ehlers-danlos.com/support-groups/ www.bombshellradio.com Stereo Embers: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 10

1 hr 3 min

“When I Hear The Music” Indira May has the kind of voice that will bring you to your knees. Self-possessed, sonorous and imbued with the kind of phrasing that’s so emotionally precise it almost feels supernatural, May is a revelation. Her new EP Simpler Things is a ravishing blend of trip-hop, jazz and indie soul—trust us: it's a straight up stunner and one listen makes it clear that for this artist the sky is indeed the limit. And, Indira’s got her own music and production company called Trash Films and Music and her company is really one to watch. Yes, she’s learned by having cool parents and paying attention to their work ethic and their grace, but Indira is now making her own mark on the music world and setting examples of her own. Now a while back we had her dad Tim May on the program—Tim was in a band in the '80s called The Righteous Boys that signed with CBS, and after that band ended he went on to become a filmmaker, making documentaries for the BBC’s multi-award winning arts strand Arena. There his subjects included Paul McCartney and folk legend, Ewan MacColl; He runs Strange Films and Music with his wife, the writer and director Karen Stowe—they produce films for agencies, brands and companies. And they make documentaries. Their latest is You Can’t Go Back, which is a fabulous movie about Del Amitri and if you think Tim sounds busy, he is. His band Aliens are set to release their brilliant new album and we could go on and on about Aliens because we love them, but there’s so much Aliens news happening, we’ll revisit it on a future show. In this chat, Indira talks to us about her vision for Trash Films And Music, growing up feeling supported in her music by her parents and how she triumphed over adversity to film the winning video for the EP’s first single, “When I Hear The Music.” www.trashfilmsandmusic..com www.strangefilmsandmusic.com www.bombshellradio.com Stereo Embers Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Sep 8

1 hr 15 min

“Fretted And Moaning” The British-born Andy Summers started loading up his musical CV at the age of 16 when, inspired by seeing Thelonious Monk and Dizzy Gillespie live in London, the young guitarist set out on the road and the road welcomed him warmly. After a few years playing live in local clubs, he moved to London and helped form Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band. From there, Summers joined Soft Machine and toured the U.S. for a few months, then joined the Animals for one record, 1968’s Love Is. He took a break from the rock and roll lifestyle to study classical guitar fat Cal State Northridge. After graduation, he moved back to London, played with Kevin Coyne, Joan Armatrading, Neil Sedaka, and Keven Ayers. Summers joined the Police in 1977 and Summers life was, putting it mildly, never the same. The Police put out five albums, sold 80 million of them, won six Grammys, toured the world and at one point in 1983 they were arguably the biggest band on the planet. They went on hiatus in '86, came back 22 years later for a massively successful tour, then officially called it a day in August of 2008. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees remain one of the most successful bands of all time. As for Summers, he never stopped working. He’s put out close to 15 solo albums, collaborated on record with with Robert Fripp, John Etheridge, Toni Childs, Carly Simon and Sting, did the soundtracks for The Wild Life and Down and Out In Beverly Hills, put out several books of photography, and published a fabulous autobiography called One Train Later. Andy’s new book Fretted And Moaning is a fabulous collection of short stories where the main character, common denominator, thematic through-line, hero and villain is the guitar. Filled with the ego-driven, the confident, the unconfident, the winners, the losers, the girls, the boys, the hopes, the dreams, the disappointments, the hilarious and the tragic, Fretted and Moaning is written with the kind of narrative velocity that will make you finish it in one sitting. It’s hilarious, it’s hopeful, it’s sad, it’s comforting and it’s alive with aspiration, inspiration and heart. It also showcases Summers’ brilliant ear for dialect and dizzying narrative control. In this discursive and engaging chat, the legendary musician talks to Alex about his new book, and they veer effortlessly off course to chat about Kraftwerk, reggae and reading The Odyssey…. https://andysummersbook.com https://rocket88books.com/products/fretted-and-moaning-signature-edition https://www.andysummers.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com STEREO EMBERS THE PODCAST Twitter: @emberspodcast Instagram: @emberseditor

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Sep 1

1 hr 10 min

"Heart Shaped Scars" The Scottish born Dot Allison made her initial splash in music fronting the indie dance band One Dove. They only put out one record—-1993’s Morning Dove White—but if you were a band that was only going to put one record out, Morning Dove White would be the perfect choice. A dizzying blend of hypnotic electronica and pulsing melodic pop, Morning Dove White is an undeniable classic. From there, Allison launched her solo career, putting out the wondrous album Afterglow in 1999. Since then, she’s put out several solo efforts, including We Are Science, Exaltation of Larks and her brand new one, which is also her first in 12 years, Heart Shaped Scars. Along the way she's collaborated with everyone from Paul Weller to Pete Doherty to Scott Walker to Kevin Shields. A sonorous collection of hypnotic indie folk that’s punctuated by dreamy and dedicated melodies, Heart Shaped Scars is one of the most stirring and quietly riveting collections of the year. Filled with lyrics that are informed by botany, philosophy, and the organic behavior of the natural world, its an album that’s intricate, and personal, yet also decidedly universal. Perhaps Allison’s botanist father planted the seeds for her interest in the behaviors of the natural world and perhaps her musician mother inspired her to pursue music. Those wouldn’t be illogical conclusions. But that only scratches the surface of the area Alison is exploring on this record. A Whitmanic approach to the natural world has found her digging in to what makes things connect both consciously and unconsciously. When Whitman writes "For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you," that’s what she’s after. Connection. Awareness. The living intelligence of the natural world that provides patterns and templates that stretch from the past to the un-lived future. This conversation is pure joy and it addresses connectivity, collaboration and....leaf blowers.... www.dotallison.com https://sarecordings.com/artist/166560-dot-allison www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast on Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Aug 25

