The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie

By The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie

Want to know what comes next in politics, culture, and libertarian ideas? Reason’s Nick Gillespie hosts relentlessly interesting interviews with the activists, artists, authors, entrepreneurs, newsmakers, and politicians who are defining the 21st century.

  1. 1.
    Chef Andrew Gruel: "I'm Not an Asshole. Gavin Newsom Is."
    46:08
  2. 2.
    Ronald Bailey: Covid-19 Should Be Our Last Pandemic
    51:32
  3. 3.
    Melissa Chen: "Ideas Have Consequences. So Does Silence."
    1:03:52
  4. 4.
    Stewart Brand: We Are (Still) As Gods
    54:36
  5. 5.
    Peter Suderman: The $1.9 Trillion American Rescue Plan Has Almost Nothing To Do With Covid
    1:07:32
  6. 6.
    Elon Musk, Welfare King!
    1:01:27
  7. 7.
    Jason Riley: Thomas Sowell's Unique Insights on Race, Economics, and Politics
    1:04:50
  8. 8.
    Conor Friedersdorf: Stand Against Left-Wing and Right-Wing P.C.
    1:28:21
  1. 9.
    Rep. Peter Meijer: Only GOP Freshman Who Voted To Impeach Trump Tells All
    1:21:36
  2. 10.
    Grant McCracken: The New Honor Code vs. Radical Wokeism
    1:09:39
  3. 11.
    Corey DeAngelis: Why 2021 Is a Turning Point for School Choice
    44:11
  4. 12.
    Chris Stewart: Race, COVID-19, and the Future of School Choice
    1:09:31
  5. 13.
    Carl Hart: Drug Use for Grown-Ups
    56:38
  6. 14.
    Mike Masnick: In Defense of Section 230 and a Decentralized Internet
    1:20:29
  7. 15.
    Alex Winter: Frank Zappa's Ultra-Individualist Legacy
    47:26
  8. 16.
    Charles Wininger: Why We Should Listen To Ecstasy and Other Psychedelics
    40:25
  9. 17.
    Sally Satel: The Secret History of the Opioid Epidemic
    1:15:48
  10. 18.
    Alex Nowrasteh and Benjamin Powell: Immigrants Revitalize Faith in American Institutions
    52:21
  11. 19.
    Damon Root: Why Frederick Douglass Loved the Constitution (and You Should Too)
    49:49
  12. 20.
    Ajit Pai on Net Neutrality, 5G, and Why He Wants To 'Clarify' Section 230
    48:20
  13. 21.
    Glenn Greenwald on Biden, Free Speech, and Leaving The Intercept
    1:13:17
  14. 22.
    Charles Koch and Brian Hooks: Believe in People
    58:36
  15. 23.
    Virginia Postrel: When Calico Was Treated Like Cocaine
    1:10:27
  16. 24.
    Shelby Steele: What Really Killed Michael Brown?
    49:41
  17. 25.
    Brian Riedl: Donald Trump, Joe Biden, and $6 Trillion Budgets
    1:01:20
  18. 26.
    Morris P. Fiorina: Why 'Electoral Chaos' Is Here To Stay
    43:32
  19. 27.
    Bob Chitester: How Free To Choose Changed the World
    1:02:23
  20. 28.
    Ira Glasser: Would Today's ACLU Defend the Speech Rights of Nazis?
    1:11:35
  21. 29.
    Corey DeAngelis: COVID-19 Is Super-Spreading School Choice
    1:07:37
  22. 30.
    Scott Barry Kaufman on Narcissists and Libertarians
    1:08:40
  23. 31.
    Jo Jorgensen: Don't Waste Your Vote on Trump or Biden
    56:39
  24. 32.
    Taghi Amirani: How the U.S.-Backed 1953 Coup in Iran Is Still Changing Global Politics
    1:00:12
  25. 33.
    Ronald Bailey: The World Is Getting Cleaner, Richer, and Safer
    37:32
  26. 34.
    Bridget Phetasy: What American Politics Can Learn From Alcoholics Anonymous
    1:12:11
  27. 35.
    Nancy Rommelmann: The Disturbing Drift of the Portland Protests
    41:46
  28. 36.
    Debra Soh: The End of Gender
    58:09
  29. 37.
    Greg Gutfeld: 'Impulse Control or Lack Thereof Is a Huge Deal Right Now'
    36:18
  30. 38.
    Cliff Maloney Says Young Americans for Liberty Event Was Canceled for Political Reasons
    34:52
  31. 39.
    Jia Lynn Yang on the Immigration Law that Changed America
    1:08:32
  32. 40.
    Jonathan Rauch on Cancel Culture and the 'Unending Battle' for Free Speech
    42:28
  33. 41.
    Kmele Foster: Black Lives Matter 'Is Hostile Towards Free Markets and Capitalism'
    1:18:21
  34. 42.
    Michael Shellenberger: Environmental Alarmism Is Wrong and Harmful
    1:02:10
  35. 43.
    Wesley Yang: Woke Protests Against 'White Supremacism' May Be the New Normal
    1:32:05
  36. 44.
    Glenn Loury on Police Abuse, Systematic Racism, and Hysteria
    1:01:31
  37. 45.
    Katie Herzog and Jesse Singal on Left-Wing Cancel Culture
    58:32
  38. 46.
    Radley Balko on George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and the Libertarian Case for Criminal Justice Reform
    50:21
  39. 47.
    Rory Sutherland on How Red Bull Explains Why Capitalism Is Great
    35:00
  40. 48.
    How Protests Over George Floyd's Death and Police Brutality Could Help Trump Win Reelection
    49:23
  41. 49.
    Edward Snowden, the Surveillance State, and the 'Dark Mirror' Still Watching Us All
    52:32
  42. 50.
    L.P. Presidential Candidate Jacob Hornberger Wants 'To Live in a Free Society'
    1:01:32

Listen to The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie now.

Listen to The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie in full in the Spotify app

\n

Chen talks with Nick Gillespie about how an obsessive focus on identity politics led the media to keep insisting without evidence that the murder of massage parlor workers in Atlanta was a hate crime against Asian Americans, why Hollywood is changing its products to please censors in the Chinese government, and how the best way to counter radicalization is with speech and information rather than repression.

","id":"3e5eTBK8C70U9WKcfsks6P","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000ba8acc6c9aec6ff68007b7d5428a","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67656300005f1fcc6c9aec6ff68007b7d5428a","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000f68dcc6c9aec6ff68007b7d5428a","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Melissa Chen: \"Ideas Have Consequences. So Does Silence.\"","release_date":"2021-03-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3e5eTBK8C70U9WKcfsks6P"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7bcc9026c7065289f45cb15a5e055bc3f478c264","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The former Merry Prankster and Whole Earth Catalog founder talks about psychedelics, computers, bringing back woolly mammoths, and his new documentary.","duration_ms":3276852,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7jTorZzco5niVlsblmmp6g"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7jTorZzco5niVlsblmmp6g","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Has anyone lived a more interesting, influential, and inspiring life than Stewart Brand?

\n

Born in 1938 and educated at Stanford and by the United States army, Brand was a Merry Prankster who helped conduct Ken Kesey's legendary acid tests in the 1960s. His guerilla campaign of selling buttons that asked \"Why haven't we seen a photograph of the whole earth yet?\" pushed NASA to release the first image of the planet from space and helped inspire the first Earth Day celebrations. From 1968 to 1971, he published the Whole Earth Catalog, which quickly became a bible to hippies on communes and techno-geeks such as Steve Jobs, who famously quoted its parting message: \"Stay hungry, stay foolish.\" 

\n

Brand has rightly been called \"the intellectual Johnny Appleseed of the counterculture.\" He helped shape early techno-culture and cyberspace by reporting on the personal computer revolution and interacting with many of its key figures early on. His ideas were instrumental in the creation of the Well, one of the earliest online communities and he helped found The Long Now Foundation, which seeks to lengthen and deepen the way we all think about the past and the future. 

\n

In a series of books on everything from the MIT Media Lab to how buildings learn to \"eco-modernism,\" he has delineated a unique strain of ecological thought that embraces technology as a means of salvation and liberation rather than a destructive force that must be stopped. His current passion is Revive & Restore, an organization that is leading the \"de-extinction movement\" by using biotechnology to bring back plants and animals including the American Chestnut tree, the passenger pigeon, and the woolly mammoth.

\n

Brand is the subject of the new documentary, We Are As Gods—a line from the first issue of the Whole Earth Catalog—which takes a long, critical look at his life and work. For today's podcast, Nick Gillespie talks with with Brand and the directors of the film, David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg, about his long, strange trip over the past 60 years that has taken place exclusively at the frontier of social and cultural change.

","id":"7jTorZzco5niVlsblmmp6g","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000ba8a72f037527963b2a17aa07221","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67656300005f1f72f037527963b2a17aa07221","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000f68d72f037527963b2a17aa07221","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Stewart Brand: We Are (Still) As Gods","release_date":"2021-03-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7jTorZzco5niVlsblmmp6g"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/97497437e657d3ecfb9ee614477be8a710def14b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Joe Biden's spending bill is a Democratic Party wish list masquerading as a public health measure.","duration_ms":4052323,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0H0MvO8h5iAAh2v9tQdWd6"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0H0MvO8h5iAAh2v9tQdWd6","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

The American Rescue Plan Act is hurtling toward final passage, but only a few percentage points of its massive $1.9 trillion price tag is specifically geared toward, you know, addressing the pandemic. How little? House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R–Calif.) says just 9 percent of it goes \"directly to toward Covid-19 relief.\" The nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Budget puts the number even lower, declaring, \"Only about 1 percent of the entire package goes toward COVID-19 vaccines, and 5 percent is truly focused on public health needs surrounding the pandemic.\"

\n

Most of it is instead a pre-existing Democratic Party wishlist of increased spending on virtually every aspect of government, including bigger unemployment benefits, even more money for schools, a gigantic child tax credit, and subsidies for Obamacare insurance policies that would phase out only at a household income of more than $580,000. This legislation comes on the heels of the $4 trillion in coronavirus-related spending passed last year.

\n

Peter Suderman, features editor at Reason, joins Nick Gillespie to discuss his cover story in the new issue of the magazine, which is titled \"Josh Hawley's Toxic Populism,\" a deep dive into the anti-libertarian platform of the Missouri senator who is one of the Republican Party's rising stars. They also walk through the nearly $2 trillion of new spending—passed along strict party lines—that is about to be signed into law by President Joe Biden.

","id":"0H0MvO8h5iAAh2v9tQdWd6","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000ba8a9a10fd6f2c08d3902363022c","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67656300005f1f9a10fd6f2c08d3902363022c","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000f68d9a10fd6f2c08d3902363022c","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Peter Suderman: The $1.9 Trillion American Rescue Plan Has Almost Nothing To Do With Covid","release_date":"2021-03-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0H0MvO8h5iAAh2v9tQdWd6"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/cdaff86d797938a8feb0a8d7ba01080185adfe25","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The tech billionaire isn't alone among the mega-wealthy in getting piles of money from government at all levels, say the authors of Welfare for the Rich.","duration_ms":3687419,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/015dgBpAoJ1ECvne9wF3H6"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/015dgBpAoJ1ECvne9wF3H6","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Tech billionaire Elon Musk is known for creating bold new companies such as PayPal, Tesla, and SpaceX, championing liberating technologies like Bitcoin, and hyping visionary plans to colonize Mars.

\n

But with a net worth of around $200 billion, he's not just the planet's richest person. He's one of its biggest welfare recipients, report Lisa Conyers and Phil Harvey, authors of Welfare for the Rich: How Your Tax Dollars End Up in Millionaires' Pockets—And What You Can do About It. By 2015, they write, companies led by Musk had gotten billions of dollars in subsidies, tax breaks, and other handouts. New York state even shelled out $750 million to build a solar panel factory for Musk's Solar City operation and said the company would pay no property taxes for a decade, saving another $260 million.

\n

Musk is not alone say Conyers, a veteran journalist, and Harvey, a successful businessman who donates to many libertarian organizations, including Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this podcast. There are literally thousands of other immensely rich people who are constantly bilking governments at all levels for special perks, carve-outs, and handouts paid for by middle-class and poor people.

\n

In exhaustively documented and perpetually enraging prose, Conyers and Harvey show how millionaire \"farmers,\" billionaire team owners, and filthy rich oil-and-gas-and-wind-power barons lobby Congress, rewrite zoning laws, and plunder the public fisc like it's a bodily function. They also outline realistic and effective ways to fight back and level a playing field that benefits the people who need the least help from government.

