Creating a Family: Talk about Adoption & Foster Care

Creating a Family

Are you thinking about adopting or fostering a child? Confused about all the options and wondering where to begin? Or are you an adoptive or foster parent trying to be the best parent possible to your precious child? This is the podcast for you! Every week we interview leading experts for an hour talking about the topics you really care about in deciding whether to adopt/foster or how to be a better parent. This podcast is produced by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are the national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content: weekly podcasts, weekly articles/blog posts, resource pages on all aspects of family building at our website CreatingAFamily.org. We also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter.

All Episodes

Have you ever thought that it would be a lot more effective if the therapist could really see your child in action? That's the gist of home-based therapy. We talk with Stephanie Glickman, a licensed clinical social worker at the Clinical Director of the Family Centered Treatment Foundation and an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina Charlotte's School of Social Work.In this episode, we cover:What is home-based therapy?Is it family therapy or child therapy?Why is it so effective for families struggling with behavioral issues?What type of issues respond well to in-home therapy?What does the research show about the effectiveness of home-based therapy vs. residential placement?How does in-home therapy work? How often does the therapist come? How long do they stay? How long does it need to continue?What if the child does not act out while the therapist is in the home?Who in the home participates in home-based therapy? Parents? Siblings? Others?Are their confidentiality concerns with this type of therapy?What are some of the advantages and disadvantages to home-based therapy?How does the cost of this therapy compare to office-based therapy?Does Medicaid cover home-based therapy? How do you find an in-home therapist that is knowledgeable about adoption and fostering and the trauma these kids may have experienced?What are some tips for knowing if you have found a good fit between the therapist and your family?Family Centered Treatment FoundationThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Nov 24

45 min 16 sec

Do your child's reactions seem bigger than they should be to everyday events? Are your reactions sometimes a bit too big? What causes us to get triggered by our kids or to trigger them? We talk with Dr. Tripp Ake, a licensed psychologist with over 20 years of experience in the field of child trauma treatment. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and the program director for the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. In this episode, we cover:What do we mean by “triggering” and how does it differ from getting our buttons pushed?What’s the difference between being triggered and being annoyed or irritated?How to become a trauma detective?What types of things can trigger a child?How much of having our “buttons pushed” stems from the belief that our child’s behavior is a reflection on us as parents? How do the belief systems that we grow up with impact us as adults? We may not even be aware that hold these values and may not even agree with them.How can we identify the things in our past that make us likely to be triggered?Examples of things parents have told us drives them to distraction (aka triggers them).WhiningDisrespectTwo universal parenting tips for improving a child’s behavior.National Child Traumatic Stress Network This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Nov 17

51 min 10 sec

Trauma can impact almost every single aspect of a child's development. But there are things parents can do to buffer that impact. We talk with Brett Loftis, CEO of Crossnore Communities for Children and Dr. Dawn O'Malley, Crossnore's Senior Director of Clinical Services.In this episode, we cover:How can trauma impact a child’s attachment and relationships?How does this impact them in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood?How can trauma affect a child’s physical development or brain development?How can trauma impact a child’s emotional development?Self-regulationDisassociationHow does trauma impact the way the child sees and values herself?How can trauma affect a child’s behavior? How can trauma impact a child’s ability to learn?What are some of the long-term physical health consequences of having been exposed to trauma as a child?What can parents and other adults do to build resilience in our kids to help withstand some of the impacts of trauma?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Nov 10

48 min 8 sec

We talk with Corey Burke, an embryologist and Tissue Bank Director at Cryos International-USA and Dr. Mark Trolice, Reproductive Endocrinologist and Director of The IVF Center in Orlando and Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine, and author of The Fertility Doctor's Guide to Overcoming Infertility about decisions doctors and patient have to make concerning eggs or embryos after retrieval.In this episode, we cover:Overview of the IVF Process.What determines how many eggs will be produced?What number of eggs is ideal for an egg retrieval as part of IVF? Are more eggs always better?Once eggs are retrieved, one of the choices a patient and doctor have to make is whether to freeze eggs vs. embryos.Compare the challenges between freezing eggs vs freezing embryos.How does vitrification differ from other methods of freezing?What is the thaw rate success for frozen eggs compared to frozen embryos?Why are eggs more difficult to vitrify than embryos?Does the quality of the eggs retrieved factor into the decision?What are the advantages to the patient of freezing eggs rather than embryos? What are the advantages to the patient of freezing embryos rather than eggs?How many eggs is usually recommended for a woman to freeze to have a good chance of being able to create a viable embryo?Can genetic testing be done on eggs?How long can human eggs remain viable if frozen vs. the viability of frozen embryos?If embryos are created, one of the choices a patient and doctor have to make is whether to transfer fresh or frozen embryos. How does genetic testing impact fresh vs frozen?What are the advantages to the patient of transferring fresh embryos?What are the advantages to the patient of transferring frozen embryos?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire infertility patients and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Nov 3

48 min 3 sec

Are adoptive parents eligible for parental leave? What about foster parents or kinship parents? We talk with Dr. Amy Beacom and Sue Campbell, with the Center for Parental Leave Leadership and co-authors of The Parental Leave Playbook.In this episode, we cover:What are the laws and rules surrounding parental leave in the US?Who is eligible for parental leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)?Parental leave on the company level.How does parental leave differ from maternity leave or paternity leave?Policies that require employees to pay back their parental leave if they do not stay employed with the company/organization for a certain period of time. How does this differ from other countries?Are the laws/rules different for mothers and fathers? Are they gender neutral?Do you receive your salary when you are on parental leave?Does parental leave differ for someone adopting a child?Are adoptive families protected under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)?Are birth mothers eligible for parental leave?Does there have to be a legal relationship between the parent and the child? Does parental leave differ for someone fostering a child? Are you eligible for parental leave with every new foster placement?Can kinship caregivers receive parental leave?The Parental Leave Playbook lays out a process for approaching parental leave in three phases: preparing for your leave, during leave, and returning from leave.What steps should you take to be successful in each phase?To support the Paid Leave for All Act This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Oct 27

51 min 1 sec

We talk about raising your grandkids with Christine Adamec, coauthor with Dr. Andrew Adesman, of The Grandfamily Guidebook. She and her husband have been raising their teenage grandson since his infancy.In this episode, we cover:Why are grandparent led families increasing?What are some common emotions that grandparents and other kin experience when they realize that they need to step in and raise their grandchildren or other kin?What type of decisions should you make about legal custody or permanency? How to protect your grandchild? How to enroll them in school? How to be able to get medical and mental health care for them? How to prevent the child’s parents from removing the child from your home? Becoming a foster parent? A will?What are some of the strains that grandparents can experience with their children (the parents of their grandchildren)?How to navigate the relationship with your adult child? Explaining the situation to the child? (“Why am I living with you and not my parents?”)Raising kids that likely experience trauma, including prenatal exposure.Adjusting to parenting in this new time. Some of the joys of raising your grandchild.Resources:AARP has a Benefits QuickLINK tool to find out if you or your grandchild may qualify for 15 public benefits — 10 for adults and families and five for children.Creating a Family podcast: Helping Parents & Kids Manage Phones, Internet, & GamingThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Oct 20

55 min 47 sec

Talking with your adopted or foster child about the hard parts of their story can feel like a daunting task. Should you tell your child that her birth father is in jail or that her birth mother is addicted to drugs, or that she was conceived by rape? If so, how in the world do you share this news. We talk with Lesli Johnson, an EMDR therapist who specializes in adoption and foster care and an adult adoptee; and Susan Myers, a licensed Master Social Worker with Adoptions from the Heart Adoption Agency with offices throughout the northeast.In this episode, we cover:Should you tell your child these difficult parts of their history? Talking about the hard parts of adoptionHow should you tell your child these hard parts of their background?How do you lay the groundwork with young children in order to fill in the details later?By what age should you have shared all of your child’s story with him?Give specific examples of how a conversation might go with a preschooler, and how would you fill in the gaps for a 6 year old, 10, 13 year old, etc.Child abuse AddictionParent in jailCan you use a lifebook to talk about rape, imprisonment, drug and alcohol addiction?What is a lifebook and what should be included in a lifebook?How to use a lifebook when there is jail, rape, abuse, etc in the child’s story?Specifically, how should parents tell their child that they were conceived during a rape?Oversharing can happen with both parents and with children.It’s tempting when your child is an infant to tell people private information. Why should foster and adoptive parents avoid this?When might it be important to share some details of the child’s background?How do you help your child understand how much of his story he should share with others outside the family?How can adoptive parents help their children understand that they are more than the hard parts of their history and that they are not doomed to repeat their birth parents’ mistakes?Additional Resources:Telling the Truth to Your Adopted or Foster Child: Making Sense of the Past, by Betsy Keefer  and Jayne E. SchoolerTalking with Children about Difficult History,  by Holly van Gulden Lifebooks: Creating a Treasure for the Adopted Child (2nd Edition September 21, 2011), by Beth O'Malley M.EdThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Oct 13

