3DPOD: Insight from 3D Printing Pros

3DPrint.com

Hosted by Joris Peels (3DPrint.com, Executive Editor) and Maxwell Bogue (3Doodler, Co-Founder & Investor), 3DPOD brings 3D printing & additive manufacturing news and insight, with straight talk from two bona fide 3D printing pros.

All Episodes

Mahendran Reddy is the Business Development Director for NAMIC. NAMIC is Singapore's 3D printing promotion and coordination organization. I think it's a remarkably effective one at that. We spoke to him to find out how Singapore was going about promoting the city state for 3D printing. What support can I have when I come to Singapore as an entrepreneur? Why is Singapore a good place to set up my Asian headquarters? What startups are already there? These are some of the things we discussed, we hope that you enjoy listening!

Nov 1

41 min 57 sec

Frank Piller is one of the leading voices in mass customisation. He's a Professor at RWTH Aachen University and has written and done a lot of research into mass customisation. He's the co-author of Leading Mass Customization and Personalization: How to profit from customization in e-commerce and beyond which you can download for free here. He's also one of the researchers behind "Surviving on the long tail: An empirical investigation of business model elements for mass customization" and has an introduction to mass customisation here. I've been following Frank's work for over a decade because he does a lot of interesting research and is clear and concise in communicating it as well. So I was really looking forward to having Frank on the 3DPod and he didn't disappoint. We have an engaging and lively discussion about mass customisation, what it means, the different types of mass customisation and more. Frank talks us through some best practices and candidly gives us examples of best practices, good implementations and failed ones. Max and I really loved the conversation and we hope that you do too.    

Oct 25

51 min 41 sec

Dr. Jason Jones was an AM researcher on a project that expanded in scope and got very complicated. Miraculously it resulted in a company called Hybrid Manufacturing Technologies. This firm makes print heads and equipment that turns CNC machines into DED machines. The company's machines are used to make parts, repair parts and add new material to older parts. They also have inspection heads to enable parts to be build right and checked the first time. I really think that Hybrid is an amazing combination of Additive and CNC and criminally underused. Jason gave us a wonderful tour of his companies advantages and the specific advantages of 3D printing and subtractive manufacturing in one machine. Really worth your time!

Oct 21

44 min 24 sec

Xometry (Nasdaq: XMTR) is a fast growing and, now, publicly-traded marketplace for manufacturing services. We talk to CEO Randy Altschuler, who came from finance to build and grow companies. What exactly is the role of Xometry? How does it aim to grow and scale up even more? What markets is it expanding into? How does it ensure that good manufacturing partners make parts well? How does it control for quality and determine price? How is it expanding and what applications and technologies is it looking to next? We talk about the company's strategy and how the business has managed to grow. I really think that there is a lot of insight here in growing and scaling a company. I especially enjoyed Randy's focus on performing every single day rather than milestones as a key to unlocking continued growth. It will be very interesting to see how the competitive landscape in 3D printing and manufacturing services evolves. This is a great listen for anyone involved in that business.

Oct 4

43 min 33 sec

In this episode of the 3DPOD, we talk to Mandaná "Mandy" Moshiri, Technology Manager at the LEGO Group. Far from the maddening crowds, the hype, and the promises of 3D printing, she and her colleagues are using additive at the famous toy block-maker. What technologies does LEGO use? What future additive processes is Mandy excited about? What is holding 3D printing back and what are its advantages? Mandy details how LEGO is using it for mold tooling and conformal cooling molds. How do you innovate with 3D printing at a firm? What kinds of applications and research are worth pursuing? And how "normal" is AM at LEGO? We get a very clear and honest picture from Mandy as to her field and how she's applying it at her employer. I really liked her directness, skepticism, and straightforward way of using and discussing 3D printing. I think this is a must-listen for those of you implementing 3D printing at large companies or in industry.

Sep 30

42 min 47 sec

Steve Grundahl started Midwest Prototyping in the very early days of 3D printing. On this episode of the 3DPOD, he tells us about how he got financing, how he grew his business. what technologies and applications he relied on, and how he kept growing. Steve also tells us why he opted to sell his firm now and how the future of Midwest Prototyping under the umbrella of Prototek will look. As well as sharing his entrepreneurial journey, Steve imparts a lot of wisdom. There are anecdotes, but ones that you can really learn from. We had a blast once again with this episode and know that you will find it to be valuable, as well.

Sep 6

44 min 55 sec

A 3D printing double unicorn, Formlabs is one of the most talked about and followed startups out there. The firm pioneered desktop stereolithography and the professional desktop segment and now has released an entry level powder bed fusion machine, as well. We speak to founder and CEO Max Lobovsky about the early days of Formlabs. How did the company get funding? Well, it started with an overheard story and a tweet. Max goes on to talk about why Formlabs made some of the choices it did and how it came to grow. He discusses the company's future and how it will continue to grow, as well. We also discuss SPACs, IPOs and more. Really great discussion! Max will also take part in the SmarTech – Stifel AM Investment Strategies 2021 summit on September 9, 2021, where he will be able to shed more light on overall market and his company’s role in it. Register for free here.