","id":"015dgBpAoJ1ECvne9wF3H6","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000ba8a43326eb80de45744863283cb","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67656300005f1f43326eb80de45744863283cb","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000f68d43326eb80de45744863283cb","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Elon Musk, Welfare King!","release_date":"2021-03-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:015dgBpAoJ1ECvne9wF3H6"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/92cb56139bef65be6cf225867f98f049347c142f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A new documentary and forthcoming biography pay tribute to the economist's intellectual fearlessness and commitment to empirical research.","duration_ms":3890887,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2eWTFAbN8KHKExlF9d8TWu"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2eWTFAbN8KHKExlF9d8TWu","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Thomas Sowell is one of the most influential economists, syndicated columnists, and social critics of the past half-century, having authored provocative, best-selling books on everything from race relations to childhood development to, most recently, Charter Schools and Their Enemies. His masterworks include Knowledge and Decisions, which uses Friedrich Hayek's insights about distributed information to explain both how markets work and why intellectuals disdain markets; A Conflict of Visions, which explores the ideological origins of political struggles; and Basic Economics, a best-selling primer now in its fifth edition.

\n

Sowell's inspiring life—he was born black and poor in North Carolina in 1930 and received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago at the age of 38—and expansive work are now the subjects of a new documentary, Common Sense in a Senseless World (watch here) and a forthcoming biography titled Maverick.

\n

Nick Gillespie speaks with Jason L. Riley, the author of the film and the biography, about why even at age 90, Sowell is more relevant today than ever. A fellow at The Manhattan Institute and a columnist for The Wall Street Journal, Riley tells me that Sowell's empirically driven research and his fearless engagement with even the most controversial topics are exactly what our world needs more of.

","id":"2eWTFAbN8KHKExlF9d8TWu","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000ba8a1809eb178c762c5f53b7b8df","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67656300005f1f1809eb178c762c5f53b7b8df","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ab6765630000f68d1809eb178c762c5f53b7b8df","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Jason Riley: Thomas Sowell's Unique Insights on Race, Economics, and Politics","release_date":"2021-02-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2eWTFAbN8KHKExlF9d8TWu"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/32f7e4fc4153dfce80f614441b16bbf4d10527ba","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Atlantic writer says that illiberalism and the urge to shut down debate need to be confronted across the political spectrum.","duration_ms":5301394,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6I56GwJW8CKymrt2CfINgf"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6I56GwJW8CKymrt2CfINgf","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

To say that we live in a hyper-polarized, angry society is to state the obvious. Everywhere around us, but especially online, in politics, and in the media, we seem to be, with apologies to Matthew Arnold, trapped on a darkling plain where ignorant armies clash by night. It's impossible to avoid a continuous stream of stories, often erupting from prestigious institutions such as The New York Times and Ivy League universities, of people being canceled for real and imagined thought crimes, political hacks defending objectively awful policy failures, and charges of racism, sexism, and homophobia being launched like drone strikes on unsuspecting, innocent civilians.

\n

Many in the media and the academy are questioning bedrock commitments to free expression and intellectual freedom.  As the former head of the ACLU, Ira Glasser, told Reason recently, many activists, academics, and journalists believe that \"free speech is an antagonist\" to social justice.

\n

One journalist who pushes back against all this is Conor Friedersdorf, a staff writer at The Atlantic, who maintains one of the smartest and engaging Twitter feeds around, and publishes the newsletter The Best of Journalism, which \"highlights exceptional nonfiction journalism.\" The 41-year-old Southern California native writes about criminal justice reform, the excesses of wokeness and political correctness on the right and the left, and the failure of government to effectively deliver many of the basic services it's supposed to provide.

\n

\"The biggest thing I'm interested in is, can we have a robust public discourse? Can we adjudicate truth propositions together?\" Friedersdorf tells me in today's podcast. He cites Jonathan Rauch's influential 1993 book, Kindly Inquisitors: The New Attacks on Free Thought, which lays out the case for free and open dialogue in society, especially about contentious topics and ideas. (Go here for my interview with Rauch on today's cancel culture.). \"It is a messy process of talking back and forth, and it's really important,\" says Friedersdorf. \"We can get tremendous value from it in the future if only we allow it to happen. And I see more and more people not allowing it to happen with the advent of social media.\"

\n

We talk about the case of New York Times reporter Donald McNeil, who was pushed out of the paper after colleagues learned he used a racial epithet in 2019 while on a trip with high-school students, calls by journalists to regulate conversations on the popular new audio-only social media platform Clubhouse, and the failure of the FDA and CDC to roll out vaccines as efficiently as possible. We also talk about how libertarians might effectively reach out to people on the left and the right who are increasingly exhausted by the orthodoxy demanded by progressives and conservatives.

","id":"6I56GwJW8CKymrt2CfINgf","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f0d864516e46f5cb959a4aef22f049a3851ec2d9","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/abba40decdaceb1e933d3809e9bcd53213417e48","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2fcb57d8d9cf407ca68237b3d17529af2974e370","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Conor Friedersdorf: Stand Against Left-Wing and Right-Wing P.C.","release_date":"2021-02-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6I56GwJW8CKymrt2CfINgf"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/422dc0e4134171c0e3690acdeeaa7946b2391851","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The 33-year-old successor to Justin Amash's House seat says his party has abandoned limited government, economic freedom, and individualism.","duration_ms":4896209,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6v3vVCuGBeLEwRFPI4sUgG"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6v3vVCuGBeLEwRFPI4sUgG","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Just three days after being sworn into Congress to represent Michigan's 3rd district, Republican freshman Peter Meijer found himself and colleagues trapped without security in the bowels of the Capitol building while a riot that ultimately claimed five lives raged all around him. 

\n

The following week, he was one of just 10 Republicans—and the only first-termerto vote to impeach Donald Trump, a decision that led to a narrowly failed censure vote from his own state's GOP and immediate announcements that he will be primaried in 2022. 

\n

The 33-year-old Army veteran who served in Iraq didn't expect his first few days in Congress to be so chaotic, but he says his military training helps him stay steady as he fills the seat vacated by Libertarian Justin Amash. On the campaign trail, Meijer supported Donald Trump but says that the truculent behavior of the former president and many members of his own party after Election Day not only caused the January 6 riot but cost the GOP the Senate.

\n

Meijer tells Nick Gillespie why he believes in limited government, economic freedom, and individualism; why he's against out-of-control stimulus spending and military adventurism; and how he plans to combat the craziness he sees both on the right and left in the House of Representatives. He also talks about what he's learned about business and public service from being the scion of the Meijer superstore chain, how generational fault lines may be every bit as important as partisan ones, and why he's committed to voting his principles rather than his constituents' will.

","id":"6v3vVCuGBeLEwRFPI4sUgG","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7335a152523f4d9b899e1dd0cefe785b2979418a","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/b4eee45ba35d5535871b399f0e7e927341e5b6f1","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/e328fc08c725eca73668e6ed09048e34d8301eac","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Rep. Peter Meijer: Only GOP Freshman Who Voted To Impeach Trump Tells All","release_date":"2021-02-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6v3vVCuGBeLEwRFPI4sUgG"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e0f3b48c6bdcea0e3622788c99ae19dd7f7d1b7f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The anthropologist and brand consultant explains why we need fewer blanket accusations of racism and more mutual respect and compassion.","duration_ms":4179566,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3mbP0kbam0Z9yA7FiLrDzF"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3mbP0kbam0Z9yA7FiLrDzF","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

An increasing number of corporations, universities, and other organizations hold anti-racism seminars in which participants are expected to acknowledge their own racism at the start of the meetings or to write \"letters of apology to marginalized people whom they may have harmed.\"

\n

Anthropologist and brand consultant Grant McCracken, who has taught at places such as Harvard Business School and worked with people such as Kanye West, says such imperatives are doubly bad. First, they don't acknowledge the changed nature of institutions over the past half-century toward inclusion and equality and second, they leave participants feeling defamed and diminished. There's never a good reason to say you are a racist, he writes, unless, of course, you are one.

\n

McCracken's work will be familiar to Reason readers, both as a contributor to our pages and as an influence on the magazine's broad conception of culture as a dynamic, participatory process through which we all figure out who we are and what we want to become. His 1998 book Plenitude, in which he documents what he calls the \"quickening speciation of social types,\" remains the essential starting point for understanding the relentlessly heterogenous world in which we live.

\n

His new book is called The New Honor Code: A Simple Plan for Raising Our Standards and Restoring Our Good Names. It explores the seeming disappearance of honorable behavior from much of our personal, professional, and public lives. Sports heroes such as Lance Armstrong not only cheat to win but lie about it while accusing others of cheating. Medical professionals such as Larry Nassar abuse their position as the USA Gymnastics team doctor to assault hundreds of young, defenseless patients. Politicians ranging from Nancy Pelosi to Donald Trump to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to Ted Cruz regularly defame and lie about their opponents without evidence or fear of reprisal.

\n

What America needs, says McCracken, is a rebirth of honor that demands we insist on basic standards of behavior, especially from those in positions of power, and that we also treat others as we ourselves would like to be treated: with respect and compassion. The New Honor Code is a rich text, drawing from McCracken's academic research into Elizabethan England, his abiding curiosity about popular culture, and his work in corporate America. Few other thinkers can distill lessons for the future from figures as diverse as 16th-century English diplomat Thomas Elyot, Beat writers such as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, and Canadian musician and Elon Musk partner Grimes.

","id":"3mbP0kbam0Z9yA7FiLrDzF","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/4f11bb6497571540565f432b43d45ff6551d3a5b","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2a1fa5db028fc9bd3b90462bbb854d6010a9d21d","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/40b7731f8e57fefae1a1048a3ff331e95f1ec40c","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Grant McCracken: The New Honor Code vs. Radical Wokeism","release_date":"2021-02-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3mbP0kbam0Z9yA7FiLrDzF"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/6f4138cdf2a50e36c0fc8892322e1dc01cb33330","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The silver lining to disastrous education lockdowns? A massive increase in support for all sorts of student-centered reforms.","duration_ms":2651742,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4zBP8vZmLBryEuQWnSU9DY"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4zBP8vZmLBryEuQWnSU9DY","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Nearly a year into ubiquitous school closings as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic—and even with a vaccine being rolled out—it's far from clear when most students will be going back to full-time, in-person classes.

\n

How are the shutdowns affecting K-12 education and changing the way we think about public schools? Corey De Angelis, the Reason Foundation's director of school choice, tells Nick Gillespie that a historically large number of parents are leaving traditional residential-assignment schools and looking to take their education dollars with them. As student failure rates climb and dissatisfaction with distance learning increases, says DeAngelis, there's also mounting frustration with teachers unions for their continued opposition to reopening despite mounting evidence that schools are not a significant source of infection.

\n

Over a dozen state legislatures are considering laws that would massively expand publicly funded school choice and De Angelis says that the pandemic ultimately may accomplish what decades of white papers have failed to deliver: a switch to a system in which parents rather than bureaucrats decide where their kids go to school.

","id":"4zBP8vZmLBryEuQWnSU9DY","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/d1b8f8c15d696efb6e96b747fc25778544ca4529","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2c431cb6e8847cde34d4eb2f38ded05911033841","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/e634f45909f13c877bb4c9acf2dc11d60551fedf","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Corey DeAngelis: Why 2021 Is a Turning Point for School Choice","release_date":"2021-01-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4zBP8vZmLBryEuQWnSU9DY"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e406cdd22170101599033cf076ba1f0db5478006","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Black families need control of their children's K-12 education, says the Minnesota activist. The past year's lockdowns might just make that happen.","duration_ms":4171755,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0jvn5sCvTBOFOFZ3RsYubR"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0jvn5sCvTBOFOFZ3RsYubR","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

\"There isn't an issue facing Black people today that doesn't find its origins in K-12 education,\" writes Chris Stewart, CEO of the education nonprofit brightbeam and a prolific writer and podcaster. \"Without our own collective governance of our children's intellectual development, how can we win? Without Black self-determination in who teaches them, what they learn, where they learn, and how lessons are taught to them, what is the future of our freedom?\"

\n

A Christian and a libertarian, the Minnesota-based Stewart says that school lockdowns over the past year have forced parents to become more involved in and attentive to their children's education and may well lead to an exodus from traditional public schools. In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, Stewart also talks about why he believes that the government shouldn't be in charge of curricula and why support for school choice will continue to grow despite efforts by teachers unions and education bureaucrats to maintain a failing status quo.

","id":"0jvn5sCvTBOFOFZ3RsYubR","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/3b6673a9eb74663910eb71de4baa03c8c7a5997d","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/96834f554d65ded010e7c2da34d0d7f4b34dfeff","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/142657f462f2fba5a1bdff643bc388377fa1a553","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Chris Stewart: Race, COVID-19, and the Future of School Choice","release_date":"2021-01-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0jvn5sCvTBOFOFZ3RsYubR"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5c988dd4ae0e23fbd8e706ed4d6dc895f4536106","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Columbia neuroscientist talks frankly about using heroin responsibly and \"chasing liberty in the land of fear.\"","duration_ms":3398713,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5GEfo3cTw4Ihdg9t5OFwfm"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5GEfo3cTw4Ihdg9t5OFwfm","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Even among proponents of drug legalization, Columbia University neuroscientist Carl Hart stands apart for his unflinching honesty.