49 min 12 sec

Primary Ovarian Insufficiency is a difficult and little understood diagnosis for infertility with ramifications for your general health as well as for your fertility. We talk with Dr. Alex Quaas, a Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist with Reproductive Partners of San Diego and an Associate Professor at UCSD.In this episode, we cover:What is Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?Is there a difference between the labels/diagnoses - Primary Ovarian Insufficiency, Premature Ovarian Failure, Premature Menopause? What are the symptoms (other than an inability to get pregnant)?Is there a decrease in egg quality and increase chromosomal abnormalities?How is POI diagnosed?How does the diagnosis differ from PCOS?What causes primary ovarian insufficiency?Is there any correlation between POI and taking Accutane (a treatment for acne) as a teen?Is there a link between premature ovarian failure and the HPV vaccine (Gardasil or Cervarix)?Can losing one ovary lead to Primary Ovarian Insufficiency?Are those with autoimmune diseases more susceptible to POI?Can IVF lead to Primary Ovarian Insufficiency? Is there any evidence that aggressive stimulation of the ovaries during a typical IVF cycle can contribute to POI?How effective is IVF with woman with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency? What are the odds of a spontaneous pregnancy for a woman with POI?What is the role of the infertility nurse in helping women with POI?Is there a medical way to slow down the diminution of ovarian egg reserves?Are their lifestyle choices that contribute to POI or contribute to increasing a woman’s ovarian reserves?Are there supplements or vitamins that help improve fertility for women with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency?Has alternative medical approaches or Eastern Medicine been effective with increasing fertility for women with POI?What are the other health implications for women with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire infertility patients and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Oct 6

49 min 5 sec

What are some tried and true ways to afford adoption? In this episode, we talk with Julie Gumm, author of  You Can Adopt Without Debt: Creative Ways to Cover the Cost of Adoption. We cover ways to find “extra” money that you can put towards your adoption, ideas for increasing your savings, and reasons to be cautious about asking for donations to pay for an adoption.In this episode, we cover:How much do adoptions cost for families adopting in the US?Julie’s story of how they afforded to adoptWhat are the different options for paying for an adoption? Savings, second job, sell things, grants, fundraise, ask for money from family and friendsHow to effectively save money? - “Start with the money you already have”How long in advance do you need to start?Federal Adoption Tax Credit State Adoption Tax Credit, Adoption Employee BenefitsSecond job and freelance ideasDownside of adding additional work to your scheduleSelling items you have but don’t use much or don’t needFundraising to help pay for an adoption. Controversial in some adoption circlesDifference between offering a service or event vs. asking for moneyThings to be aware of when deciding on how to fundraise for adoption.  Dangers of oversharing your child’s story in order to raise moneyThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Sep 29

1 hr 5 min

We talk about the challenges of adopting, fostering, IVF, or third-party reproduction while being in the military. We talk with the co-founders of the Military Family Building Coalition, Katy Bell Hendrickson and Ellen Gustafson.In this episode, we cover:What are the challenges of being in the military and trying to adopt?What are the challenges of being in the military when seeking fertility treatmentMilitary health insurance: Tri CareMilitary Family Building Coalition https://www.militaryfamilybuilding.org/What does Military Family Building Coalition do?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Sep 22

53 min 44 sec

Kinship caregivers (primarily grandparents raising their grandchildren) are often functioning as a shadow foster care system. We talk with Josh Gupta-Kagan, a Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina School of Law and author of America’s Hidden Foster Care System in the Stanford Law Review, and Karissa Phelps, a Stoneleigh Emerging Leader Fellow at Temple Legal Aid, where she provides legal representation and services to kinship caregivers.In this episode, we cover:In many cases, child protection agencies induce parents to transfer physical custody of their children to kinship caregivers by threatening to place the children in foster care.How often does this happen?Why do you call this the “hidden” foster care system?Generally speaking, don’t we consider it best practice for kids to remain with extended family? So why is this a problem? Is it inherently coercive?What are the advantages to encouraging placement with kin before they enter the formal foster care system?What are the risks?If this transfer takes place outside of the system, how long does it last? How can children go home? Who decides?How does this differ from informal kinship care?How does The Family First Prevention Services Act of 2018 contribute to the “hidden foster care system”?Do you see kinship placements increasing?What are child welfare agencies doing to support kinship families? Follow the money: Is it less expensive for agencies to place with kin rather than unrelated foster parents?How is foster care funded?What is the status of kinship navigator programs? How can we best support kinship families?What do you see as the biggest challenges to kinship families? This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog posts Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Sep 15

58 min 2 sec

The trauma of racism impacts our children's physical and emotional health. In this episode, we talk with Dr. Roger Harrison, a clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University and a pediatric psychologist in the Division of Behavioral Health at Nemours/Alfred I DuPont Hospital for Children; Dr. Lonna Gordon, the Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine at Nemours Children’s Hospital in Florida. She is board certified in pediatrics, adolescent medicine and obesity medicine; and Cindy Bo, Senior Vice President, Delaware Valley Strategy and Business Development and Interim DRIVE Enterprise Leader.In this episode, we cover:We talk a lot about the impact of trauma on children and often we do so in the context of neglect, loss, abuse, removal from biological family, and prenatal exposure. Today we are going to expand the concept of trauma to include the impacts of racism.What is racism and what are the different forms it can take? Examples of the different types of racism.Does racism impact the physical health of minorities? Racism hurting the emotional health of minorities.In other forms of trauma we can see that the impact on the child varies depending on many factors, such as who was responsible for inflicting the trauma and that persons relationship to the child, the child’s age, and the child’s basic temperament. Is the same true for the traumatic impacts of racism?Internalized racismCumulative impact of different types of trauma.Are children of color being raised by white parents more vulnerable to the traumatic impacts of racism? Does the trauma of racism differ depending on the race or ethnicity of the child or person? Model minority?Are non-minority children also impacted negatively by racism?How can we help children of color cope with racism and not be unduly impacted by the trauma?Suggested books and activities.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Sep 8

1 hr

What do you need to know about uterine fibroids if you want to get pregnant? We talk with Dr. Desiree McCarthy-Keith, is the Medical Director of Shady Grove Fertility Atlanta and a Board Certified OB/GYN and Reproductive Endocrinologist. She also has a Master of Public Health in maternal and child health. She has been listed in Atlanta Magazine’s Top Doctors for Infertility from 2017-2021 and as one of Black Health Magazine’s Most Influential African American Doctors.In this episode, we cover:What are uterine fibroids?What are the main symptoms of fibroids?Who is most at risk for having fibroids?Is there a genetic connection to uterine fibroids? Do fibroids pass through families?Why do some fibroids grow very slowly and others rapidly? Is the speed the fibroid is growing something to worry about? How should women track this?Are fibroids always a problem requiring treatment?How to diagnoses fibroids.Symptom distinction between endometriosis and fibroid?What is the best way to medically treat uterine fibroids?Are their alternative medicinal treatments that have been seen to be effective at treating uterine fibroids?When is a hysterectomy the preferred treatment?Skill of surgeon is important when using a surgical treatment. How can a patient determine the surgeon’s skill?Can fibroids cause infertility?Impact of fibroids on pregnancy?What happens to fibroids during pregnancy? If a woman knows she has fibroids, what should she be aware of when she is pregnant?Are their lifestyle factors that contribute to having fibroids or worsening fibroids once you have them?Does diet affect fibroids?Are women with fibroids at a higher risk for uterine cancer or reproductive tract cancers?What other routine medical treatment should women with fibroids make sure they receive?What can infertility nurses do to help patients with fibroid.Other health issues associated with fibroids.Are tampons safe to use? Do they cause or contribute to fibroids? Are the sponge and cup safe to use or better to use?What happens to fibroids after menopause?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org.  Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Sep 1

52 min

Do you have a child that is more—more loud, more energetic, more argumentative, more everything? Intense children can be harder to raise, but their intensity is a gift as well as a parenting challenge. We talk with Howard Glasser, creator of the Nurtured Heart Approach to parenting. He is the author of Transforming the Difficult Child and Transforming the Intense Child Workbook.In this episode, we cover:What do you consider to be an intense child? My child was “more”—more loud, more energy—their reaction to most things was simply more. They go from 5 mph to 60mph in about a second. What are the labels and diagnoses that intense children often accumulate? ADHD, ODD (Oppositional Defiance Disorder), conduct disorder, PTSD, anxiety disorder, depression.What makes some kids more “intense” than others? What do you mean by energy-challenged kids? Unable to handle or effectively control their physical, cognitive or emotional energy. They have a disorder of self-control. They have more energy than they have self-control.Energy is a gift as well as a challenge.You mention in Transforming the Difficult Child that many intense or difficult kids love video games—more so than the average child. I’ve noticed this too. Why? Structure-while I think all children need structure, the high intensity child really needs structure. Positive forms of structure vs. negative forms of structureTraditional parenting techniques did not work well for my intense little wonder. Your approach to raising an intense child is based on your Nurturing Heart Approach as outlined in your book, Transforming the Difficult Child and Transforming the Intense Child Workbook. What are the basic principles of this approach to parenting? The 3 strands.Strand 1: Refuse to energize the negative. What are some of the challenges parents face when applying this? What are some common ways we might accidentally energize the negative?Strand 2: Energize the positive. active recognition, experiential recognition, proactive recognition, creative recognition.Is there a problem with too much praise?Strand 3: Absolute clarity on limits and consequences. How to set limits?Intensity is not something that a person outgrows.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Aug 25

