Global News What Happened To...?

Curiouscast

You’ve heard the stories. You’ve felt for the people involved. But what happens after the cameras shut off and the reporters walk away? Just because a story disappears from the news doesn’t mean it’s gone. So what happened to the nuclear disaster at Fukushima? or the trapped Chilean Miners? And did anything actually come out of the Ice Bucket Challenge? Join Global News reporter, Erica Vella on this unique history podcast as she takes you inside these stories and talks to the people at the heart of each one to find out exactly what’s happened since. 

Introducing: Global News What Happened To...?
Trailer 59 sec

All Episodes

Moufida Holubeshen and her husband John Holubeshen have long been passionate about beekeeping; the couple has three hives of their own at their home in Nanaimo, B.C. In 2019, Moufida recalled an email that sparked her attention; several sightings of large hornets had led officials to believe there was a suspected Asian giant hornet nest in Nanaimo. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…? Erica Vella finds out more about the Asian giant hornet and how they managed to arrive in Canada in 2019. She also learns how the insect earned the nickname "murder hornets" and finds out if the insects pose a significant risk to North American honeybees. Contact: Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nov 25

47 min 43 sec

There are stories…..that grabbed the whole world’s attention… But what happens when the news cycle continues to turn and new stories take over the headlines? This season, not only do we revisit major new events, we dig deep into topics YOU have asked for. We have 20 brand new episodes for you this season.  Global News What Happened To...? arrives November 25th. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nov 11

1 min 43 sec

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jul 29

33 min 15 sec

On this episode of the Global News podcast What happened to…?, Erica Vella updates stories that were covered in Season 1 of the podcast, including the Quebec mosque shooting, Boko Haram and the Fukushima nuclear crisis. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jul 15

20 min 38 sec

In 2002, Trent Evans was overcome with excitement when he learned he would be invited to the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah to volunteer as an icemaker. Originally from Edmonton, Alta., Evans had been working as a supervisor for the maintenance team that cared for the ice during Oilers games, team practices and other activities. Evans was one of 16 people invited to make and maintain the ice that would be on the international stage at the Olympics. When Evans arrived in Salt Lake City in February 2002, he started working on creating the ice that would be eventually used in the Olympic hockey tournaments for both the women’s and men’s teams. To mark centre ice, he placed a loonie — a piece of luck for the Canadian teams. Canada’s men’s hockey team hadn’t won a gold medal since 1952. Wayne Gretzky was the team’s executive director, Pat Quinn was the head coach and with players like Mario Lemieux, Joe Sakic, Eric Lindros and Jerome Iginla, Eric Zweig, a sports historian and author, said people were hopeful Canada could win the 2002 tournament. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…? Erica Vella finds out if the loonie was really lucky and speaks with Trent Evans to see what happened once it was revealed that it was hidden in the ice. She also finds out where the loonie is now and if its legacy has continued on. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jul 1

40 min 42 sec

Introducing Episode 1 of China Rising - Hostage Diplomacy On the first episode of China Rising, we examine  the Chinese government's practice of detaining political prisoners, by hearing directly from Canadians who've become caught in the crossfire. Christian aid workers Julia and Kevin Garratt lived in China for 30 years before their arrest in 2014, when they were suddenly cast as pawns in a geopolitical chess match. The Garratts’ traumatic experience is eerily similar to the case of the 'Two Michaels,' Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, detained in China since December 2018. Using their stories and others as a guide, we'll investigate how Western countries, including Canada, should respond to China's so-called 'Hostage Diplomacy.' You can listen to more episodes here: https://link.chtbl.com/china-rising See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jun 22

