Gray Matters

The Ricochet Audio Network

The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Administrative State, at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, supports research and debate on the modern administrative state, and the constitutional issues surrounding it. In this podcast, we’ll discuss some of the questions being debated around modern administration — some new questions, some timeless ones. And you can also get the audio from Gray Center events.

All Episodes

On October 21, 2021, the Gray Center and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted a special event to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court of the United States. This event, consisting of a daytime law symposium and evening lecture, brought together jurists, legal academics and practitioners, including many of the Justice’s former clerks, where we discussed his jurisprudence and impact on the Court over the past three decades. In a special evening lecture, the inaugural “Justice Clarence Thomas First Principles Award” was presented by Ambassador C. Boyden Gray to Laurence H. Silberman, Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. This was followed by Donald F. McGahn II’s introduction of Mitch McConnell, Senate Republican Leader, who provided Keynote Remarks. The lecture concluded with Concluding Thanks by Justice Clarence Thomas, U.S. Supreme Court. This episode features C. Boyden Gray, John G. Malcolm, Jennifer Mascott, The Honorable Mitch McConnell, The Honorable Donald F. McGahn II, The Honorable Laurence H. Silberman, and The Honorable Clarence Thomas.

Nov 22

58 min 5 sec

On October 21, 2021, the Gray Center and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted a special event to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court of the United States. This event, consisting of a daytime law symposium and evening lecture, brought together jurists, legal academics and practitioners, including many of the Justice’s former clerks, where we discussed his jurisprudence and impact on the Court over the past three decades. The fourth and final panel featured a Solicitors General discussion about advocacy in the U.S. Supreme Court, with Justice Thomas as a key influencer, over the last thirty years. It included: Noel Francisco, Partner-in-Charge of the Washington office of Jones Day and 47th Solicitor General of the United States; Paul Clement, Partner at Kirkland & Ellis and 43rd Solicitor General of the United States; Lisa Blatt, Partner and Chair of the Supreme Court and Appellate practice group of Williams & Connolly LLPm and former Assistant to the Solicitor General of the United States, and Jeffrey Wall, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP and former acting Solicitor General of the United States. It was moderated by Gray Center Co-Executive Director Jennifer Mascott. This episode features Lisa S. Blatt, Paul D. Clement, Noel J. Francisco, Jennifer Mascott, and Jeffrey Wall.

Nov 18

1 hr 13 min

On October 21, 2021, the Gray Center and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted a special event to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court of the United States. This event, consisting of a daytime law symposium and evening lecture, brought together jurists, legal academics and practitioners, including many of the Justice’s former clerks, where we discussed his jurisprudence and impact on the Court over the past three decades. Michael Pack, President and Founder of Manifold Productions, Inc., and producer of the documentary “Created Equal: Justice Thomas in His Own Words,” sat down with Mark Paoletta of Schaerr Jaffe LLP to discuss the film, its portrayal of Justice Thomas, and its impact. This episode features Michael Pack and Mark R. Paoletta.

Nov 15

1 hr

On October 21, 2021, the Gray Center and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted a special event to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court of the United States. This event, consisting of a daytime law symposium and evening lecture, brought together jurists, legal academics and practitioners, including many of the Justice’s former clerks, where we discussed his jurisprudence and impact on the Court over the past three decades. The second panel looked at the constitutional liberties of the first amendment, religion, race, and natural law, relating them to Justice Thomas’s jurisprudence. It included a discussion featuring: Allison Jones Rushing, Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit; Nicole Stelle Garnett, Professor of Law at Notre Dame Law School; Elbert Lin, Partner at Hunton Andrews Kurth and former Solicitor General of West Virginia, and Michael McConnell, Professor and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Stanford Law School. It was moderated by Adam Mortara, Lecturer in Law at University of Chicago Law School. This episode features Nicole Stelle Garnett, Elbert Lin, Michael W. McConnell, Adam Mortara, and The Honorable Allison Jones Rushing.

Nov 12

1 hr 13 min

On October 21, 2021, the Gray Center and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted a special event to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court of the United States. This event, consisting of a daytime law symposium and evening lecture, brought together jurists, legal academics and practitioners, including many of the Justice’s former clerks, where we discussed his jurisprudence and impact on the Court over the past three decades. The first panel focused on the structural constitution, including the concepts of federalism and the separation of powers. It included a discussion featuring: William Pryor Jr., Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit; Edith Jones, Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; Neomi Rao, Gray Center Founder and Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and Thomas Hardiman, Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. It was moderated by John Yoo, Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law. This episode features The Honorable Thomas M. Hardiman, The Honorable Edith H. Jones, The Honorable William H. Pryor, Jr., The Honorable Neomi Rao, and John Yoo.