46 min 10 sec

Have you ever thought about becoming a foster parent but didn't know where to begin? This is the show for you! We talk with Vicki Ochoa, State Director for South Carolina MENTOR, an organization that provides an array of child and family services, on the ins and outs of becoming a foster parent.In this episode, we cover:Why should you become a foster parent?What is the role of a foster parent?What are the expectations of what a foster parent will do?How to become a foster parent.How do you get licensed to be a foster parent?How much training is required?What type of ongoing training is required?Do you have to own your home? How big does your house need to be?How many kids can you have already in your home?What agency can you work with to become licensed?Who places the child with you?What are the needs of kids in foster care?How is the decision made as to which child or children should be placed in your home?Can you specify the age, gender, # of kids, and degree of special need of the child you want to foster?What type of help should the agency provide for you after the child is in your home?If you have a choice, how do you choose a foster agency to work with? How much voice do foster parents have on what happens to the child?Do foster parents get paid?Can you adopt your foster child?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

E

Aug 18

45 min 11 sec

How can we raise children who are resilient and able to bounce back from the ups and downs of life and move forward with optimism and confidence? In this episode, we talk with Dr. Ken Ginsburg, the Co-Founder and Director of Programs at the Center for Parent and Teen Communications, a Professor of Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and The University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, and author or “Building Resilience in Children and Teens” and “Raising Kids to Thrive”.In this episode, we cover:What is resilience and why is it important. Resilience is the ability to bounce back and the capacity to rise above difficult circumstances, allowing our children to exist in this less-than-perfect world, while moving forward with optimism and confidence.What are the biggest challenges in creating resilience in children?Raising resilient kidsWe want our kids to be successful. What is Success- how does it relate to happiness?The importance of imagining the person we want our child to be at 35. How to take the long view of parenting?How to Foster Resilience in Children / What are the two fundamental principles of building resilience in our children? Young people will be resilient when the important adults in their lives believe in them unconditionally and hold them to high expectations.Unconditional love is key to resilience. It gives children the deep-seated security that allows them to take chances when they need to adapt to new circumstances and the knowledge that in the long run all will be okay.What do we mean by hold them to high expectations?What are the 7 crucial ingredients to building resilience in our kids/raising resilient kids: strategies to build the seven crucial “Cs” — competence, confidence, connection, character, contribution, coping, and control.How does trauma impact resilience?Resources mentioned in this episode: https://parentandteen.com/category/for-teens/This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Aug 11

53 min 35 sec

Can problems in our immune system cause infertility, miscarriage, or premature birth? Today we talk with Reproductive Endocrinologist Dr. Daniel Stein, Director of RMA of New York’s Westside office and Chief of Reproductive Endocrinology at Mount Sinai West Hospital, about the impact our immune system has on our fertility.In this episode, we cover:In what ways are our immune system and reproductive system linked?Why does the woman’s immune system not react to the presence of a fetus?Autoimmune diseases-how do they impact fertility and miscarriage or premature birthWhat are the most common auto-immune diseases? (lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, Crohn’s Disease, Hashimoto's disease, celiac disease, endometriosis, premature ovarian insufficiency)Are autoimmune mechanisms involved in infertility disorders such as premature ovarian failure or diminished ovarian reserves, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), unexplained infertility, and repeatedly unsuccessful IVF attempts and may be responsible for the pathophysiology of preeclampsia or spontaneous abortions?EndometriosisPremature ovarian insufficiencyImpact of auto-immune diseases on pregnancy complications, miscarriage, and still births.What is antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and do they impact fertility or miscarriageMucosal immunity of the female genital tract? Female immune system reacting to sperm.What are anti-seminal/sperm antibodies in men and women?Can a woman be allergic to sperm?What role does our microbiome play in our immunity?What role does our microbiome play in fertility? What are natural killer cells?Does infertility treatment, such as IVF, affect a woman’s immune system?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Aug 4

49 min 26 sec

What are the long-term impacts of prenatal alcohol and drug exposure and how can we parent these kids to help them thrive. In this episode, we talk with Dr. Mona Delahooke, a clinical child psychologist and the author of Beyond Behaviors: Using Brain Science and Compassion to Understand and Solve Children’s Behavioral Challenges.In this episode, we cover:Long term impact of prenatal alcohol and drug exposure: Research has found that most drugs that are commonly abused easily cross the placenta and can affect fetal brain development. In utero exposures to drugs and alcohol thus can have long-lasting implications for brain development resulting in behavioral challenges and mental and physical health implication. Some things to consider:The amount of drugs and alcohol used by the mom and the timing in the pregnancy matter, although this is information that is seldom available to adoptive or foster parents.Very often children are exposed to more than one substance in utero. For example, it is not uncommon for a pregnant woman who is drinking alcohol to also use drugs. Untreated drug abuse/addiction often coincides with poor nutrition and prenatal care, which increases the risk further for pre-natal and post-natal trauma with potentially lifelong impacts. It helps to begin with understanding how alcohol and drugs exposure in pregnancy can affect the child not just in infancy but throughout their life.Alcohol Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) is characterized with a broad range of deficits. Children with FASD may not have the facial dysmorphology and other physical abnormalities associated with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). FASDs currently represent the leading cause of mental retardation in North America. Of all the substances of abuse (including cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines), alcohol produces by far the most serious neurobehavioral effects in the child and into adulthood. Alcohol exposure can cause a host of cognitive and behavioral impairments, including:Low to average IQs (IQ can range from mental retardation to normal) Poor executive functioning skills Poor information processing skills Lack of social and communication skills Lack of appropriate initiative Discrepancy between their behavioral age and their chronological age (i.e., acting younger than they are) Difficulty with abstract concepts, such as time and money Poor judgment Failure to consider consequences of actions. Doesn’t learn from mistakes. Poor concentration and attention Social withdrawal Other drugs: Methamphetamines, Amphetamines (speed and also some of the medications used to treat ADHD), 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)- street name Ecstasy, Opioids-(including heroin, fentanyl), Methadone or Suboxone, cocaine (including crack), and marijuana. While there are distinctions, after reviewing a lot of research it is fair to say that the following long-term impacts are often found.In newborns: growth restriction, decreased weight, length, and head circumference, but these don’t necessary follow the child through life.Executive function impairments. (Executive function is a set of mental processes for the management of cognitive operations that include attention, behavior, cognition, working memory, and information/problem solving.)Attention and impulse control issues.May include some learning difficulties.Increased child externalized behavioral problems.Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jul 28

1 hr

In this episode we talk with a panel of four former foster youth to find out what it is like to be raised in foster care and what they wish foster parents knew about the experience.In this episode, we cover:What was the experience of being removed from your home and taken from your parents? Was there something that your foster parents could have done when you were first placed in the home to help alleviate some of the trauma?Did you feel fully included in your foster family? What can foster parents do to help the child feel included?This wasn’t relevant when you were in foster care, but what are your thoughts on blurring out the foster child or putting stickers over their face when posting pics on social media?Relationships with the children of the foster family.Who did you feel like was on your side? Who could you go to if you needed help?Do you think enough was done to help your biological parents before you were removed?Do you think enough was done to help your biological parents with reunification? Or do you think they were given too many chances?Do you have pictures or keepsakes from the time you were in foster care? Would these have been or are they important to you now? What can the system do to make sure these are preserved?While I’m sure you carry the scars of your early life trauma, you have all become successful and--at least from the outside looking in—emotionally healthy adults. What factors contributed to this?Tips for foster parents.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamily Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jul 21

1 hr 6 min

What issues do you need to think about when using social media as an adoptive or foster parent? What issues do you need to consider for your teens and tweens as they engage in social media? We talk with Katie Biron, Director Fostering Connections for Families and Program Manager of the Family Connections Program; Laura Jean Beauvais, licensed professional counselor with New Wind Counseling; and Dawn Friedman, a licensed professional clinical counselor with supervisory designation at Building Family Counseling about handling social media with adopted, foster, and kinship children.In this episode,  we include:Some of the most popular social media platforms include: FacebookInstagramYouTubeTikTokSnapchatTwitterPinterestRedditSocial Media pre-adoptionKeep in mind that states have varying laws on matching online and advertising for an expectant parent. You need to know what is allowed.How much information can you or should you post after you have been matched with an expectant mom during her pregnancy?How much info can you share post birth and after the baby comes home, but before the adoption is finalized?Is it OK to “snoop” on expectant family and birth family online pre-adoption? You should know that the expectant family will also be checking you out online.Should you friend the expectant mom and family pre-adoption?How, when, and if to announce a child coming into your family through adoption.Social Media as an Adoptive Parent How much of your child’s adoption story should you share online?How much should you share of your child’s birth parent’s online presence with a school aged child or younger?Sharing photos online. How to handle differing opinions between adoptive and bio family on sharing pics. Common scenario is adoptive parent doesn’t share online pics and bio family does.Friending biological or first family or accepting friend requests from biological family.How to seek help online without divulging your child’s personal information or oversharing.Post anonymously either on your own or ask group admin.Ask general questions without personal details.How to juggle the ups and downs of adoption groups on social media. Social Media as a Foster ParentDiffering rules and expectations on social media use between foster child and foster parent will be discussed later in the interview.Can a foster parent post a foster child’s picture online?Ask you caseworkerConfidentiality is essentialUse the Reasonable Prudent Parent StandardDiscussion in online forums. How open can you be?Social Media with Adopted/Fostered Teens What age do adolescents start having access to social media without adult supervision?How to handle and navigate social media with the teens in foster care?Benefits of social media for adopted and fostered adolescents.Maintaining social ties. Social media is how many youth connect with friends, both old and new. May be especially important for young people who have been moved from their communities and families.Support. Through either organized online groups for youth in similar situations or informally. Family connections. Youth may be able to with biological family members between family visits, where appropriate and approved by the caseworker. Self-expression. Social media is where many budding poets, artists, videographers hone their skills. It is also a place where young people shape their identity and can contribute to healing from childhSupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jul 14