1 hr 15 min

“Meet Me On Another Day” From the mid-‘80s to about 1993, David Long used to front the Dublin band Into Paradise. Filled with moody rhythms, dark melodies and churning choruses, their work brought to mind that of Echo and the Bunnymen and The Sound. Sure enough, Adrian Borland of The Sound produced their second album Churchtown. Made up of David, Rachel Tighe, James Eadie and Ronan Clarke, Into Paradise were a spellbinding outfit whose songs were urgent and yearning. But they only put out two albums Under The Water and Churchtown and aside from a handful of great singles in the early 90s, that was that. In '96 Long and his childhood pal Shane O’Neil who fronted the band Blue In Heaven, teamed up for an album under the moniker Supernaut. The two friends had also been in bands together before, so working with each other was a natural thing. And then Long kind of stepped away for a bit. A bit being like 20 years or so. After a series of winning solo albums, he and O’Neil started writing and recording together in 2018 or so and that collaboration yielded loads of new material. So much so, in fact, that their new EP Far From Home is out now and their new album Moll and Zeiss is forthcoming. The new material is a nervy blend of The Go Betweens, The Triffids' Born Sandy Devotional and the Jesus and Mary Chain. It’s some of the most riveting work we've heard by anyone in years. And David Long? One of the nicest dudes around. You’re going to dig this chat. David Long Links: https://linktr.ee/DavidLong_ShaneONeill Www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers on Twitter: @emberseditor Instragram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Aug 18

1 hr 19 min

“Worth The Wait” The New Zealand poet John Allison once wrote: “In dividing the light, things are seen. And we notice ourselves.” That division of light and ensuing glimpse of ones true self is the perfect description of the work of one of Allison’s native New Zealanders, Elroy Finn. Finn’s debut solo album, simply titled Elroy, is a shimmering collection of sonorous indie pop that manages to be both spare and textured at the same time. Finn is a master of musical light division and his work is brimming with low-fi folk, thoughtful psychedelia, pure poetry, and a lot of heart. Finn is no stranger to the stage, having toured with Wild Nothing and his brother Liam, and as part of his dad’s band Crowded House. But in crafting the gentle song cycle of his album, Elroy Finn took a long look at himself and that kind of honest introspection yielded results that are both intimate and universal. The songs are bleached in sun, doused in surf and then coaxed into the clouds, where they hang as resplendent as stars. Catchy, bewitching and infectious in the most deviously subversive of ways, Elroy is a revelation—an artistic triumph that’s as charming as it is beguiling. www.grandphony.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Aug 11

58 min 46 sec

“The Coronation” The Massachusetts-born Seth Glier is a musician who’s no stranger to the road, with a regular touring schedule that usually finds him playing close to 250 shows a year. But when lockdown locked into place in 2020, Glier found himself where we all found ourselves—at home. Watching the chaos outside while fostering stillness inside was the foundational element to the creation of his sixth album The Coronation. Built on the idea of reconciliation and repair, The Coronation is a stirring song cycle that’s filled with poetic precision and melodic smarts. With subject matter ranging from the death of John Prine to systemic inequality to a plea for gun control, The Coronation is a powerful and moving entry in Glier’s already winning discography. The Grammy Award-nominated singer/songwriter who has been praised by everyone from Paste to NPR, has shared the stage with folks like James Taylor, Mark Knopfler and Ani DiFranco The winner of five Independent Music Awards, Glier’s 2016 TedX talk focuses on the gifts and challenges of caregiving for a family member. An outspoken advocate for Autism Speaks, Glier is a musician, an activist and a a very impressive human being. In this chat Seth talks to Alex about what was life like OFF the road, why his brain functions well in chaos and how a little home construction ended up being unexpectedly moving. www.sethglier.com www.mpressrecords.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Aug 4

1 hr 7 min

“Storm Coming” The LA.-based artist, producer and composer Ethan Gold’s debut album Songs From A Toxic Apartment left his fans wanting more and more is exactly what they’re getting. Gold will be releasing a trilogy of albums that will surely make his longtime fans very pleased and it will also bring him scores of new ones in the process. The first in the trilogy is Earth City 1: The Longing and it’s a stunner. A meditation on isolation and loneliness in a seemingly deeply connected digital world and feeling like an outsider while being on the inside, Earth City 1 is a moving and heartfelt glimpse of modern life and how it engenders alienation. A sly pop craftsman, Gold’s music is warm, heartfelt and comforting, even when he’s exploring themes that break us all apart. Over the course of his career, Gold has produced and arranged for Elvis Perkins, composed film scores which featured John Grant and Staves and in the process crafted some of the most unforgettable pop songs around. In this conversation Gold talks to Alex about the past and the future, Leonard Cohen and the freedom of performing poetry onstage. www.ethangold.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jul 31

1 hr 11 min

"To Be Dreaming" The North Carolina-based singer/songwriter Ashley Virginia's style falls somewhere between '70s country cool and west coast cosmic Americana. Like the spiritual daughter of Stevie Nicks and Gram Parsons, visually, Ashley Virginia is one of the most distinct and innovative artists you're likely to meet. But fashion aside, Ashley Virginia's music is as cosmic as her clothing—an arresting blend of indie folk, experimental country and '60s pop, her debut album And Life Just Goes On Living is a stirring first effort that marks the arrival of a major talent. Her voice is rich and emotive, her lyrics are heartfelt and honest and her songs are brave and bold.  From being tear gassed by Raleigh police during a peaceful assembly during the George Floyd protests to her own mental health, Ashley Virginia presents the unvarnished truth of the world and the raw and sometimes unsettling state of the human soul. In this conversation, Ashley talks to Alex about weddings, fashion, and the perspective of having a 9-5 job in the music business. She also opens up about mental health and why being onstage is one of the most comfortable places for her in the world. www.ashleyvirginiamusic.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers On Twitter: @emberseditor Stereo Embers On Instagram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jul 30