Nov 8

1 hr 18 min

On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan’s published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. The fourth and final panel featured two authors of recent books on presidential power: Saikrishna Prakash, author of The Living Presidency: An Originalist Argument against Its Ever-Expanding Powers, and John Yoo, author of Defender in Chief: Donald Trump’s Fight for Presidential Power. They were joined by University of Michigan Professor of Law Julian Mortenson. The session was moderated by the Gray Center’s Co-Executive Director Jennifer Mascott. This episode features Jennifer Mascott, Julian Mortenson, Saikrishna Prakash, and John Yoo.

Oct 26

1 hr 10 min

On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan’s published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. The third panel analyzed current issues in presidential administration and executive power. It included a discussion featuring The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania’s Brian Feinstein, University of California Hastings College of the Law’s Zachary Price, and Arizona State University’s Bijal Shah, which was moderated by The Ohio State University’s Christopher Walker. Brian Feinstein’s working paper, co-authored with Abby Wood of the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, is available here: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Feinstein-Wood-Divided-Agencies.pdf Zachary Price’s working paper is available here: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Price-Faithful-Execution-in-the-Federal-Government-and-the-Fifty-States.pdf Bijal Shah’s working paper is available here: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Shah-The-Purpose-of-Presidential-Administration.pdf This episode features Brian D. Feinstein, Zachary S. Price, Bijal Shah, and Christopher J. Walker.

Oct 25

1 hr 9 min

On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan’s published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. D.C. Circuit Judge and Gray Center Founder Neomi Rao sat down with Gray Center Co-Executive Director Jennifer Mascott for a conversation about her career, the administrative state, and the creation of the Gray Center. This episode features Jennifer Mascott and The Honorable Neomi Rao.

Oct 20

51 min 58 sec

On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan’s published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. The second panel looked at Kagan’s landmark piece, “Presidential Administration,” after 20 years and its impact. It included a discussion featuring Columbia Law School’s Ashraf Ahmed, University of Minnesota’s Kristin Hickman, and Rutgers Law School’s Kathryn Kovacs, which was moderated by the Gray Center’s Co-Executive Director Adam White. Ashraf Ahmed’s working paper, co-authored with Columbia Law School’s Lev Menand, and New York University School of Law’s Noah Rosenblum, is available here: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Ahmed-Menand-Rosenblum-The-Tragedy-of-Presidential-Administration.pdf Kathryn Kovacs’s working paper is available here: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Kovacs-From-Presidential-Administration-to-Bureaucratic-Dictatorship.pdf This episode features Ashraf Ahmed, Kristin E. Hickman, Kathryn E. Kovacs, and Adam White.

Oct 19

1 hr 9 min

On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan’s landmark published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. The first panel was introduced by Gray Center Co-Executive Director Adam White and The Ohio State University’s John W. Bricker Professor of Law, Christopher Walker, and it focused on presidential administration and political polarization. It included a discussion featuring The George Washington University Law School’s Richard Pierce, Jr., Michael Rappaport of the University of San Diego School of Law’s Center for the Study of Constitutional Originalism, and Vanderbilt University Law School’s Kevin Stack, which was moderated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies’s Melanie Marlowe. Michael Rappaport’s working paper, co-authored with Northwestern University’s John O. McGinnis, is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/McGinnis-Rappaport-Presidential-Polarization.pdf Kevin Stack’s working paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Stack-Partisan-Administration.pdf This episode features Melanie M. Marlowe, Richard J. Pierce Jr., Michael B. Rappaport, Kevin M. Stack, Christopher J. Walker, and Adam White.

Oct 18

1 hr 15 min

On September 17, 2021, the Gray Center hosted an event in memory of Judge Stephen F. Williams: a conference for new papers written for a symposium on his enormous legacy in law and liberty. We are grateful to our authors, who discussed their newly completed papers at this event, hosted at the Decatur House in Washington, D.C., and followed by a reception where we were all able to continue the conversation. Keynote remarks for the symposium were offered by Judge Williams’s colleague, Judge Douglas Ginsburg, who was introduced by Adam White. Judge Ginsburg originally created this symposium with Professor Michael Greve and former Scalia Law School Dean Henry Butler. This episode features Judge Douglas H. Ginsburg and Adam White.