1 hr 7 min

How can we prepare kids already in our home for the adoption of a sibling whether that new sibling is an infant or an older child. We will talk with Michelle Hoevker, a board-certified Clinical Social Work Supervisor and Program Director of Adoption and Foster Care at Presbyterian Children’s Homes and Services with more than 20 years experience in child welfare; and Adam Crawford, a Licensed Master Social Worker and the Program Director of Adoption and Foster Care at Presbyterian Children’s Homes and Services with more than 15 years of experience in child welfare.In this episode, we cover:Adopting an InfantHow to prepare children for the adoption of an infant?How to answer question from others.How to explain open adoption to kids already in the home?What if the child already in the home is adopted but with a different degree of openness with their birth family?Transracial AdoptionHow to prepare children for the adoption of an infant when it is a transracial adoption where the child being adopted is not the same race or ethnicity as the children already in the family?Adopting an Older Child Who is Not Your Foster Child (adopting from foster care or adopting internationally)How much of your new child’s history should you share with the kids already in the family?How to prepare kids in the family for potential behavioral challenges.Prepare your kids in advance for changes to the family routine to accommodate the new child’s needs?Creating a support network in advance.Handling the transition period.Different expectations and rules.How much voice should children in the family have on whether to adopt?Advice on parenting if you are disrupting birth order.Advice on parenting if kids are in the same grade at school. Adopting an Older Child Who is Your Foster ChildRole change from foster sibling to adoptive sibling (and foster parent to adoptive parent).Expectations of transition period.Resources:Creating a Family has a great list of books for Preparing Kids for the Adoption of a SiblingSuddenly Siblings website answers the question on every parent's mind: how will fostering or adoption affect my kids already in the home?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jul 7

59 min 9 sec

Is human fertility declining? What is the cause and what can we do about it. Our guest is Dr. Shanna Swan, an award-winning scientist based at Mount Sinai Medical Center and one of the world’s leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologists. She is the author of Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race.In this episode, we cover: Is sperm count in human males declining?  Is this decline seen worldwide or just in developed countries?Is sperm count the only measure of sperm health that is declining? Are we seeing a change in sperm motility or morphology also?Do we see a change in the average testosterone level in men worldwide?Do we know what is causing the decline in sperm count? Do we see a similar impact on women’s reproductive health?  And if so, how do we know?Could the decline in the fertility rate be, at least in part, the result of a general trend toward delayed childbearing, access to birth control, move from an agrarian society where large numbers of children were valued, etc.? Certainly, so in the western world but also so in developing countries where girls have the opportunity for education and employment.Has there been a reduction in the age of puberty in girls in the US. Worldwide?If we are comparing current sperm count of men on a country wide basis to past sperm count how do we know we are comparing apples to apples? Couldn’t differences in studies techniques and who they studied account for the difference?Has there been an increase in gender fluidity?Has there been an increase in disorders of sexual development?Can exposures to environmental toxins impact human sexuality and gender identity?Can exposures in utero or childhood or adulthood that can impact sexuality and gender identity?What lifestyle factors negatively influence fertility?What environmental exposures affect fertility for both men and women and how do we avoid exposure? This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and infertility patients and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jun 30

56 min 28 sec

What issues should parents think about when adopting a relative (niece, cousin, sibling) from abroad. We talk with Mary Beth King, who has a Master of Science in Social Administration and is Frank Adoption Center’s Executive Director, and with Katie Schultz, an International Adoption Specialist with Madison Adoption Associates.In this episode, we cover,What level of genetic relationship is required to call it a kinship adoption as well as what circumstances make a child eligible for an international kinship adoption, especially in the eyes of USCIS.At what age is a child no longer eligible for international kinship adoption?Changing relationship for both adopter and child – to go from the “cool, exotic US visitor” to everyday caregiver.Relationship with bio family in home country.Helping children navigate (and choose) the language of family – will they continue to refer to you as “aunt” or will you be “mom,” etc.Blending children by birth and this newly adopted child.Understanding that trauma and loss are still a part of the child’s story even though they are remaining in their biological extended family.It can take a long time for relative adoptions to come to fruition, the child can be much older than when the family started the process and so helping families adjust to the fact that they may be bringing home an older child can be challenging.Helping families embrace pre-adoption education as necessary even though they have experience in parenting or they know this child and therefore don't need education on how to parent.Recognizing that the child’s immigrant experience will be different than your own and how to separate the two.One parent not related and maybe not been an immigrant.Navigating two identities, for example - Preparing your child to embrace their identity not just as a Cameroonian, but also as a Black American.Managing expectations of cultural changes – Understanding that these children are very likely to take on cultural norms of America kids and teens which may be different than the parent-child relationship expectations of your country of originUnderstanding the importance of hobbies, sports, extracurricular activities, play time, etc. in addition (and sometimes even as backseat to) academics, especially as kids adjust to these big changes, make new friends, and heal from trauma and lossNavigating the American school system and understanding that grade levels don’t always translate internationally. Accessing services to help the child transition.Adjusting to parenting as an older parent. Things may have changed since they parented last.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jun 25

55 min 43 sec

What are the 7 essential character traits that parents can teach their children to increase resiliency? In this episode we talk with Dr. Michelle Borba, an internationally renowned educational psychologist and author of Thrivers: The Surprising Reasons Why Some Kids Struggle and Others Shine.In this episode, we cover:You paint a picture in your book of tweens, teens and young adults who are stressed, anxious, depressed, and lonesome. Why are our kids experiencing this?Importance of play.Importance of sleep.7 essential character traits of a child who will thrive both in childhood and adolescence but also into adulthood.Self-ConfidenceWhat is the difference between self confidence and self-esteem?How does parental praise factor into teaching self-confidence?How do you teach self-confidence? EmpathyWhy is empathy so important to resilience?How do you teach empathy or at the very least encourage it?How does our modern technology impact empathy?Self-ControlWhat is self-control in children?How do we teach self-control?IntegrityHow do you define integrity?How can we help our kids develop integrity?CuriosityWhy is curiosity important for thriving?What can we do or not do to encourage curiosity?PerseveranceWhat causes kids to give up?What can parents do to help?OptimismIs optimism an inborn temperament or one that can be taught?If you could leave parents with 5 actionable tips for raising a “thriver”, what would they be.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Please leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jun 18

54 min 55 sec

Call it co-parenting, shared parenting, or partnership parenting, the gist is the same: foster parents are expected to share the nurturing of a foster child with the birth parents to facilitate reunification whenever possible. Join us today to talk about shared parenting with Carrie Sgarlata, an educator, mom, foster mom, and foster parent trainer and recruiter; and Andrea Leaman, a social worker with the Foster Care Licensing and Placement Program with Children’s Wisconsin Community Services and trainer in partnership parenting. In this episode, we covered:1.     Why is shared parenting best for the child? (less divided loyalty, foster parents can be a role model, less time in foster care, better behavior, majority of kids will return home and co-parenting makes that easier)2.     Building a relationship that begins when someone’s child is removed is not easy. What are some of the emotions the birth parents are likely feeling when they first meet the foster parent? (fear, confusion, denial, anger, embarrassment, feeling that the authorities over-reacted, shame, grief, betrayal, sadness, uncertainty, taking their child away, loss of control)3.     How to build a relationship of co-parenting?a.     Start with compassion b.     Lower expectationsc.     Reassure them that you are only here to help not adopt their childd.     Show a picture of where the child is stayinge.     Don’t take things personally? (be the more emotionally stable person) Realize that you are seeing these people at likely the worst moment of their life.f.      Go the extra mileg.     Language matters: refer to the child as their child.h.     Treat them with dignity and respect.i.      Go the extra mile to make it easier or less awkward for them.j.      Ask birth parents questions about the child, her likes, dislikes, fears, etc.k.     Send pictures, share artwork, share cute stories4.     Communication between birth and adoptive parents is key to success. Ideas for setting up good communication. How to communicate between visits?5.     How to handle visits to facilitate co-parenting?6.     How to overcome our own anger and judgement towards birth parents?7.     How to establish healthy boundaries?8.     Is it possible to do partnership parenting with incarcerated parents?9.     How to handle Social media10.  Becoming a parenting mentor to birth parents. What are some skills that birth parents may need help developing and how can foster parents help? (importance of routine, working with the school, discipline, normal child developmental stages, how to find community support)11.  How can we help birth parents shift their attitude towards the foster care system from existing to keep them from their children towards existing to help stabilize the family?12.  What if:a.     What if the birth parent abused the child?b.     What if the birth parents don’t accept responsibility for what they did that caused the child to be removed?c.     What if the birth parent lies about what happened that resulted in the child being removed? This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jun 11

45 min 43 sec

How does the endocrine system impacts fertility, what can go wrong, and what can be done about it. We talk today with Dr. Mark Trolice, the Director of Fertility CARE: The IVF Center in Orlando and Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine. He is double Board-certified in Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility and OB/GYN.In this episode, we include:·      What is the function of the endocrine system in human health?·      How does the thyroid gland function within the endocrine system?·      How is female fertility impacted by the endocrine system?·      How is male fertility impacted by the endocrine system?·      What is hypothyroidism?·      What is hyperthyroidism?·      How are dysfunctions in the endocrine system diagnosed?·      How are dysfunctions in the endocrine system treated?·      What dietary and lifestyle choices impact the health of the endocrine system and thyroid gland?·      What are some common endocrine disrupting chemicals in our environment?·      How are environmental endocrine disruptors impacting fertility?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org.  Creating a Family brings you the following expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jun 4