1 hr 14 min

“Swinging On The Moon” Steve Kilbey can swing from anywhere he wants in the universe; the moon, the stars, whichever planet he chooses. And yes, of course, he can also swing from the milky way. Because the fact of the matter is that Steve Kilbey is a musician whose talents are not only downright otherworldly, they’re positively celestial. A poet, a painter, a singer, a writer, a partner and a dad, Kilbey is not only one of the most fascinating musicians to ever walk around on this planet, he’s also one of the most productive. In addition to the 25 albums he’s recorded with the Church, he’s got almost twenty solo albums under his belt, along with numerous side projects with members of Game Theory, The Go-Betweens, All India Radio and Remy Zero. Kilbey’s new double album The Hall of Counterfeits is a straight up stunner that’s as raw as it is ravishing. In this chat he talks to Alex about the pressures of recording for a major label, why he’s writing songs on acoustic guitar now and how heroin addiction ended up being a chapter in his life rather than a book. He also talks about his friendship with Grant McLennan, his penchant for being competitive and his favorite album by The Triffids…. https://waterfrontrecords.mywaterfrontstore.com/Product/94653/1?ffm=FFM_21f04e523dca1e9055cf4b6e20f53a16 https://ffm.to/thehallofcounterfeits www.thetimebeing.com www.thechurchband.net www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Find Alex on Twitter: @emberseditor And Instragram: @emberspodcast EMAIL: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jul 28

1 hr 41 min

“The Hardest Battle” Talking to Colin Moulding is no battle at all. In fact, the XTC co-frontman and bassist is one of our favorite guests and we’re thrilled to have him back on the show. We’re also thrilled that the occasion of his return is to promote his new single “The Hardest Battle.” A swirling pop gem that’s filled with layered pop melodies, “The Hardest Battle” is one of the catchiest songs of the year. Moulding was on the show when he and former XTC drummer Terry Chambers under the TC&I banner put out their Great Aspirations EP, but this new track is Moulding’s first foray as a solo artist. And what a foray it is. As the bassist and co-frontman of XTC, Moulding played on 14 of the legendary Swindon band’s albums, including White Noise, Skylarking, Drums and Wires and Oranges and Lemons. And if it every comes up at parties, an interesting fact is that Moulding wrote the band’s first three charing singles. Over the course of his career he’s collaborated with everyone from Sam Phillips to Anton Barbeau and the fact of the matter is, he’s a great musician and he’s a fascinating guy. We’re lucky to have him as a friend of the podcast. In this conversation Colin talks to us about his songwriting process, his brief return to live music and the status of his current relationship with Andy Partridge Order Colin’s new EP here: https://burningshed.com/store/colin-moulding_store/colin-moulding_the-hardest-battle_cd www.alexgreenonline.com www.bombshellradio.com Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast

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Jul 21

58 min 28 sec

“Sparkle Up” Raised in Cork, Sean O'Hagan got his start with the beloved Irish indie outfit Microdisney in 1980. Microdisney put out five marvelous albums in eluding The Clock Comes Down the Stairs and Crooked Mile, before calling it a day in 1988. Two years later O’Hagan put out the High Llamas solo album and then he put together a band of the same name. Atmospheric, harmonic, melodic and rife with texture and nuance, the work of the High Llamas summons the musical complexity of everyone from Brian Wilson to Ennio Morricone. Therese’s even a dash of XTC in there. The High Llamas' brand of summer psychedelia summons the surf, the summer the joy and isolation of island life and the complex contrasts of any coastal city where high rises and blindingly beautiful beaches occupy the same space. The High Llamas have put out ten stellar records, including Gideon Gaye, Hawaii, Santa Barbara, and Here Come the Rattling Trees, and you would think that would keep O’Hagan busy enough, but his CV proves otherwise. He’s collaborated with everyone from Will Oldham to Cornelius and not only was he a member of Stererolab in the early '90s, he’s appeared on many of their albums. A producer, a gifted guitarist, and a real sonic architect, O’Hagan is intuitive, instinctive and blessed with the kind of musical aptitude that ranks him among the very best. www.highllamas.com www.bombshellradio.com

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Jul 14

1 hr 31 min

“Hard To Get" My fascination with Starclub is kind of like one of those people who has a fascination with an unsolved murder. You put the pieces together and none of them make sense. You had this British band made up of schoolboy friends who knew each other since they were 11. They signed the biggest deal for a debut album in the history of anyone on the roster of Island Records (U2, Bob Marley). With “Hard To Get” they released a scorcher of a single that was the perfect embodiment of the manic pop thrill and a few weeks later their album hit shelves. So: you’ve got a great band, a great debut album, a charismatic and handsome frontman--what could go wrong? Well, in many ways, everything did. Starclub had their triumphs, but ultimately, their major label deal sucked the life out of the band and hastened their premature demise. For the '90s and the better part of the oughts, I was utterly lost about why this band hadn’t taken over the world. In fact, at one point in the early '90s I said to my friends that Starclub were going to take over the world. Spoiler alert: they didn’t and it made no sense. Until now. Singer Owen Vyse has been a regular guest on the podcast, but this is the first time that he and Starclub bassist Julian Taylor have appeared together to talk about what went right and what went wrong with their career. This is an unflinching, unvarnished and very real chat. Strap in. www.owenvyse.bandcamp.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jul 9

