21st Folio Podcast

Discussing modern Shakespeare productions of stage and screen

A podcast about modern Shakespeare productions of stage and screen.

Todos los episodios

In this episode, we discuss the Schaubühne Berlin's recorded productions of Hamlet and Richard III, both directed by Thomas Ostermeier and starring Lars Eidinger. The productions are in German with English subtitles, and were recently streamed on the Schaubühne's website as part of their quarantine programming. The productions are modern dress and in German, with modernized German dialogue, though the English subtitles reproduce Shakespeare's text (rather than translating the modern German back into English). We discuss Ostermeier's interpretations of the two plays, Eidinger's performances, the problematic misogyny in both, the excitement of the improvisations, the costumes, and much more. Excerpts of the productions are available on YouTube though not always with English subtitles! For detailed show notes, visit: : http://21stfolio.com/2020/04/20/ep-29-hamlet-richard-iii-schaubuhne Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief at Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz, actor, director, and contributing writer at Seventh Row (@noemiola) Mary Angela Rowe, Editor-at-Large at Seventh Row (@lapsedvictorian) Editor: Edward von Aderkis Find 21st Folio online at http://21stfolio.com Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row, an online publication dedicated to interdisciplinary film criticism. Find us at http://seventh-row.com and on Twitter @SeventhRow.

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abr 2020

1 hr 53 min

In this episode, we discuss the Groundling Theatre Company's current production of Julius Caesar; the genius of Moya O'Connell, André Sills, and Michelle Giroux; and the influence of Nicholas Hytner. This production is heavily inspired by Nicholas Hytner’s 2018 production (which we discussed here) of the play, featuring similar approaches to gender-swapping characters, as well as much of the same blocking and sets. Directed by Chris Abraham, the Groundling production is in the round in a large space with high ceilings, often with the effect of it feeling like an intimate arena. Unlike Hytner’s production, this is very much Cassius’s show, and Moya O’Connell regularly steals every scene she’s in right out from under Johnstone’s Brutus. André Sills, as Casca, also shines, having been given short shrift as Coriolanus in Stratford’s Coriolanus. And Michelle Giroux, who previously played Marc Antony at Stratford in 2018, shines in a series of smaller parts, including as Brutus’s wife. Groundling is an independent off-shoot of Ontario’s Stratford Festival, featuring many of the same actors and directors that appear at Stratford; their productions are mounted during Stratford’s off-season. Last year, Groundling produced a revelatory production of Lear starring Seana McKenna. For a history of past productions, visit their website here. For detailed show notes, visit: https://21stfolio.com/2020/01/27/ep-28-groundling-theatre-julius-caesar/‎ Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Editor: Edward von Aderkas Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio, or visit our website at 21stfolio.com Find out more about Seventh Row at seventh-row.com

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ene 2020

1 hr 5 min

In the latest attempt to adapt Shakespeare for modern audiences, Australian director David Michôd (The Rover) directs Timothée Chalamet in The King, a sort-of rewriting of Shakespeare's Henry IV Part 1 & 2 and Henry V. The film is set in the original time period, but Shakespeare's language has been gutted, while his structure is preserved, in favour of modern English with the occasional "ye olde" touch. The script, written by Joel Edgerton (who stars as Falstaff) and Michôd, turns Falstaff into one of the stars of Henry V (instead of showing his death...) who goes to Agincourt with Hal. In this episode, we try to make sense of why Netflix's The King was made, who it's for, how it hews closely to some aspects of Shakespeare and veers wildly away from it, and why it made us so angry. For show notes, visit: https://21stfolio.com/2019/12/09/ep-27-the-king/‎ Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Laura Anne Harris (@lauraanneharri1), and Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark) Editor: Edward von Aderkas Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio, or visit our website at http://21stfolio.com Find out more about Seventh Row at seventh-row.com