45 min 25 sec

In this episode we interview Sarah Sentilles, author of a newly released book by Random House titled Stranger Care. "Stranger Care" is a beautifully written book that captures the promise and often the failure of foster care. And it is a beautiful portrait of love with no promise of a future.In this episode, we cover:Beautifully written book that captures the promise and often the failure of foster care. And a beautiful portrait of love with no promise of a future.·      How did you come to the decision to become foster parents? And did you come to that decision or were you really trying to become an adoptive parent?·     Discussion of “ethically cleaner”.·      I appreciated how you showed Evelyn, the birth mom, to be human and to love her child. You did a good job of showing the nuances, which are hard to do, especially when you are the one losing the child. I very much enjoyed seeing how that relationship grew. What helped change it?·      Rooting for and against birth mom·      Love and yet not belonging to you·     The power of the state to remove kids should not be used without great care.·      What qualifies as good parenting and is “good enough” enough. Ex. of the car seat.·      Keeping siblings together.·      It is discouraging that organizations, such as Creating a Family exist to support people like you when you were first considering your options. And if we didn’t reach someone like you who is educated and I would assume someone who researches and gathers info then how in the world do we reach people. Education research focused woman are our demographic!·      How long has it been and do you know what has happened to Coco?·      How have you and your husband been changed by this experience?·      Is this book in part an attempt to reach out to Coco. Did you write it with an ear to her reading it later in life and you talking to her. Do you hope she will hear about it and read it?·      Did you decide to give up on fostering? What about adopting?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

May 28

54 min 54 sec

Have you ever considered adopting after you had children by birth? Or thought about trying to get pregnant after you adopted? Is it a good idea to combine kids by birth and adoption. In this episode, we talk with Rebecca Ricardo, an LCSW who has worked in the field of adoption since 1991. She currently serves as the Executive Director for a licensed, child-placing agency that provides both placement and support services. She is an adoptee and a birth mom. The son she placed for adoption was raised as the only adopted child between two children born to his adoptive parents.In this episode, we cover:•       What are the typical reasons why families have both adopted and non-adopted kids?•       What does the research show on how children and families adjust when there are children by both adoption and infertility?•       Do parents have a tendency to favor their biological children? Kin Selection Theory based on evolutionary psychology.•       Does it matter if the adopted child is adopted after the family has had bio kids, or if the adopted child comes first (most often because the parents were infertile) and they went back into treatment after they adopted to try for a biological child? What different factors come into play?•       Favoritism by grandparents or extended family. How to handle?•       The tendency of parents of families that combine biological and adopted kids to downplay genetics, birth stories, etc.•       How to handle conflicts with children or extended family members when children require a different type of parenting because one child has experienced trauma?•       How to handle conflicts when one child requires more of the parent’s time than another child?•       Tips for parents who are combining kids by birth and adoption. How can social workers help families that are considering this?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

May 21

1 hr 2 min

Do you sometimes feel that self-care is an impossible goal when you are parenting kids who have experienced trauma. There isn't enough time in the day to do it all, much less take care of yourself. Or is there? Join us to talk about how to find time to take care of yourself. We will talk with Angelica Jones, MSW, Program Director of Intercountry Services and the Intensive Service Foster Care Recruiter and Trainer at Vista Del Mar Child and Family Services.In this episode, we cover:·      “Selfcare” or “take care of yourself” are overused but still vitally important terms for  foster, adoptive, and kinship parents.·      Why do all parents but especially parents of kids who’ve experienced trauma need to practice self-care?·      What is secondary trauma?·      Why are kids who’ve experience neglect, abuse and other childhood traumas harder to  parent?·      The busyness of foster and adoptive parenting.·      What are some of the barriers to taking care of ourselves as adoptive, foster or kinship parents?·      The importance of respite care and the barriers to parents using it.·      Practical ideas for providing self-care.·      Think small when thinking self-care.·      Ask for help and accept it when offered. If someone offers to help, say “yes” and suggest something specific. Ex. A meal on Wednesday night. Babysitting or taking a child to the movies once a month.·      Parent Support groupsThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

May 14

38 min 33 sec

Do you worry that the over the counter medications you take for a headache or allergies could impact your fertility? What about CBD or melatonin? We talk with Dr. Kathleen Tucker, a scientific director for various IVF labs; and with K.E. Tucker Consulting, and Dr. Angie Beltos, CEO and Chief Medical Officer of Vios Fertility Institute.In this episode, we include:Research has found three reasons why the impact of OTC medication on fertility has become an increasing issue.We are taking more medications now that people in the past. People are waiting longer to start a family and age is associated with greater medication use.People are experiencing more chronic disease at earlier ages.Taken together, these factors have increased the number of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs being taken by women and men attempting to get pregnant with or without fertility treatment.As always, talk to your doctor about any concerns you have regarding both prescription and non-prescription medications.Impact of OTC drugs on fertility - female and male fertility.Impact on natural conception.Impact when taken during fertility treatment.Impact on pregnancy.Impact of NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) on fertility.Aspirin (brand names include Bayer, Bufferin, Ecotrin, St. Joseph)Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)Excedrin (acetaminophen, aspirin and caffeine)Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox DS, Naprosyn)Celecoxib (Celebrex)-prescription onlyAcetaminophen (Tylenol)Antacids-histamine blockers and proton pump inhibitorsAntihistamines B-both types? 1st generation, 2nd generationSleep aidsCBDOther common over-the-counter (OTC) medicationsSkin and hair care productsHerbal supplements?As always, talk to your doctor about any concerns you have regarding both prescription and non-prescription.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

May 7

49 min 17 sec

How should you talk with young children, toddlers, and preschoolers about adoption. How do you talk about birth mothers and birth fathers? In this episode we talk with Jenna Howard, a LMSW who has worked in the adoption field since 1994 in both domestic and international adoption. In addition, she is an adoptee and an adoptive mom.In this episode, we cover:Why is it important to start talking about adoption and birth parents with kids when they are very young?When should you begin talking about adoption with children if they are adopted at birth or a very young age?How to talk with infants about adoption.What do young children understand about the concept of adoption?What name should be used when referring to birth parents?How to talk with toddlers and preschoolers about adoption. (They are accepting of what parents say and the attitude it was said.)Adoption is cool stage.Oversharing details. Distinction between secret and private.Oversharing as a parent.Helping child explain adoption.Talking about adoption vs. different ways families are made.Keep it short and simple. Laying the groundwork.Positive adoption language.Common questions children this age might ask and sample answers.How to talk about birth fathers and the role of birth fathers when the child doesn’t understand conception?How to talk about birth fathers when birth father is unknown or otherwise not in the picture?How to talk about birth siblings.Why do some adoptive parents hesitate to talk with young children about adoption?When should parents share some of the harder parts of their child’s adoption story  (domestic violence, substance abuse, incarceration, unknown birth father, rape)?Tips:Books – Creating a Family has a great list of the Best of the Best Adoption books for kids broken out by type of adoption and age of the child.Movies/TV shows (Sesame Street, Mister Rodgers, etc)Make a life bookParenting Your Adopted Preschooler and the link won’t change so that makes it easy. https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/preschoolThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Apr 30

59 min 42 sec

How do you discipline kids who have experienced trauma? We provide 5 tips and then discuss 5 challenging parenting situations. Our expert is Karen Doyle Buckwalter, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Registered Play Therapist and Supervisor, and co-author of "Raising the Challenging Child".In this episode, we cover:1.     The Relationship Bank Account Spend effort building your relationship with your child so that you have banked “good will” for when you need to say no or set a firm rule. Ideas for making quick and easy deposits:Praise efforts, successes, helpfulness, their unique essence—big and small.Let the child choose whenever possible. Look for compromises.Make more deposits than withdrawals.Magic “rule” 5 positive comments to every 1 negative.Difference between making a deposit and spoiling your child.Sideswipe instead of confront. 2.     Respond to What is Beneath the Behavior Behavior is a reflection of a need. It’s a symptom.Strategies for digging deeper into what is underneath the behavior.3.     Reexamine Your ExpectationsSee your child for who she is.4.     Balancing Structure and NurtureHow does structure lead to feelings of safety and why is this often misunderstood when parenting children with a history of trauma?Choose your battles: choose to ignore some behaviors.5.     Share Power to Gain PowerSpecific Behaviors:TantrumName calling and teasingHandle attention seeking behaviors.LyingSexualized Behavior and PlayThis podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Apr 23

1 hr 3 min

What's it like to have your world turned upside down when you become the parent to your grandchild, niece, or nephew? What are the hidden joys and challenges. In this podcast episode, we have a frank and open talk with a panel of kinship caregivers about their experience.In this episode, we cover: What has been one of the greatest joys you’ve experienced as a kinship caregiver?What has been one of the greatest challenges you’ve had in raising your grandchild or niece or nephew?How has your age played into your parenting experience with this child?How has caring for your grandchild affects your friendships and activities?How do you handle the dual roles of being a mom to your grandchild and a mom to your grandchild’s parent? How has kinship caregiving impacted your role as parent to your child? Have you had to set boundaries with your child to protect your grandchild?How have you handle if your grandchild’s parent has another child? Would you take that child in as well?How have you learned about technology, screens, video gaming, etc. in order to parent a child of this younger generation?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Apr 16