1 hr 44 min

“Good Clean Fun" Bonnie Hayes moved to San Francisco from the San Joaquin Valley in the early '70s and it didn’t take long for her to establish herself as a commanding musical presence. Her new wave band The Punts became Wild Combo, and they signed with Slash and put out the Good Clean Fun Record. Slash was about as cool as it got—they had Fear, The Germs, The Gun Club and The Blasters and Hayes was for sure one of the cool kids. Her song "Girls Like Me" was used in Valley Girl—and behind her Brand New Girl EP, she and the Wild Combo toured with Huey Lewis, whose guitarist was also Bonnie’s brother Chris. Hayes finished the decade by being a part of Belinda Carlisle's band for her world tour and then Bonnie Raitt, in 1989 recorded two of her songs—"Love Letter" and "Have a Heart” for her massive Nick of Time album. In 1991 she was a part of Billy Idol’s band for the almost two year Cradle of Love tour and along the way, her songs were recorded by Cher, Bette Midler, Natalie Cole, Adam Ant, Robert Cray and David Crosby. Not too shabby. She put a few more albums out, including Empty Sky and Love in the Ruins, and she taught at the Berklee College of Music, the Stanford Jazz Workshop, the REO Songwriting Retreat outside of Vancouver B.C, the ASCAP workshop in Los Angeles and at the WCS Conference at Foothill College. In 2013, Hayes became chair of the songwriting department at Berklee in Boston. A compelling and dynamic singer and an intuitive and brilliant songwriter, Bonnie Hayes is a fascinating and very cool person. In this conversation she talks to Alex about the physics of songwriting, her love of Liz Phair and why she decided to leave Berklee and then why she changed her mind and went back. Bonnie Hayes and the Wild Combo’s Good Clean Fun has been remastered with 11 bonus tracks. www.blixa.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor IG: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jul 7

1 hr 19 min

“A Castle For A Song” It’s hard to explain how profoundly important Miles Copeland has been to modern music. Put it this way: without him, a lot of your favorite bands wouldn’t have been your favorite bands because you never would have known they were bands in the first place. Copeland’s I.R.S. Records brought R.E.M., Fine Young Cannibals, The Cramps, The English Beat, The Go-Go’s and The Bangles to the masses and along the way he managed The Police, Squeeze, Wishbone Ash and Sting. Copeland’s new autobiography Two Steps Forward, One Step Back chronicles his nearly 50 year career as a music executive and, as you can imagine, it’s an extraordinary read. From having a father who co-founded the CIA to a brother who played drums for the biggest band in the world, to being raised during his formative years in the Middle East, the London-born Miles Copeland has lived quite a life. In this in-depth conversation he talks to Alex about…well, about everything: Jools Holland, R.E.M., Bruce Springsteen and Concrete Blonde. He also talks about his writing retreats in France and he explains why music always comes second and image is always first. www.jawbonepress.com www.performingartsinternational.com/cia www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast on Twitter: @emberseditor Stereo Embers The Podcast on Instagram: @emberspodcast Stereo Embers The Podcast email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jun 30

2 hr

“Rip Tides And Clean Horizons" With his band New Model Army, Justin Sullivan has put out 15 fabulous albums, including such legendary efforts like 1986’s The Ghost Of Cain, 1993’s The Love Of Hopeless Causes and 2019’s From Here. Formed in West Yorkshire in 1980, New Model Army have turned out a bit like The Fall—hard to categorize, defiantly original and boasting a revolving door of so many members, we could do a podcast on their personnel, alone. Back in the '80s New Model Army were one of those bands that everyone liked and every group claimed. Goths, mods, metalhead and college rock kids all thought New Model Army were in their camp, but the fact was, New Model Army were in everyone’s camp. They were versatile that way—and part of that versatility was the way that they stretched the intersectionality of their own music—there were bits of metal and punk and goth and folk in their musical attack and that was what led to their widespread appeal. Career highlights? Oh, they’ve got those. John Peel loved them, they bumped the Smiths from the top slot on the indie charts in ’84, they played the Reading Festival and even opened a gig for Bowie. Sullivan’s new solo album—only his second one overall—is called Surrounded and it’s a stirring effort, filled with introspective Viking ballads and plaintive musings on human nature. He plays with depth and finesse and has quietly turned in one of the best records of 2021. In this chat, Sullivan talks to Alex about how he feels about birthdays and band anniversaries, traveling in the Middle East and why the lockdown made everyone a more extreme version of themselves. www.newmodelarmy.org www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Twitter: @emberseditor IG: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jun 25

1 hr 7 min

“Pull It Out Of The Bag” So, Salt Ashes has been on the show before and I asked her to come back because I love talking to her. She’s charming, witty, honest and she’s one of those people that just feels familiar to me. And I think it won’t be long before her music is familiar to a very big audience. The London-based singers' work is inventive, artistic, bold, and thrilling. A ravishing blend of synth pop and electro bliss with overtones that range from goth to new wave, the music of Salt Ashes is riveting and alive. In this illuminating conversation, Salt Ashes talks about her frustrations with social media, how she handles bumps in the road and why in the music business the music is always second. Her new single is "Too Many Times" and she’s got an album coming out this Fall. So get ready. www.saltashes.com www.instagram.com/saltashes www.facebook.com/SaltAshes www.bombshellradio.com Stereo Embers The Podcast: Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast

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Jun 23

1 hr 6 min

“American Canyon” The Jenny Thing are back. Although it’s been 20+ years since the Bay Area band have put out a record, they have returned more potent than ever. Formed on the campus of U.C. Berkeley, The Jenny Thing’s brand of catchy New Wave and carefully crafted indie rock made them fan favorites in the Bay Area in the early ‘90s. The band’s original lineup finds them on their brand new fourth album American Canyon, playing with muscle and heart. The hooks are big, the bass is funky and the synths are popping and as a result, American Canyon brings to mind U2’s All That You Can’t Leave Behind and Rubyhorse’s Rise. Singer Matt Easton talks to Alex about being a fellow Bay Area native, why the album sounds like wide open spaces and how all those years ago he managed to be in a band and in college at the same time…. The Jenny Thing: Matt Easton, vocals Shyam Rao, guitars Ehren Becker, bass Mike Phillips, drums www.thejennything.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Alex on Twitter: @emberseditor Alex on Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jun 18