34 min 40 sec

In the 1980s, the threat of acid rain in Canada and the U.S. had become a brewing environmental crisis. In areas of Southern Ontario, lakes that once were teeming with wildlife were on the verge of becoming dead lakes, void of fish and other aquatic species. Acid rain occurs when sulphur dioxide and other pollutants mix with moisture in the air to form rain droplets with a high level of acidity. This acidity causes aluminum to leach out of the soil and water, potentially poisoning the plants and animals in the impacted ecosystem. Acid rain had been a big issue in Sudbury because of its nickel production, and early on, large smelters were identified as a source of the pollution and all levels of government worked to change regulations and have companies reduce emissions. The acid rain crisis also led to a bilateral Canada-U.S. agreement: the Air Quality Agreement, which was signed in 1991 by former prime minister Brian Mulroney and then-U.S. president George H. W. Bush. Mulroney and Bush committed to cutting down on the air pollution that causes acid rain in 1991, under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement. Both nations promised to reduce the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides — the air pollutants that give rise to acid rain — through a cap-and-trade system. The agreement led to major reductions in dirty fossil-fuel emissions in both countries. Canada slashed its total sulphur dioxide emissions by approximately 63 per cent from 1990 to 2014, while the U.S. cut emissions by 79 per cent. Both countries also recorded major reductions in nitrogen oxide pollution. At the height of the environmental crisis, 2.5 million tonnes of SO2 emissions were being released in the atmosphere a year from Sudbury. With changes in emission standards, Sudbury now emits 50,000 tonnes of SO2 a year. In Canada, SO2 emissions have decreased by 69 per cent — and in Sudbury, by 98 per cent. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…?, Erica Vella finds out how emissions causing acid rain were reduced, what is happening now in Ontario lakes, and how can we apply the lessons learned from acid rain to other environmental problems. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jun 17

41 min 5 sec

Hannatu Stephens was in her school's hostel in Chibok on the night of April 14, 2014. Speaking through a translator, she said at around 1 a.m., she heard loud noises coming from outside. The men who had broken into the hostel were not military soldiers, but members of the insurgency group, Boko Haram. Stephens and 275 other young women were ordered to leave the hostel and the insurgents set the school on fire. Stephens and the other girls were taken to Sambisa Forest, the known hiding sport for members of Boko Haram. The abduction of 276 girls sparked a campaign called Bring Back Our Girls, which had become the rallying cry in Nigeria and abroad. The #BringBackOurGirls hashtag tweeted by hundreds of thousands of people, including former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. Stephens would be one of 82 schoolgirls eventually released after more than three years in Boko Haram captivity. In the largest liberation of hostages since the schoolgirls were abducted from their boarding school in 2014, five commanders from the extremist group were exchanged for the girls’ freedom. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…?, Erica Vella speaks with Hannatu Stephens about the night of the abduction and what life was like after she was freed. Erica also speaks with experts to find out if Boko Haram is still a threat to those living in Nigeria. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca Captive - https://www.tvo.org/video/documentaries/captive-feature-version  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jun 3

42 min 33 sec

In April 2014, Grace Danladi Saleh had moved to her husband’s hometown of Chibok, Nigeria. He husband, Idrisa Danladi Saleh, was the town’s doctor and cared for the community. On April 14, 2014, Grace said she heard loud noises and their home began to shake. Her husband went to investigate. That night 276 schoolgirls were abducted by Boko Haram and in the days and weeks following the abductions, international outrage began to mount. A campaign called Bring Back Our Girls became the rallying cry in Nigeria and abroad, with the #BringBackOurGirls hashtag tweeted by hundreds of thousands of people, including former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…?, Erica Vella finds out what happened the night of the abductions, but also looks into how the insurgency group started and how the Bring Back Our Girls campaign helped shed light on an issue that had many people in Nigeria living in fear. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

May 20

39 min 33 sec

Aymen Derbali knew he would be late for evening prayers, but he decided to go anyway. He left his home in Sainte Foy, Que., on Jan. 29, 2017. When he arrived at the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City, he took a spot in the back corner to not disturb others but within minutes, he said he heard a loud noise. That night, six people were killed and 19 seriously injured when a gunman burst into the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City, Derbali was one of them. The attack stunned the country and was condemned as an act of terrorism. In the months following the shooting, Canadian Muslims voiced fear around discrimination and there was a heated debate erupted in Canada over the concept of Islamophobia. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…? Erica Vella speaks with Aymen Derbali about that night. She also looks at what happened to the man who was responsible for this tragedy and finds out if Islamophobia played a role in the tragedy. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