54 min 55 sec

How old is too young for a phone? Is gaming harmful to our kids? How much technology is too much. We talk with Dr. Jay Berk, a licensed psychologist and an expert in working with children and families. He is the author of two books: “A Parent’s Quick Guide to Electronic Addiction” and “Codeswitching: Social Skills in the Screen-Age”.In this episode, we cover:Parents from time immemorial have worried about the impact of the “new technology” and this goes back to our great great great grandparents worrying about the influence of novels to parents of the 50’s worry about too much time on the phone, to parents of the 80s worrying about too much TV, and on to the present where we worry about screen time, texting, and gaming. We parents are digital “immigrants” while our kids are digital natives. How does this dynamic present challenges?How to keep up with what our kids are doing?What are the general best practices for elementary aged kids using digital technology?What age should kids be given a phone?What are reasonable rules for phone use?      How do things change as our kids each around age 11 or 12 and on into their teen yearsHow important is the use of digital media to socialize for this generation?When should parents worry?Is the child getting enough sleep?Are they eating well?Are they getting enough exercise?Are they doing well in school?Do they have real life friends?If so, they are probably just fine.What are the signs that our kids may be too involved with digital technology or gamingHow much screen time is too much for tweens? For teens?Do different types of technology have different risks and benefits? Internet? Gaming? Porn?What are some reasonable rules for families to set in regards to technology, screen time, and gaming?  How to get buy-in from our tweens and teens?App-tell kidA challenge particular to families adopting or fostering older children or teens is that often our kids come to us with having had little supervision or rules about internet use? How can we establish healthy habits when the rules are new to them?Resources: A Parent’s Quick Guide to Electronic Addiction by Dr. Jay BerkCenter for Parent and Teen Communication: A Fact-Not-Fear Approach to Parenting In the Digital Age https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aNtRhYfA3kCreating a Family’s Navigating the Internet with Adopted or Foster Tweens and Teens https://creatingafamily.org/adoption-category/adoption-blog/navigating-the-internet-with-adopted-or-foster-tweens-and-teens/This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Apr 9

50 min 35 sec

Have you ever wondered if your struggle to conceive could be caused by your genes? Today we're going to answer that question and more about genetics and fertility by talking with two certified genetic counselors with CooperGenomics: Sharyn Lincoln and Sheila Johal.In this episode, we cover:Infertility is a disease affecting nearly 7% of all couples. It is a highly heterogeneous pathology with a complex etiology that includes both environmental and genetic factors. In this episode we will be focusing on the genetics. What percentage of infertility can be attributed to our genes? Genetics and Female Infertility47,XXX (trisomy X; Triple X)⁃       What is trisomy X?⁃       How common is 47,XXX?⁃       What are the symptoms of Triple X syndrome?⁃       How common is infertility in women with Triple X?⁃       Will the children conceived also have this chromosomal abnormality?Turner syndrome (monosomy X)⁃       What is Turner Syndrome?⁃       How common is it?⁃       What are the symptoms?⁃       How common is mosaicism with this chromosomal defect?⁃       How common is infertility in women with monosomy X?⁃       Will the children conceived also have this chromosomal abnormality?Single Gene Disorders⁃       Fragile X (Primary Ovarian Failure)⁃       Premutation⁃       Galactosemia⁃       OthersPolygenic, complex female infertility (environment & genetics)⁃       Endometriosis⁃       Is there a genetic link?⁃       Fibroids⁃       Is there a genetic link?⁃       Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC)⁃       Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)⁃       Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)⁃       Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)⁃       Is there a genetic link?⁃       XXX syndrome⁃       Fragile X syndrome Genetics and Male InfertilityKlinefelter syndrome⁃       What is Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XXY?⁃       How common is Klinefelter syndrome?⁃       What are the symptoms of Klinefelter syndrome other than infertility?⁃       Is it possible for a man with Klinefelter syndrome to reproduce?⁃       Will the children also have chromosomal abnormalities?47,XYY syndrome⁃       How common is XYY syndrome?⁃       What are the symptoms of XYY syndrome other than infertility?⁃       Will the children also have chromosomal abnormalities?Structural chromosomal abnormalities (SCAs) include deletions, duplications,translocations (balanced, imbalanced, and Robertsonian), and inversions.⁃       Y chromosome micro deletionsSingle Gene Disorders (Cystic Fibrosis)Why has it been so hard to pinpoint the exact genes associated with male and femalefertility?Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Apr 2

1 hr 5 min

Bringing foster children into your family may impact the kids already in your home—both in positive and potentially negative ways. We will provide suggestions on how to integrate new foster children into your home as seamlessly as possible. Our guest expert is Dr. Eshele Williams, a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, who brings her professional expertise with counseling foster families as well as her personal experience as being a biological child in a family that fostered many children in her childhood.In this episode, we cover:Positive benefits of fostering on children already in the family.Possible challenging issues children in the family might face when foster children join the family.Benefits of preparing children in the family for the realities of fostering.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Mar 26

57 min 28 sec

What do we mean by attachment and what can parents do to help their child attach. What can parents do if they are struggling with attaching to their child. We talk with Dr. Casey Call, the Assistant Director of Education at the Institute of Child Development at TCU. She is a researcher and trainer for Trust-Based Relational Intervention.In this episode, we cover:What is attachment and why is it so important to a child’s development?How does attachment develop in children who are raised from infancy in a healthy functioning family? What does healthy attachment look like?What events can interrupt the normal development of healthy attachment? (e.g. multiple caregivers, abuse, neglect) What about a primary care giver with mental illness? What about long term hospitalization?When we have a child placed in our homes for either adoption or fostering, what are some signs that this child may have attachment issues?Attachment issues fall along a spectrum from mild to severe. Describe typical behaviors that might appear along this spectrum.Reactive Attachment DisorderWe have people contacting us with worries after only a few weeks in their home when the child and family are still adjusting to a total change in their lives. What is a reasonable time to give a child before parents begin to worry about major attachment issues?What are some things parents of newly adopted or fostered kids can do to help their child attach?What type of therapy is effective for children with attachment issues?How can you find a therapist who will be knowledgeable on how to help a child and family that is struggling to attach?How to discipline while still focusing on attachment.The importance of parental attachment.What interferes with a parents ability to attach to their child?What are some things that a parent can do if they are struggling to attach to their child?Post adoption depression.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Mar 19

55 min 56 sec

What do adoptive and foster parents need to know about the impacts of prenatal exposure to opioids, Suboxone, and Methadone. What are the risks to a baby born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome or Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS)? We talk with Dr. Julian Davies, a pediatrician at the University of Washington’s Center for Adoption Medicine and their FASD and Prenatal Exposure Clinic.In this episode, we cover:What are opiates or opioids? What are the most common opiates that are being used during pregnancy? What are the most common non-opiate drugs that are being used by pregnant women? What are the common treatment medication/drugs given to those struggling with addiction who are trying to get off opioids? Methadone, Suboxone, and Subutex Are Methadone, Suboxone, and Subutex safe to use during pregnancy? What are the short- and long-term impacts on infants exposed to opiates? What are the short- and long-term impacts of infants exposed to Methadone in pregnancy? What are the short- and long-term impacts of infants exposed to Suboxone in pregnancy? Does the dosage of methadone or suboxone have an effect on the baby? What are the short- and long-term impacts of infants exposed to methamphetamines (meth) in pregnancy? What are the short- and long-term impacts of infants exposed to cocaine in pregnancy? What are the short- and long-term impacts of infants exposed to marijuana in pregnancy? Edible vs. smoking vs. vaping Does the timing of exposure in pregnancy affect the prognosis for the child? Is there a safer time for a fetus to be exposed to drugs in utero? Many parents believe that if the child is not born dependent or with drugs in their system that the prognosis is better. Or conversely, if the child is born dependent and has to go through withdrawals that they will suffer more impact from the in-utero drug exposure. Is this true? How serious is drug dependency and withdrawal for the infant? How is withdrawal treated in the infant? How is Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) and Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS) treated in babies born dependent? Families that adopt out of state are often concerned about how soon they can travel home with their baby if she has been born dependent and is going through withdrawal. How long does withdrawal in an infant born dependent last? If a baby tests positive for opiates is it possible to determine what drug the baby has been exposed to? Does the long-term prognosis matter depending on which drug? How do you foster attachment while baby is suffering through withdrawal? How common is it for women who use drugs during their pregnancy to also drink excessively during their pregnancy? One thing you hear a lot is that “early intervention is key” and that a baby’s brain can be rewired during the first couple of years with the right therapy. What exactly does that therapy entail? Where can you find it? What strategies should you be using at home with your child with a diagnosis of prenatal drug exposure? There are many similarities between drug exposure and trauma in how it affects children’s learning, behavior, etc. When a child has both of those challenges, is it possible to tell the difference on what is causing specific problems, and is the treatment different depending on the cause? Are children who are exposed prenatally at a greater risk for drug abuse as teens and adults if they were adopted and not raised in an environment that exposed them to drug use? What are the most common blood borne diseases that women who use drugs are exposed to are more likely to have. What is the risk to a baby whose motherSupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Mar 12