1 hr 28 min

"Motherhood, Butterflies And American Quilt" We're so happy to welcome back Paula Cole to the podcast. The Massachusetts-born singer/songwriter is one of our favorite guests and in this chat she talks about maternal responsibility, baby butterflies and her fabulous new album American Quilt. The Grammy Award-winning musician is about to head back on the road to support American Quilt and she discusses what that experience feels like as we crawl slowly out of pandemic restrictions. A singer of tremendous muscle and grace, Cole is a riveting and stirring performer and she talks about what it means to hit the road at this stage of her 30+year career. A conversation about nurturing, Joni Mitchell and aging parents, Paula Cole's return to Stereo Embers The Podcast is thoughtful, funny and deeply moving. www.paulacole.com www.alexgreenonline.com www.bombshellradio.com Alex on Twitter: @emberseditor Alex on Instagram: @emberspodcast Alex's email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

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Jun 16

1 hr 10 min

“Beast Of Eden” Our guest today on the program is a real artist. The Jersey born J Hacha De Zola is hard to categorize—he’s wholly original and unlike anything out there today. A feral blend of David Johansen, Screaming Lord Sutch and Nick Cave,over the course of his five album career, J Hacha Zola has delivered some of the most captivating, fascinating and utterly infectious music around. Like a junkyard DaVinci, Hacha De Zola has demonstrated that he knows how to take rusty horns, scrap metal saxophones, guttered guitars and battered drums and turn them into pure gold. And that gold not only sparkles under the moonlight, it was spun by a dark figure lurking in the alley and prowling through the abandoned avenues of a city that everyone knows but is too afraid to name. Filled with ragged melodies, rabid rhythms and corruptive carnival stomp, the music of J Hacha De Zola is the real deal. It’s spellbindingly brilliant in every turn. The enigmatic singer’s new album East Of Eden is a startling departure from his previous work. East of Eden is an aching collection of dark and dreamy doo-wop, street soul and urban R&B. It’s J Hacha De Zola in his most unvarnished and purest iteration. Or is it? Yes, it is, but this guy is a moving artistic target—you never know where he’s going to go next. In this conversation Hacha and Alex talk about having an alter ego, keeping his artistic identity a secret from his family and what it’s like being in touch with his shadow self... www.jhachadezola.bandcamp.com www.fanaticpromotion.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com

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Jun 11

58 min 16 sec

“Reason To Live” Well, if you're looking for the kings of the indie rock grand slam, it’s a short list. But Lou Barlow is on it. The Ohio-born Barlow has Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh, the folk Implosion and his solo career on his CV and that’s only a partial list that doesn’t include Sentridoh and Deep Wound. Yes, Lou Barlow has been a major part of major bands that were all groundbreaking and game changers in terms of sound, recording approach and aesthetic. He’s been on legendary labels like SST, Homestead , Sub Pop, Merge and Domino and he’s one of the most recognizable and adored indie rock dudes of all time. So yes, Barlow is a founding member of three groundbreaking indie rock outfits and his solo career has yielded several remarkable albums, including his fabulous new one Reason To Live. A songwriter of startling depth, introspection and pinpoint emotional accuracy, Lou Barlow is, to put it simply, one of the best we’ve got. Over the course of his career, he’s collaborated with Mike Watt, Stephen Merritt, Dale Crover of the Melvins and Belgian musician Rudy Trouve’ He’s both vulnerable and brave his work redolent with intimacy, observational wisdom and longing. Reason To Live might very well be his best work yet. Managing to be both layered and spare, this album is filled with breezy acoustic numbers, rolling pop jangles and textured indie rock that’s catchy, memorable and moving. In this conversation Lou talks to Alex about eating dinner with strangers, walking the financial tightrope, writing again with John Davis of The Folk Implosion and why it was so hard to ask J. Mascis for a drumbeat….

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Jun 9

1 hr 9 min

"There’s Room On The Street For More Than One Restaurant" James Mastro’s musical CV is a string of highlights—over the course of his career, he’s worked with Patti Smith, John Cale, Steve Wynn of the Dream Syndicate, Phoebe Snow, Richard Lloyd of Television, and The Jayhawks. In between all that, he formed the Health and Happiness Show who put out two fabulous albums on Bar None and for almost twenty years he’s been playing guitar, mandolin and sax for Ian Hunter’s band. He also owns and operates the Guitar Bar in Hoboken and he’s readying his debut solo album for a Fall release. His new single is "My God,” a moving ballad that was produced by Tony Shanahan who plays in the Patti Smith band. The song is reflective, honest, deeply moving and decidedly melodic. As a guitar player he’s got the perfect blend of muscle and grace and as a singer songwriter he’s deft and intuitive. In this conversation, James talks to Alex about his friendship with Ian Hunter, the guitar playing of Brian Setzer and playing softball with Yo La Tengo. He also talks about the impetus behind his new single, whether or not there will be a new Bongos record and his admiration of Jesse Malin. www.jamesmastro.bandcamp.com www.guitarbar.com www.velvetelkrecords.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com

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Jun 2

1 hr 2 min

“Fatal Mistakes” In this special mini-episode, Alex reviews the new album from Del Amitri. Titled Fatal Mistakes, the album marks the first new effort from the legendary Scottish band in almost 20 years. Singer Justin Currie will be on the podcast in a few weeks, so in the meantime, Alex breaks down Fatal Mistakes and plays two songs from the album. His verdict? "Fatal Mistakes is as searing as it is soothing—it's a thrilling battlecry from true pop warriors who are free from the past, crushing the present and riding fearlessly into the future." www.delamitri.info www.cookingvinyl.com