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dic 2019

1 hr 22 min

In this episode, we discuss Richard Eyre's film adaptation of King Lear starring Anthony Hopkins, Emma Thompson, Emily Watson, and Florence Pugh. Director Richard Eyre (The Hollow Crown Henry IV Part 1 & 2, The Children Act) adapted King Lear for the small screen in 2018, airing on the BBC in the UK and Amazon Prime in the US. (It's on iTunes in Canada). Set in the present day, Emma Thompson stars as Goneril, alongside Emily Watson as Regan, Florence Pugh as Cordelia, Andrew Scott as Edgar, Jim Broadbent as Gloucester, Tobias Menzies as Cornwall, Christopher Eccleston as Oswald, and Karl Johnson as The Fool. This production of Lear is really an ensemble piece, which takes the time to flesh out each of the daughters and their relationships to their husbands. The acting, across the board, is top notch. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2019/10/21/ep-26-richard-eyres-king-lear/‎ CREDITS Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Seventh Row Editor at Large Mary Angela Rowe, of (@lapsedvictorian), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark) and Laura Anne Harris (@lauraanneharri1) Editor: Edward von Aderkis Find us online at 21stfolio.com Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio.

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oct 2019

1 hr 35 min

In this episode, we discuss the 2019 Almeida Theatre's production of Richard II starring Simon Russell Beale, which was broadcast to cinemas worldwide via NTLive. Joe Hill-Gibbons directed this streamlined 1 hour and 40 minutes (no interval) production of Richard II starring Simon Russell Beale. For detailed show notes, visit: https://21stfolio.com/2019/07/22/ep-26-simon-russell-beale-in-richard-ii/ CREDITS Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe, Editor at Large of Seventh Row (@lapsedvictorian) and Noemi Berkowitz (@noemiola) Sound Recordist and Editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Find us online at 21stfolio.com Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio.

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jul 2019

1 hr 2 min

This is the second part of our discussion of the current 2018 Stratford Festival production of Coriolanus directed by Robert Lepage. In this episode, we discuss how the production approaches the relationships between each of the key characters: Volumnia and Coriolanus, Volumnia and Menenius, Menenius and the Tribunes, Menenius and Coriolanus, and Coriolanus and Aufidius. We also delve deeper into how the design choices for the production affect our interpretation of each of the characters and how they relate to each other. This production runs until October 2018. For detailed notes on the production and this episode (including the trailer for the production and a gallery of stills from the production), visit the episode page here: http://21stfolio.com/2018/08/17/robert-lepage-coriolanus-stratford/ ----- CREDITS Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe, Editor at Large of Seventh Row (@lapsedvictorian) and Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound Recordist and Editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Find us online at 21stfolio.com Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio.

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ago 2018

1 hr 6 min

In this episode, we discuss the Stratford Festival's current modern dress production of Coriolanus directed by Robert Lepage. Québécois director and set designer Robert Lepage makes his Stratford debut this year with a modern dress production of Coriolanus. André Sills stars as Coriolanus and Stratford Grand Dame Lucy Peacock plays Volumnia. Known for mixing film elements (through projections) with theatre, Lepage creates a series of stunning backdrops and sets to make the settings feel almost as real as if it were film. There's a lot of stage magic involved that's an impressive achievement. Part one of this episode focuses on Lepage's design for the production, the world he creates, and how he uses projections. For detailed production notes, visit: https://21stfolio.com/2018/08/17/robert-lepage-coriolanus-stratford/ ----- CREDITS Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe, Editor at Large of Seventh Row (@lapsedvictorian) and Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound Recordist and Editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Find us online at http://21stfolio.com Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio.

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ago 2018

53 min 27 seg

In this episode, we discuss the NTLive recording of the Bridge Theatre's 2018 production of Julius Caesar. Directed by Nicholas Hytner, the production stars Ben Whishaw as Brutus, David Morrissey as Mark Antony, Michelle Fairley as Caius Cassius, and Adjoa Andoh as Casca. The production was performed in the round, with a constantly shifting stage, and a standing audience in the stalls who also helped served as the Roman mob. We discuss the modern interpretation of the text, its gender-swapped casting (Casca, Cassius, and several others are now women), the way the production works as immersive theatre (and its limits), and more. Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief at Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz, actor, director, and contributing writer at Seventh Row (@noemiola) Mary Angela Rowe, Editor-at-Large at Seventh Row (@lapsedvictorian) Edited by: Edward von Aderkis Find 21st Folio online at http://21stfolio.com Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row, an online publication dedicated to interdisciplinary film criticism. Find us at http://seventh-row.com and on Twitter @SeventhRow