1 hr 3 min

Have you or someone you care about experienced a miscarriage or stillbirth? We talk about coping with pregnancy loss with Dr. Poonum Sharma, a Licensed Psychologist specializing in reproductive issues. She is a long term member of the Mental Health Provider Professional Group at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.In this episode, we cover:Miscarriage and Stillbirth StatisticsDistinction between a miscarriage and stillbirth. A stillbirth is the death of a baby before or during delivery. Both miscarriage and stillbirth describe pregnancy loss, but they differ according to when the loss occurs. In the United States, a miscarriage is usually defined as loss of a baby before the 20th week of pregnancy, and a stillbirth is loss of a baby at 20 weeks of pregnancy and later.About 1 pregnancy in 100 (1%) end in stillbirth, and each year about 24,000 babies are stillborn in the United States.For women who know they’re pregnant, about 10 to 15 in 100 pregnancies (10 to 15 percent) end in miscarriage. As many as half of all pregnancies may end in miscarriage. We don’t know the exact number because a miscarriage may happen before a woman knows she’s pregnant.Most miscarriages happen in the first trimester before the 12th week of pregnancy. Miscarriage in the second trimester (between 13 and 19 weeks) happens in 1 to 5 in 100 (1 to 5 percent) pregnancies.The primary cause of first trimester miscarriage is chromosomal abnormalities. The Grief ProcessFactors that may impact grief:How long a woman or couple has been trying to get pregnant.Timing in the pregnancy of the loss.The number of miscarriages or pregnancy losses she has experienced.The cause of the miscarriage or lack of an explanation?Patient’s age.If she has existing children. Secondary infertility.The ability to talk about the loss to family and friends.Temperament of the patient and her partner.Pregnancy loss before others know about the pregnancy.Helping Patients CopeHow can those around the woman or couple support them during this time? How to share the news.How can nurses help patients cope?What are the symptoms of compassion fatigue that infertility nurses should be aware of.How can nurses prevent or cope with compassion fatigue.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Mar 5

49 min 17 sec

What issues should you consider if you want to adopt as a single person? We talk with Susan Fremer, a licensed mental health intern and a single mom of five adopted girls; and Lee Varon, a LICSW specializing in adoptive parenting, a single mom to two sons through adoption, and author of two books on single parent adoption. In this episode, we cover:Single parenting is common. Are there distinctions between becoming a single parent through divorce, conception, and adoption? How easy is it to adopt as a single woman or single man? Are there any additional requirements for single parents to be able to adopt? Any additional questions in the home study?  Legal issues. Importance of a will and naming a guardian. What are some potential issues single parents should consider before they decide to adopt? Is there another single parent or family that you could partner with to provide mutual child care support either full time or babysitting type arrangement? Emotional support. Consider moving closer to family. Changes to your friend network after you become a parent. Finances. Costs for raising a child. Look at your debt. Will your housing have to change? Child care. May influence the age of child you decide to adopt. Finding the opposite gender role model for your child. Self-care.  Dating. Are you ready to be a single parent? Are you ready to give up the fun parts of being child-free, like the freedom to do what you want when you want? The freedom to tackle a new time consuming work project, educational degree, hobby, travel, etc. Are you ready to feel the inevitable time crunch of single parenting? Are you ready financially? Annoying comments you may hear. You haven’t given enough time to finding a partner. Consider joining a single parent by choice support group. Online or in-person (check Meetup) Resources: Single Adoptive Parents: Our Stories (Book by Lee Varon and Sherry Fine) Adopting On Your Own: The Complete Guide to Adoption for Single Parents (Book by Lee Varon) Single Mothers By Choice (organization and website) Motherhood Reimagined (organization and website) ChoiceMom.org E-guide: Finding Support (eGuide) This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Feb 26

56 min 26 sec

Grandparents raising grandkids or aunts and uncles raising nephews and nieces is often complicated and comes with a mix of challenges and blessings. What are the unique issues that kinship caregivers face and what do they need to succeed. We talk about these issues with LaNette Jacobs, an aunt raising her two nephews; Marla Galvan, a licensed clinical social worker and Foster Care Strategic Consultant for Child Welfare Information Gateway; Dr. Ali Caliendo, the Executive Director of Foster Kinship, a nonprofit support of kinship families in Nevada; and Jaia Lent, the Deputy Executive Director at Generations United where she provides direction for the National Center on Grandfamilies.In this episode, we covered:Kinship care, also often called grandparent care or grandparent-led families, is used to care for children whose parents are unable. And while we will often use the term grandparent, we fully recognize that it is often aunts, uncles, cousins, and sometimes other siblings that are stepping up to care for these children. Kinship care can be permanent or temporary, financially subsidized or not, formal or informal. Kinship care at its best helps to maintain family connections and cultural traditions that can minimize the trauma of family separation. Grandparents raising grandkids or aunts and uncles raising nephews and nieces is often complicated and comes with a mix of challenges and blessings.There is often a blurred line between being a family member and assuming responsibility for a relative's children. Is your role the grandparent or the parent and if parent, to whom is your first allegiance—to your child or your grandchild.It’s also a blessing. It’s a do over, a chance to be fully involved in a child’s life again and make a difference in the next generation.Why is raising your grandkids different from raising your own kids the first time around?Understanding emotions. Guilt, shame, anger, distrust, loss, loneliness, grief. And these feelings are often felt by both the parent and the kinship caregiver.Managing boundaries.CommunicationBeing honest about your needs and the kids needsPutting the children’s needs first.How to help with reunification?Try to show empathy towards the challenges that the parents are struggling with. Don’t put down birth parents, especially in front of the kids.Assure children that their parents love them.Tell parents that you know that they love their child.Don’t put the children in the middle.Make visits a conflict free zone—if possible.Have adult conversations on working out disagreements away from the kids.Support change in the parents.Support groups.Not financially prepared for the addition of kids.Parenting kids who’ve experienced trauma.Legal resources to be in the best position to advocate for the child.This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Feb 19

54 min 36 sec

Should you consider freezing your eggs? What is involved and how much does it cost. We talk with Dr. Taraneh Nazem, Board-Certified Reproductive Endocrinologist with Reproductive Medicine Associates of NY.In this episode, we cover:Female Fertility Overview of female fertility.What impacts fecundity?How important is age in female fertility?Why does age negatively impact fertility in women?What other factors decrease a woman’s fertility?Fertility PreservationAt what age does fertility begin to decrease?What causes Diminished Ovarian Reserves?What are the symptoms of Diminished Ovarian Reserves?How to evaluate and diagnosis Diminished Ovarian Reserves?What can women do to support their fertility and maintain optimum fertility for as long as possible?Does birth control influence future fertility positively or negatively? Does exercise impact female fertility?Egg FreezingWho should consider egg freezing?At what age should women consider freezing their eggs?What is the egg freezing process?What are the short and long-term risks of the fertility medication needed for egg freezing?Do you need to have your IUD removed in order to go through an egg retrieval process?How many eggs do you need to freeze to provide a fair chance of having a baby? Are women with low AMH levels a good candidate for egg freezing? How many egg retrieval cycles should you expect in order to have enough eggs for a strong chance for a baby?How long can eggs be frozen?Does freezing damage the eggs?If you don’t use your frozen eggs can you donate them?What is the success rate for frozen eggs?Should you freeze eggs or freeze embryos?Cost of egg freezing:Initial egg retrieval. Cryopreservation storage fee. What is the process when you want to return to use your frozen eggs? This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen families. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingCreating a Family also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Feb 12

1 hr 1 min

Have you ever wondered why a specific behavior by your child drives you crazy? What do we as parents bring to the relationship that could be part of the problem? We talk about how a parent's history with attachment and trauma impacts our parenting with Dr. Patrice Berry, a licensed clinical psychologist with specialized training in adoption and foster care and over 15 years of clinical experience. In this episode, we cover:·      Research has shown that our attachment style with our own parents is the biggest predictor of the attachment style we’ll have with our child.·      What do we mean by attachment style? Attachment style refers to the internal “working models” we develop of how relationships function. They influence the way we relate to important people in our lives. The attachments we form in our early relationships with parents or caretakers can have an impact on our feelings of insecurity, anxiety, fear, avoidance, and satisfaction in our closest relationships throughout our lives.·      A detailed tool has been developed to determine our attachment styles. Adult-Attachment Inventory (AAI). In the inventory, done by a professional with specific training, adults are asked to describe their childhoods, and it is in the telling of their stories that attachment styles are assessed.·      What are the types of attachment styles that have been identified in adults?·      Are our attachment styles fixed in childhood by how we were parented or can they change through growth and work on our part? ·      To further complicate the parenting picture, it’s important to remember that foster and adopted children come to us having experienced some degree of trauma and a set of experiences from their own family of origin or previous care settings that did not develop in the family system of their adoptive family and may contrast sharply.·      All parents are susceptible to being “triggered” by things in their past and, consciously or unconsciously, having this shape their behavior. A child’s behavior can certainly be such a trigger.·      Examples of situations where a parent’s past trauma and attachment style may interfere with their being the best parent to their child.·      How can we move toward a more secure attachment style?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingCreating a Family also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Feb 5