\n

\"I am now entering my fifth year as a regular heroin user,\" the 54-year-old full professor writes in Drug Use for Grown-Ups: Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear. \"I do not have a drug-use problem. Never have. Each day, I meet my parental, personal, and professional responsibilities. I pay my taxes, serve as a volunteer in my community…and contribute to the global community as an informed and engaged citizen. I am better for my drug use.\"

\n

In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, Hart makes the case that responsible adults should be free to buy, sell, and use whatever substances they want to and that policy discussions about drug use have been polluted by bad information and moral posturing. He marshals an impressive body of academic research showing that virtually all currently illegal drugs can be and are used safely by millions of people, that drug prohibition has little or nothing to do with public safety, and that the United States would be a better place if its citizens were allowed to consume a much broader set of substances for pleasure.

\n

\"The Declaration of Independence guaranteed life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for all of us, as long as we don't disrupt anybody else's ability to do the same,\" says Hart. \"That means we get to live our life as we choose, as we see fit. Taking drugs can be a part of that and is a part of that for a lot of Americans.\"

","id":"5GEfo3cTw4Ihdg9t5OFwfm","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/516005b88723485eb75c77c069a552e51ac713b6","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c29dd281090317bfaa913f27eb652fa047671709","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9f802820b5d0dfdf6d55eae7369d49b8dcf4fb3c","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Carl Hart: Drug Use for Grown-Ups","release_date":"2021-01-20","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5GEfo3cTw4Ihdg9t5OFwfm"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/94b1d697c9cf37310513b810cddd14239607326e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Techdirt's founder wants to give end users, not politicians and tech giants, more control over what we can say and see online.","duration_ms":4829283,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5PTfrlq2Yjk1NfkW6SGC0P"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5PTfrlq2Yjk1NfkW6SGC0P","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

One of the few things that Donald Trump and Joe Biden agree on is their shared hatred of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which gives ISPs and website operators legal immunity from most user-generated content. 

\n

Donald Trump vetoed the defense spending bill in December because the legislation didn't include language \"terminating\" Section 230 and Joe Biden has said that \"Section 230 should be revoked, immediately.\" Conservative Republicans such as Sens. Ted Cruz (Texas) and Josh Hawley (Mo.) and progressive Democrats such as Sens. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) and Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) have called for its reform or repeal. 

\n

Sometimes called \"the internet's First Amendment\" and \"the 26 words that created the internet,\" Section 230 is widely accused of, on the one hand, allowing Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other social-media giants to squelch conservative voices and, on the other hand, fueling the spread of misinformation and disinformation that allowed Donald Trump to win the 2016 election. Critics also charge that Section 230 enables all sorts of social ills, from QAnon conspiracy-mongering to the global sex-trafficking of children.

\n

Enter Mike Masnick, the 46-year-old entrepreneur and analyst behind the influential website Techdirt and the digital think tank the Copia Institute. Where others are constantly talking about how to restrict and regulate the internet and tech giants to conform to one ideological vision or another, he champions protocols and practices that he thinks would lead to a more-decentralized internet and culture, including expanding Section 230 immunity, the use of encryption, and the sorts of tools that give end users more power to control what they say and see online.

\n

Nick Gillespie spoke with Masnick about what current debates over social media get drastically wrong, how free speech is simultaneously both empowered and imperiled by politicians here and abroad, and why a more-decentralized internet is not just possible but preferable to what we have now.

","id":"5PTfrlq2Yjk1NfkW6SGC0P","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ade46c4becb1d39723088714947aaf69903a79bc","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/1bf530d600a95ee1d2750d8619124659f3a6c090","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/975ca6b4a58770470fbed013784d7239102fa12b","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Mike Masnick: In Defense of Section 230 and a Decentralized Internet","release_date":"2021-01-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5PTfrlq2Yjk1NfkW6SGC0P"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a130085dd03a389319adf330abce56f3a32e5c29","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The rock legend fought for free speech and self-expression in ways that appealed to dissidents in America and communist countries alike.","duration_ms":2846798,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7MvzyA5LEbbnn8ql0jyYlS"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7MvzyA5LEbbnn8ql0jyYlS","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Before his death from prostate cancer in 1993, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame member Frank Zappa spent time in jail for making an obscene recording requested by undercover cops, released 60 records in every genre imaginable, became one of the first modern musical artists to start his own company, testified before Congress that labeling music due to lyrical content was an attack on free speech, and inspired Vaclav Havel and others fighting Czechoslovakia's repressive communist regime. He packed a hell of a lot into 52 years, and made a lot of waves and enemies along the way.

\n

Zappa is the subject of an eponymous new documentary by Alex Winter, whose previous films include Downloaded (a study of Napster and unauthorized file sharing), Deep Web (a look at Ross Ulbricht and the Silk Road), and Trust Machine (an exploration of how blockchain technology decentralizes power; go here for a Reason interview with him about that film). \"Zappa,\" says Winter, who is also well-known for his acting in the Bill & Ted series and other films, \"matters because he was an extremely talented and composer but also because…was very anti-authoritarian, very anti-fascist, very pro–citizens' rights. He also saw the tech revolution coming. In all of these extremely interesting ways, Zappa was ahead of the curve.\" Although his politics, like his music, defy easy (or any, really) categorization, Winter says that Zappa's overriding beliefs in free speech, individualism, and entrepreneurship carried strong libertarian connotations.

\n

Winter talks with Nick Gillespie about Zappa's life and legacy, including his internal contradictions regarding sexual freedom, his ultra-critical attitudes toward hippies and drugs, and other matters. Winter also discusses his own oeuvre as a documentarian and weighs in on a possible pardon for Ross Ulbricht, the founder of Silk Road whom President Donald Trump is reportedly considering for a pardon or commutation. Ulbricht, says Winter, bore the brunt of panics over both the internet and bitcoin, and was sentenced for far longer than his crimes deserve. \"I think he should not be in jail anymore. Full stop.\"

","id":"7MvzyA5LEbbnn8ql0jyYlS","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9047d850938f7274dd7e17488cb3df2be53d95b3","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/1c25de739df1b4dd22c66cde32543374aea6512d","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7a34c66f4f700b838a668f21dc693aede98726cd","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Alex Winter: Frank Zappa's Ultra-Individualist Legacy","release_date":"2021-01-06","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7MvzyA5LEbbnn8ql0jyYlS"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3f19054defac3826be6ad42888eccb526da32d83","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A 71-year-old therapist comes out of the \"chemical closet\" to promote MDMA as a means of self-discovery","duration_ms":2425339,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0IkSmF33vS2Dm47TXq1bbx"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0IkSmF33vS2Dm47TXq1bbx","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Charles Wininger has been a psychotherapist and \"psychonaut\"—a user of psychoactive substances ranging from LSD to marijuana to psilocybin—for decades. In his new memoir and practical guide, Listening To Ecstasy: The Transformative Power of MDMA, the 71-year-old New Yorker comes out of the \"chemical closet\" to talk about how MDMA has helped to revitalize his personal and professional life, what important lessons today's \"psychedelic renaissance\" has learned from the 1960s counterculture, and why \"serious fun\" that leads to both self-actualization and the revitalization of community is within our grasp.

\n

As MDMA-assisted therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder enters Phase 3 trials for FDA approval and voters around the country legalize or decriminalize the use of psychedelics, Wininger believes that the time has come to have honest discussions of how best to use what the government calls illicit drugs to create a better world. One way we make that happen, he says, \"is for those who can do so and who dare to do so to come out of the chemical closet and say, 'I am a user of these compounds, they do me a lot of good, and they help me function in a better way. They help me become more creative, more alive and more useful to society as a whole.'\"

","id":"0IkSmF33vS2Dm47TXq1bbx","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9daee6110c6e749d1297ba7dad4b022477cdc848","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c5576bdb78819b5b71f6f888c6d5232afae6e05c","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/585a5ab10ded0f9b91698806db5fb0aef2d2c5b5","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Charles Wininger: Why We Should Listen To Ecstasy and Other Psychedelics","release_date":"2020-12-30","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0IkSmF33vS2Dm47TXq1bbx"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3d1be376783fb44ea7ae6941928163a08b6c9413","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The story of why pain relievers took root in Appalachia begins decades before the introduction of OxyContin.","duration_ms":4548885,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3lY0oovKvyIW66l7tj4LAM"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3lY0oovKvyIW66l7tj4LAM","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Why did prescription opioids bring so much misery, addiction, and death to the small towns of post-industrial America? The media's standard narrative focuses on the role played by OxyContin, a powerful painkiller supposedly foisted on helpless rubes and naive doctors by cynical profiteers at Purdue Pharma, whose executives have already pleaded guilty to a number of crimes. In this telling, the opioid epidemic is a morality tale of capitalism run amok, regulation made toothless by anti-government zealots, and uneducated populations left behind by the knowledge economy.

\n

Sally Satel has a vastly different, more complicated, and more accurate story to tell. She's a practicing psychiatrist who specializes in substance abuse, the author of a series of books on health care issues, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. In 2018, she moved to Ironton, Ohio, a small, economically depressed town in Appalachian Ohio, and worked with patients and social service providers to better understand how opioids, heroin, and fentanyl became drugs of choice for people in a part of the country that have been using all manner of substances—from moonshine to marijuana to earlier versions of opioids—to escape both brutally demanding physical labor and the absence of jobs for decades if not centuries.

\n

\"The story of why pain relievers took root in Appalachia actually begins decades before the introduction of OxyContin,\" says Satel, and simply clamping down on prescriptions for painkillers will not only fail to solve the problem in places like Ironton, it will consign thousands of chronic-pain sufferers to excruciating discomfort.

\n

In a conversation with Nick Gillespie, Satel explains what the standard narrative of the opioid epidemic gets wrong and discusses her heterodox theories of addiction that are laid out in her article \"Dark Genies, Dark Horizons: The Riddle of Addiction,\" which appears in the new issue of Liberties: A Journal of Politics and Culture. \"Despite popular rhetoric,\" she says, \"addiction is not a 'disease like any other'\" but a deeply human condition.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

","id":"3lY0oovKvyIW66l7tj4LAM","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/a2a7797c55a479a47d76597be321b156f947888a","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/13004cb2a0e9f8b3e27c5bfe453e52192c4a4894","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c7110ca500489883f610f04a6ef898d7b5db736b","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Sally Satel: The Secret History of the Opioid Epidemic","release_date":"2020-12-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3lY0oovKvyIW66l7tj4LAM"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2b632633e158170a920189afee030a5422be8e3e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A new book, Wretched Refuse?, documents that newcomers not only increase economic activity but often revitalize faith in free market, limited-government institutions. ","duration_ms":3141042,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5GlD6odt2xz3Vzu8EkyA3I"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5GlD6odt2xz3Vzu8EkyA3I","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Do immigrants bring with them the worst attributes of the countries and societies they are fleeing?

\n

That fear motivates anti-immigrant sentiments from populists and nationalists such as President Donald Trump, who famously declared at the start of his campaign for the presidency that \"when Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best.\" It also stokes anxiety from an influential group of mostly free market economists such as Harvard's George Borjas, Britain's Paul Collier, and George Mason's Garret Jones, who speculate that mass immigration from countries with illiberal political and economic cultures will undermine countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom.

\n

In Wretched Refuse?: The Political Economy of Immigration and Institutions, Alex Nowrasteh and Benjamin Powell take an exhaustive look at the data and conclude that destination countries not only benefit economically from immigration but that many key markers of liberal democracy—such as support for the rule of law, belief in private property, and trust in government—improve when newcomers arrive en masse.

\n

\"One of the things we take a look at sort of in some detail in the book is whether immigrants have more trust in our institutions—whether they have more trust in the legal system, whether they have more trust in American businesses, whether they have more trust in the general sense of government and the way things are run here,\" says Nowrasteh, director of immigration studies at the libertarian Cato Institute. \"Overwhelmingly they do. If it weren't for immigrants in the United States, trust in these institutions would be a lot lower.\"

\n

Powell, an economist at Texas Tech who also heads up that school's Free Market Institute, points to the experience of Israel in the 1990s, whose population increased by 20 percent, largely due to Jews fleeing the former Soviet Union. \"There was a massive flood of people coming from a country with a 70-year history of no rule of law and no economic freedoms [who] piled into Israel with immediate voting rights. Confidence in property rights didn't go down,\" notes Powell. \"Confidence in property rights didn't go down, it went up. [So did] economic freedoms across board…Israel went from something like 90th in the world in economic freedom to 45th during a period of massive immigration from a communist country.\"

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

\n

Photo: Rrodrickbeiler | Dreamstime.com

","id":"5GlD6odt2xz3Vzu8EkyA3I","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/851521dbcf3ca3a91ca7fd20d6c22bf1c2334026","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f7b63319109d13c1c36a8b481a3f8ac34f4ec9f9","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fdbd586e5f9c44512f5d555b12f396e1475edc7c","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Alex Nowrasteh and Benjamin Powell: Immigrants Revitalize Faith in American Institutions","release_date":"2020-12-16","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5GlD6odt2xz3Vzu8EkyA3I"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/df051d595b96087c18407969f7b460d6b0c26d48","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The escaped slave called the Constitution \"a glorious liberty document\" that justified extending equality to blacks and women.","duration_ms":2989845,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6B17iLZvoq26aCnzOo0Voh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6B17iLZvoq26aCnzOo0Voh","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In August 2019,*  The New York Times published The 1619 Project, an immensely ambitious, influential, and controversial reframing of American history.