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May 28

19 min 39 sec

“Silent Dreams” When the Victims were an active proposition back in the ‘80s, hard rock and hair metal were running the show, so a few dudes dressed like new romantics or goths playing the kind of new wave that fell somewhere between OMD and the Cars, probably weren’t an easy sell in their small town of La Crosse, Wisconsin. But they did get out there and play and before too long, they had a devoted fanbase and seemed poised to break and break big. The trio was comprised of Steve Harm and his brother Jeff on drums and Jeff Rinartz on guitar. Their lone album Silent Dreams, on the strength of catchy numbers like "Let Her Go" and "Whispering Walls" should have been huge. And it almost was. There was label interest, there was a night out drinking with the Cure in Chicago, there was a little blast of daylight that could have been burst through, but it just didn’t happen. Why? We'll let Steve tell you, but in the meantime, the digital remastered version all these years later should finally get this album into the hands of everyone who should have had it in the firsts place. This is one of those stories where the band members are finished with the unfinished business they started all those years ago. The postscript is Silent Dreams and the story really does end there. But it’s an interesting tale of how we got from 1986 to 2021 and Steve is here to fill in the details; he’s a great guy and this is one of those stories in the lore of musical history about what could have been, what actually was and why that’s totally okay. victimsog.bandcamp.com/album/silent-dreams-2021-reissue www.WarehouseRocks.com www. WHrocks.com www.warehousealliance.org

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May 26

58 min 6 sec

“Introspection and Awareness" The French born drummer Greg Gilmore landed in Seattle as a young man and what better way to punctuate those formative teenage years than with a punk band? Joining forces with John Conte, Todd Fleishman, and Duff McKagan Gilmore and his pals played speedbag punk that fell somewhere between the Clash and The Germs. They became local favorites, opened for DOA in Vancouver and Seattle and thanks to a quick studio session, recorded seven tracks which are now seeing the light of day for the first time. Released on Loosegroove Records which is owned by Stone Gossard of Pearl Jam and Regan Hagar of Satchel and Brad, the band’s set is called The Living 1982 and of the document, Gossard says, is "a reminder that the Living are ground zero for the Seattle sound.” The songs are fast and dynamic and played with a frenzied punk spirit and youthful momentum. The idea to put these songs out came from Gilmore, who actually unearthed the recordings. He says: “The Living was the beginning of all things Seattle for me --a turning point in my life. I joined a band and a community. These guys are still my brothers. I've cherished these recordings since the days we made them. This record is a fantastic document of a loaded moment. I love it.” Well, in music years, The Living really were only around in music years for about a moment. After the band, broke up, Duff and Gilmore landed in Ten Minute Warning, then the two pals went to LA. McKagan ended up joining Guns N’ Roses and Gilmore headed back to Seattle where he played briefly with Skin Yard before co-founded Mother Love Bone. After the death of Mother Love Bone singer Andrew Wood, Gilmore went on to collaborate with Seattle producing legend Jack Endino for a series of albums. He also played with Land, Doghead, and Steve Fisk. As a drummer, Gilmore plays with thoughtful muscle. He’s an introspective guy and his playing has the perfect blend of cerebral athleticism. We talk about that introspection here among a lot of other things: travel, friendships, self-awareness, intellectualizing ourselves in and out of enjoyment and the ins and outs of being social. https://www.instagram.com/loosegrooverecords linktr.ee/loosegroove www.alexgreenonline.com Instagram: @emberseditor Twitter: @emberspodcast

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May 19

1 hr 29 min

"Blood" The Maine born, Massachusetts-raised Julian Hatfield studied at both Boston University and the Berklee College of Music. Along with John Strohm and Freda Love she founded the Blake Babies, who put out five fabulous, critically-acclaimed albums.One of the most potent artists out there, Hatfield has put out nearly 20 solo albums, including Hey Babe, Become What You Are and Whatever, My Love. She’s also put out full length albums of covers by Olivia Newton John and the Police. She’s been in the Juliana Hatfield 3, Minor Alps with Nada Surf’s Matthew Caws, the I Don’t Cares with Paul Westerberg of The Replacements and Some Girls with Freda Love and Heidi Gluck. She’s also had stints in the Lemonheads, recording and touring with Evan Dando’s outfit. Her resume just never stops, so here’s more highlights, but keep in mind, this is a partial list. She’s contributed vocals to tracks by Belly, Aimee Mann and Susanna Hoffs, she started her own label called Ye Olde Records, she played Conan and Letterman, appeared on the "Adventures of Pete and Pete,” “My So-Called Life", and "Space Ghost Coast to Coast,” and her book When I Grow Up is one of the best memoirs you’ll ever read. Which brings us to her new album Blood. A truly riveting affair, it’s one of the best albums of 2021—open-wounded pop that’s as sweet as it is raw. From the delicious distortion of the murderous "Had A Dream," to the percussive blast of “Chunks," to the dark '60s pop of "Mouthful of Blood,” the album is stirring, it’s feral and it’s undeniably and deliciously melodic. Hatfield is one of the sharpest writers around—she’s funny, smart, caustic, observant and deeply, deeply wise. In this conversation Juliana talks to Alex about being in a post-love state of mind, if she gets recognized at the gym and the reverse of seasonal affective disorder. They also talk about cupcakes and muffins…. www.julianahatfieild.com www.alr-music.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com