51 min 33 sec

How can you talk full advantage of the Adoption Tax Credit? What changes are important when filing for this credit for your 2020 taxes. We talk with Becky Wilmoth, an Enrolled Agent and Adoption Tax Credit Specialist with Bill's Tax Service and Josh Kroll, the Adoption Subsidy Resource Center coordinator at the North American Council on Adoptable Children.In this episode, we cover: What is the Adoption Tax Credit for adoption being claimed on 2020 federal taxes $14,300It is a non-refundable tax credit. How to advocate for refundability.What is a “credit” and how does it differ from a deduction or some other form of tax savings? If you get a tax refund every year, how would you use the Adoption Tax Credit? If you don’t have any federal tax liability, should you still apply the credit to your federal income taxes? What type of adoptions are included or excluded? Stepparent adoption? Embryo adoption? Same-sex partner second parent adoption? Unmarried heterosexual second parent adoption? Surrogacy?Can you get credit for each adoption you complete even if completed in the same year? What about adopting siblings at the same time?What is a Qualified Adoption Expense for purposes of the Adoption Tax Credit?When can you claim the Adoption Tax Credit?Domestic Infant AdoptionInternational Adoption Re-adoption in the US for International AdoptionFoster Care AdoptionSpecial Needs Adoption: How does the Adoption Tax Credit differ for adoptions from foster care?Special needs child for international adoptionWhat income level is excluded from claiming the Adoption Tax Credit in 2020?How long can the credit be carried over?Will the Adoption Tax Credit offset self-employment tax or will it only offset income tax liability? How does the Adoption Tax Credit work in conjunction with employer benefits?What type of documentation should you submit with your taxes? What type of documentation should you keep in your records?What should you do if you do not have your child’s social security number when you get ready to file your taxes? When should you consider using an Adoption Taxpayer Identification Number (ATIN #) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN #)?How does the Adoption Tax Credit work with kinship adoptions? What if the child never was involved with the foster care?What are the most common questions received about the Adoption Tax Credit?How to find a tax specialist knowledgeable on the Adoption Tax Credit?This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingCreating a Family also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram.  Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

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Jan 27

57 min 44 sec

We talk about evaluating the risk factors for foster care with Dr. Kimara Gustafson, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota with appointments at both their Adoption Medicine Clinic and Pediatric Emergency Department.In this episode, we cover:The common risk factor that foster parents and those wanting to adopt from foster care need to be aware of include physical, emotional, developmental, educational, and behavioral problems rooted in childhood adversity and trauma.What types of trauma are foster kids exposed to? Neglect, abuse, prenatal exposure, multiple caregivers, not having a reliable caregiver, constant stress What percentage of children in foster care have been exposed to drugs or alcohol prenatally? Impact of trauma on physical health.  Foster parents often have little information about prior health history. Overmedication of foster children and youth. Research has found that the average number of psychiatric diagnoses and psychotropic medications prescribed were significantly greater for youth and children in foster care. o Children in foster care are likely to be kept on them longer than other Medicaid-enrolled children who are not in foster care. What are psychotropic drugs and why are so many foster children on them? Who has authority to make health care decisions for foster children and youth? Impact of trauma on mental health. hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity.  What types of behaviors are common as a result of trauma? Sleep issues common to children in foster care. Food issues common to children in foster care. Creating a Family course: Practical Solutions to Typical Food Issues  Impact of trauma on a foster child’s education. Children in foster care need educational advocates. Risk factors to consider for children already in the home. Creating a Family course: The Impact of Fostering on Children Already in the Home  Children can heal and foster parents can and do make a difference! This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts·         Weekly articles/blog posts·        Resource pages on all aspects of family buildingCreating a Family also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

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Jan 22

1 hr 4 min

We don’t just bring kids into our homes; we bring them into our marriage and relationships. And marriages or relationships are particularly challenged when we are parenting kids who have been exposed to trauma. We talk with Amy Garber, MSW and LICSW, the Manager of the Post Adoption Program with Wide Horizons for Children, a child welfare organization. We also talk with Anne Meijers, a licensed clinical social worker, specializing in adult and couples therapy.In this episode, we cover:Our goal should be for our marriage or relationships to be around long after the kids leave home. This takes being proactive because if we’re not careful our relationship becomes all about parenting or fostering.How can kids enhance a marriage or relationship? We know that kids who’ve experience trauma can be challenging to parent and can test a marriage or a relationship.Why are children adopted or fostered past infancy, children with prenatal exposure, and kids who have experienced trauma often harder to parent? CreatingaFamily.org has many courses on Trauma Informed Parenting.What are some of the stresses that relationships may face when fostering or adopting kids who’ve been exposed to trauma? Feeling isolatedOne parent wanting to adopt or foster more than the other Blame from the outside or between the parentsGrief- that parenting is harder or less fun than you anticipated, etc.What are some situations that children who’ve experienced trauma can bring to the family and be particularly difficult for the marriage?Disagreement on how to handle behaviorsTriangulationWhat are some signs that you are neglecting your marriage?How can trauma or neglect in the parent’s background impact the marriage once children arrive?How to handle extended family members (grandparents, etc.) that are negatively impacting your relationship?Tips for strengthening your relationship while parenting kids who’ve been exposed to trauma, including prenatal exposure.Special issues for single parents.We encourage single parents to establish a support network. How can challenging kids test this network? How can single parents find support?Tips for singles to strengthen their support network and relationships. This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:·         Weekly podcasts ·         Weekly articles/blog posts ·        Resource pages on all aspects of family building Creating a Family also has an active presence on many social media platforms. Please like or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jan 15

1 hr 2 min

What should you expect as you return home with a newly adopted baby or child? What are the common emotions? We talk with Laura Jean Beauvais, a licensed professional counselor and mother of two adult daughters through adoption. She has conducted domestic, foster, and international adoptions for more than 25 years.In this episode, we cover:Adopting a NewbornWhat are some common emotions when adopting a newborn?What are some common stresses when adopting a newborn?How may the revocation period affect the transition to new adoptive parenting?Expectations of extended family during this transition period.How do the stresses of newly adopted families differ from a family that gives birth to their child?How does the pre-adoption process affect this transition to new parenthood?What are some feelings that come up about birth parents after the baby comes home? Realities of open adoptions Handling grief of birth family Feeling like the presence of a birth mom makes the adoptive mom less of a “real” mom The balance of power shifting from the expectant/birth mom to the adoptive mom How much of your child’s “story” should you share?How can infertility struggles impact the transition period?Adopting a Child Past InfancyWhat are some common emotions when adopting a child from foster care or through international adoption?What are some common stresses when adopting a child past infancy?The challenge of setting realistic expectations.How to help your child and you settle in to becoming a new family.Post Adoption DepressionWhat is post-adoption depression?What are the symptoms?How common is post-adoption depression?Can fathers also have post-adoption depression?Who is at risk for post-adoption depression? Are there ways to predict which people are more prone to post-adoption depression?How can post-adoption depression impact parenting?What are some steps to take to prevent post-adoption depression?What should you do if you think you are suffering from post-adoption depression?Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jan 8

1 hr 9 min

What foods and supplements help improve fertility for those trying to conceive naturally and for those undergoing fertility treatment. We talked with Dr. Jorge E. Chavarro, Associate Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Chavarro’s research is focused on understanding how nutrition and lifestyle impact human reproduction. He is the Principal Investigator of the Nurses’ Health Study 3 – an ongoing prospective cohort of young professional women started in 2010 designed to investigate the role of lifestyle and biologic factors on women’s health – and leads the nutritional component of the EARTH Study, an ongoing prospective cohort of couples undergoing infertility treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital.In this episode, we cover:How Does Nutrition Impact FertilityWe know that women are born with all the eggs they are ever going to have so how does nutrition impact female fertility and egg quality?How does nutrition impact male fertility?How does weight and BMI affect fertility?We know that the microbiome in our reproductive tract is important to fertility. Does what we eat impact this microbiome?What Foods and Diet are Best for Enhancing FertilityWhat foods improve natural fertility or the fertility of those in fertility treatment?What is the importance of protein? What type of protein is bestRole of carbohydrates in fertility. Low carb? Complex vs simple carbs?CaffeineSoy productsWhat Supplements are Effective at Improving FertilityWhat supplements should you take if you are trying to conceive with or without fertility treatment?Prenatal vitaminMicronutrient supplementationFolatesCoQ 10Vitamin B12DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone)Vitamin DFish OilSupport the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Jan 1

1 hr 7 min

Children adopted from foster care or from abroad have often experienced abuse, neglect, or trauma. These children require a different form of parenting.  This is a re-air of an older interview we did with the late Dr. Karyn Purvis, author of The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family, and the founder and Director of the TCU Institute of Child Development, about how to help children from hard places heal.  In this episode, we cover:Why is parenting abused children different from traditional parenting?What are the 3 most important things you should do during the first 6 months home with a newly adopted child?How can we discipline our children while still remaining connected and create attachment?How can we help a child who has tantrums whenever he hears the word “no,” or is told he can’t do something?How long should parents stay home (if possible) after adoption?How can parents be proactive with children who have experienced abuse and neglect in order to help them and to improve behavior?Parenting kids adopted from foster care and internationally can be hard on the marriage and especially when one of the parents is the one getting educated on the type of parenting these kids need and the other one has not “bought into” it yet. How to help both parents get on the same page.How should parents handle criticism (implied or direct) about their parenting style when they are trying to follow the empower to connect style?What are some practical tools for encouraging attachment?Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Dec 2020

1 hr

How do you find and adopt a baby or child in another state and what is the Interstate Compact for the Placement of Children (ICPC)? We talk with Chantilly Wijayasinha, MSW and MPH and Interim Director of Adoptions and Foster Care at Vista Del Mar Child & Family Services; and Jim Thompson, adoption, foster care, and assisted reproduction attorney at the Thompson Dove Law Group, and a Fellow at Academy of Adoption & Assisted Reproduction Attorneys.Support the show (https://creatingafamily.org/donation/)

Dec 2020

54 min 58 sec