Sep 1

41 min 12 sec

MeaTech 3D (NasdaqCM: MITC) is the Israeli startup rocket ship that is aiming to commercialize and industrialize 3D printed meat. Ethical meat uses fewer resources, less water, less land and creates many fewer emissions than regular meat does. But can this development actually work at scale? How much will it cost? And how do you make 3D printed meat? We look into the future and at the possible disruption that 3D printed meat may bring together with co-founder Omri Schanin.

Aug 17

40 min 55 sec

Jochen Loock has trained over 1000 professionals in Additive Manufacturing through the Additive Academy at Fraunhofer Research Institution for Additive Manufacturing Technologies (IAPT). He now performs business development with automotive companies for the prestigious German research institute. Jochen has been instrumental in several groundbreaking 3D printing projects for end-use automotive components. He has helped car companies adopt 3D printing and industrialize it for parts that could be on your next car. Our conversation with Jochen was, therefore, fueled by experiences and knowledge gleaned not only from academia but also from the frontlines of 3D printing in manufacturing. We hope that you'll like this episode!

Aug 10

45 min 39 sec

Carlos Zwikker has long been involved with AM. He was a great influence on Shapeways when it started and has advised many other firms, as well. Previously at Electrolux and Philips, Carlos now deploys his expertise and talents at AM-FLOW. AM-FLOW is a company that uses machine vision and machine learning to automate 3D printing. AM-FLOW's solutions automatically detect and identify parts so they can be routed, compared, picked and put in the right boxes. Together with its partners, the firm wants to help drastically reduce the costs of 3D printing by automating part handling and more. We had a fun conversation with Carlos that made us think a lot, not only about AM-FLOW, but also about 3D printing in general and its fortunes and future.

Aug 3

45 min 41 sec

Julien Cohen worked for Stratasys Direct and Eaton in Application Development before joining 3DEO. He takes us through what application engineering is and how it helps customers. We also have a lively discussion about the relative merits of various technologies and approaches. Additionally, he explains 3DEO's unique binder jetting technology and how the company is using it for serial production in 3D printing. We talk about future scenarios in manufacturing and what will power the 3D printing. A lovely conversation and we hope that you enjoy it as well.

Jul 26

39 min 54 sec

Jason Fullmer is the COO of Formlabs. We spoke to him about the company's global supply chain, including sourcing, interruptions, reverse logistics, shipping, quality assurance, quality management and many more topics. Operations and supply chain are super important to businesses, but we often overlook this importance and focus on the more obvious sides of a businesses, such as their marketing or strategies. A good idea is nothing without execution and excellence in operations. We hope that a look at some aspects of supply chain and quality will make this a handy and interesting talk for you.

Jul 19

34 min 6 sec

Gordon Styles is a true 3D printing pioneer. He bought a stereolithography machine very early and built the UK's biggest service bureau off of it. After selling said business, he moved to China to start Star Rapid, a leading 3D printing and low-volume manufacturing service. Gordon tells about the very early days of the 3D printing industry. He also discusses entrepreneurship, building a business, marketing, doing business in China, 3D printing, CNC and many other subjects. Gordon is very frank and has a lot of really sage advice, as well as some war stories. We really liked talking to Gordon and hope that you enjoy listening to him, as well.

Jul 12

43 min 18 sec

Nadav Goshen is the CEO of MakerBot. He talks to us about how the firm has developed from a scrappy startup to a part of Stratasys, including Makerbot's identity and role. We discuss the education market, the business of catering to engineers, and Makerbot's offering. We also get into manufacturing with clusters of desktop 3D printers and the future of 3D printing. Nadav explains what his vision is for the future and if the consumer 3D printing revolution will happen after all. We really liked speaking with Nadav and hope that you'll like listening.

Jul 5

42 min 23 sec

Kenneth Jiang's The Spaghetti Detective uses machine learning and vision to analyze your FDM prints. Relying on Octoprint, the tool looks at your 3D printer to determine whether or not it is printing spaghetti. We manage to belatedly ask Kenneth what causes spaghetti, but most of the podcast is us brainstorming with Kenneth about all of the types of things his tool can do. Machine learning and machine vision will play an important part in 3D printing, but we have very few actual practical working examples. This is one of those few and we find out all about it, as well as Kenneth's own story, in this podcast.  

Jun 21

44 min 23 sec

Olaf Diegel is a professor at the University of Auckland who specializes in all aspects of design for additive manufacturing (DfAM). He also 3D prints guitars, other instruments, and eyeballs to try to fool Apple's facial recognition software. Olaf's lab sometimes builds heat exchangers along with all sorts of other parts. We have a conversation with him mostly about DfAM, including the software toolchain, AMF, nTopology, Fusion360, and more. We had a fun but valuable conversation with Olaf and hope that you enjoy it as well.