\n

The project's creator, Nikole Hannah-Jones, won a Pulitzer Prize for her work while arguing that the nation's founding was based on a \"racist ideology,\" and that the U.S. Constitution was a \"decidedly undemocratic\" document.

\n

This idea has resonated with many Americans and The 1619 Project has been adapted into a high school curriculum that attempts to \"reframe U.S. history by marking the year when the first enslaved Africans arrived on Virginia soil as our nation's foundational date.\" Appearing just months before highly publicized police killings of African Americans such as George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, The 1619 Project informed much of the rhetoric of demonstrators who took to the streets to protest racially charged police brutality.

\n

But Hannah-Jones' view of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence is at odds with that of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), the escaped slave, abolitionist, intellectual, and towering figure in American history.

\n

In his new book A Glorious Liberty: Frederick Douglass and the Fight for an Antislavery Constitution, Reason Senior Editor Damon Root looks at the arguments that took place in the middle of the 19th century over racism and America's founding, which are being replayed today.* Far from seeing our country's Constitution as a morally ambiguous document that simply sanctioned white supremacism, Douglass extolled it as \"a glorious liberty document\" that justified the ending of slavery and other forms of race- and gender-based inequality. Douglass's message, says Root, is as vital to the current moment as it was in the 19th century.

\n

Root is also the author of the influential Overruled: The Long War for Control of the U.S. Supreme Court (2014). In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, he talks about recent changes at the Supreme Court and whether the three judges appointed by President Donald Trump (Neil Gorsuch, Bret Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett) will be good from a libertarian perspective.

\n

CORRECTION: The text originally stated that Root's book argues that the contemporary debate over the American founding are replaying arguments that took place in the 19th century. A Glorious Liberty: Frederick Douglass and the Fight for an Antislavery Constitution doesn't mention The 1619 Project or the contemporary debate. The original text also misstated the publication date of the project, which was August 2019, not December.

","id":"6B17iLZvoq26aCnzOo0Voh","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/24eb5429d0dcf9f1ac7fa9873451ed128a7af954","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/d4ddf6d4e25f0ee77215614ccfb5bfc006e1634e","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/a8ffa4c70c588e66eca166ae17b6f6954fb21792","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Damon Root: Why Frederick Douglass Loved the Constitution (and You Should Too)","release_date":"2020-12-09","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6B17iLZvoq26aCnzOo0Voh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b84e3be06fc0c04fbcb3925b6a488d8610590312","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The outgoing FCC chairman discusses 'light-touch' regulation and the future of free speech on the internet.","duration_ms":2900402,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2yQfSkUVFbO2KnHWDuhN3a"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2yQfSkUVFbO2KnHWDuhN3a","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

How much does President Donald Trump hate Section 230, the controversial law that gives internet service providers, website operators, and social media platforms broad immunity from legal responsibility for user-generated content? He's threatened to veto funding for the military unless Congress \"completely terminates\" the law, which also allows social media sites to moderate or ban speech they don't like.

\n

Trump is joined in his contempt for Section 230 by President-elect Joe Biden, who earlier this year said the law should be \"revoked immediately.\" Democrats argue that Section 230 allows hate speech and misinformation to proliferate and throw elections, while Republicans say that it's used to squelch conservative voices in the public square. What comes next?

\n

Enter Ajit Pai, the chairman of the Federal Communication Commission. In October, after President Trump went on a tear about Twitter and Facebook restricting access to a New York Post story critical of Joe Biden's son Hunter, Pai said the FCC would be looking to clarify Section 230. Even though he's announced he's stepping down on January 20th and that Congress has ultimate responsibility for passing laws governing online speech, what Pai does in his final weeks could have a lasting impact.

\n

Nick Gillespie spoke with him the day before the Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this podcast, awarded Pai the Sixth Annual Savas Award for Privatization for his market-friendly policies, including facilitating the growth of 5G networks and ending FCC regulation of internet service providers commonly known as Net Neutrality. Pai discusses what sorts of reforms or revisions of Section 230 he supports, what he's most proud of accomplishing at the FCC, and whether he thinks free speech—especially online—has much of a future.

","id":"2yQfSkUVFbO2KnHWDuhN3a","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0575f3d660fe9fb7bcb1d7430ce927ede0bb4b26","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9c4db630ac18c594421212b6bfd69138ebe221cc","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/a3fe3de4d6e60088f05e7d27a21fc7a86801b9c8","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Ajit Pai on Net Neutrality, 5G, and Why He Wants To 'Clarify' Section 230","release_date":"2020-12-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2yQfSkUVFbO2KnHWDuhN3a"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0eb47534c33d950788e4fdc634cbd8a7c9d669ae","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"There’s no journalist more relentlessly iconoclastic than Greenwald, who won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the Snowden revelations.","duration_ms":4397192,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0LXkU39vUHSC9pms6sKGiI"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0LXkU39vUHSC9pms6sKGiI","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

No journalist is more relentlessly iconoclastic than Glenn Greenwald, who shared a 2014 Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the Edward Snowden revelations.

\n

Though unapologetically progressive, the 53-year-old former lawyer never shrinks from fighting with the left. A week before the 2020 election, he quitThe Intercept, the online news organization he co-founded in 2014, because, by his own account, it refused to run a story unless he \"remove[d] all sections critical of\" Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden. Denouncing what he called \"the pathologies, illiberalism, and repressive mentality\" that led him to be \"censored\" by his own media outlet, Greenwald railed that \"these are the viruses that have contaminated virtually every mainstream center-left political organization, academic institution, and newsroom.\"

\n

Like a growing number of refugees from more-traditional news organizations, Greenwald took his talents to Substack, a platform for independent content creators to earn revenue directly from their audiences. He wasted no time lobbing grenades, posting stories and videos with titles like \"No Matter the Liberal Metric Chosen, the Bush/Cheney Administration Was Far Worse Than Trump\" and \"The Three Greatest Dangers of Biden/Harris: Militarism, Corporatism and Censorship, All Fueled by Indifference.\"

\n

Nick Gillespie spoke with Greenwald via Zoom at Greenwald's house in Brazil, where he lives with his husband, two children, and numerous dogs. Among other topics, they discussed what Greenwald sees as a generational fight playing out in newsrooms, the challenge identity politics poses to free expression, and whether a coalition of libertarians and progressives can effectively push non-interventionist foreign policy, lifestyle liberation, and an end to corporate subsidies during the Biden presidency.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

\n

Photo: Marcelo Chello/ZUMA Press/Newscom

","id":"0LXkU39vUHSC9pms6sKGiI","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/00944becbd6bbea1bcdb82f40137bfd966297cc1","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5e3738ced00e9b862767cbf1868e9a28e7aaa5cb","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/d951f2adc0464d098ff258e9e5cd4fd1364499b7","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Glenn Greenwald on Biden, Free Speech, and Leaving The Intercept","release_date":"2020-11-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0LXkU39vUHSC9pms6sKGiI"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/125e7ee90c90f715ab3a87b4e3a51278eb1b2ebe","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The libertarian billionaire and the head of his foundation discuss their new book, leaving partisanship behind, and learning from their critics.","duration_ms":3516317,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/77uusf1bFWzKdFP9SV19Yq"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/77uusf1bFWzKdFP9SV19Yq","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Over the past 50-plus years, Charles Koch grew his family business, Koch Industries, into one of the largest privately held companies in America. At the same time, he played a leading role in creating or supporting the modern libertarian movement and some of its major institutions. Among them: The Cato Institute, the Institute for Humane Studies, the Mercatus Center, and the Charles Koch Foundation, a nonprofit that supports many organizations, including Reason Foundation, which is the publisher of Reason magazine. Along with his brother David, a longtime trustee of the Reason Foundation who passed away last year at the age of 79, the 85-year-old billionaire became not only one of the most successful businessmen in the country but also one of the most controversial, with leftists blaming  \"the Koch brothers\" for many of our contemporary problems.

\n

Koch has just published Believe in People, a book that seeks to \"offer a paradigm shift [that] calls for all of us to move away from the top-down approach to solving the really big problems\" by instead \"empowering people from the bottom up to act on their unique gifts and contribute to the lives of others.\"

\n

In a conversation with Koch and his co-author, Brian Hooks, who is the chairman and CEO of Stand Together and the president of the Charles Koch Foundation, Reason's Nick Gillespie discusses the 2020 election, the successes and failures of the libertarian movement, and what Koch and Hooks see as the defining challenges and opportunities in the coming decade.

\n

For a video version of this interview, go here.

","id":"77uusf1bFWzKdFP9SV19Yq","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/89b8ee1235e73f88c4b69974790b3d3206dd7e6d","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/846e006f897817e8c07ae2bfab06a77088c63bc5","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/41c77a084da6095e60ca87e4e07289df698f3ca7","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Charles Koch and Brian Hooks: Believe in People","release_date":"2020-11-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:77uusf1bFWzKdFP9SV19Yq"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/6df451b026f2c7019146e2a995c055b9d2fad40b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The former Reason editor discusses her new book, The Fabric of Civilization, and why she's optimistic about the future.","duration_ms":4227788,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7Fy0QrgPgT3BOGOcV81a9I"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7Fy0QrgPgT3BOGOcV81a9I","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

\"From the moment we're born, we're surrounded by textiles,\" says Virginia Postrel, author of the new book The Fabric of Civilization. \"It's not just our clothes, it's our blankets, it's our curtains. It's our bandages. It's our duct tape! There are more textiles than you can ever think about surrounding us. And we don't think about them very much.\"

\n

A former editor of Reason, Postrel is also the author of The Power of Glamour, The Substance of Style, and The Future and Its Enemies. Her new book is a thick history of a technology that is absolutely central to our daily lives and yet one we take for granted. By focusing on fabric, she is able to tell a fascinating story about economics, politics, trade, industrialization, and centuries' worth of disruptive technology.

\n

For instance, she notes that in 17th- and 18th-century Europe, countries banned the importation of super-soft, super-colorful cotton prints from India known as calicos because they threatened domestic producers of everything from lower-quality cotton fabric to luxury silks. \"For 73 years, France treated calico the way the U.S. treats cocaine,\" she says. \"There was this huge amount of smuggling, and they wereconstantly ratcheting up the penalties [so] that they got quite grotesque, at least for the major traffic.\" Some of \"the earliest writings of classical liberalism are in this context, people saying not only is this not working, but…it is unjust to be sentencing people to the galleys in order to protect silk makers' profits.\"

\n

\"Human beings live in history and we inherit the legacies, positive and negative, of that history,\" says Postrel, discussing the large themes of her work. \"All you can do is start from where you are and try to do better from where you are.\" 

\n

She tells Nick Gillespie why polyester is far cooler than its reputation, why she's frustrated with libertarians who \"want to make the world be like a clean sheet of paper,\" and why, despite pandemics and threats to liberalism everywhere, she is optimistic about the future.

","id":"7Fy0QrgPgT3BOGOcV81a9I","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/e249a01a36dadceedd1da72450f01305892a0880","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/da5ca86bd7e0867bdf7cc5540eb42a7c65047753","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9bda82826bea02b2f4b18f72cdfa4b5793fce4ac","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Virginia Postrel: When Calico Was Treated Like Cocaine","release_date":"2020-11-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7Fy0QrgPgT3BOGOcV81a9I"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/709c8a8af1ff4e562c25d58eabffa41f9dd19a14","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A new documentary argues that Great Society liberalism laid the foundation for 2014's police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.","duration_ms":2981094,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/09oPr7sQYhVckp18PnlzWg"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/09oPr7sQYhVckp18PnlzWg","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Before George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, there was Michael Brown, an 18-year-old black man who was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014. Brown's death inspired the fledgling Black Lives Matter movement, and \"Hands Up. Don't Shoot,\" a line derived from accounts of Brown's final words, has been a rallying cry at protests against police violence ever since.

\n

But Michael Brown probably never spoke those words. An exhaustive Department of Justice report later concluded that the claim that \"Brown held his hands up in clear surrender\" came from sources who later \"acknowledged that they didn't actually witness the shooting, but rather repeated what others told them.\" And that account was \"inconsistent with the physical evidence,\" which instead corroborated Officer Darren Wilson's claim that Brown attacked him and tried to grab his gun.

\n

In contrast to other police killings that have energized Black Lives Matter and nationwide protests—including that of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, shot while wielding a plastic gun; of Eric Garner, who died while an officer held him in a chokehold; and of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor—there's no reason to believe that by shooting Brown, Wilson was acting unreasonably, concluded Barack Obama's Justice Department, because he was under attack.

\n

Writer and filmmaker Shelby Steele went to Ferguson to investigate the meaning of Brown's death and the reaction that it inspired. His new documentary, a collaboration with his son Eli, is called What Killed Michael Brown?

