Upon Reflection

Nick Byrd

A podcast about what we think as well as how and why we think it.

All Episodes

On this episode of Upon Reflection, I read my 2021 paper in Logoi titled, "On Second Thought, Libet-style Unreflective Intentions May Be Compatible With Free Will". Imagine if I could predict your behavior before you even became of your conscious of your intention to behave that way. Would this mean that you don't have free will? I used to think so. In this paper, I explain why I was wrong: my view of free will involved magical thinking. Some figures from the paper. As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This podcast sponsored by DataCamp. DataCamp helps you make better use of data. You can build data skills online while learning from the world’s top data scientists. Find our more at datacamp.pxf.io/byrd. Students get a bonus 62% discount until August 25: You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts 6 Tips For Academic PresentationsOnline Conferences: Some history, methods & dataA Dissertation About Reflective Reasoning in Philosophy, Morality, & Bias15+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about Philosophy

Aug 10

16 min 43 sec

Welcome to the latest episode of Upon Reflection. This time, I read my paper with Michał Białek, "Your health vs. my liberty: Philosophical beliefs dominated reflection and identifiable victim effects when predicting public health recommendation compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic" (Total N = 998). As the title suggests we found that complying with public health recommendations didn't depend on whether people received messaging about identifiable COVID-19 victims or statistical victims in flatten the curve graphs. Rather compliance increased the more that people endorsed an effective altruist principle about reducing harm and the more that they endorsed the truth of scientific theories, but compliance decreased as people valued liberty more than equality. Importantly, we also found that people were less likely to prevent the spread of disease by wearing masks and staying at home if the pandemic was equally deadly, but labeled as a "flu" pandemic—-mostly because they perceived this as less threatening to society. We think this suggests that people's life-threatening decisions to flout public health recommendations like mask-wearing and staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic was not just about ineffective messaging, but also about their prior philosophical commitments. As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This episode was sponsored by Pluralsight's courses in coding, design, cloud-based solutions, and more. You can find out more about Pluralsight and sign up for a free trial at pluralsight.pxf.io/byrd. You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts New paper: “Your Health vs. My Liberty”4 Free DIY Data Analysis & Statistics ToolsThe meaning of 'statistical significance' and of p-values15+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about Philosophy

Jul 18

46 min 51 sec

Welcome to Upon Reflection. In this episode, I review the major take-aways and findings from my dissertation titled, "Reflective Reasoning For Real People". I explain what cognitive scientists mean by terms like "reflective reasoning", how reflection is measured empirically, how reflection can either help or hinder our reasoning, how more reflective philosophers tend toward certain philosophical beliefs, and how reflection may help us retrain our implicit biases. The recording is from my remote dissertation defense on May 29, 2020. You can find video of this dissertation overview (complete with the slideshow) below or on my YouTube Channel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjOF8puPvIY As the chapters of the dissertation are accepted for publication in academic journals, the free preprints will become available on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". This podcast is brought to you by the scientists who put up with philosophers like me and the philosophers who put up with scientists like me. Long live natural philosophy. More seriously, if you want to support the podcast, my ongoing research, or my other projects, then you can do so at byrdnick.com/support. You can subscribe wherever you find podcasts and you can find out more about me at byrdnick.com, on Twitter (@byrd_nick), or on Facebook (@byrdnick). Comments and questions can be submitted at byrdnick.com/contact. And, of course, if you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your review. Related A Dissertation About Reflective Reasoning in Philosophy, Morality, & BiasDebiasing in Administration, Advising, & TeachingIs post-fact reasoning redeemable?Fact-checking is not enough: We need argument-checkingThe Base Rate Fallacy

Aug 2020

15 min 52 sec

In this episode of Upon Reflection, I explain how academics should conference better. More accurately, I read my chapter, "Online Conferences: Some History, Methods, and Benefits" from Right Research: Modelling Sustainable Research Practices in the Anthropocene. This chapter reviews some history of online academic conferencing going back to the 1970s, explain the potential advantages of online conferences, report quantitative and qualitative results from three online conferences, and urge scholars to consider how they can contribute to a more sustainable, inclusive, and emergency resilient academy by replicating these online conferences. Title page of the chapter As with all of my writing, a free preprint can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". You can find the Upon Reflection podcast here or in your podcast app. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts New Paper: Online Conferences: Some History, Methods, and BenefitsA Free, Online Philosophy ConferenceHow To Record Professional Quality Presentations15+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about Philosophy

May 2020

34 min 47 sec

In this podcast, I read my chapter, "Causal Network Accounts of Ill-being: Depression & Digital Well-being". The paper reviews how well-being and ill-being can be understood in terms of the causal networks studied by economists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and other scientists.

Jan 2020

40 min 20 sec

In this podcast episode , I'll be reading Paul Conway's and my recent paper about moral dilemmas entitled, "Not all who ponder count costs: Arithmetic reflection predicts utilitarian tendencies, but logical reflection predicts both deontological and utilitarian tendencies". In this paper we find that—contrary to some dual process theories' claims—consequentialist responses to moral dilemmas may not be more reflective per se, but rather more influenced by mathematical information. As with all of my papers, the free preprint of the paper can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". If this sounds like the kind of research that you want to hear more about, you can subscribe to Upon Reflection wherever you find podcasts. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related Upon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 0: IntroductionUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 1: What We Can Infer About Implicit Bias10+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about PhilosophyIs Reflective Reasoning Supposed To Change Your Mind?Christine Korsgaard on Reflection and Reflective Endorsement

Sep 2019

1 hr 19 min

Welcome to the first episode of Upon Reflection, a podcast about what we think as well as how and why we think it. In this podcast, I'll be reading my paper entitled, "What We Can (And Can't) Infer About Implicit Bias From Debiasing Experiments". I argue that implicit bias is not entirely unconscious or involuntary, but it probably is associative. As with all of my papers, the free preprint of the paper can be found on my CV at byrdnick.com/cv under "Publications". If this sounds like the kind of research that you want to hear more about, you can subscribe to Upon Reflection wherever you find podcasts. You can also find out more about me and my research on Twitter via @byrd_nick, or on Facebook via @byrdnick. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related posts Podcasts ...for research?New paper: What We Can (And Can't) Infer About Implicit Bias From Debiasing ExperimentsUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 0: Introduction10+ Podcasts about Cognitive Science40+ Podcasts about Philosophy

Aug 2019

53 min 22 sec

Welcome to the first, introductory episode of Upon Reflection, a podcast about the philosophy of cognitive science and the cognitive science of philosophy. In this podcast I'll be sharing my own and others' research with you. For instance, I'll talk about the differences between intuition and reflection and how intuitive reasoning predicts different philosophical beliefs than reflective reasoning. I'll also discuss topics like implicit bias and how—contrary to what you may have heard—implicit bias may not be entirely unconscious and involuntary. Of course, cognitive science is an interdisciplinary research community. So there will be much more to talk about. If this sounds like the kind of research that you want to hear more about, you can subscribe to Upon Reflection wherever you find podcasts. You can also find out more about me and my research at @byrd_nick on Twitter, or @byrdnick on Facebook. If you end up enjoying the Upon Reflection podcast, then feel free to tell people about it, online, in person, or in your ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review. Related Posts Podcasts ...for research?10+ Cognitive Science Podcasts40+ Philosophy PodcastsUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 1 – What We Can Infer About Implicit BiasUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 2 – Not All Who Ponder Count CostsUpon Reflection Podcast, Ep. 3 – Causal Network Accounts of Ill-being

Jul 2019

1 min 22 sec