Jun 14

42 min 28 sec

This time on the 3DPOD, we get to chat with Major Travis Tubbs of the U.S. Space Force. Surprisingly, a lot of the conversation was about plants, but we also discussed satellites, farming from space, farming in space, terraforming planets, 3D scanning plants, and a lot more. We were also super curious about the brand new U.S. Space Force. We asked questions about what it's like working there and being part of such a new service. Due to Major Tubbs's extensive research, we get to bounce all over the place speaking to him about topics relevant to 3D printing. The result of this is a fun and informative conversation about many things that you may not expect to think about.

Jun 7

42 min 45 sec

Clement Moreau founded Sculpteo and led the 3D print service for ten years before selling it to BASF. In this episode, we follow his journey, discuss what made Sculpteo successful, and how the company changed along with its market. We hear of an initial consumer focus that was replaced by one focusing on European businesses. Now, as a part of BASF, how will Sculpteo fair? And what is Sculpteo's role in BASF's 3D printing expansion? Clement is open and direct and tells us about finding investors, growth, and focus. This is a really great story for entrepreneurs and those operating in the service bureau space!

May 31

37 min 55 sec

In this episode, Max and I fall all over ourselves to ask questions of Douglas Hofmann, Principal Scientist at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). We also listen intently as Doug explains the ins and outs of bulk metallic glasses (aka "amorphous metals") and why one would use these materials. With high wear and chemical resistance amorphous metals can be used for gearboxes that do not require lubrication, handy if you're on Mars and the nearest Jiffy Lube is 319 million kilometers away. We also get to understand a bit more about what it is that JPL does and how it uses 3D printing to make parts for its vehicles and projects. Max and I could scarcely contain our excitement with this episode and we hope that you enjoy it also. By the way, to learn more about how 3D printing is used for space programs, check out 3DPrint.com's Space Zone.

May 24

44 min 12 sec

I'm unabashedly a Domin fanboy. The UK-based company makes high-performance hydraulic valves in Poland using powder bed fusion. These optimized products are high value and outperform traditionally manufactured systems in many metrics. It seems that the valve world is ripe for digitization and may forever be changed via 3D printing. Domin CEO Marcus Pont shimmers with ambition and has a lot of wise and insightful things to say on this podcast. We cover numerous subjects and I think that there are deep insights to be had in how to engineer for value and how to make breakthrough end-use parts. I was on a kind of hazy 3D printing high when this episode ended—give it a listen.

May 17

48 min 35 sec

Byron Kennedy is the CEO of SPEE3D, an Australian firm that develops cold spray metal 3D printing. After a successful exit in powertrain components, he and his business partner Steven Camilleri were exploring 3D printing and new technologies. They found an existing 30-year-old technology, cold spray, and decided to make it additive. The result is a machine capable of producing 30 tonnes of metal parts a year at extremely low-cost points per part. Byron talks us through the technology and applications. He speaks of opportunities in marine and defense with large, low-cost components that are out of bounds for most of the rest of our industry. The boys down under have really turned the cold spray process on its head, but have also upended the economics of 3D printing. Byron gives us a lot of engineering insight related to how the process was designed and how they're finding applications for their technology. It was a real eye-opener for Max and me and really let us think much much bigger about additive than we did before.

May 10

41 min 58 sec

This episode is a blast, as we descend into the mayhem that was the early days of MolyWorks. A team that tries to make a gas atomizer on a founder's lawn inside a shipping container and survives is a lucky one indeed. And now, years later, Chris Eonta's company is more mature and shipping its Greyhound containerized atomization facilities worldwide. These can turn scrap into low-cost, high-performance metal powders for powder bed fusion. You can also use them to recycle scrap or to turn failed prints and supports into new powder. I really feel that Molyworks is overlooked and think that they could have a profound impact on making 3D printing more sustainable and moving it into austere areas. We hope you enjoy this episode.

May 3

37 min 34 sec

Jeff Mize is a veteran entrepreneur who sold his firm NAVTEQ to Nokia for $8.1 billion and his Climate Corporation to Monsanto for $1.1 billion. He now heads up PostProcess Technologies. There, Jeff wants to help 3D printed goods become a reality through a number of post-processing solutions. With a variety of technologies with exciting names, Post Process helps remove SLA supports, de-powder SLS builds, and surface finish parts. We talked about Jeff's goals for the company and how he sees the industry grow and change. I think that both Max and I learned a lot from Jeff and hope that you will as well.