\n

Born in Chicago in 1946, Steele, a former college professor who specialized in Russian literature, is the son of a truck driver and the grandson of a slave. His views on how to correct America's racial injustices were deeply influenced by his experiences in the late 1960s and early '70s working in a poverty program in East St. Louis. Steele believes—provocatively—that what killed Michael Brown is the \"liberalism that put him in public housing, that expanded welfare payments so that his family broke up, the fatherless home, the terrible education, terrible schools, terrible public housing, uh, the destructive school busing.\" In place of today's increasing focus on identity politics, Steele believes we need to emphasize citizenship and the experiences we have in common if we are to deliver fully on America's promise as a land of opportunity.

","id":"09oPr7sQYhVckp18PnlzWg","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6217964719ee0db7c179850556ff0fdbac7d144c","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/87fa0353559dc0e2a5437d893aad9922e3161622","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9d82ae2fb081b6992ba49aa000dde24b271e65f9","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Shelby Steele: What Really Killed Michael Brown?","release_date":"2020-11-11","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:09oPr7sQYhVckp18PnlzWg"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/d91d107554e00c673c0fd8287c09d7dd989bc369","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"How to slow massive and unchecked national deficits in an age of runaway spending and divided government.","duration_ms":3680784,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3Bv2KkTSyMrkDkUHSdBPoa"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3Bv2KkTSyMrkDkUHSdBPoa","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In four years as president, Republican Donald Trump has overseen massive spending increases. His Democratic challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, has laid out a spending plan that would add $11 trillion in new spending and institute the largest tax hike since the end of World War II.

\n

Is this any way to run a country? Brian Riedl, a senior fellow at The Manhattan Institute who analyzes budget issues, walks Nick Gillespie through Trump's rotten fiscal record and Biden's insane wish list, explains how bipartisanship is just another word for more spending, and why even a divided government can't stop the red ink from flowing anymore. There are ways to cut spending and stabilize growth-killing national debt, says Riedl, but it's going to take a sea change in politics, rising interest rates, and a cold shoulder from the global economy to make them palatable.

","id":"3Bv2KkTSyMrkDkUHSdBPoa","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/91f97c7882a5408a79d4e96365d5d73c961320c6","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/1ca91b05654549d3973966c701e14a8ee052ca3a","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6dc861aa12521e80a882d6d7a17be185bae266f2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Brian Riedl: Donald Trump, Joe Biden, and $6 Trillion Budgets","release_date":"2020-11-04","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3Bv2KkTSyMrkDkUHSdBPoa"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/66d8a8f3321ba7d8339e57b907ecbee2757633d5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Whether Trump or Biden wins, the Stanford political scientist says \"unstable majorities\" will persist in the coming decade.","duration_ms":2612140,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0dPgc7zSSBlY69T8QBNhac"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0dPgc7zSSBlY69T8QBNhac","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Very little will likely be decided on Election Day, says Stanford and Hoover Institution political scientist Morris P. Fiorina, and that's not simply because a historically high percentage of mail-in ballots means the final tally might not be known for weeks or even months.

\n

Fiorina says we are in an extended age of what he calls \"unstable majorities\" because neither the Republican Party nor the Democratic Party is popular enough to get and hold enduring legislative power. The result is a historically rare period in which control of the White House and each house of Congress regularly flips back and forth between the two parties.

\n

Fiorina says the main cause of such \"electoral chaos\" is the way that parties select candidates and platforms. Party activists are more ideological and less representative not simply of most Americans but even of the other members of their own parties. When they take control, the parties push extreme agendas at odds with popular opinion, resulting in regular turnover the next time there's an election. In 2008, for instance, Barack Obama and the Democrats won in a landslide before losing control of Congress two years later. Similarly, Donald Trump won the White House in 2016 and had a Republican Congress, only to lose the House two years later.

\n

Fiorina, who describes himself as a \"soft libertarian,\" expects Joe Biden to win next week and figures it's likely that the Democrats will win a majority in the Senate while keeping the House. But he also expects \"electoral chaos\" to characterize the 2022 midterms and the 2024 presidential election because the underlying conditions that produce such unstable majorities haven't changed.

\n

Despite deep discord stoked by COVID-19 lockdowns, economic collapse, and racial tensions, Fiorina is guardedly optimistic about the future. His work in books such as Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America shows that citizens actually agree overwhelmingly on many issues (including abortion, marijuana legalization, gay rights, and free trade) despite divisive political rhetoric. \"There are big problems and no one seems to have a good idea of how to get a handle on them,\" he grants. But comparing the current moment to the late 1960s and early '70s, though, he says \"we're not on the verge of civil war\" and that today's violence is far less intense or extensive. \"We somehow muddled through [the '60s],\" he says, \"and so I think we will probably as a country do that again, although it won't be pretty and it won't be quick.\"

","id":"0dPgc7zSSBlY69T8QBNhac","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/bfb9a7bc9431c93540d68f78a37de41630951352","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/00d664b16709668bbb5019434e4402fb8e0fb625","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/088a5850503ec64c15e3cccbbad6d3fc9cf27be4","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Morris P. Fiorina: Why 'Electoral Chaos' Is Here To Stay","release_date":"2020-10-28","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0dPgc7zSSBlY69T8QBNhac"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/615c892634e6b23c59c48e883d4e26ee87b84d7d","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Here's the inside story of Milton Friedman's path-breaking PBS series about economic and political freedom, from the man who produced it.","duration_ms":3743007,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1XOGTULzFlJSzHhbWVNhxP"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1XOGTULzFlJSzHhbWVNhxP","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Forty years ago, PBS (of all networks) gave the libertarian economist Milton Friedman hours in prime time for Free To Choose, an unapologetic defense of why capitalism was both morally and pragmatically superior to socialism. Over the course of 10 hourlong episodes, the Nobel Prize winner laid out the pitfalls of protectionism. espoused the virtues of school choice, and explained why spending, not taxes, is the real measure of the burden that governments put on their citizens.

\n

Long before the internet and YouTube democratized discourse, Friedman showcased an assortment of relatively unknown radical thinkers such as economists Walter Williams and Thomas Sowell while subjecting popular left-wing intellectuals such as democratic socialist Michael Harrington, teachers union head Albert Shanker, and political scientist Frances Fox Piven to withering criticism of their ideas.

\n

Free to Choose has been translated into two dozen languages and a companion book, co-authored by Milton and his wife Rose, became a New York Times bestseller. The show began life as a response to The Age of Uncertainty, a 1977 PBS series hosted by John Kenneth Galbraith, a Harvard professor who had served as ambassador to India and was a leading evangelist for big-government liberalism.

\n

The visionary producer behind the series was Bob Chitester, a hardcore free marketer who ran the PBS affiliate in Erie, Pennsylvania, and wanted to bring libertarian ideas to mainstream audiences. \"Age of Uncertainty was an attempt to begin to use storytelling as a way to reach people, but it was a dismal failure because Galbraith was terrible,\" the 83-year-old Chitester tells Nick Gillespie in a wide-ranging conversation. \"The series just went into a black hole and disappeared. It's not like Free To Choose, which is just everywhere, even 40 years later.\" 

\n

In the 1980s, says Chitester, programs about free markets \"were really muckraking attacks on what was perceived to be abusive and unsympathetic…capitalism, where profit was all that mattered.\" Free To Choose talked about capitalism in upbeat, positive terms, stressing how it helped individuals rather than exploited them and how it brought about cooperation in a way that benefitted the poor most of all. After Free To Choose, Chitester would go on to produce more shows and collaborate with figures such as broadcaster John Stossel, economist Johan Norberg, and federal judge Douglas H. Ginsburg. His project izzit.org has delivered videos and educational materials to hundreds of thousands of K-12 classrooms around the country.

\n

Did Friedman make any mistakes in Free To Choose? His celebration of the free market miracle in Hong Kong is poignant to watch at the moment when the city's freedoms are under siege. But before his death in 2006, Chitester says Friedman came to question his famous axiom that economic freedom in autocracies such as China would inexorably give rise to political and cultural freedom. \"In a discussion close to near the end of his life, he said, 'Bob, I made a mistake. I was wrong. You [also] have to have rule of law. You have to have law that applies equally to everyone,'\" recalls Chitester. \"And clearly that's what you see not happening in China.\"

\n

Ailing from a long bout with cancer, Chitester is contemplating his own mortality and how American society has changed since Free To Choose first aired 40 years ago. He's proud that the program remains popular online but, like Friedman, feels its analysis is incomplete. \"Power is really something we have to factor into our thinking…The desire of humans to tell other humans what to do—when you couple that with equality, boy, you've got a recipe for constant problems in defending a classical liberal society.\"

","id":"1XOGTULzFlJSzHhbWVNhxP","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5800c6a2f5b5310e55131ad49733e5695c45da92","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/32cdad0c656dd835e966ce773f32e275dbc50acf","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/25f340c67e25b0fb54a1c864cbe1ed5e82fa45c1","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Bob Chitester: How Free To Choose Changed the World","release_date":"2020-10-21","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1XOGTULzFlJSzHhbWVNhxP"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4bea08c752f96b7039a53128b2e2308b8b2aac83","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The subject of the new film Mighty Ira explains why social justice warriors are wrong to attack free speech.","duration_ms":4295419,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2Vv6js60hE2KwNCtiZOtEo"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2Vv6js60hE2KwNCtiZOtEo","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In 1977, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) went to court to defend the rights of American Nazis to march through the streets of Skokie, Illinois, home to many Holocaust survivors. The ACLU defended the Nazis' right to march and won the case on First Amendment grounds, but at a high cost: 30,000 members quit the organization in protest.

\n

The Skokie case cemented the image of the ACLU as a principled, absolute defender of free speech. The following year, Ira Glasser would become the organization's executive director, a position he would hold for the next 23 years while leading the charge against government regulation of content on the Internet, hate speech laws, speech codes on college campuses, and more. Now Glasser is the subject of a new documentary, Mighty Ira, that celebrates his time at the ACLU and his legacy of protecting free speech.

\n

Retired since 2001, Glasser tells Nick Gillespie that in an age of cancel culture and wokeness, he's worried not just about the future of free expression but the future of the ACLU, too. In 2018, for instance, a leaked memo offered guidelines for case selection that retreated from the ACLU's longstanding content-neutral stance, citing as a reason to decline a case \"the extent to which the speech may assist in advancing the goals of white supremacists or others whose views are contrary to our values.\"

\n

The 82-year-old Glasser fears that in becoming more political and less absolutist when it comes to defending speech, the ACLU is shrugging off a hard-earned legacy. \"There is no social justice movement in America that has ever not needed the First Amendment to initiate its movement for justice, to sustain its movement to justice, to help its movement survive,\" he says. \"[Former Rep.] John Lewis said that without free speech and the right to dissent, the Civil Rights movement would have been a bird without wings. That's historically and politically true without exception.\"

","id":"2Vv6js60hE2KwNCtiZOtEo","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/41265191531dc4c152461451666d43fe0794f364","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/edcbc798e1c67325ace6de7de8a7735967d1da9f","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/b9ab7c79dd9922fcd0f8d82b773cb4fca1cd5a29","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Ira Glasser: Would Today's ACLU Defend the Speech Rights of Nazis?","release_date":"2020-10-14","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2Vv6js60hE2KwNCtiZOtEo"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/759c061010644df1b9abf786da5deec17fa740ce","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Lockdowns are forcing students, parents, educators, and even taxpayers to look for all sorts of alternatives to the status quo.","duration_ms":4057757,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1FRVdYEdIhLmmDtRaCaz66"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1FRVdYEdIhLmmDtRaCaz66","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

The lockdowns in response to COVID-19 have upended no part of our lives more than education, where virtually no K-12 schools are open for business with full-time, in-person instruction. The result is something approaching pandemonium for students, parents, and educators alike, all of whom are scrambling to make sense of a system that no longer seems capable of doing what it's supposed to do. 

\n

The one constant? Critiques of school choice—especially by wealthy, well-connected liberals such as Samantha Bee, the host of the popular commentary show Full Frontal on TBS. In a recent segment called \"How The School Choice Debate Is Failing Our Public Schools,\" Bee took a dark view of alternatives to traditional public schools, warning that \"private and charter schools can be especially problematic because some states have virtually no oversight over them.\"

\n

As a matter of fact, Bee is wrong, especially about charter schools, which are always overseen by either local or state education officials. But her anxiety—and that of other defenders of the status quo—is understandable: The lockdowns and forced shift to mostly virtual learning are driving massive interest in alternatives to the residential-assignment public schools most Americans have attended for decades. Angry pushback from teachers unions about going back into classrooms and the desultory quality of learning via Zoom is activating parents in a way that white papers on school reform never did.

\n

For today's podcast, Nick Gillespie speaks with Corey DeAngelis, the director of school choice for Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this website and podcast. They talk about why COVID-19 will almost certainly spur long-lasting interest in school choice and the success of the new collection DeAngelis co-edited with Neal McCluskey of the Cato Institute, School Choice Myths: Setting the Record Straight on Education Reform. In a wide-ranging conversation, they also discuss presidential contender and former Vice President Joe Biden's open antagonism toward school choice, especially charter schools, and whether President Donald Trump's warm embrace of choice is actually a mixed blessing for reformers.