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ago 2018

1 hr 36 min

In this episode, we finish our discussion of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s 2016 production of Hamlet directed by Simon Godwin and starring the 25-year-old Paapa Essiedu. This is part 2/2 of our discussion of the production, and it focuses on Essiedu's superlative performance and the curated information loss from recording the production. 0:00–4:20 What to do about the much-hated Osric/Reynaldo 4:20–7:12 Ophelia's death 7:12–20:32 Paapa Essiedu's dirtbag teenage Hamlet 20:32–35:52 How the production was recorded Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz (@noemiola), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), and Lesley Peterson Editor and Producer: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio and find us online at 21stFolio.com. The 21st Folio is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), seventh-row.com

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mar 2018

35 min 52 seg

In this episode, we discuss the Royal Shakespeare Company's first production of HAMLET (2016) to star a black actor, rising star Paapa Essiedu, as the melancholy Dane. 0:00–1:45 Intro 1:45–19:30 The RSC’s first black Hamlet and setting the production in Ghana 19:30–26:00 Costumes and colonialism 26:00–35:30 How depressed is Hamlet in this production? 35:30–52:45 Hamlet The Cool Kid and his messed up relationship with women, Ophelia The Modern Woman, and a very flat Gertrude 52:45– 1:05:46 Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and the key players at court (Claudius, Polonius, etc) Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz (@noemiola), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), and Lesley Peterson Editor and Producer: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio and find us online at http://21stFolio.com. The 21st Folio is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), http://seventh-row.com

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mar 2018

1 hr 5 min

This is part two of our discussion of the Almeida Theatre's 2012 production of King Lear starring Jonathan Pryce and directed by Michael Attenborough. The production was recorded over two nights, and is now streaming on Digital Theatre where it is available for rent or to watch as a subscriber. 00:00–7:35 The theatre space 7:35–14:40 Filming the production 14:40–24:23 The set and tone of the production 24:23–30:52 The costumes 30:52–56:23 The production’s target audience & the pros and cons of concept productions 56:23–59:20 Incest or no incest, that is the question 59:20–1:04:23 Who we think this production is for and whether Lear is a good gateway play Find us online at http://21stFolio.com Find us on Twitter @21stFolio Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Craig Ruttan (@crut), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark) Editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) 21st Folio is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), http://seventh-row.com

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feb 2018

1 hr 4 min

The 21st Folio podcast is back from hiatus! We discuss the Almeida Theatre's 2012 production of King Lear starring Jonathan Pryce and directed by Michael Attenborough. 00:00 – 1:28 introduction 1:28 – 21:35 duty and nature in King Lear: the daughters, Kent, and Lear’s role as King. “You’ve made your daughters thy mother”. 21:35 – 28:31 The fool’s disappearance 28:31 – 38:50 Who gets our sympathy and why? 38:50 — Lighting and staging Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Craig Ruttan (@crut), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark) Editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio and check out our website at http://21stfolio.com. The 21st Folio is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (http://seventh-row.com)

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feb 2018

49 min

In this episode, we talk to Argentine director Matias Piñeiro about his latest film, Hermia & Helena, which is more inspired by than loosely based on A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Hermia & Helena is Piñeiro’s English language debut and the fourth film in his Shakespeare cycle, which started with the short Rosalinda in 2011, based on As You Like It. Piñeiro talked eloquently about his experience reading Shakespeare in translation and translating Shakespeare into Spanish himself. He talked about why he loves the Bard’s comedies, which he likened to 1930s screwball comedies, and how these stories allow him to explore new approaches to cinema. Host and editor: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste). Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio and visit us online at 21stfolio.com

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oct 2016

33 min 4 seg

In this episode, we continue our discussion from eps. 12–16 on the Laurence Olivier and Ian McKellen Richard III films. We discuss how the two films depict Richard's disability and whether Richard III is a good gateway drug for Shakespeare neophytes. For detailed show notes, visit http://21stfolio.com/2016/07/01/ep-17-richard-iii-film-pt-6-disability Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut) and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com 21st Folio is a subsidiary of Seventh Row, http://seventh-row.com, @SeventhRow.