May 6

56 min 31 sec

The Flint Michigan water crisis garnered international attention in 2015 after it was discovered that residents were being poisoned by the water running through their taps. A year earlier in 2014, the city switched its water source from the Detroit water system to the Flint River as a cost-saving solution while awaiting the building of a pipeline from Lake Huron which hadn’t been completed yet. Many people living in the city questioned the decision before the switch which officially happened on April 25, 2014, and Lewis said she remembers noticing an immediate difference in the water. Residents began reporting various illnesses and several people had died from a Legionnaires outbreak. It was later revealed that the city didn’t treat the water with anti-corrosion agents that might have prevented aged pipes from leaching lead into the water system. On this episode of Global News’ What happened to…? Erica Vella revisits the water crisis to find out how it all began and what has happened since. She also speaks with the community members who pushed for change and finds out where they are now. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Apr 22

53 min 52 sec

Brazil was among one of the countries most affected by the Zika virus in 2015 and 2016 but Dr. Carlos Pardo, a professor at Johns Hopkins University, said the virus emerged in the 1950s. Zika virus is an arbovirus — a type of virus that is transmitted by certain kinds of insects like mosquitos. The ades Aegypti mosquito, which is primarily found in tropical climates, is a known carrier of the virus. It can also be sexually transmitted. In 2015, Germana Soares, who lives in Brazil, was infected with Zika virus. Soares was 12 weeks pregnant when she became ill, but at the time, doctors believed there was no harm to the baby. In November, just before she gave birth, Soares said local news stations began reporting a link between Zika and microcephaly with women who were pregnant. Days after his birth, doctors confirmed the diagnosis; Guilherme had microcephaly. Pardo said only 20 per cent of infected people show symptoms, but the risk rests with pregnant mothers as Zika is known to also cause Congenital Zika Syndrome and microcephaly in fetuses. Microcephaly occurs in these children when their mothers are infected with Zika while pregnant, he said. The fetus develops viral illness and eventually encephalitis. The World Health Organization estimated at the height of the epidemic, there were over 216,207 probable cases of acute Zika virus disease reported in Brazil, and thousands of babies were born with complications. Anis Institute for Bioethics, a not-for-profit organization in Brazil, has been one of the leading organizations advocating for women and families affected by the Zika epidemic. Luciana Brito, researcher and psychologist for Anis Institute for Bioethics, said since the beginning of the epidemic, over 19,000 babies have been born with suspected Congenital Zika Syndrome. On this episode of What Happened To…?, Erica Vella revisits the 2015 Zika epidemic and finds out if the virus is still a threat. She also speaks with the families impacted virus who share what life has been like. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Apr 8

40 min 59 sec

Eleven years ago, Haiti was rocked by a seven-magnitude earthquake that killed, injured and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Franciscot Auguste was living in the country at the time with his mother and four other siblings. He said Jan. 12, 2010, started out like a normal day that is until he realized the shaking he was feeling was an earthquake; he acted immediately and ran outside of the building. 20 seconds after he escaped the three storey building came crumbling down and he heard chaos around him. Shock and adrenaline coursed through Auguste; he escaped death by seconds. He thought everyone made it out safely, but his brother was still unaccounted for. 13-year-old brother, Peterson Auguste, was killed by the earthquake. In the days after the earthquake international foreign aid began flooding into the country; more than $13-billion was pledged to help rebuild the small Caribbean country. On this episode of Global News What Happened To…?, Erica Vella finds out what happened to the money that was raised. She also finds out what happened to Franciscot Auguste and how his life changed after the earthquake. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mar 25