","id":"1FRVdYEdIhLmmDtRaCaz66","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7a67ad1494df06cfc7530f9952c39e474a1c462e","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f024fc0aee27767114c1196627787157b2b9e17e","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5e18a867580a31a4e4ff309c34498ba634a987fe","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Corey DeAngelis: COVID-19 Is Super-Spreading School Choice","release_date":"2020-10-07","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1FRVdYEdIhLmmDtRaCaz66"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5e99b24c7458f4de17cf70a605bb1e7f11070bef","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The author of the new book Transcend updates Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs for an era of pandemics, racial strife, and extreme polarization.","duration_ms":4120581,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2V5khgdTjATUT1DnHyss0i"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2V5khgdTjATUT1DnHyss0i","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Scott Barry Kaufman is a psychologist, a podcaster, and the bestselling author of the new book Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, which updates Abraham Maslow's famous hierarchy of needs and his theories of personal fulfillment for a time of global pandemic, racial unrest, and polarized politics.

\n

In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, Kaufman discusses how self-actualization—fulfilling our personal potential and goals—intersects with contemporary debates about Black Lives Matter and racial strife, nastiness and bad-faith arguing in partisan politics, and rising rates of depression and anxiety during pandemic-related lockdowns. They also talk about how aspects of Maslow's thought map onto libertarian ideas about autonomy, individualism, freedom, and self-fulfillment.

","id":"2V5khgdTjATUT1DnHyss0i","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fc7ed18e643ba2886748262f8fbb8a0f602cf4fb","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/11a4c1727ad2e6448c2a78684580d34c6221c751","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ec5d865c33660bdfc4e1e9055ba298a5c6e1c98a","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Scott Barry Kaufman on Narcissists and Libertarians","release_date":"2020-09-30","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2V5khgdTjATUT1DnHyss0i"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/22fa0e89dc37a7d163ed3e80f773ed6b743891fe","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Libertarian presidential nominee won't win but is upbeat about Gen Z and protests against lockdowns and police violence.","duration_ms":3399471,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1PkNataALxFuNPBHJ32Fjs"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1PkNataALxFuNPBHJ32Fjs","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

\"I used to tell people the Libertarian Party is the best of both sides. We take the economic freedoms from the right and the social freedoms from the left,\" says L.P. presidential nominee Jo Jorgensen. \"I can't even say that anymore because Republicans aren't acting like Republicans and Democrats aren't acting like Democrats.\"

\n

In a recent NPR/PBSNewsHour/Marist poll, the 63-year-old Clemson psychology lecturer is pulling 5 percent, which might cover the final spread between Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

\n

Jorgensen, who is on the ballot in every state, is preaching a message of self-empowerment and autonomy that she says attracts mostly independents and people who are getting politicized for the first time. Her constituents are \"people who believe that they should be able to make their own decisions. People who believe that they should have a right to decide their child's education, which health care they want and which health care they don't want, [how] to control their retirement dollars, and that they should be able to make a choice of whether or not they wear a mask.\"

\n

In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, Jorgensen, who was the L.P.'s 1996 vice-presidential candidate, explains why she thinks Gen Z is very \"live and let live,\" why the federal government should be half its current size, why she's optimistic about the future, and how Alan Dershowitz (!) would make a great Supreme Court justice.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

","id":"1PkNataALxFuNPBHJ32Fjs","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fcbe51b1424a219163a64a63ac6d136a123eeced","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/9bef1181aa3d49c790e2bc11dd384513ebaf0424","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/b42289ef199328323948485a8703021a2976ccc4","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Jo Jorgensen: Don't Waste Your Vote on Trump or Biden","release_date":"2020-09-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1PkNataALxFuNPBHJ32Fjs"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7226cc002dd2c031257c1c06819d9320aa5df049","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"New documentary explains why installing the shah in 1953 led to ruinous American covert operations throughout the Cold War and beyond.","duration_ms":3612970,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7mvJLYucrZvHN3qqmOvy0W"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7mvJLYucrZvHN3qqmOvy0W","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Almost 70 years after a U.S.-backed coup deposed the democratically elected Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh and replaced him with Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi as the leader of Iran, relations between the two countries remain at a fever pitch. Just days ago, President Donald Trump, responding to unspecified intelligence reports, threatened that \"any attack by Iran, in any form, against the United States will be met with an attack on Iran that will be 1,000 times greater in magnitude!\"

\n

In the new documentary Coup 53, Taghi Amirani tells the story of how British and American secret agents overthrew Mossadegh after he nationalized the oil industry, starting a series of events that would lead to the rise of the autocratic, U.S.-hating Islamic regime that continues to reign to this day. Beyond its tragic effects on Iran and the Middle East, Amirani argues that the seemingly easy 1953 coup became the \"playbook\" for future U.S. covert actions in countries such as Guatemala, Vietnam, Chile, and beyond, forever changing the face of global politics.

\n

In a wide-ranging conversation about immigration, foreign policy, and filmmaking, Amirani tells Nick Gillespie that Trump's policies, like those of all U.S. leaders, are \"the product of the military-industrial complex and that, ultimately, matters more\" than whatever a president enters office thinking.

","id":"7mvJLYucrZvHN3qqmOvy0W","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5bd58ff2c004dedeb5d2379a5aa61328d330b4c1","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/cbc3a58f3d12b2827d796e9a5e5d21698ffb34ab","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/470601f71f9ddf2ae2863752dda8240b46975de5","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Taghi Amirani: How the U.S.-Backed 1953 Coup in Iran Is Still Changing Global Politics","release_date":"2020-09-16","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7mvJLYucrZvHN3qqmOvy0W"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/dedd30d21265a21b9cc8c4a7f8f30609c290eda7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Ten Global Trends Every Smart Person Should Know documents the immense, ongoing progress that politicians and media refuse to acknowledge.","duration_ms":2252591,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2oOkJiLNdDvaXynCYH3uwQ"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2oOkJiLNdDvaXynCYH3uwQ","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In the time of a global pandemic, soaring unemployment, massive wildfires, and racial strife, it feels like the world is going to hell.

\n

It's not, says Reason Science Correspondent Ronald Bailey, the coauthor (with HumanProgress.org's Marian Tupy) of Ten Global Trends Every Smart Person Should Know: And Many Others You Will Find Interesting. \"In 1820,\" Bailey tells Nick Gillespie, \"84 percent of the world's population lived on [the equivalent of] less than $1.90 a day. It took 160 years for that to get down to only 41 percent. But since then, it's now below 10 percent…and we'll probably be 5% or less by 2030.\"

\n

Bailey's new book also shows that forests are increasing in size, deaths from natural disasters are declining, and there are fewer autocratic governments than ever. He believes climate change will become a significant problem, but one that can be handled with technology and economic growth. The main reasons for massive and persistent progress are better ideas for organizing human society. \"Basically,\" he says, \"the Enlightenment happened.\" With that came the rise of representative government, property rights and markets, and especially a belief in free speech and open inquiry that are essential for technological and social innovation.

\n

If improvements are so ubiquitous, why don't we recognize it more? Bailey argues that politicians and media outlets have vested interests in focusing on bad news and that humans have a \"glitch\" that leads us to take progress as a given. \"We just take it for granted, he says. \"What we're trying to do with this book is to not let people take it for granted and [remind them], this is what has happened. And look to the future. If we keep the same institutions that enabled this, then much more of it will happen in the future.\"

","id":"2oOkJiLNdDvaXynCYH3uwQ","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/158d242fa44003f902ff5c3cba67f9de3901985f","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8dc92440e24882f461dce4f965a428614b30cfce","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fcab7ee1e41ba871f96fdf1217fa82083e7761d8","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Ronald Bailey: The World Is Getting Cleaner, Richer, and Safer","release_date":"2020-09-09","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2oOkJiLNdDvaXynCYH3uwQ"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/34efd9edc2af8084fd3a4521629bddbaec74f09a","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The podcaster and comedian offers a 12-step plan for political independence and recovery.","duration_ms":4331416,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6JGiJfx5Wz9uKXlxjmqUbE"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6JGiJfx5Wz9uKXlxjmqUbE","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

\"Democracy doesn't die in the darkness,\" writes Bridget Phetasy, \"it dies when politics become team sports, in full view of a bloodthirsty, cheering electorate.\"

\n

Phetasy is apopular podcaster, comedian, and writer who a year ago penned a great column titled \"The battle cry of the politically homeless.\" She followed it up just a few days ago with an equally powerful piece called \"Why I won't vote,\" which channels the frustration felt by the 41-percent plurality of us who are political independents. \"This is the best we've got,\" she says of presidential contenders Joe Biden and Donald Trump. \"Do I poke out my left eye? Or my right eye?\"

\n

Nick Gillespie speaks with Phetasy about what she thinks has to happen for politics to improve. A former heroin addict and recovering alcoholic, she says that Democratic and Republican hyper-partisans would benefit from some of the lessons about personal responsibility and optimism taught by Alcohol Anonymous; she even offers her own 12-step program for electoral independence and recovery. She also talks about whether Generation Z is completely post-gender, how new platforms continue to create new ways for creators and audiences to circumvent legacy media, and why things are generally getting much better culturally even if politics are getting much worse.

","id":"6JGiJfx5Wz9uKXlxjmqUbE","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/a0dc873473910b5513c5443bd576dfb05c52a71f","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/23738e37590ba056eba8b0ed957147c68efc8e38","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/22bdeccb2169a1129b1e7208ec94716a020473d8","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Bridget Phetasy: What American Politics Can Learn From Alcoholics Anonymous","release_date":"2020-09-02","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6JGiJfx5Wz9uKXlxjmqUbE"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f43d2f1bed28d6a4feaaa7b945703ec5809b735d","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Rose City has been on fire for months. Are Portland-style protests coming soon to a town near you?","duration_ms":2506815,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4iFjjudEaPqsmmer4wE5Qj"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4iFjjudEaPqsmmer4wE5Qj","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

What's behind the monthslong violent protests in Portland, Oregon, and are they coming soon to a city near you?

\n

Since the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May, demonstrators in Portland have taken to the streets every night, often smashing windows, setting buildings on fire, and scuffling with local and federal law enforcement as well as fellow city dwellers. Lately, protesters have been entering residential neighborhoods in the early morning hours, shining lights into windows and telling people to literally and figuratively \"wake up\" to a world the protesters say is made intolerable by racism, income inequality, the presidency of Donald Trump, and more.

\n

Veteran journalist Nancy Rommelmann has been covering the Portland protests for Reason. She knows Rose City like the back of her hand, having lived there for 15 years. Nick Gillespie spoke with her about the roots of the unrest in Portland, what she's learned by talking with the protesters and authorities, and what might be coming next. Rommelmann paints a disturbing picture of mostly young demonstrators who are becoming increasingly restive, prone to violent rhetoric, and unfocused in their demands.

","id":"4iFjjudEaPqsmmer4wE5Qj","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/22391c16f4dd0c44bf5c3e366c290328c782c94f","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8f5ab339a79222854df9a7f55f3673f01bed15a8","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ad96d3aa46b7abe2c89c86b31bb6ff875b2d5256","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Nancy Rommelmann: The Disturbing Drift of the Portland Protests","release_date":"2020-08-26","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4iFjjudEaPqsmmer4wE5Qj"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/00107224233f874e13fd5941c819f2b5b0623054","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A controversial new book aims to debunk \"the myths about sex and identity in our society.\" ","duration_ms":3489620,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0qFRzfmDETEwAGiaf5qQt1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0qFRzfmDETEwAGiaf5qQt1","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In a world where Facebook recognizes more than 70 sexual identities, are we really witnessing what author Debra Soh calls The End ofGender?

\n

The Toronto-based sex researcher's new book is subtitled \"debunking the myths about sex and identity in our society\" and she tells Nick Gillespie that scientific rigor is being tossed aside in the name of political activism when it comes to talking about gender differences and flashpoint issues such as allowing pre-pubescent children to transition sexually. Unapologetically \"sex-positive\" and in favor of letting consenting adults do whatever they want with their bodies, Soh worries that a new form of science denialism mostly on the left will ultimately undermine all sorts of social progress.

","id":"0qFRzfmDETEwAGiaf5qQt1","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/d503c57e19f3f6d6fe6ca844668d3ad2500735ce","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/99c474c23ac9a3b85748bbfcd0c19326462605bc","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/4d70be1aeb98abaa1a3d7d8410aaebf22defb9da","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Debra Soh: The End of Gender","release_date":"2020-08-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0qFRzfmDETEwAGiaf5qQt1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8a5e9f8272ab6982f5172b2be72fb7a63e403c25","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Fox News host explains his new self-help book The Plus, the upside of quarantine, and why he thinks Donald Trump will be reelected.","duration_ms":2178900,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4ZM0Ah9nlAcmZmUxILb8bi"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4ZM0Ah9nlAcmZmUxILb8bi","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

For years, Greg Gutfeld has entertained and edified audiences by hosting Fox News shows such as Red Eye, The Five, and The Greg Gutfeld Show and by authoring best-sellers such as How To Be Right: The Art of Being Persuasively Correct, Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War on You, and The Joy of Hate: How to Triumph over Whiners in the Age of Phony Outrage.  