Oct 13

34 min 49 sec

On September 17, 2021, the Gray Center hosted an event in memory of Judge Stephen F. Williams: a conference for new papers written for a symposium on his enormous legacy in law and liberty. We are grateful to our authors, who discussed their newly completed papers at this event, hosted at the Decatur House in Washington, D.C., and followed by a reception where we were all able to continue the conversation. The second panel looked at Judge Williams’s contributions in areas related to the American Constitution and liberal democracy. It featured a panel discussion of new research papers by Antonin Scalia Law School’s Michael Greve, Harvard Law School’s Stephen Sachs, and Nathaniel Zelinsky of Hogan Lovells LLP, and was moderated by Gray Center Co-Executive Director Adam White. Michael Greve’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Greve-So-Close-And-Yet-So-Far-Away.pdf Stephen Sachs’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Sachs-Law-Within-Limits.pdf Nathaniel Zelinsky’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Zelinsky-Stephen-F-Williams-on-Liberalism.pdf This episode features Michael Greve, Stephen Sachs, Adam White, and Nathaniel Zelinsky.

Oct 11

1 hr 10 min

On September 17, 2021, the Gray Center hosted an event in memory of Judge Stephen F. Williams: a conference for new papers written for a symposium on his enormous legacy in law and liberty. We are grateful to our authors, who discussed their newly completed papers at this event, hosted at the Decatur House in Washington, D.C., and followed by a reception where we were all able to continue the conversation. The first panel was introduced by Adam White and focused on Judge Williams’s work on administrative law and regulatory policy. It featured a panel discussion of new research papers by Ambassador C. Boyden Gray of Boyden Gray & Associates PLLC, Columbia Law School’s Thomas Merrill, and Lewis & Clark Law School’s James Huffman, which was moderated by Gray Center Co-Executive Director, Jennifer Mascott. Ambassador C. Boyden Gray’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Gray-Judge-Stephen-F-Williams-and-the-Underestimated-History-of-the-Non-Delegation-Doctrine.pdf Thomas Merrill’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Merrill-Judge-Williams-on-Administrative-Law.pdf James Huffman’s paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Huffman-Judge-Stephen-Williams-Environmental-Jurisprudence.pdf This episode features C. Boyden Gray, James L. Huffman, Jennifer Mascott, Thomas W. Merrill, and Adam White.

Oct 8

1 hr 6 min

This summer, Professor Jennifer Mascott joined the Gray Center as its new Co-Executive Director. With school back in session, and the Center’s fall programs underway, Jenn visited the podcast for a conversation with our other Co-Executive Director, Adam White. They discussed her current research interests, her recent experience in the Justice Department, and her plans for Gray Center programs — beginning with an October 21 conference on Justice Thomas’s thirty-year legacy on the Court, details for which are available at https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/events/justice-thomas-thirty-year-legacy-on-the-court/. This episode features Jennifer Mascott and Adam White.

Sep 15

34 min 57 sec

In his confirmation hearing, Chief Justice John Roberts famously analogized his role to that of an umpire, “to call balls and strikes, and not to pitch or bat.” Dean Ronald Cass argues in a new paper that in three notable decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court—Kisor v. Wilkie, Department of Commerce v. New York, and Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of University of California—Roberts also seems to be concerned by the way the crowd will perceive the call. Cass explains that these decisions depart from prior law on judicial review and create additional discretion for the courts at the expense of the other branches. The paper was part of a Gray Center roundtable entitled “Judicial Review after Kisor.” In today’s podcast, Dean Cass joins Gray Center Co-Executive Director Adam White to discuss all three decisions and more. Cass’s paper, “The Umpire Strikes Back: Expanding Judicial Discretion for Review of Administration Actions,” is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/02/Cass-the-Umpire-Strikes-Back.pdf This episode features Ronald Cass and Adam White.