45 min 6 sec

On this episode of the Global News What Happened To...?, journalist Erica Vella revisits the story of Alan Kurdi and the Syrian refugee crisis (Part 2) In 2012, Ruba Bilal was living in Damascus, Syria with her husband and two sons; she had reached a level of stability in her life, but the country where she had lived her whole life was in the middle of a dangerous civil war. Bilal said she was an activist in her community and worked on providing aid to people who were in areas that were under siege, but her family had concerns that she would be taken and detained because of the work she was doing. That year, Bilal and her family felt tensions beginning to mount and she said they made the decision to temporarily relocate to Lebanon. As the civil war continued, it was clear Bilal and her family would never have the chance to return to Syria and she submitted an application to LifeLife Syria, an organization that connects Syrian refugees with potential sponsors in Canada. In 2016, she learned her family would be coming to Canada as privately sponsored refugees. Bilal and her family were one of thousands who came to Canada in 2016, after the federal government made promises to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees. The commitment came after a photo of two-year-old Alan Kurdi garnered international attention on the dangers refugees undertake to seek safety. Kurdi and his family were attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea by boat after fleeing war-torn Syria. On the journey Alan, his brother Ghalib and mother Rehana perished; Abdullah Kurdi, Alan and Ghalib's father, was the only one to survive. On this episode of Global News What Happened To…?, Erica Vella speaks with Bilal about how she and her family adapted to life in Canada. She also finds out what happened to the Kurdi family and if the federal government has continued its commitment to resettle refugees in Canada. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mar 11

51 min 7 sec

In early September in 2015, a photo of a young boy lying lifeless on a beach in the Mediterranean captured the world’s attention. The picture showed two-year-old Alan Kurdi lying face down in the sand. Kurdi and his family were attempting to cross the Mediterranean by boat after fleeing war-torn Syria, but on the journey Alan, his brother Ghalib and mother Rehana perished; Abdullah Kurdi, the family’s father and husband, was the only one to survive. Tima Kurdi, Abdullah’s sister and Alan’s aunt, spoke about the night the family boarded the boat in Bodrum, Turkey. Tima said she went to grab her phone and noticed she had dozens of missed calls; she called her sister-in-law who was living in Turkey. The journey the Kurdi family took was one thousands of Syrians attempted at the height of the civil war. On this episode of the Global News What Happened to...? journalist Erica Vella revisits the story of Alan Kurdi and the Syrian refugee crisis and speaks with Tima about the Kurdi family’s devastating journey and finds out how the photo of Alan mobilized Canada to take action and help thousands of Syrians fleeing persecution. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Feb 25

45 min 36 sec

On this episode of the Global News What Happened To...? journalist Erica Vella revisits the 2013 Lac Megantic train derailment. In the early hours of July 6, 2013, a train carrying petroleum crude oil crashed into the centre of Lac Megantic, a small town in Quebec. The downtown core erupted in flames; 47 people perished, 2,000 people were evacuated from their homes. The tragedy marks one of the worst rail disasters in Canadian history. The incident happened at 1:15 a.m. July 6, 2013, when a runaway train with 72 oil tankers — owned and operated by the now-bankrupt railway company Montreal Maine and Atlantic Railway Ltd. (MMA) — barreled into the town at over 100 km/h. Along with the 47 deaths, much of the town was also destroyed. The Transportation Safety Board launched an investigation into the derailment and found 18 factors led to the Lac-Megantic disaster, including poor training, mechanical problems and sloppy safety oversight, a Transportation Safety Board (TSB) investigation concluded. Three men, Tom Harding, Richard Labrie and Jean Demaitre, were charged following the derailment, but in 2018 a jury had found the men not guilty. On this episode of Global News What Happened To...?, Erica Vella visits the town of Lac Megantic to speak with people who witnessed the tragedy over seven years ago. She describes what the town looks like know and finds out if any changes were made to ensure a derailment like this never happens again. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca If you enjoy Global News What Happened To...?, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts, tell us what you think and share the show with your friends. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Feb 11