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May 14

1 hr 16 min

“Bach Is My Torah" The Philadelphia-born Eric Bazilian's dad was a psychiatrist but it was his concert pianist mother who likely influenced him to start playing the piano at age 5. Four years later he was playing guitar and seven years later at the age of 16 he had his first band, Evil Seed. While getting a B.S. in Physics at the University of Pennsylvania, Bazilian and his college pal Rob Hyman formed a band called Baby Grand and after that band called it a day with two albums under their belts, Bazilian and Hyman formed the Hooters. Over the course of their winning career, the Hooters put out six albums, had a handful of top 40 hits with songs like "Day By Day” and "And We Danced," they opened Live Aid in Philadelphia, the Amnesty International Concert at Giants Stadium in ’86 and the Roger Waters The Wall Concert in Berlin in 1990. Bazilian not only produced Joan Osborne’s Grammy Nominated Relish album, he wrote "One Of Us," which is one of the most memorable songs of the last 50 years. It was covered by "everyone from Prince to Seal and it was used as the theme song for the TV show "Joan of Arcadia," for which Bazilian won an ASCAP Film and Television Music Award. Over the course of his career he’s written and co written songs for and with a crazy list of talent. Here’s a partial list: Patty Smyth, Bon Jovi, BIf Naked, Ronnie Spector, Matt Nathanson, and Robbie Williams. In 2000 Bazilian was inducted into the Philadelphia Walk of Fame on the Avenue of the Arts and his new solo album Bazilian is a life-affirming blast of rootsy pop stomp that’s energizing, soulful and positively infectious. The Hooters are an ongoing proposition and they’re massively popular in Germany and Scandinavia, playing sell-out shows to adoring fans. In this chat, Bazilian talks to Alex about life in Sweden, why Bach is his Torah, and saying no to Bob Dylan... www.ericbazilian.com www.hootersmusic.com www.alexgreenonline.com www.bombshellradio.com

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May 12

1 hr 3 min

"Mercy Rising" The California born singer/songwriter Maia Sharp wrote her first song at 5, so it’s no surprise that over the years her compositions have been recorded by—and by the way this is going to be a murderers row of talent, so get ready—Bonnie Rait, Keb Mo, Cher, Art Garfunkel, Paul Carrack and Trisha Yearwood. More Maia Sharp resume items: and mind you, this is a partial list: she’s toured all over the U.S. and the UK, she’s appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered, CBS Early Morning and the Today Show, she’s an adjunct professor at NYU’s Summer Songwriter workshop and she’s been writing for Songwriting with Soldiers where active duty service members team up with songwriters who help them turn their stories into songs. Sharp has put out nearly ten solo albums and her newest is Mercy Rising. Filled with poeticism, wisdom, and observational grace, Mercy Rising is a moving collection that’s a perfect balance of elegance and intensity. In this conversation Maia talks about recovering from COVID, the power of Bonnie Raitt and what it was like to step into a songwriting castle with Jane Siberry and Jules Shear and get down to business. Oh, and we have a super psychic moment about Louise Goffin….listen for it! www.maisharp.com https://www.maiasharp.com/shop https://www.instagram.com/maiasharpmusic/ www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com

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May 7

1 hr 8 min

“Nothing’s Ever Lost" Eleventh Dream Day have never stopped being great. Since their self-titled 1987 EP, over the course of 13 albums the band have retained the same scruffy splendor that has always made them one of the most riveting acts around. I always told my friends they sounded like a cross between X and R.E.M. but that was an oversimplification on my part. That might have even been a bit lazy. The fact is, Eleventh Dream Day have a lot in common with the bands I mentioned, but they’re so much more than that. They’re an arresting blend of muscle and heart and even when the songs jangle they still sting. The vulnerable numbers have frayed, poetic finesse and the faster ones rip away with ragged and battered beauty. Singer Rick Rizzo, to borrow an expression from Saul Bellow, is an open wound of a man and drummer/singer Janet Bean is a revelation—she’s sonorous and sorrowful, but she also blazes through each number with conviction and heart. Bean you might recognize from being one of the co founders of Freakwater and bassist Doug McCombs plays in Tortoise, but when they come together as Eleventh Dream Day, the sound is distinct, stirring and always energizing. The band’s new album is called Since Grazed and it’s a startling collection of thrilling indie rock bliss. Jagged, gripping, moving and deeply inspiring, the album shows that Eleventh Dream Day remain as vital as ever. In this chat with Rick Rizzo and Janet Bean, we talk about life on a major label, the Meat Puppets’ RV and why it’s always a good idea to listen to the Fall... Order Since Grazed: https://eleventhdreamday.com http://www.comedyminusone.com http://www.facebook.com/comedyminusone http://www.twitter.com/comedyminusone

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May 5

1 hr 13 min

"A Good Feelin’ To Know" The Ohio-born Richie Furay has a resume' that’s kind of staggering. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee was not only a co-founder of Buffalo Springfield, he was also a co-founder of Poco and he was in the Au Go Go Singers, the Souther Hillman Furay band and he fronts the Richie Furay band as well. Although Buffalo Springfield wasn’t around that long, the band reformed in 2010 and Furay found himself playing everywhere from the Bridge School Benefit to Bonnaroo. A singer whose phrasing is as graceful as they come and a guitar player who is both thoughtful and dynamic, Furay is not only one of the greats, he’s one of the main architects of the country rock sound that later influenced bands I grew up listening to like Green on Red or Uncle Tupelo. Furay was set to retire from the road in 2020 but the pandemic thwarted those plans, so his farewell tour had to be put off. Dates are being rescheduled, but in the meantime, the singer songwriter has just put out a double live album called 50th Anniversary Return To The Troubadour, a riveting set of classics that showcases Furay’s depth as a musician. That depth can also be seen in the upcoming Cameron Crowe narrated Richie Furay documentary Through It All: The Life and Influence of Richie Furay.