Apr 26

46 min 30 sec

Technical ceramics keep on working when a lot of other materials fail. If a part needs to be in a very hot or very chemically abrasive environment, or if you need incredibly high abrasion resistance, then technical ceramics will continue to work where polymers and metals would have long since failed. In a lot of applications, they're lighter, as well, and have great properties for very specific uses. But, of all the materials, technical ceramics are the bastard stepchildren of the materials world. Misunderstood and unloved they are underutilized. One person who wishes to change this is Guillaume de Calan of Nanoe. Nanoe makes ceramic filaments for desktop machines and a number of other ceramics besides. Max and I were charmed by Guillaume's deep knowledge of ceramics and the way he qualifies everything he says and is very realistic. We talk with Guillaume about sintering, binder jet, the use of desktop 3D printers for print ceramic parts, and many of the issues, as well as opportunities, with ceramics as well. At the end of it all, I think that this 3DPOD can really help you learn a lot more about ceramic materials and processes that could help you solve your problems.

Apr 20

36 min 58 sec

Brent Wright is a prosthetist and orthotist who uses 3D printing to help people regain function in their lives. Max and I both found talking to him to be super inspiring. Brent works for EastPoint Prosthetics & LifeNabled, as well as Additive America. In this wide-ranging conversation, we talk about HP Multi Jet Fusion, prosthetics sockets, wear, posterior cruciate ligaments, VarioShore TPU 3D printing filament, how to make an orthotic, and how to become a prosthetist. Needless to say, Max and I were both taken by the extremely motivating and wonderful work that Brent does. It's also a 3D printing application that makes useful parts that are very valuable to patients. Check out the training, prosthetics, and work that Brent does here. $70 gets someone a knee.

Apr 12

44 min 45 sec

Pia Harlaß is the Head of Global Marketing & Corporate Communications for DyeMansion, a leading post-finishing company that offers machines that can depowder, create a uniform surface texture, and then color powder bed fusion parts. Now expanding beyond sintered components, the company is a key enabler in turning parts into products. I'm following the post-processing industry very closely because they're a bellwether for our overall health. Anyone can buy a printer to liven up their innovation lab, but only those doing manufacturing will invest in post-processing equipment. Since so much of the cost of a 3D printed part is in labor, any gains made by DyeMansion and its peers will mean savings for all of us and more manufacturing opportunities. Between the promises of manufacturing with 3D printing stands a wall of costs and this wall is being brought down by DyeMansion and others. We really loved hearing from Pia about just how different the brash upstart DyeMansion is and how it has been to work at the company. We hope you'll like this episode, as well!

Apr 5

35 min 57 sec

Ethan Escowitz, whom we interviewed here, co-founded Arris, which hopes to revolutionize the world of composites. By combining molding and 3D printing, his company's innovative technology can make parts with good surface finish almost automatically. It can also lay down continuous fiber in different compositions or concentrations across the part. This allows the company to reinforce parts or change properties of the part at certain areas, for example, modifying radio frequency properties or altering torsion in a determined way. The company hopes that it can play a role in drones, sports gear, cars, consumer electronics, and beyond. Arris is a really exciting startup with a lot of potential and we really enjoyed speaking with Ethan about the possibilities.

Mar 29

47 min 5 sec

For the past several months, Jürgen von Hollen has been the CEO of Ultimaker. He comes from Cobot leader Universal Robotics and was previously in leading roles at several different filtration and industrial firms. von Hollen is a consummate strategist and professional, but will he expand the business while staying true to Ultimaker's roots? What is his vision on segmenting, approaching, and selling into this market? What does he hope to achieve in the coming years? What role will resellers and partners play in the Ultimaker ecosystem? Learn the answers to all of these questions and get a feel for Ultimaker's new chief on the 3DPOD.

Mar 23

42 min 56 sec

Today, Max and I got to chat to Benny Buller, CEO of VELO3D. His company is shaking up the metal powder bed fusion market and Benny lets us in on the company's strategy, how VELO3D's technology works, and his vision on running and growing a business. Benny tells us about how he got to where he is today, as well. Benny also discloses that he wants VELO3D to be a public company. While he did not comment on the current rumors that he is in talks to merge with Barry Sternlicht’s Jaws Spitfire Acquisition Corp to get listed, we have reached out to VELO3D for a comment about the potential SPAC meger. He believes in direct communication and honesty. He additionally discusses the company's focus on relatively few part families and industries. The firm wants to reach customers that could potentially buy many machines from it. This kind of thinking is very different from other players in the market and I love this approach to the industry. It's a refreshing podcast with a lot of insight, especially for those who wish to grow their own businesses.

Mar 13

42 min 1 sec

Sumeet Jain is the Senior Director of 3D Printing Worldwide for Arkema. Previously Sumeet headed up Sartomer, the company's DLP and SLA resin brand, for seven years. Sumeet discusses with us how they make custom resins for applications and customers. Now, he's also responsible for their sintering powders, including the bio-based Rilsan polyamide 11, Kepstan PEKK, and Kynar PVDF, among other materials. We discuss Arkema's approach to the industry, its go-to-market strategy, and how 3D printing fits into the overall Arkema picture. We also talk about the materials themselves, such as PEKK and PVDF, as well as the company's PMMA for FDM, which us initially perplexing for us. We really loved having Sumeet on the 3DPOD and enjoyed his clear explanations and open approach to 3D printing. We hope you do to.