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jul 2016

40 min 2 seg

In this episode, we continue our discussion from episodes 12–15 on the Richard III films starring Laurence Olivier (1955) and Ian McKellen (1995). We discuss breaking the fourth wall, adapting soliloquies for the screen, entrances and exits, what the camera represents, how Richard is The Worst, and how Shrek stole from Olivier's Richard III. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/27/ep-16-richard-iii-adapting-screen Credits ===== Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut) and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com

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jun 2016

20 min 38 seg

In this episode, we continue our discussion from episode 12–14 on the Laurence Olivier and Ian McKellen Richard III films. We discuss the way the films begin and end, how to catch an audience up on 6 hours of Henry VI in a few minutes, how we meet Richard, and how he meets his end. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/24/ep-15-richard-iii-pt-4/ Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut) and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com. The podcast is a subsidiary of The Seventh Row (http://seventh-row.com).

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jun 2016

41 min 20 seg

In this episode, we continue our discussion from episode 12 and episode 13 of the Laurence Olivier and Ian McKellen Richard III films. We discuss the interpretations of Buckingham and some minor characters. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/20/ep-14-richard-iii-film-pt-3-buckingham Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut) and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Visit our website at 21stfolio.com. Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio.

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jun 2016

19 min 28 seg

In this episode, we continue our discussion from ep. 12 of the Laurence Olivier and Ian McKellen Richard III films. We discuss the interpretations of Lady Anne and changes to the text for the film adaptation. We also mention the Mark Rylance and Kevin Spacey Richard III productions. For detailed show notes, visit http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/18/ep-13-richard-iii-lady-anne/ Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut) and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Visit our website at http://21stfolio.com. Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio.

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jun 2016

28 min 32 seg

In this episode, we compare two film versions of Richard III: Laurence Olivier's 1955 film and Richard Loncraine's 1995 film starring Ian McKellen, which was based on the Richard Eyre stage production. This is the first of a several-part discussion on these two films. Here, we discuss our first impressions of the two films and the differences between the two interpretations of Richard and what's driving him. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/13/ep-12-richard-iii-film/ 00:00–2:00 Introductions 2:00–7:35 First impressions 7:35–16:30 The differences between the two Richards and what’s driving them 16:30–19:53 Hitler imagery in the Ian McKellen Richard III and why the film is set in the 1930s 19:53–20:37 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Kevin Condardo (@FearStrikesOut, @NoHoldsBardCast) Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com. Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio.

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jun 2016

20 min 36 seg

Picking up on our discussion of Twelfth Night from episodes 8–10, we ask, "What is the shelf life of a Shakespeare production?" Is there such thing as a timeless Shakespeare film? What makes a Shakespeare production a product of its time? Why is it important to document theatre productions? In what context do we view new productions of Shakespeare on stage and film? Will we still be watching these films and production recordings in 100 years? And we tangent on the treatment of music on the stage vs. screen for Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night film and the recording of the 2012 Shakespeare's Globe production of Twelfth Night. For detailed show notes, visit: http://wp.me/p7wRL3-fG Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Dan Beaulieu (@DanBeauKnows), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. Visit our website at http://21stfolio.com

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jun 2016

30 min 27 seg

In this episode, we talk about the advantages of doing Twelfth Night on stage, through the lens of the 2012 Shakespeare's Globe production starring Mark Rylance (directed by Tim Carroll). We make some comparisons with Trevor Nunn's 1996 film to illuminate the advantages of the Globe's production. For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/06/02/ep-10-twelfth-night-stage/ ‎ 00:00–00:50 Intro 00:50–4:31 Where scenes are set in the Nunn film 4:31–9:42 Trap doors and spatial metaphors on stage 9:42-11:44 Thrust stages, proscenium stages, and how Twelfth Night works in different theatrical spaces 11:44- 14:37 How did the Globe production work as a recording? 14:37–19:54 How do you capture these landmark productions for posterity when interaction with the audience is so key? 19:54–23:27 Things that only work on stage & the problem with dealing with soliloquies 23:27–24:11 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Dan Beaulieu (@DanBeauKnows), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com