\n

Now the 55-year-old punk-rock obsessive has published The Plus: Self-Help for People Who Hate Self-Help, a funny yet serious book about becoming a better person. In a wide-ranging conversation with Reason's Nick Gillespie, Gutfeld explains why he thinks Americans have so many problems controlling our worst impulses, how we will eventually emerge better off from the COVID-19 lockdowns, and why we will reelect President Donald Trump in November.

","id":"4ZM0Ah9nlAcmZmUxILb8bi","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c5215031223137aedde14c79289edc88d440a90f","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c7fbffdf3b841f290669456628d6f521c5505764","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/d11d6a8449db02ff44e2ced4621a1d8b1246e68c","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Greg Gutfeld: 'Impulse Control or Lack Thereof Is a Huge Deal Right Now'","release_date":"2020-08-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4ZM0Ah9nlAcmZmUxILb8bi"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9aeb6312debd38acf070632bb1690ee828ca60c9","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Dallas officials pulled the plug on the event just three days before it was to begin, costing the libertarian student group $200,000.","duration_ms":2092016,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/39Gn5q7Z9fqGXBjOyiYrZV"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/39Gn5q7Z9fqGXBjOyiYrZV","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Cliff Maloney, the president of the libertarian student group Young Americans for Liberty (YAL), is hopping mad. Just three days before YAL's Mobilize 2020 conference—an event with 1,400 attendees from all over the country—the city of Dallas pulled the plug on the meeting, citing worries about the spread of COVID-19.

\n

\"We had been working hand in hand with the Omni Hotel, which was our host, and the city of Dallas,\" says Maloney, who explains that his group had agreed to abide by a host of conditions insisted on by health officials, including the wearing of masks, social distancing, and serving box lunches. Though the group received a refund from the hotel, Maloney estimates YAL is out around $200,000 for other vendor and non-refundable travel fees.

\n

He's especially irked that months ago, he switched the location from Austin to Dallas on the assumption that the latter would be more business-friendly and that COVID-19 hospitalizations are declining in the Dallas metro area. \"The fire marshall approved all of our plans a week and a half ago [and] nothing has changed in the state\" in terms of new lockdown orders, says Maloney. Though he has no evidence for it, he claims that politics played a role in the last-minute cancellation, citing Mayor Eric Johnson's praise for large police-reform rallies.

\n

In a wide-ranging conversation, Maloney talks about YAL's focus on state-level races in the November election and why he is optimistic about electing a slate of \"liberty legislators\" who will help shrink the size, scope, and spending of government at the state and local levels. He's also keen on outreach to younger Americans, saying that millennials and Gen Z are particularly interested in ending wars and protecting civil liberties. \"The issues of civil liberties and peace are typically where we get people to open the door for conversation,\" Maloney tells Nick Gillespie.

","id":"39Gn5q7Z9fqGXBjOyiYrZV","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0c39c82349346cc1d8e328aef6dd78a1aa5f85df","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ca2dcc0b8e30fa7c0892ebf1c9013f549ed184f2","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7a531ca3a86fd7cd943992c500e2f54b61d12e1f","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Cliff Maloney Says Young Americans for Liberty Event Was Canceled for Political Reasons","release_date":"2020-08-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:39Gn5q7Z9fqGXBjOyiYrZV"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9b0f3158e0690b73486188a690798a59ace511ee","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The author of a new history of immigration worries that the coronavirus is bringing the mythology of America as a nation of immigrants to an end.","duration_ms":4112039,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1h0wCZls1Mt8SZwPbAWNxn"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1h0wCZls1Mt8SZwPbAWNxn","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

What will the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown of our society mean for the hundreds of thousands of foreign workers, refugees, and asylum seekers who apply annually to become Americans? Donald Trump won the presidential election in 2016 in part by vowing to \"build a wall,\" deport all unauthorized residents, and greatly reduce the number of people welcomed here legally.

\n

COVID-19, which has its origins in China, may help the president to deliver on his campaign promises. Is the mythology of America as a nation of immigrants coming to an end?

\n

A deputy national editor at The New York Times, Jia Lynn Yang is the author of the timely new book, One Mighty and Irresistible Tide: The Epic Struggle Over American Immigration, 1924–1965. The book begins at another dark moment in American immigration policy, when a restrictive law ended a long period of relatively open borders and effectively stopped mass movement to the United States for the next 40 years. It tells the story of the decades-long battle that led the U.S. to begin accepting foreigners once again. And yet almost nobody involved in that fight foresaw the extent to which the 1965 law signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson would open the door once again to large numbers of new immigrants—including Yang's family, who came here from Taiwan in the 1970s.

\n

Nick Gillespie sat down with Yang first in March and then again in May, after signs that COVID-19 pandemic could have a major effect on U.S. immigration policy, including Trump's executive order temporarily halting legal migration, a delay in asylum hearings on the Mexican border, and a federal order blocking entry of migrant children that invokes a 1940s-era law.

","id":"1h0wCZls1Mt8SZwPbAWNxn","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/a52849fb57972e0109ea937b9807ef0f93cc1979","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6925002e04335c30a8b3039c94b282230fb33cb7","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/dba7553c8ca016f0348e1036f5488e7b1d0c9899","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Jia Lynn Yang on the Immigration Law that Changed America","release_date":"2020-07-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1h0wCZls1Mt8SZwPbAWNxn"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f4b92adeed92f8bafdb80f30875b1e8102d6fee5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"\"The idea that wrongheaded, dangerous, heretical, and blasphemous ideas should be not only allowed but protected is preposterous,\" says Rauch. And yet, it's \"the single most successful social principle ever invented.\"","duration_ms":2548558,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1SxdIDdpmVJuY7f4DupAA2"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1SxdIDdpmVJuY7f4DupAA2","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

We live in a world where a Boeing executive was forced to resign over a 33-year-old article opposing the idea of women in combat and a respected art curator was pushed out of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art for saying he would \"definitely still continue to collect white artists.\" The editor of The New York Times opinion page left his job after publishing an article by Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.) and TV host Nick Cannon was fired by ViacomCBS after voicing anti-Semitic comments on his podcast.

\n

What is driving such instances of what many call \"cancel culture\"? To answer that question, Nick Gillespie turned to Jonathan Rauch—a fellow at the Brookings Institution, a contributing writer to The Atlantic, and a signatory to the recent open letter in Harper's warning that \"the free exchange of information and ideas, the lifeblood of a liberal society, is daily becoming more constricted.\"

\n

In 1993, Rauch wrote Kindly Inquisitors: The New Attacks on Free Thought, an influential defense of free speech and open inquiry that was excerpted in Reason. Is free thought under unprecedented attack? And if it is, what's driving the repression? Rauch, who is currently working on a book tentatively titled The Constitution of Knowledge, answers those questions and discusses the best way to engage censors and cancelers.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

","id":"1SxdIDdpmVJuY7f4DupAA2","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/07560404f7be979ebb64f254445fd1ed286ccfda","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/efaa62cb17e4a29d135e7ad06623f1aac5e68afc","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8a0fdb22a4d03aa033cc63d94b3e1a3b84e1093a","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Jonathan Rauch on Cancel Culture and the 'Unending Battle' for Free Speech","release_date":"2020-07-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1SxdIDdpmVJuY7f4DupAA2"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2d7b682c82ff16eebf43d4b7a544038192801751","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Fifth Column podcaster on racial identity, cancel culture, libertarianism, and Trump vs. Biden","duration_ms":4701753,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4Tw0CqHeViPfm2QlEWsKs5"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4Tw0CqHeViPfm2QlEWsKs5","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Kmele Foster is the co-founder of Freethink, a media company that showcases social and technological innovations, a co-host of the Fifth Column podcast, and an outspoken libertarian critic of Black Lives Matter, cancel culture, and political orthodoxy.

\n

In a wide-ranging, in-depth conversation with Nick Gillespie, Foster explains why he signed the Harper'sletter on cancel culture, why he thinks that racism is not the primary factor for most African Americans' success or failure, and why libertarians need to be pushing individualism now more than ever. He also talks about his video documentary company Freethink (which he co-founded with former Reason videographer Dan Hayes), which he says highlights the sorts of innovations that will \"matter in a thousand years.\"

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

","id":"4Tw0CqHeViPfm2QlEWsKs5","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fc2c7e86f5ce6ff379ae2ec42344c78e7152b8a8","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/57e1ffe5236cc51ddc1a65cabdf3d00502923b79","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f2ee7fa6127b0d598c99bfc975800a3708986ff9","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Kmele Foster: Black Lives Matter 'Is Hostile Towards Free Markets and Capitalism'","release_date":"2020-07-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4Tw0CqHeViPfm2QlEWsKs5"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/eedcaffec701c159bb0eb8e60dd5ff680ea7987b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Apocalypse Never author documents that things are getting greener and makes a case for nuclear power.","duration_ms":3730390,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5vAIeH7NjcuuBmJQK1zUv7"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5vAIeH7NjcuuBmJQK1zUv7","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

If there's one consistent message coming from activists and politicians pushing the Green New Deal and massive new subsidies for renewable energy it's that if we don't take radical action now, life on Earth as we know it will soon be irreversibly destroyed. Greta Thunberg, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.), and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden all have claimed that we have less than a dozen years left in which to save the planet.

\n

Such fear-mongering is flat-out misleading and the findings of the scientists studying global warming don't support such alarmist claims, according to the new book Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All. Michael Shellenberger argues that deforestation and deaths from extreme weather are actually declining, and concerns about environmental damage from plastics are fundamentally misplaced.

\n

Shellenberger, who began his career as an advocate for more government spending on wind and solar, was eventually disillusioned after witnessing the failure of subsidies to fix the inherent drawbacks of renewables. Named a \"Hero of the Environment\" by Time magazine in 2008, he is an \"expert reviewer\" for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, whose 2018 report has been widely misinterpreted as saying we had just 12 years to stave off catastrophic climate change. Shellenberger also appeared in the 2013 documentary Pandora's Promise, which was shown at Sundance, and featured several prominent environmentalists who have come around to see the virtues of nuclear power. 

\n

Nick Gillespie interviewed Shellenberger about Apocalypse Never and why he believes that environmentalism has become a replacement for religion in an increasingly secular world.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

\n

Photo: James Arthur Photography/James Arthur/Newscom.

","id":"5vAIeH7NjcuuBmJQK1zUv7","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/b2f3f7bd6a6b6e100fb4271df8d5e54b95b628f1","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/39793948c56f8f051eee54659b7d9d65921e4496","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6224e8eba04ab7d4f86baba686901f484351a7bd","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Michael Shellenberger: Environmental Alarmism Is Wrong and Harmful","release_date":"2020-07-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5vAIeH7NjcuuBmJQK1zUv7"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b20ebecacf8ffe2e329da106ddb38e62aad01998","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Souls of Yellow Folk author says a new \"elite consensus\" fixated on racial outrage is forming and may destroy our ability to function.","duration_ms":5525316,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4OfaVXoTDlGhiomVGf1ZtW"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4OfaVXoTDlGhiomVGf1ZtW","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

Wesley Yang is the author of the widely praised essay collection The Souls of Yellow Folk and proprietor of one of the liveliest Twitter feeds around. In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, he discusses the cultural impacts of the coronavirus lockdown and protests in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd; racism against black people, Latinos, Asians, and white ethnic people in American history; and how a totalizing and misguided attack on \"white supremacism\" came to replace a focus on ending specific racist policies and attitudes in recent years. \"Wokeness\" and \"anti-racism\" are forming a new elite consensus, Yang says, that may well undermine traditional American beliefs in a prosperous, innovative, and better future.

","id":"4OfaVXoTDlGhiomVGf1ZtW","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/adae5ef737acbe0bfeef193b769f73cb79f1d405","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/687ee0e018733423caa430c6e1f63340b3663a72","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/cde5bb1f8f903d655c887438b89acc17257472a7","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Wesley Yang: Woke Protests Against 'White Supremacism' May Be the New Normal","release_date":"2020-07-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4OfaVXoTDlGhiomVGf1ZtW"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/155a61acc484820062005a684b0cedae7f83e1f3","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Brown University economist says prejudice and systemic racism are not the primary problems facing African Americans.","duration_ms":3691598,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2Z3glbxFcCyPgZh7IPSwZB"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2Z3glbxFcCyPgZh7IPSwZB","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, protests have erupted around the country, calling attention to racial disparities in the way that black people are treated by the criminal justice system and by American society more generally.

\n

Brown University's Glenn Loury has emerged as one of the most vocal and outspoken critics of Black Lives Matter and other groups arguing that systemic racism is at the center of the African American experience in the United States today. Loury worries that our institutions are failing \"to affirm the primacy of reason over violence in calibrating our reactions to the supposed 'oppression,'\" as he wrote in response to an open letter from his school's administrators that highlighted \"anger\" at what they called an \"ongoing epidemic of racism.\"

\n

The 72-year-old professor—the first African American to be granted tenure in Harvard's economics department back in the 1970s—talked with Reason via Zoom about how the U.S. has changed for the better over his lifetime, why understanding history is vital to social change, and whether rational discourse has any purchase in social and political debates.