Mar 9

43 min 2 sec

After studying at Loughborough and MIT he worked on making snowboard components for Burton, Mike Vasquez started 3Degrees. There, he's not only a 3D printing consultant but also has his own podcast. So, as a first for us, we're doing a collab where you and the 3Degrees audience will be able to listen to our joint show. Ignore the MIT degrees and the vast knowledge, as well as Mike's silky smooth voice, please, and stick to our program! Max and I again enjoyed this discussion and Mike's vision on materials, polymers, and when and where 3D printing is useful. Mike is focusing on enabling small-to-medium businesses to tackle additive head-on in implementation and production. This is a super valuable area for him to leverage his knowledge. He has also launched Trace, an application to help companies track and implement quality management systems for additive.

Mar 1

41 min 54 sec

I'm a huge nScrypt fan and love the firm's technologies. The way they've defined their "line in a tool" approach to additive is really inspiring to me. With nScrypt machines, you can print electronics, polymers, micro dispense, mill and aerosol jet, all in one machine. The company is the only one that is working on combining bioprinting and electronics and is far ahead of anyone else in electronics 3D printing, as well. At the same time it leads in high-tech, rugged printers that can be used in austere environments and has worked on printers for use on board the International Space Station. I love the capabilities of nScrypt's machines and think that they are criminally unknown. Talking with the CEO of nScrypt, Ken Church, was a blast. We discussed bioprinting from a realistic standpoint, as well as electronics 3D printing and the future of our industry. Ken's a straight shooter and is as knowledgeable as he is opinionated, so you'll learn a lot from him, I'm sure. We also surprisingly talked a while about the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), with nScrypt having been partially funded by them. Unsurprisingly, Max and I had a little to say about that, as well. This would be a great episode to give a listen to, especially if you're thinking of applying for DARPA funding or have something that could help them. But, if you just want to be completely jazzed out about our technology and the possibilities, well then you should listen, too.

Feb 22

49 min 9 sec

On this episode of the 3DPOD, we go into bioprinting. With us is Hector Martinez, the CTO and a co-founder of CELLINK (CLNK-B.ST). CELLINK is a bioprinting rocket ship which took off only a few years ago. A small passionate team began selling bioinks and have since grown the company into a leader in bioprinting. CELLINK is publicly traded and has a wide array of printers from the affordable to complex machines and from extrusion to DLP and holographic machines, as well. Martinez tells us about the foundation of CELLINK and the initial teams. He also has sage advice about how to know when your co-founders are the right partners for you. He talks to us as well about the near-term opportunities in bioprinting, what he expects from the market and where he expects interesting things to happen. If you are looking to explore bioprinting or are in the industry, this is a must-listen. I'd also recommend it to entrepreneurs and people with entrepreneurial spirits. You'll walk away jazzed and informed from this one.

Feb 16

44 min 2 sec

The affable and knowledgeable Dr. Ian Gibson is a professor of Design Engineering at the University of Twente, as well as the Scientific Director of the Fraunhofer Project Centre there. Dr. Gibson has written many papers on various areas in 3D printing across a long and deep additive career. He's also a co-author of the 3D printing textbook Additive Manufacturing Technologies. Working in the UK, Australia, Hong Kong, and Singapore, he truly has a global perspective on additive technologies. From concrete printing to medical, metals, and polymers, he has an objective and learned view of many parts of the industry. He's careful in what he says and how he says it and is wise in our 3D printed world. Max and I loved this, of course, and we went on a meandering journey past binder jet, house printing, implants and much more besides. We really hope that you like this talk.

Jan 28

42 min 40 sec

An often little understood key element of the 3D printing equation is powder. Powdered metal is the material in powder bed fusion and binder jet systems. We write, read, and hear a lot about machines and parts, but not often do we learn much about powder itself. One man who can teach us a lot about it is Carpenter Additive's Ben Ferrar. Carpenter (NYSE: CRS) is the Medical/Dental Sponsor for 3DPrint.com's upcoming Additive Manufacturing Strategies summit, taking place February 9th and 10th. Ben is very knowledgeable about powder and in this episode walks us through what can go wrong, what makes a good powder, why storage is important, and tells us some new material developments. Carpenter Additive is one of the largest 3D printing powder providers and has a wide range of materials on offer. We discuss the most notable of these. The omnipresent Ti-64, which was once the end-all-be-all of materials is now being complemented by many materials that are newer to additive. Ben is really great at explaining things in a measured tone, so it was a treat to get to talk to him about the powder side of our business. We really hope that you like this episode! Ben Ferrar will be speaking at 3DPrint.com’s upcoming AMS online industry summit (Feb 9-10, 2021). Register here.