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jun 2016

24 min 10 seg

Through the lens of Trevor Nunn's 1996 film and the 2012 Globe Production of TWELFTH NIGHT (which we discuss in ep. 8), we ask: What is the difference between doing Shakespeare on film vs stage? What do we look for in a good production of each? And what can you only do on stage or screen? For detailed show notes, visit http://21stfolio.com/2016/05/31/ep-9-twelfth-night-stage-vs-film/ 00:00–0:50 Intro 00:50–10:10 When you hear Shakespeare on film, what does that mean to you? 10:10–14:36 The role of the director in stage vs film 14:36–23:50 The role of the audience 23:50–26:55 The control you have on film…and the influence of a theatre background on filmmaking choices 26:55–34:10 Did you find the revelations of character more subtle or more aggressive in the film or the stage production? 34:10-34:45 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Dan Beaulieu (@DanBeauKnows, Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For more information, visit http://21stfolio.com

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may 2016

34 min 44 seg

We continue our discussion of the 2012 Globe Production (starring Mark Rylance)of Twelfth Night and Trevor Nunn's 1996 film adaptation of the play. In part two of our discussion, we focus on Malvolio, Maria, and melancholy in the two productions. This is the second of four parts. For detailed show notes visit http://21stfolio.com/2016/05/24/ep-8-twelfth-night/ 0:00–0:51 Intro 0:51–10:51 Violence, melancholy, and Malvolio 10:51–16:35 Nuance and subtlety in the Nunn film 16:35–18:10 Maria steals the show at the Globe 18:10–25:47 Approaches to status — Maria, Sir Toby 25:47–26:30 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Dan Beaulieu (@DanBeauKnows), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Craig Ruttan (@Crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For more information about the podcast, visit http://21stfolio.com

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may 2016

26 min 30 seg

In this episode, we discuss Trevor Nunn's 1996 film adaptation of Twelfth Night and the 2012 recording of the Globe Theatre production with an all-male case (starring Mark Rylance as Olivia, directed by Tim Carroll). For detailed show notes, visit: http://21stfolio.com/2016/05/24/ep-8-twelfth-night/ 00:00–1:13 Intro 1:13–2:06 Guest intros 2:06–8:36 Initial thoughts 8:37–33:08 Who is the central character in the Nunn film: Feste or Viola? 33:08–46:15 Performance of gender and the queer undertones 46:15–52:30 Interpretations of Olivia 52:30–53:14 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Dan Beaulieu (@DanBeauKnows), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio For more information, visit: http://21stfolio.com

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may 2016

53 min 13 seg

This is the second half of our discussion about Greg Doran's film adaptation of his RSC Hamlet production starring David Tennant. For detailed show notes, visit: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/05/06/ep-7-hamlet-david-tennant/ Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. Find us online at http://seventh-row.com Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz (@noemiola), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) 00:00–0:50 Intro 0:50–7:50 Ophelia’s madness - why does she always have to be naked when she’s crazy 7:51–14:24 Keeping up appearances, how everyone is performing for everyone else in this world, and the surveillance state 14:24–30:59 A controlled, diplomatic Polonius, the great Patrick Stewart, and David Tennant's performance 31:00–39:35 The problems with Horatio, the need for a dispassionate observer, and the role of the camera 39:35–55:50 How does this "hybrid" film/play production work as a means of capturing theatre? 55:50–1:05:02 The humour in the production and the Hamlet/Polonius relationship 1:05:02–1:07:52 Sign-offs, the Yorick skull story, and outro

