Travels Through Time

Travels Through Time

One year in history. Three scenes. Tailored tours of the past with the world's best historians and public figures.

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In this episode of Travels Through Time the author and journalist Hugh Aldersey-Williams takes us back to 1655 and the vibrant heart of the Dutch Golden Age to meet Christiaan Huygens, a figure oddly forgotten by us today but who was once venerated as the greatest mathematician, astronomer and physicist of his age. Hugh guides us back to the year 1655 to see Christiaan make his thrilling discovery of one of Saturn's moons; to watch him struggle with the mathematical problem of pendular motion, and to follow him as he enters Paris - the city he would come to love - for the very first time. Much much more about the scenes, characters and materials discussed in this conversation can be found at www.tttpodcast.com The discussion in this episode of Travels Through Time arises from the characters and events described by Hugh Aldersey-Williams in his new book, Dutch Light: Christiaan Huygens and the making of science in Europe which is recently published in hardback by Picador Show notes Scene One: 25 March 1655. With Christiaan and his telescope in the garden of the Huygens’s house in The Hague. The discovery of Saturn’s moon later to be called Titan. Scene Two: 4 March 1655, Huygens recommends a Polish inventor’s clock for Dutch patent, demonstrating that he is already thinking about the problem of pendular motion. Scene Three: 23 July 1655, Huygens arrives in Paris - the city that he would grow to love - for the very first time Memento: One of Huygens’s magic lanterns People Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Hugh Aldersey-Williams Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Colorgraph Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ See where 1655 fits on our Timeline

Sep 22

54 min

How close did we come to a world without the USSR? A world with no Stalin, no KGB, or even Putin today? In this episode of Travels Through Time we head back to 1918 and the scene of the audacious, thrilling Lockhart Plot to find out. Our guide in this episode is the American historian Jonathan Schneer. He takes us back to revolutionary Russia to visit the Smolny Institute in Petrograd, the American Consulate and the scene of the final showdown in Grain Alley. He explains just who Bruce Lockhart was and what his plot set out to achieve. The subject matter and scenes that feature in this episode come from Jonathan Schneer's book, The Lockhart Plot: Love, Betrayal, Assassination and Counter-Revolution in Lenin's Russia  For much much more visit: tttpodcast.com Show notes Scene One: February 15, 1918: Bruce Lockhart’s first appointment with Leon Trotsky at the Smolny Institute in Petrograd. Scene Two: August 25, 1918: secret meeting at the American Consulate in Moscow, hosted by American Consul General, DeWitt Clinton Poole, but presided over by French Consul General Josef Fernand Grenard. Scene Three: Earliest hours of September 1, 1918: #24 Khlebnyi pereulok (Grain Alley), Cheka agents arrive to arrest Lockhart, George Hicks, and Moura von Benckendorff . Memento: Sidney Reilly’s full report on the status of the plot for British Intelligence People Presenter: Peter Moore Interview: John Hillman Guest: Jonathan Schneer Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Colorgraph Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_

Sep 15

46 min

Who were the Ottomans? Why have they been so neglected in the traditional Western approach to history? What precisely was their influence on the fabled events of the sixteenth century? In this episode of Travels Through Time, the historian Alan Mikhail takes us back to the monumental events of the year 1517 to find out. We look at the conquest of Cairo, the start of the Reformation and the arrival of the Europeans in Mexico. Everywhere, the influence of the Ottomans was felt. In particular, Mikhail tells us about the life of Sultan Selim I. The subject matter and scenes that feature in this episode come from Alan Mikhail's new book, God’s Shadow: The Ottoman Sultan Who Shaped the Modern World. Alan Mikhail is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at Yale University. For much much more visit: tttpodcast.com Show notes Scene One: February 1517, Ottoman Sultan Selim captures Cairo Scene Two: October 1517, Wittenberg, Germany. Disaffected Professor of Theology Martin Luther writes the 95 Theses Scene Three: Early 1517, The first Europeans land on the coast of Mexico Memento: The Map of Piri Reis People Presenter: Peter Moore Interview: Violet Moller Guest: Professor Alan Mikhail Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Colorgraph Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_

Sep 8

51 min

In this fascinating and unusual episode of Travels Through Time the archaeologist and writer Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes takes us back further than we’ve ever been before, 125,000 years, to meet our extinct kindred: the Neanderthals. We visit the vibrant wild woodlands of Britain, a hornbeam forest on the European continent and a German lakeshore. Rebecca describes the world as it was in the interglacial age known as the Eemian and tell us how the Neanderthals lived, worked and loved in this warm woodland environment. The subject matter and scenes that feature in this episode come from Rebecca Wragg Sykes's new book, Kindred: Neanderthal Life, Love, Death and Art. For much much more visit: tttpodcast.com Show Notes: Scene One: Britain, 123,000 years ago. A catastrophic flood breaks the ridge connecting Britain to the rest of Europe. The island becomes a wasteland for many thousands of years. Scene Two: A hornbeam forest in Germany, during the Eemian. We meet the weird and wonderful animals that populated the continent at the time. Scene Three: Neumark lakeshore, also during the Eemian. Tiny remains of organic material provide insight into the kinds of tools the Neanderthals were making and using. Memento: One of the spears used to kill deer at the Neumark lakeshore. People/Social Presenter: Artemis Irvine Guest: Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Podcast Partner: ColorGraph