Jan 21

41 min 48 sec

Max and I had a really great time talking to nTopology CEO Brad Rothenberg. Brad started nTopology as a series of tools for creating lattices, but it became much more than that with a new way of modeling and simulating using signed distance functions to form an equation describing a shape. Also called volumetric modeling or implicit modeling, this technique makes shapes easy to describe and modify. This compares to the  the cumbersome way through which STLs describe all the winding triangles in large files that take ages to render or modify. This is a new path to making and describing geometry. By not having to update or keep track of all faces and normals and indeed the mesh, as you would with NURBS and other ways to generate and manipulate geometries in CAD, nTopology is meant to be faster. Especially for large files, complex files and complex parts, the company's nTop software should be able to generate manifold geometries and modify them through a series of parameters quickly. But, will the team be able to find a place next to Autodesk, Dassault and ANSYS? Will it be able to compete, or play nice with the triangle giants? We talk about this and a lot more with Brad in an enlightening conversation.

Jan 15

48 min 16 sec

Today, we've got the whirlwind that is Sarah Goehrke on the 3DPOD. Max and I had a great time talking to the former 3DPrint.com Editor-in-Chief about her editorial business, Additive Integrity, along with her work in 3D printing journalism, predictions for the next year, and a brief look back into the last year. Most of the time, however, we spoke about Women in 3D Printing and the enormous flight that this organization has taken. We discuss their upcoming conference and other events. We also talk about how to get more girls and women involved in our industry. We discuss diversity and inclusion, which are two subjects that Goehrke is passionate about. We really do hope that you like this episode and do keep your ideas, suggestions, and feedback coming.

Dec 2020

44 min 48 sec

Today, we talk once again with John Barnes, but we also have Jennifer Coyne of the Wabtec Corporation joining the program. Wabtec is a huge Pittsburg-based train company that makes all manner of trains and train parts with 27,000 employees and $8 billion in revenue. Coyne leads their 3D printing efforts, which are mostly based around spare parts, but she discloses that they're already working on parts for new trains, as well. She openheartedly and concisely discusses the opportunity for additive at her firm, as well as the challenges. The company is working on qualifying new parts, making components that are already going on trains and is expanding to a new facility at Pittsburg's Neighbhorhood91. Coyne discusses what Wabtec is going to do at the new campus geared towards additive manufacturing located on the grounds of Pittsburg's airport. John Barnes, who runs Barnes Global Advisors, is super enthusiastic about the facility and what it will bring. He talks to us about how they want to make powder and recycle argon at the facility to lower the costs of 3D printing. Really an enjoyable episode once again that felt like a friendly chat, but was also informative.

Dec 2020

51 min 40 sec

Edouard Moens de Hase talks to us today about Aerosint. For the last few years, they have been working on improving powder bed fusion. The company has an innovative drum roller that can recoat layers of powder selectively. This means that the company can mix several metals, polymers, or ceramics in one layer or build. The company can also make gradient materials or bimetallic parts. Aerosint's path to market is also unique in that it is focusing on its drum-based recoater technique and not in making the entire machine. Aerosint is a very inspiring company to me. They can radically alter what can be made and how parts can be designed and used with an existing technology. Aerosint could really be a force multiplier for many users and OEMs and advance 3D printing applications for many players. We hope that you enjoy listening!

Nov 2020

42 min 13 sec

This time, Max and I got to speak with 3D Systems' CEO Jeff Graves. Graves has spent over 17 years in corporate leadership roles and now will helm 3D Systems into a new era. We really enjoyed talking to him as he explained the current state of 3D Systems and what it's like to be at the company now. He also is open about divestitures, changing margins, future activities, and the focus of the firm. 3D Systems' acquisitive past has meant that it became quite amorphous and Graves is trying to change this through focusing the firm on applications where reliability is key. He also hits at selling more units and making new investments. Graves talks about how to get customers and how the firm aims to expand. He also discusses how machines, software and materials are the key pillars of the firm, crucially excluding services. He mentions some new initiatives and some future plans, as well. We really liked this talk and found Graves to be engaging and clear in his plans for one of the largest companies in 3D printing.

Nov 2020

43 min 10 sec

Stefanie Brickwede's efforts at Deutsche Bahn and Mobility Goes Additive are herculean and will have a significant impact on our industry. Through Brickwede's efforts, Deutsche Bahn has already 3D printed thousands of parts from polymer items to help the blind to large metal parts in critical applications. Seeing that the challenge of industrializing 3D printing for rail was too big for even the huge Deutsche Bahn, she cobbled together an alliance of railway firms and partnered them all with service companies, software firms, metal printer companies, and materials businesses to see if they could conjointly implement 3D printing for rail. This is an incredibly cost-effective move that could see us implement 3D printing across the rail industry much sooner than if everyone tried it alone. Brickwede talks with us about how she did it, what the key challenges are and were, what kinds of parts they print, and how Deutsche Bahn works together with others. I really believe that if others follow in her footsteps for other industries, applications and regions, we can accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing significantly. This is really one of the most important things happening in 3D printing, so give this a listen and spread the word.