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may 2016

1 hr 7 min

In this episode, we discuss Greg Doran's film version of his RSC production of Hamlet starring David Tennant. The production is currently available to stream on PBS.org in the US. For detailed show notes, visit http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/05/06/ep-7-hamlet-david-tennant/ 00:00–1:58 Intro 1:58–7:00 Initial thoughts on the production 7:00–11:23 Claudius in Act IV & Act V and the worldbuilding in the production 11:23–21:04 Translating the play into a hybrid film of the play (the sets, the cameras within the production, breaking the fourth wall) 21:04–31:05 Incest-y things: Laertes-Opehla and Hamlet-Gertrude 31:06–36:33 The Laertes-Ophelia-Polonius family unit 36:35–42:40 Denmark is a Prison? + Rearranging Act 2 & 3 (and the “To be or not to be” speech) 42:40–49:40 Excising (almost all of) Fortinbras and cuts to Horatio’s scenes 49:40:–1:00:06 Women in the production 1:00:06–1:00:50 Outro Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Noemi Berkowitz (@noemiola), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. Find us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio

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may 2016

1 hr

In this very special bonus episode, we interview Maxine Peake about playing Hamlet in the Royal Manchester Exchange production of Hamlet (2014/2015), which was recorded on film. The film of the production will be screening across the U.S. this week (mostly on May 2). To find a theatre near you. visit: http://www.hamletmaxinepeake.com For detailed show notes, visit: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/05/02/interview-maxine-peake-hamlet/ Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Interviewers: Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark) and Laura Anne Harris with questions contributed by Lesley Peterson. Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) 00:00–3:13 Introductions 3:15–5:08 How did being a woman playing Hamlet as a man (in a production with roles that are gender-swapped) affect Peake's interpretation of Hamlet? 5:08–6:25 How did Peake decide to play Hamlet as trans? 6:25–8:11 How did the decision to gender-swap some of the characters come about? 8:12—11:05 What is the difference between tackling Hamlet when there’s so much text to play with compared with so many female characters (like Ophelia) in Shakespeare where there’s so little and so much of it is what you’re bringing to the role? 11:05–13:05 How much discussion did you have with your director about using your sexuality as a tactic in the play? 13:05–14:22 How did you feel about moving the ‘to be’ speech to Act 4? 14:22–16:56 How important do you think it is for theatre companies to open more opportunities to play famous Shakespearean characters? 16:56–17:51 Are there other male parts you’re now itching to play? 17:51–20:27 What was your experience of audience interaction and your performance? 20:27–22:40 How did doing the play in the theatre in the round at the Exchange affect things? 22:40–24:47 How did having cameras in the theatre for the filmed version change the performance or your experience of it? 24:47–26:33 There are a few line readings in your performance that are different from the traditional ones. How did these come about? 26:34–29:05 How did you develop Hamlet as a 21st century character? 29:05–31:01 How did the decision to do the lines so quickly at the beginning come apart and how did that affect you physically? 31:02–33:11 At some point, it slows down. How did you decide where and how to slow down? 33:11–35:40 Because the second half is so difficult, what was the strategy for tackling that in rehearsal? 35:40–37:35 How did you prepare for the part before rehearsals began? 37:35–40:18 How did you find the performance changed across the 7-week run? 40:18–42:18 How did you decide to cut Fortinbras? 42:18–44:57 How did you edit the Michael Grandage script you were working from? 44:58–47:21 What was the backstory between Horatio and Hamlet in your production? 47:30–48:45 Closing comments and outro

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may 2016

48 min 45 seg

This is the 2nd part of our discussion of the film version (dir. Margaret Williams) of the Manchester Royal Exchange Theatre's HAMLET (dir. Sarah Frankcom) starring Peake as Hamlet. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Laura Anne Harris, Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), Lesley Peterson Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) 00:00–0:50 Intro 0:50–8:12 Hamlet Sr. The Ghost 8:12–12:28 The fishmonger scene 12:28–30:00 Gender-swapping in the production 30:00–41:27 Using accents as a shorthand in Shakespeare productions 41:27–50:30 The Hamlet/Ophelia relationship 50:30-58:50 The theatre in the round and how it works 58:50–1:10:48 Filming the production for the screen