Jul 28

51 min 28 sec

On June 11, 1946, President Truman signed the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) into law, and it was intended to be “a bill of rights for the hundreds of thousands of Americans whose affairs are controlled or regulated in one way or another by agencies of the Federal Government,” according to its lead sponsor in the Senate. If we were to redesign the APA for today’s version of the administrative state, what would it be? To mark the 75th anniversary of the APA, on June 11, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference gathering many of the George Mason Law Review Symposium Issue authors together at the Historic Decatur House in DC for an afternoon of conversations on this and related questions. The second panel session, titled “The Life of the Law: What Has Happened Since 1946?” centered on papers by four Symposium Issue authors: The Honorable Ronald A. Cass, Aaron L. Nielson, Richard J. Pierce, Jr., and Stuart Shapiro. The panel session was moderated by Jennifer Mascott, Co-Executive Director of the Gray Center, who also gave opening remarks, along with Adam White. Links to the papers by this panel’s authors are available below, and the videos from the entire event as well as all Symposium Issue papers are available at https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/events/the-75th-anniversary-of-the-apa-the-george-mason-law-reviews-3rd-annual-symposium-on-administrative-law/. This episode features Ronald Cass, Jennifer Mascott, Aaron Nielson, Richard Pierce, Stuart Shapiro, and Adam White. Papers discussed during this panel session include: “Rulemaking Then and Now: From Management to Lawmaking” by Ronald Cass, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/rulemaking-then-and-now-from-management-to-lawmaking/ “Three Wrong Turns in Agency Adjudication” by Aaron Nielson, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/three-wrong-turns-in-agency-adjudication/ “Agency Adjudication: It Is Time to Hit the Reset Button” by Richard Pierce, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/agency-adjudication-it-is-time-to-hit-the-reset-button/ “The Impossibility of Legislative Regulatory Reform and the Futility of Executive Regulatory Reform” by Stuart Shapiro, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/the-impossibility-of-legislative-regulatory-reform-and-the-futility-of-executive-regulatory-reform/

Jul 14

1 hr 23 min

On June 11, 1946, President Truman signed the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) into law, and it was intended to be “a bill of rights for the hundreds of thousands of Americans whose affairs are controlled or regulated in one way or another by agencies of the Federal Government,” according to its lead sponsor in the Senate. If we were to redesign the APA for today’s version of the administrative state, what would it be? To mark the 75th anniversary of the APA, on June 11, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference gathering many of the George Mason Law Review Symposium Issue authors together at the Historic Decatur House in DC for an afternoon of conversations on this and related questions. The first panel session, titled “Creation Stories: What Did the 79th Congress Mean to Accomplish?” focused on papers by four Symposium Issue authors: Michael S. Greve and Jeremy A. Rabkin of George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, Christopher J. Walker of the Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law, and former ACUS Administrator, Paul R. Verkuil. The panel session was moderated by Adam White, Co-Executive Director of the Gray Center, who also gave welcoming remarks along with George Mason Law Review Symposium Editor, Carly Hviding. Links to the papers by this panel’s authors are available below, and the videos from the entire event as well as all Symposium Issue papers are available at https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/events/the-75th-anniversary-of-the-apa-the-george-mason-law-reviews-3rd-annual-symposium-on-administrative-law/. This episode features Michael Greve, Carly Hviding, Jeremy Rabkin, Paul Verkuil, Christopher Walker, and Adam White. Papers discussed during this panel session include: “Why We Need Federal Administrative Courts” by Michael Greve, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/why-we-need-federal-administrative-courts/ “The Origins of the APA: Misremembered and Forgotten Views” by Jeremy Rabkin, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/3948-2/ “The Administrative Procedure Act at 75: Observations and Reflections” by Paul Verkuil, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/the-administrative-procedure-act-at-75-observations-and-reflections/ “The Lost World of the Administrative Procedure Act: A Literature Review” by Christopher Walker, available at: https://lawreview.gmu.edu/print__issues/the-lost-world-of-the-administrative-procedure-act-a-literature-review-2/

Jul 7

1 hr 31 min

“Do NEPA (the National Environmental Policy Act) and other permitting requirements doom green energy and infrastructure plans?” That was the title of a recent webinar, organized by the Law & Economics Center at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School. The Gray Center’s Adam White moderated a discussion with Mario Loyola (Competitive Enterprise Institute) and Andrew Rosenberg (Union of Concerned Scientists). Both have worked firsthand on these issues: Loyola at the Council on Environmental Quality, and Rosenberg at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This episode features Mario Loyola, Andrew Rosenberg, and Adam White.

May 25

1 hr 2 min

For the last forty years, courts have been especially deferential to federal agencies’ claims of scientific expertise. And in the last year, we have seen the Supreme Court grapple repeatedly with questions of administrative decisions related to managing the Covid-19 pandemic. How much deference should courts afford agencies on scientific and technical matters? This was among the subjects discussed in a recent Gray Center roundtable on “Facts, Science, and Expertise in the Administrative State.” The roundtable’s working papers are now on the Center’s web site, and in this podcast two of the authors, Jonathan Adler and Don Elliott, discuss their own papers on the “super-deference” doctrine of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. v. NRDC. They’re joined by the Center’s Executive Director, Adam White. This episode features Jonathan Adler, E. Donald Elliott, and Adam White.