Nov 2020

40 min 50 sec

Al Siblani is a 3D printing pioneer who got his start over 19 years ago. He worked with layered object manufacturing—the paper, and laser technology—which is a leitmotiv of our podcast and was exceedingly problematic at the time. Subsequently, Siblani founded EnvisionTEC, whose digital light processing (DLP) technology has been a major player in manufacturing, especially for jewelry casts, hearing aids, and dental applications. We speak to Siblani about his history in 3D printing and how he managed to found his firm. He shares some war stories with us and talks about the current state of EnvisionTEC and the market. He also expresses what he wants to do in the future and how he perceives the market. EnvisionTEC's development from a one-technology company to one that deploys various different technologies in many markets makes it a versatile, independently held firm. Siblani relays the potential for one particular area, bioprinting specifically. He also talks about the position that being an employee-held company gives the firm and how he sees his independence in the future. All in all, a great story for us and hopefully for you as well. Tell us what you thought of this episode and keep up your suggestions!

Oct 2020

37 min 21 sec

Alessio Lorusso built his first 3D printer at 17 and went on to bootstrap his company Roboze. His enthusiasm and drive really shine through in this episode of the 3DPod. The founder talks of Roboze's expansion into the U.S., where it will hire a lot of staff. He also discusses their parts service, Roboze's work in materials and their Argo printer. Lorusso discloses that Roboze wants to produce its own materials and that it has done a lot of work characterizing them. He talks about finding the right investors and the right kind of relationships, as well. Roboze is now a leader in the high-temperature FDM space, where PAEKs and other high-performance polymers are 3D printed. The high-temperature machines that make these parts out of materials such as PEI, PEKK and PEEK need to stop heat bleed in the chamber and control the print process very well. Lorusso touches on some more things also such as pre-drying and settings. He talks about Roboze's efforts at controlling repeatability and getting the same part to print in New Zealand and Texas. He outlines the vision behind his business and plots a course forward. It's easy to be swept away by Lorusso's enthusiasm and grand plans and both Max and myself were! We hope that you enjoy this episode.

Oct 2020

39 min 58 sec

I think we can all agree that, so far, this year has been incredibly taxing and confusing for us all. Some of us have had their working lives affected in a much more fundamental way still. Industries such as aviation, automotive, and hospitality have been adrift on a storm of uncertainty and changing information and realities. One of the most affected fields is the convention industry. Dependent on international guests, air travel, people mixing up-close, and a wish to grow business has driven fairs and conventions to be a significant sector worldwide—one that has had a very rocky year with fits and starts. An individual that is well aware of this is Sascha Wenzler, who heads up Formnext for convention firm Mesago. Formnext is the definitive 3D printing event and brings together tens of thousands from all over the globe each year. This year, Formnext is going all-digital. That announcement rocked the 3D printing industry and has blown a hole in everyone's marketing calendar. We talk to Wenzler about what the digital Formnext will be like. How will marketeers and companies be able to showcase themselves? Wenzler mentions an interesting matching solution the company will deploy and how presentations and product launches can take place. We talk about how guests will interact and how discussions will form. We also delve deeper into the taxing year so far. Wenzler tells us with candor how it was for him and his team to endure. He tells us of the changing plans and how he's proud of the amazing responsiveness and mountains of work done by his team in organizing a Formnext, then switching over to and organizing a blended version and now switching again to an all-digital event. Wenzler also talks of the future of tradeshows and how Formnext plans to be more relevant year-round. All in all, this was a great talk and we hope that you find it informative. I really wish Sascha and his wonderful team all the best and am looking forward to an all digital but all amazing Formnext!

Oct 2020

51 min 34 sec

I met Jos Burger when I was working for Shapeways years ago. He's astute, very bright and a natural leader who later worked at Ultimaker while I was there as well. Naturally, we discussed what Burger calls "Ultimaker's romantic period," or the chaotic period between hobby and hyper-growth that he stepped into. We talked about going direct versus indirect for production, Ultimaker's European loan, the private equity investment, the number of printers the firm has sold to date (over 130,000!), and the Ultimaker ecosystem. Burger tells us of future plans and the positioning of the firm. He talks of the Business Development teams' application development, as well as training and Ultimaker Essentials. We also discuss positioning and price points. As Ultimaker moves up in the world towards corporates what does the company lose? Will they lose touch with makers, educators, and people in the developing world? Will there be fewer community improvements? Burger emphatically redoubles his support for Ultimaker's open source roots and character and calls it essential for the firm, which may assuage many a worry. All in all, both Max and I really liked hanging out with Jos Burger and we think that you'll enjoy this thoughtful conversation also.