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abr 2016

1 hr 10 min

In the first part of episode 6, we'll be discussing the film version (dir. Margaret Williams) of the Manchester's Royal Exchange Theatre's 2014/2015 HAMLET(dir. Sarah Frankcom) starring Maxine Peake as the Danish Prince. The production features several gender-swapped characters, including Polonia and Marcella, and features a stage completely surrounded by the audience. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Laura Anne Harris (http://lauraanneharris.com), Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark), and Lesley Peterson Editor and Sound Recordist: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For detailed show notes visit: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/04/24/ep-6-maxine-peake-hamlet/ For more information on the podcast, visit: http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio 0:00–2:36: Intro, Addendums to Ep. 5 on Coriolanus, Shakespeare 400 announcements 2:36–3:13: How to see the Maxine Peake production 3:14–10:30: Guest introductions and first impressions of the production 10:30–17:00: Innovations in line readings, including pacing 17:00–19:42: Hamlet's madness and his dumb plans 19:42–28:00: Where does "To be or not to be" belong anyway? 28:00–32:00: Making Act IV work and Hamlet's trip to England 32:00–41:30: Staging Act I Scene 2 around the dinner table 41:30–53:30: Polonia, the gender-swapped Polonius 53:30–55:00: Claudius, the wet noodle, and his relationship with Polonia and Gertrude 55:00–1:02:34: Costumes! And clothing! And virginity! Oh my! 1:02:34–1:06:20: Why did they rip the mat up off the stage? 1:06:20–1:10:20: Bird's eye views of the stage and actors 1:10:20–1:11:04: Outro

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abr 2016

1 hr 11 min

In the second part of our CORIOLANUS discussion, which pits Fiennes against Hiddleston, we discuss the importance of physicality in the productions, Corfidius, Coriolanus' death, how the productions were shot, and what's with all the fight scenes? Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Danny Bowes (@bybowes), Jeremy Mongeau (@JeremyMonjo), and Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian) Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio. For detailed show notes, visit: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/04/17/21st-folio-coriolanus-ep-5/ For more information about the podcast, visit: http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio

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abr 2016

58 min 27 seg

In this episode, we compare two productions of Coriolanus: Ralph Fiennes' 2011 film in which he stars and the 2014 Donmar Warehouse production (which was broadcast through National Theatre Live) directed by Josie Rourke and starring Tom Hiddleston. We discuss Fiennes' cold and terrifying interpretation compared with Hiddleston's more humane Coriolanus. We also compare how the two productions build the worlds of Antium and Rome and how well the character seem to fit together. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Jeremy Mongeau (@JeremyMonjo), and Danny Bowes (@bybowes). Sound recordist and editor: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio. For more detailed show notes: http://wp.me/p6ZLnU-2aA For more podcast information: http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio

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abr 2016

54 min 46 seg

In our pilot episode of Sorting Shakespeare, we sort Shakespearean characters — from Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, and Henry V — into Hogwarts houses. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests & Hogwarts experts: Danny Bowes (@bybowes) and Connor Joel (@keepthemuse) Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio. For detailed show notes visit: http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio

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abr 2016

1 hr

In part two of our discussion about Baz Luhrmann's and Franco Zeffirelli's film, we compare the final death scenes, contemplate the water imagery in Luhrmann's film, and ask "What makes Shakespeare 'Shakespeare'"? That is, at what point is Romeo & Juliet no longer Shakespeare? We discuss ballet, opera, translations, modernized language, and try to determine how we can evaluate at what point it's merely an adaptation of the Bard and not the Bard's own work.

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abr 2016

1 hr 14 min

In this episode, we compare two film adaptations of Romeo and Juliet: Franco Zeffirelli's 1968 film and Baz Luhrmann's 1996 modern dress film. We discuss why we prefer Luhrmann's film even though they don't Speak The Speech I Pray You. Also in this episode: the greatest Mercurio ever on screen, the differences in the balcony scenes, how the filmmakers have translated the play to the language of cinema, modern dress vs period dress, and more. Host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste), Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Laura Anne Harris, and Caitlin Merriman (@CaitlinSnark). Editor and sound recorder: Cam White (@JediDusk). Follow us on Twitter @21stFolio or visit us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio where you can also find more detailed show notes.