46 min 20 sec

Following years of drought, Australia was ravaged by sweeping bushfires that began in 2019; 33 people were killed and thousands of others were displaced. Bushfires are an annual threat during Australia’s dry summers, but this wave of fires came early, catching many by surprise. The speed of the fires, coupled with the consistently dry conditions, created a situation firefighters struggled to control. New South Wales, a coastal state, was the hardest hit. The region located in the eastern part of the country is home to about six million people. Nathan Barnden, who has been working as a volunteer firefighter for the New South Wales Rural Fire Service since he was 16 years old, knew the 2019 fires were going to be bad ones. According to Australia’s Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, more than 10 million hectares of land was affected. The World Wildlife Fund estimates the bushfires killed or displaced nearly three billion animals, including 143 million mammals, 2.5 billion reptiles, 180 million birds and 51 million frogs. The devastation motivated people around the world to donate. The Wildlife Information Rescue and Education Service — also known as WIRES — received more than $90 million to help native Australian wildlife. In this episode, Erica Vella speaks with Barnden about his story, learns about the animals and land that was destroyed and finds out how the country is recovering since the massive blaze a year ago. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca If you enjoy Global News What Happened To...?, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts, tell us what you think and share the show with your friends See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jan 28

49 min 54 sec

Brandon Wolf recalls the hours leading up to June 12, 2016 vividly. He said he made plans to go out with his friends Christopher Andrew (Drew) Leinonen and Juan Ramon Guerrero. They decided to go to Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando. At 2:02 a.m. a man armed with a semi-automatic rifle and a handgun walked into the tightly packed club and began firing. The massacre is on record as one of the deadliest mass shootings of LGBTQ2S+ people in the U.S. Forty-nine people were killed and 53 others were injured by gunfire, most of whom were LGBTQ2S+ and many were people of colour. On this episode, Erica Vella revisits the story of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Fla., on June 12, 2016 and speaks with Brandon Wolf about his experience as a survivor and how witnessing the shooting that night changed the course of his life. She also finds what happened to the nightclub and the investigation into the mass shooting and if the events led to any changes in the U.S. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca If you enjoy Global News What Happened To...?, please take a minute to rate it on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts, tell us what you think and share the show with your friends. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jan 14

55 min 13 sec

On this episode of Global News What Happened To...?, journalist Erica Vella revisits the SARS epidemic that gripped parts of Canada in 2003. This year has been an unprecedented year as the world battles the COVID-19 pandemic, but 17 years ago, parts of the world faced another coronavirus -- Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, better known as SARS. Erica Vella looks back at the SARS epidemic and explains how one super-spreading event brought the virus to Toronto, where health-care workers were among the hardest hit. Sylvia Gordon was working in the critical care unit at Scarborough Grace Hospital in 2003 and there was one day in early March that she recalls vividly. “I was doing a day shift -- a 12-hour day shift -- we had trouble staffing and I stayed on for an extra hour or so,” she said. “Just as I was on my way out the door, I heard deep snoring. I thought, wow somebody is in trouble. I went in the room and sure enough, the patient was having like a cardiac arrest. So I put my bag down and called a code and we began resuscitating him.” At the time, Gordon had no idea that the patient she was resuscitating had SARS and she was now infected with the virus. “Initially I thought I was coming down with the flu. It was, you know -- you're coughing and you're feeling lethargic, running the temperature and just body pain, aches and pains all over,” she said. Gordon called in sick and explained what she was feeling. “I was told 'gosh, you know, you're not the first one. We've been getting a number of calls from other colleagues that they're not able to make it to work, that they're ill.' And then I started figuring out, well, maybe we contracted something. So I started calling my colleagues and then they described the same symptoms.” In Canada, there were 438 probable and suspect SARS cases reported and there were 44 deaths that included three health-care workers. Globally, the virus killed more than 800 people. Erica Vella finds out what changes were made following the SARS epidemic to protect health-care workers in Ontario and most importantly, if it helped in the battle ahead with COVID-19. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dec 2020