","id":"2Z3glbxFcCyPgZh7IPSwZB","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c870f00e16399327a9880f0ea249ec64aa9e89ba","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7fb3e21bbcd3432adb047cc2dfa583568b591547","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/cb29b57f4aa24101a9a6497c41f3d3ba09c5b53b","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Glenn Loury on Police Abuse, Systematic Racism, and Hysteria","release_date":"2020-06-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2Z3glbxFcCyPgZh7IPSwZB"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/09f2ecffe887e406de3f890e3b18d39947468620","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The heterodox hosts of the popular Blocked and Reported podcast talk about surviving internet outrage, the roots of speech repression, and the power of direct financial support from fans.","duration_ms":3512790,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/656I5PBGgOOnQzAeZ4Qh6p"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/656I5PBGgOOnQzAeZ4Qh6p","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In today's podcast, Nick Gillespie talks with Katie Herzog and Jesse Singal, two controversial, heterodox journalists in their late 30s who have been \"canceled\" multiple times for writing articles that have inflamed trans activists (go here and here), defended young adult novelists from would-be censors, and blamed Elizabeth Warren (rather than sexism) for the failure of her presidential campaign.

\n

Though Herzog lives in Washington state and Singal in New York City, the pair produces the popular new show Blocked and Reported, \"a podcast about internet nonsense.\" In a wide-ranging conversation with Gillespie, they talk about the growing repression of speech among progressives, the roots of and fixes to \"cancel culture,\" how identity politics stifles open inquiry and honest disagreement, and surviving the collapse of alt-weeklies. They also talk about the liberating effect of Patreon, the online platform that allows creators to generate subscription revenue directly from fans (Blocked and Reported currently raises more than $8,000 per month from over 1,400 supporters).

","id":"656I5PBGgOOnQzAeZ4Qh6p","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c4a3e057db03edf457fdfcb42f65b4397c6ecc00","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/3633595cf073db6fe14037827341a7a982c2b8f5","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/b6cfabe8633978ba3bda0e7c82063fc258e58d13","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Katie Herzog and Jesse Singal on Left-Wing Cancel Culture","release_date":"2020-06-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:656I5PBGgOOnQzAeZ4Qh6p"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/af61946a7e83c516633441e57b7f67bd777f1669","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"How to reduce police killings and enact lasting change.","duration_ms":3021375,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0Vd9n19wRxHlZCiGa3GQuw"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0Vd9n19wRxHlZCiGa3GQuw","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

George Floyd's death at the hands of the Minneapolis police has sparked nationwide protests against police brutality. A new consensus is forming around the urgent need for criminal justice reform.

\n

Six years ago, after the police killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, just 43 percent of Americans believed that such incidents indicated a systemic problem. Now, though police killings have remained level since 2014, 69 percent of Americans agree that \"the killing of Floyd represents a broader problem within law enforcement.\"

\n

To better understand this shift and to get a sense of what changes would be most effective, Nick Gillespie sat down with Washington Post opinion writer Radley Balko, a former Reason reporter who covers police abuse, the drug war, and criminal justice reform. His Reason coverage of Cory Maye, a black man in Mississippi put on death row for killing a police officer during a no-knock raid, helped bring about Maye's acquittal, and his books Rise of The Warrior Cop and The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist document widespread problems with law enforcement, expert testimony, and media coverage of crime.

","id":"0Vd9n19wRxHlZCiGa3GQuw","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/91cdb6e30960dc5bed31b5046b2a2c4a253effee","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/290b45e2e8f8fdec36f76c7e4a08a0efaf745219","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f322ab1fab3ef44d48a368c8333872a915590237","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Radley Balko on George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and the Libertarian Case for Criminal Justice Reform","release_date":"2020-06-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0Vd9n19wRxHlZCiGa3GQuw"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f19dd381575e8df57257f09903fcf6607fadfd81","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The Ogilvy ad man and Alchemy author says Ludwig von Mises is his hero and that efficiency has nothing to do with free markets.","duration_ms":2100793,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5qVXOJY98Td56QMv0TiXkk"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5qVXOJY98Td56QMv0TiXkk","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

With unemployment around 13 percent and talk of recession—or even depression—in the air, libertarian ideals of free minds and free markets need champions now more than ever.

\n

Rory Sutherland, the vice chairman of the legendary global advertising agency Ogilvy UK, may seem like an unlikely defender of capitalism, but he is one of its most persuasive and engaging.

\n

Sutherland calls the stentorian Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises his hero and celebrates not capitalism's ruthless efficiency and capacity to outproduce a command economy but its ability to create seemingly trivial products such as Red Bull and to transform the disgusting-sounding Patagoniantoothfish into the delicacy known as Chilean sea bass.

\n

Fittingly enough, Sutherland's latest book is called Alchemy: The Dark Art and Curious Science of Creating Magic in Brands, Business, and Life. It explains why the real genius of capitalism isn't maximizing output but the ways in which creative destruction fulfills desires we never knew we had, allowing us to become whatever we want to be. He's a critic of economistic thinking on the right and the left that reduces all human activity to mere utility and material considerations.

","id":"5qVXOJY98Td56QMv0TiXkk","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f0c6e33631618c7e06a6aa38f5a12b11e28fb9bb","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fac01e5cf82511ebf001ed2880b03791685c7d3a","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5385dca337830f9ad3513e8561c90e82a2ee79ee","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Rory Sutherland on How Red Bull Explains Why Capitalism Is Great","release_date":"2020-06-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5qVXOJY98Td56QMv0TiXkk"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/dc4fb2c0947195d16ef996479315b33fd6c2953a","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Princeton political scientist Omar Wasow says violent protests helped Richard Nixon win the presidency in 1968.","duration_ms":2963592,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2nEKzoFjrhTZb7VnFVaqWt"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2nEKzoFjrhTZb7VnFVaqWt","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, protests have erupted around the country. Some of these have turned violent and resulted in injuries to citizens and police as well as looting and property damage.

\n

Cities have implemented curfews and other restrictions on movement, further stoking tensions that were already present due to the coronavirus lockdown, the start of summer, and a 15 percent unemployment rate.

\n

The last time the nation faced this level of social unrest was 1968, the year that Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy were assassinated.

\n

To help us make sense of the current moment and figure out where it could lead, Nick Gillespie spoke with Omar Wasow, a political scientist at Princeton, who has studied how protests of the 1960s affected public opinion, social discourse, and voting patterns.

\n

Will today's protests make policing reform more or less likely? Is it possible that violence in the streets will boost Donald Trump's reelection chances—just as events in 1968 helped put Richard Nixon in the White House?

\n

Wasow's research also looks at the nature of police misconduct, analyzing whether headline-grabbing incidents such as the horrific killings of Eric Garner and Tamir Rice are the result of a few bad apples or a systemic problem with law enforcement in minority communities.

\n

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

\n

Photo: Joi Ito

","id":"2nEKzoFjrhTZb7VnFVaqWt","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/66aa5141e3a00e3feeacaba1707c36c7f9124e0e","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/c6eb39d863d7b907e75d7b6d3dd96eb4611b3b7e","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/59d4496d554dffbf9cb16209f2110376b61df78d","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"How Protests Over George Floyd's Death and Police Brutality Could Help Trump Win Reelection","release_date":"2020-06-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2nEKzoFjrhTZb7VnFVaqWt"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5dffb132ccfa8ddeb65019a9148846f56de70c06","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"National security journalist Barton Gellman talks about \"the surveillance-industrial state,\" the possibility of a Biden presidency or a second Trump term, and his gripping new book.","duration_ms":3152901,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0EepLfJXFf2yS43izRtrmt"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0EepLfJXFf2yS43izRtrmt","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

In 2013, Barton Gellman of The Washington Post started publishing stories about what he called the \"surveillance-industrial state\" based on documents given to him by former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden. Along with work done by filmmaker Laura Poitras and journalist Glenn Greenwald, Gellman's exposés laid bare an extensive and previously unacknowledged network by which the federal government systematically and illegally spied on American citizens and routinely circumvented checks on its power.

\n

Gellman has just published Dark Mirror: Edward Snowden and the American Surveillance State, which tells the story of his interactions with the whistleblower, bureaucrats, politicians, and the media as he helped reveal one of the biggest secrets in U.S. history. Nick Gillespie spoke with him about his new book and earlier, Pulitzer Prize-winning work that revealed how Donald Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney, and others in the Bush administration exceeded constitutional limits in the name of prosecuting the war on terror.

\n

They also discuss national surveillance in light of the two major-party presidential candidates, Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Former heads of intelligence services are \"much less sanguine about the government accumulating this enormous machinery of surveillance\" with Trump in the White House because they openly acknowledge \"it is subject to horrific potential abuse,\" says Gellman. At the same time, he stresses that Biden, who served in the Senate for decades and eight years as vice president under President Barack Obama, \"has not been an apostle of transparency in the national security world. He was a strong backer of the prosecution of whistleblowers and leakers in the Obama administration and there were more prosecutions with charges of espionage against people who talked to journalists during the Obama administration than in all previous administrations combined, which had a chilling effect on national security reporting.\"

","id":"0EepLfJXFf2yS43izRtrmt","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/fbe45d0bc6f1e100b64747b0fda71ee074a55e08","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2392a93f8c024821146482ccb6fae05ec8a7ed21","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6eb3a03aeedba22490c03cffd63d93a0235e545e","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Edward Snowden, the Surveillance State, and the 'Dark Mirror' Still Watching Us All","release_date":"2020-05-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0EepLfJXFf2yS43izRtrmt"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/68e5c0b3e2c950e447dc4756ed5f073b7850a59e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The longtime activist is the front-runner for the L.P. presidential nomination and has a special message to young people.","duration_ms":3692016,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4vbZGHCe7ifu9ELIYkN7xd"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4vbZGHCe7ifu9ELIYkN7xd","html_description":"
\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t
\n\t\t

\"I'm running for president because I want to live in a free society,\" says Jacob Hornberger, the founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation. With Michigan Rep. Justin Amash's withdrawal from the race for the Libertarian Party (L.P.) presidential nomination, Hornberger is the front-runner as the voting process gets underway on Friday, May 22.

\n

Born and raised in Laredo, Texas, and a lawyer by training, Hornberger's platform is straightforward, concise, and doctrinaire: He unapologetically stands for open immigration, free trade, an end to non-defensive military interventions and what he calls the national security state, the legalization of all drugs, and the replacement of the income tax and the IRS with voluntary payments to fund the government. In a wide-ranging conversation with Nick Gillespie, Hornberger also discussed some of his outlier beliefs—he believes that Franklin Roosevelt goaded Japan into bombing Pearl Harbor so the United States could enter World War II and that Lee Harvey Oswald was \"framed\" for the assassination of John F. Kennedy. He also goes into detail about how his Catholicism informs his policy positions (he is anti-abortion, but says the federal government has no jurisdiction in the matter and favors suasion over laws to reduce its occurrence).

\n

At 70 years old, Hornberger would be the youngest nominee for president among the country's three biggest parties. He says his campaign will not only be boldly and unapologetically libertarian but focused on younger Americans. \"My message,\" says Hornberger, \"is I trust you, I trust you with your freedom. Right now, the government is taking out of your paychecks $2 trillion a year just for Medicare and Social Security. What they're saying to you by taking this money out of your paycheck is: 'You're bad people. You cannot be trusted to handle your own money. You'll turn your backs on your parents, you'll turn your backs on the needy.' I'm saying, bull! Keep your money, cut out the middleman…I trust you to handle this on your own.\"

","id":"4vbZGHCe7ifu9ELIYkN7xd","images":[{"height":360,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/6f2795d65c3b399a1eed632637f4ef9d4920d2dc","width":640},{"height":169,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/7b9f9e36dcb06763e2d79e6d0da9d7680eb63a5e","width":300},{"height":36,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/97a5ae64549be8adbf73dbe8b578843970b99a15","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"L.P. Presidential Candidate Jacob Hornberger Wants 'To Live in a Free Society'","release_date":"2020-05-20","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4vbZGHCe7ifu9ELIYkN7xd"}],"limit":50,"next":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/69l53aQZ3VjbESh7tqHM4j/episodes?offset=50&limit=50&market=US","offset":0,"previous":null,"total":100},"explicit":true,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/show/69l53aQZ3VjbESh7tqHM4j"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/69l53aQZ3VjbESh7tqHM4j","id":"69l53aQZ3VjbESh7tqHM4j","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/548439e83726703fb68a059235dc1b7f065bebf6","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/ee0b5fa5b8f4535b85517ea76f1b3a46460fa59a","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/0a19f74b684f302e4692486f9514de36ffb3d4fe","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"languages":["en"],"media_type":"audio","name":"The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie","publisher":"The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie","total_episodes":100,"type":"show","uri":"spotify:show:69l53aQZ3VjbESh7tqHM4j"};