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abr 2016

1 hr 3 min

In the second part of our discussion of Justin Kurzel's 2015 film adaptation of The Scottish Play, we consider whether it is in fact still "Shakespeare". We discuss killing Duncan, how The Lion King is actually a Macbeth story, the film as a Western, killing Banquo, the final showdown, the importance of speaking the speech, the historical context in which the play was written, and more! Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Laura Anne Harris, Contributing Writer for Seventh Row; Connor Joel, Copy Editor for Seventh Row (@keepthemuse) Editor and Sound Recordist: Cam White (@JediDusk) For more detailed show notes: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/04/01/21st-folio-episode-3-macbeth/ Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio and visit us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio. This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication.

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abr 2016

45 min 26 seg

In this episode, we discuss Justin Kurzel's 2015 film adaptation of The Scottish Play starring Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard. We consider the Christian imagery in the film, the decision to delete all references to witchcraft, the importance of the sound mix, and the problems with how the speech is spoken in the film. We also discuss other adaptations of Macbeth including Sleep No More. Host: Alex Heeney, Editor-in-Chief of Seventh Row (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Laura Anne Harris, Contributing Writer for Seventh Row; Connor Joel, Copy Editor for Seventh Row (@keepthemuse) Editor and Sound Recordist: Cam White (@JediDusk) For more detailed show notes: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/04/01/21st-folio-episode-3-macbeth/ Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio and visit us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio. This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication.

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mar 2016

58 min 3 seg

In the second part of our discussion about film versions of Henry V — Kenneth Branagh's 1989 film in which he stars and Thea Sharrock's 2012 TV movie starring Tom Hiddleston — we discuss the depiction of the French in the film, Harry's courtship with Princess Katherine, and more. For more detailed show notes: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/03/25/ep-2-henry-v-film/ Your host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian)and Craig Ruttan (@crut). Editor and Sound Recordist: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio and visit us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio. This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication.

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mar 2016

41 min 1 seg

In this episode, we discuss two major film versions of Henry V: Kenneth Branagh's 1989 film in which he stars and Thea Sharrock's 2012 TV movie starring Tom Hiddleston, which was the final part of the Hollow Crown series. We discuss the differences in interpretations of the character of Henry V, the edits made to the text in each film, and how each film handles the Chorus. For more detailed show notes: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/03/25/ep-2-henry-v-film/ Editor's note: We had to re-record a few parts of this episode, especially when Alex Heeney is speaking to introduce the episode, so there is some disparity in sound quality. Your host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian)and Craig Ruttan (@crut). Editor and Sound Recordist: Cam White (@JediDusk) Follow the 21st Folio on Twitter @21stFolio and visit us online at http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio. This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication.

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mar 2016

57 min 46 seg

This is the second part of our discussion about the live cinema broadcast of Barbican Theatre’s production of Hamlet (2015) directed by Lindsey Turner and starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet. We discuss Turner’s directorial choices, Cumberbatch’s performance, the cuts made to the text, the set and costumes, and what we gained from this interpretation. We also discuss how well the cinema broadcast captured the live theatre experience. Follow 21st Folio: @21stFolio Your host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: David Larsen (@leaflemming), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Craig Ruttan (@crut) Edited by: Cam White (@JediDusk) Detailed show notes: http://www.seventh-row.com/2016/03/17/folio21-ep1/ For more information about this episode, including show notes, visit: http://seventh-row.com/21st-folio For additional information about 21st Folio, visit http://seventh-row.com/folio21 This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication: http://seventh-row.com

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mar 2016

47 min 18 seg

In this episode, we discuss the live cinema broadcast of Barbican Theatre’s production of Hamlet (2015) directed by Lindsey Turner and starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet. We discuss Turner’s directorial choices, Cumberbatch’s performance, the cuts made to the text, the set and costumes, and what we gained from this interpretation. We also discuss how well the cinema broadcast captured the live theatre experience. Your host: Alex Heeney (@bwestcineaste) Guests: David Larsen (@leaflemming), Mary Angela Rowe (@lapsedvictorian), Craig Ruttan (@crut) For more information about this episode, including show notes, visit: http://wp.me/p6ZLnU-1T8 For additional information about 21st Folio,, visit http://seventh-row.com/folio21 This podcast is a subsidiary of Seventh Row (@SeventhRow), a multidisciplinary arts criticism publication: http://seventh-row.com

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mar 2016

1 hr 9 min