40 min 52 sec

On this episode of Global News What Happened To...?,, journalist Erica Vella revisits the story of the ice bucket challenge. In 2014, social media feeds were flooded with videos of people showering themselves in ice cold water; the goal was to raise awareness and money for ALS. Julie Frates’ husband, Pete Frates, was one of the co-creators. “Our good friend Pat Quinn, who has ALS and lives in New York, he was challenged and in that challenge, he also named one of Pete's good friends,” she said. “Pete saw it immediately and thought, okay … everyone's got to get on this right away and I remember sitting down that night at dinner and he directed all of us to go on Facebook and just continually start challenging people and sharing it.” The campaign went viral; celebrities like Justin Timberlake, Jimmy Fallon and Bill Gates joined in on the dare and globally over $220 million dollars was raised. “It was unfathomable,” she said. “It was shocking for us and it was shocking for everyone in the medical community. Everyone who had spent their whole career trying to research this disease; it was kind of like such a huge windfall. It was amazing and overwhelming and completely hard to grasp.” Pete was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in 2012. The disease weakens muscles and impairs physical functioning. There is no known cure. Erica Vella speaks with the family that started the viral campaign to see what has happened since 2014 and endeavors to answer; did it lead to any positive change? Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dec 2020

48 min 59 sec

On this episode of the Global News What Happened To...?, journalist Erica Vella revisits the story of the 33 trapped Chilean miners. On Aug. 5, 2010, the San Jose Mine in Chile collapsed while 33 men were underground. Mario Sepulveda, who has worked in the mining industry for almost two decades, spoke to Global News through a translator and said he remembers the day vividly. At approximately 2 p.m., Sepulveda said he began hearing really loud noises. Above ground, teams of people had been working to find the trapped miners, unaware if they had survived, but on Aug. 22, contact was made with the 33 men after a drill broke through. For 69 days in 2010, the world held its breath hoping for the safe return of 33 men trapped in a mine in Chile and people from all over the world helped in the rescue – including members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Erica Vella speaks with one of the miners and members of the teams that helped in the rescue. She also finds out what changes were made to the mining industry following the collapse. Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dec 2020

40 min 41 sec

On this episode Erica Vella revisits the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the nuclear crisis that followed at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. On Mar. 11, 2011, a magnitude-9.0 earthquake rocked parts of Japan and triggered a massive tsunami that killed almost 20,000 people. Kazuko Moghul, who lives in Ontario, said she had family in parts of Japan that was hit by the earthquake and tsunami. “I watched the program of NHK [Japan Broadcasting Corporation]. … I realized a big earthquake and huge tsunami hit Tohoku region,” she said. “I knew I had to contact my family right away.” Moghul tried to get in touch with her family that day, but had no luck and in the days that followed she would learn that earthquake and deadly waves would take the lives of four family members. The natural disaster caused the Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima to go into meltdown. Ontario resident, Dan Ayotte, an employee for General Electric, was working in the offices of nuclear plant when the earthquake hit. “I really didn't think we were going get out. I thought the building was going to come down,” he said. While Ayotte managed to escape and make it back to his home in Peterborough, Ont., a nuclear crisis was unfolding at the Daiichi plant and concerns had been raised around if people in Canada had been exposed to unsafe levels of radiation. On this episode of Global News What Happened to…?  Erica Vella speaks with Moghul and Ayotte; she also discovers if the nuclear disaster affected people living on Canada’s west coast. For more exclusive content head over to https://globalnews.ca/news/7457185/whatever-happened-to-podcast-great-east-japan-earthquake-daiichi-nuclear-crisis/  Contact: Twitter: @ericavella Email: erica.vella@globalnews.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nov 2020

36 min 26 sec

Just because a story disappears from the news doesn’t mean it’s gone… Like whatever happened to the nuclear disaster at Fukushima? or the trapped Chilean Miners? And did anything come out of the Ice Bucket Challenge? Join Erica Vella, a reporter for Global News, as she revisits these stories and talks to the people at the heart of each one to find out exactly what’s happened since.   Global News What Happened To...? Coming Soon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oct 2020

59 sec