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Apr 30

41 min 10 sec

“Kicking Against Convention” Classical music is ruled by composers that are thought of as deities. Composers like Bach, Mozart and Beethoven are the undisputed masters of the genre and they nobody can argue with their compositions being the blueprints for the foundation of classical music. But for the Korean-born JooWan Kim, studying the masters at the Berklee School Of Music made him…a bit rebellious. Kicking against the rote conventions of classical composition, Kim found himself drawn towards hip-hop and the dynamism and energy made him wonder if grafting hip-hop with classical was possible. Turns out it was. Teaming up with his college pal Christopher Nicholas, Kim founded Ensemble Mik Nawooj, an invigorating and vibrant musical collective that’s got everything: flute, clarinet, drums, bass, a lyric soprano and an MC. Using an inventive technique called Method Sampling, as the basis for the architecture of each composition, Ensemble Mik Nawooj are one of the most original outfits out there. In this conversation with Kim and MC Sandman, the two talk to Alex about protest music, the value of studying music in higher education and how coming from two different worlds ended up forming one of the most creative working situations in modern music. The band’s new album Death Become Life is out now. https://miknawooj.bandcamp.com/album/death-become-life-2 http://www.ensemblemiknawooj.com/shop http://www.alexgreenonline.com http://www.bombshellradio.com Twitter: @emberseditor INST: @emberspodcast

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Apr 28

1 hr 14 min

“The Night Economy” Over the course of their brilliant career, which got started around 1999, Stars have put out nine winning and magical albums including Set Yourself on Fire and the Polaris-Prize nominated efforts In Our Bedroom After The War and The Five Ghosts. Their last full-length effort was 2017’s There Is No Love In Fluorescent Light, and I know that was four years ago, but don’t worry—new music is coming. Stars play a ravishing blend of jangly chamber pop, breezy new wave and melancholic indie rock. They fall somewhere between Prefab Sprout and Broken Social Scene and their songs are thoughtful, quirky, moving, inspiring and wrenching in all the right ways. They can evoke the bittersweet memories of the past and they can conjure the hope and optimism of the future. They’ve played Coachella and the WAYHOME festival in Toronto and their music has appeared in "Gossip Girl," "One Tree Hill," "The Vampire Diaries,” “Skins" and "Warehouse 13." The British-born Torquil Campbell is a musician, an actor on stage and film, a playwright and the host of a weekly podcast called The Soft Bulletin. Aside from his work in Stars, Campbell also put out albums with Memphis and he has a a solo project under the name Dead Child Star. In this conversation, which happens to take place on Campbell’s birthday, a lot of ground is covered: the resuscitation of the night economy, staying afloat financially as an artist during COVID, a mutual love of The Chills and why buying an album is still one of the best deals around.

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Apr 21

1 hr 9 min

“Lost And Found" One summer in the early '90s I drove around with only one cassette in my car and that was Born to Quit by the Smoking Popes. Led by the Illinois-born Josh Caterer and his brothers Eli and Matt, the band were nothing short of a revelation. Josh’s lilting vocals has all the elegance of Sinatra and the finesse of Morrissey, but it also had muscle. The songs? Good god—I mean, the album only clocks in at 28 minutes but the songs were so timeless and unique, you could cycle through it 50 times and repeat listens never chipped away at the brilliance of the tracks, it only reinforced that you were listening to a stone cold classic. The Popes tore it up—they toured with Green Day, Jawbreaker and Morrissey, had a bit of a hit with "Need You Around,” had their songs appear in movies like “Clueless" and "Tommy Boy" and found Morrissey himself declaring that he absolutely loved the band. Over the course of their career the Popes have put out seven albums, played massive gigs, like Riot Fest in 2016 and though they’ve broken up, gone on hiatus and reformed, they remain one of the most enduring outfits out there. As for Josh, you’ll hear a lot about him in this interview, but Josh has founded other bands like Duvall and the Jackson Mud Band over the years and his new album The Hideout Sessions is a live gig that was recorded in Chicago in October of 2020. Raw, powerful, intimate, and rousing, The Hideout Sessions finds Caterer pushing his voice in ways he never has before—he’s always been a great singer, but the evolution of his voice is on full display here—there’s a new layer of intensity and fragility that makes this live document incredibly moving. In this conversation we talk about the faulty Spotify model, the ‘90s, Jawbreaker, having COVID and why being found brings real understanding to being lost.

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Apr 14

1 hr 26 min

“The Cup Of Youth” If Kip Berman’s name sounds familiar to you, that’s for good reason. He fronted the beloved indie rock outfit The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart from 2007 to 20018. The NY-based band played all over the world, put out four perfect albums, culminating in 2017’s The Echoes Of Pleasure and they called it a day a year later. Berman moved to Princeton, New Jersey, started a family and started a new band as well. Dubbed The Natvral, Berman’s new musical project finds him swinging with freewheeling abandon and grinding poetic grace. Falling somewhere between Blood On The Tracks and Ezra Furman’s Day Of The Dog, his debut album Tethers is one of the year’s very best. Filled with rootsy snarl and howling bliss, Tethers is nothing short of a revelation. In this chat, Berman talks to Alex about discovering Fairport Convention, worrying about his kids in the age of COVID and the recent death of DJ Sophie. They also talk about our relationship to the past, their mutual love of Roddy Frame and why it took moving to New Jersey to start listening to British folk rock. https://thenatvral.bandcamp.com/album/tethers

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Apr 7

1 hr 22 min

“Consideration Of Rhythm" The Calgary-born Clea Anaïs is about to take flight in two ways. First, her solo career is blooming with the release of two new singles from her upcoming album and it won’t be long before her music is soaring through headphones across the world. It also won’t be long before she’s soaring across the world in a plane—not sure what you did during COVID, but Clea got her pilot’s license. The cello-playing Anaïs' name might sound familiar because she was the co-founder of the beloved Canadian outfit Raleigh who won alternative album of the year in 2018 at the YYC Music Awards. Over the years Clea has shared the stage with Unknown Mortal Orchestra and City and Color and she’s done session work for Astral Swans, Woodpigeon and 100 Mile House. Her solo work is a stirring blend of swirling indie rock and dreamy, sonorous pop that’s filled with wisdom, grace and resolve. Her voice is hypnotic and arresting and her textured arrangements are as ravishing as they are riveting. In this interview we talk about being raised by multi-ethnic parents, having a house full of sisters and how to respond when things get dark….

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Apr 2

1 hr 5 min