May 18

1 hr 2 min

The Paycheck Protection Program was the single largest component of the federal pandemic relief legislation passed in March of 2020. Since then, a debate has developed about the program’s speed-accuracy trade-off, exposing the challenges administrators face when they’re responsible for administering vague statutes in emergency circumstances with little or no information up front. Prof. Susan Morse wrote on this subject as part of a Gray Center roundtable on administration in crisis. In this episode of the podcast, she joins Adam to discuss her paper and more. This episode features Susan Morse and Adam White.

May 11

51 min 44 sec

Amid the Covid-19 crisis, Operation Warp Speed helped to develop vaccines with astonishing speed. But even with a fast-tracked FDA process, there still remain significant questions about risk, liability, and intellectual property. These are the subjects of two new Gray Center working papers by Professors Sam Halabi of the University of Missouri and Professor Kristen Osenga of the University of Richmond. The papers were discussed at a roundtable last fall, and published as working papers this year. In this episode of the podcast, they join Adam to discuss their papers and what we’ve learned since the fall. (NOTE: Unfortunately, we encountered some audio difficulties during the recording). This episode features Sam Halabi, Kristen Osenga, and Adam White.

May 4

52 min 35 sec

Executive orders are not a new tool of presidential power — all presidents have used them, and some much more than others. But in recent decades they seem to have become a more significant and prominent aspect of American government. In today’s episode, Bowdoin College’s Andrew Rudalevige and the Gray Center’s Adam White describe the processes of E.O. development, with special focus on the Office of Management and Budget’s central role. It’s all the subject of Rudalevige’s new book, “By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power.” This episode features Andrew Rudalevige and Adam White.

Apr 27

1 hr 2 min

At least five Supreme Court justices seem interested in reconsidering the current version of the “Nondelegation Doctrine.” And their recent judicial opinions have inspired waves of new scholarship for and against judicial reform. Last spring, the Gray Center invited scholars to workshop new papers on the nondelegation doctrine; now those articles are online in our Working Paper Series, and two of the authors—Kristin Hickman and Nicholas Parrillo—chat with Adam White about their papers and the broader nondelegation debates.

Mar 26

1 hr 13 min

The Biden Administration faces immensely consequential policy choices on questions of financial regulation—from the proper regulatory standards to apply to banks for the sake of safety, soundness, and systemic risk; to cryptocurrencies; to the use of financial regulatory agencies to drive policy on non-financial issues. And as the Gamestop/Robinhood saga highlighted, new technologies can radically complicate even old policy frameworks. How will the new administration and Congress confront these challenges? On March 11, 2021, the Gray Center hosted an expert panel on “The Future of Financial Regulation in the Biden Administration,” to confront these issues and more. This webinar was the fifth installment of the Gray Center’s series, “The Administrative State in Transition.” It featured the following panel of experts: Peter Conti-Brown, of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the Brookings Institution, Kathryn Judge of Columbia Law School, and Jennifer J. Schulp, of the Cato Institute’s Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives. The conversation was moderated by the Gray Center’s Executive Director, Adam White. This episode features Peter Conti-Brown, Kathryn Judge, Jennifer J. Schulp, and Adam White.

Mar 19

1 hr 32 min

Throughout his presidential campaign, Joe Biden called for national reforms to police practices and civil rights. Immediately after the election, his transition team highlighted Racial Equity as one of its four policy priorities. And right after his inauguration, he signed a set of initial executive actions focused generally on discrimination. Yet at the same time, he has argued that the focus should be not on “defunding the police,” but rather on promoting accountability. With that in mind, what specific policies might the Biden Administration and Congress pursue in the months and years ahead? What reforms are in the federal government’s direct regulatory powers, and which will need to be pursued through federal spending or other powers? And what issues are committed to state and local governments? To discuss these issues, on February 25, 2021, the Gray Center hosted the fourth event in its webinar series, “The Administrative State in Transition,” featuring the following panel of experts: Rachel Harmon of the University of Virginia School of Law, Gail Heriot of the University of San Diego School of Law, and Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr., of Harvard Law School. The conversation was moderated by the Gray Center’s Director, Adam White. This episode features Rachel Harmon, Gail Heriot, Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr., and Adam White.

Mar 8

1 hr 29 min