Sep 2020

52 min 8 sec

Fried Vancraen is one of my favorite people in 3D printing. It was a pleasure working for him years ago, as well. I was therefore especially happy that Vancraen chose to come back to the 3DPod once again, as Max and I really enjoyed his initial talk. This time, Vancraen talks to us about some past things that he's experienced in terms of exciting moments and career highlights. Max asks him if he thought Materialise would be as successful as it is. Vancraen also talks about Materialise's Five Year Plans and reveals that, during the next one, he will be looking for a successor. We also mention that very many people at Materialise have been with the firm a very long time and that this may have aided the company's success. We talk about the market outlook for 3D printing and Materialise, as well. Vancraen mentions some interesting developments, such as Rapid Fit's adoption with fixtures and components for electric cars, medical printing advancements, and the firm's continued COVID response. We discuss flying cars and the entrepreneurial activity going on there, as well. Other topics include bioabsorbable PCL trachea implants and why Vancraen thinks that it's too soon for the company to invest in bioprinting. Vancraen discusses adding value and how Materialise has been extremely lucky as a company. He talks about disappointing customers and firing people. Max and I really enjoyed this talk a lot and Fried's thoughtful answers have a depth and humanism that really made us savor this episode.

Sep 2020

42 min 52 sec

Todd Grimm has been working in AM and 3D Printing for 30 years. He has done a lot of work for Additive Manufacturing Users Group (AMUG), and is a frequent guest speaker at conferences. So, naturally, we spoke about the conferences in the COVID-19 era. As a team, we even developed an exciting new conference idea. We also looked at the past of the industry. Grimm's work as a consultant has given him a lot of different viewpoints on and through our industry. Grimm was reserved and weighed his thoughtful responses. Grimm was asked by Max what he got completely wrong and right in his predictions in the past, which he duly and bravely answered. Grimm also spoke about what has changed in the industry, how important software is, and how the market has evolved. Grimm wowed us with his deep radio voice, but, more importantly, with a great deal of insight, as well. We were challenged and this brought up a lot of new thoughts and ideas. This felt like a fireside conversation and Max and I enjoyed it immensely. We hope that you do as well!

Sep 2020

57 min 8 sec

In this episode, Max and I spoke with Eric Pallarés of BCN3D. BCN3D is a Barcelona-based material extrusion 3D printing company. Having started on the desktop, BCN3D now is moving toward enterprise and the factory floor. The company is working on developing an ecosystem of tools including software, settings, and machine. The firm's new Epsilon 3D printer is meant for engineers and has two independent extruders, carbon and HEPA filtration, as well as a large build volume. The company is entering into new territory here making something above Pro printers, but below entry-level industrial units. They call it a "workbench" system. We also delve into Pallarés's view of the market now and how the market will evolve: what will happen, what needs to happen and how printers will be improved. All in all, Pallarés gives us a lot of interesting information to think about. We'd love your feedback and keep your suggestions for new guests coming.

Sep 2020

36 min 5 sec

I've known Alexander Oster a long time now. He joined FIT at 16 to work on making a printer and later writing code for the leading service bureau. This eventually resulted in one of the first online price quoting tools. He then wrote one of the first software packages for creating lattices. This effort, in turn, morphed into Netfabb which was later sold to Autodesk and is now a part of Fusion 360. Now, Oster is the Director Additive Manufacturing at Autodesk. He's also the Chairman of the Technical Working Group at the 3MF Consortium. He talked to us about 3MF and what it brings to the table, as well as how adoption is faring. He also spoke about the future of file types and workflow in printing. He also spoke about Fusion 360 and what this tool brings to the ecosystem. Most importantly, Oster dove into some 3D printing history, outlining his path and that of Netfabb. Max and I both really enjoyed this story and how it dovetails with the maturing of 3D printing. We hope that you enjoy this episode, as well.

Aug 2020

40 min 14 sec

Tuan is known universally by his first name alone. Like Madonna and Beyonce, everyone knows hi by just that one name. In Tuan's case his fame is 3D printing specific and stems from his long history in 3D printing. Tuan has been working in our industry for over 17 years. Having started at color binder jetting company ZCorp, he later worked for 3D Systems, then Objet; he went over to Stratasys, when that was acquired, then on to Arcam (GE Additive). Later on, he moved to Desktop Metal and, now, he is with AREVO. Because AREVO 3D prints composites and has now released a composite 3D printed bicycle, we spoke a bit about that on our most recent episode of 3DPOD. But, Tuan also addressed his career and new emerging technologies. We talked about 3D printing constraints and futures. We also spoke of sales, how sales in 3D printing works, and how Tuan sells. We spoke of new business models and new markets also. A candid Tuan talked about where he thinks that the industry is headed, as well. Both Max and I really enjoyed speaking with Tuan and gleaning from his insights into the industry. Give it a listen and tell us what you think.

Jul 2020

48 min 28 sec