Sep 1

52 min

In this politically-charged episode of Travels Through Time, Professor Simon Hall takes us on a fascinating tour of the United States in 1960. We watch on as 'the Greensboro Four’ ignite a nation-wide series of sit-ins. We take a visit to see Fidel Castro and his swashbuckling entourage at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem. And we watch as Nixon and Kennedy go head to head in the most famous presidential debate of them all. The subject matter, the scenes and characters that feature in this episode come from Simon Hall's new book, Ten Days in Harlem: Fidel Castro and the Making of the 1960s. To be in with a chance of winning a hardback copy of this book and a superb colourised image of Fidel Castro, visit: tttpodcast.com Simon Hall is Professor of Modern History at the University of Leeds. Show notes Scene One: 1 February 1960; the lunch counter at the F. W. Woolworth store in Greensboro, North Carolina. Scene Two: Evening of Thursday 22 September; the Skyline Lounge, Hotel Theresa, Harlem. Scene Three: 26 September, CBS’s McClurg Court studios, Chicago. Memento: One of Fidel Castro’s cigars People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Simon Hall Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Podcast Partner: ColorGraph So much more at: tttpodcast.com

Aug 28

51 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time, the writer Thomas Levenson guides us back to the scene of one the first and most devastating of all stock market crashes, an event that traumatised Georgian Britain: the South Sea Bubble. The subject matter, the scenes and characters that feature in this episode come from Levenson's new book, Money for Nothing. Much more information is to be found at tttpodcast.com Thomas Levenson is Professor of Science Writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Show notes Scene One: 22 January, 1720: John Aislabie, Chancellor of the Exchequer, rises in the House of Commons to present the South Sea deal to the members. Scene Two: A Sunday in May, 1720. Daniel Defoe goes to church and witnesses the ‘South Sea’ hysteria. Scene Three: 20 December, 1720, the House of Commons. Robert Walpole decides the fate of the speculators. Memento: A pocket watch made in the year 1720 People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Thomas Levenson Editorial: Artemis Irvine Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Podcast Partner: ColorGraph So much more at: tttpodcast.com

Aug 25

50 min

In this fascinating episode of Travels Through Time, Ken Follett, one of the world’s best loved historical novelists, guides us back to the beginning of the last millennium. The year we visit, 1002, comes at a time of change when, after centuries of stagnation, English society was beginning to emerge from that gloomy period we call ‘The Dark Ages.’ The subject matter, the scenes and the characters that feature in this episode come from the world depicted by Follett in his hugely-anticipated new novel The Evening and the Morning, the prequel to his bestselling masterpiece, The Pillars of the Earth. For a chance to win a first edition hardback copy of The Evening and the Morning, to read more about the scenes discussed in this episode and to see images and show notes, please head to our website: tttpodcast.com Show notes Scene One: 1002, The Slave Market, Bristol Scene Two: 1002, The Viking seige of Exeter Scene Three: 1002, The wedding of King Æthelred II & Emma of Normandy Memento: A four-legged chair People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Ken Follett Editorial: Artemis Irvine Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Podcast Partner: ColorGraph So much more at: tttpodcast.com

Aug 18

53 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time we are taken on an invigorating tour of the ports, coasts and oceans of the world with Professor David Abulafia, winner of the prestigious 2020 Wolfson Prize for History for his book, The Boundless Sea. For much more information about this episode, including images of the people and places involved, head to our website, tttpodcast.com The scenes discussed in this episode come from The Boundless Sea: A Human History of the Oceans (Allen Lane). Show notes: Scene One: 21 August 1415, The Portuguese attack on Ceuta, North Africa Scene Two: 1415, The Eastern Settlement Greenland Scene Three: 1415 Nanjing, east coast of central China Memento: A piece of Chinese porcelain from Nanjing People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor David Abulafia Editorial: Artemis Irvine Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O --- Check out the amazing colourised images made by our podcast partner, ColorGraph!

Aug 11

55 min

In this swashbuckling episode of Travels Through Time we head back to the year 1453. We watch on as the brilliant, ruthless young sultan, Mehmet II, makes use of terrifying modern weaponry as he seeks to capture the prize of his heart’s desire: the ancient city of Constantinople.   Our guest this week is the award-winning and bestselling writer Justin Marozzi. Marozzi has lived for much of his professional life in the Middle East and North Africa and is known for books like The Man Who Invented History: Travels with Herodotus (2008) and Baghdad: City of Peace, City of Blood.   The events described and the characters involved in this episode are taken from Marozzi’s latest book, Islamic Empires Fifteen Cities that Define a Civilization. That book is published in paperback on 6 August by Penguin Press.   For much, much more about this episode, including battle plans and portraits of Mehmed and Constantine, head to our website: tttpodcast.com   Show notes   Scene One: January 1453. A Hungarian siege engineer called Orban offers the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II the most powerful new weapon in the world. Scene Two: 22 April 1453, Mehmet displays an astonishing example of his military genius to seize control of the Golden Horn, Constantinople Scene Three: 1:30am on 29th May, the battle for Constantinople reaches its dramatic climax Memento: The magnificent cannon cast for the seige in 1453 by the Hungarian engineer Orban   People/Social   Presenter: Peter Moore Interview: Violet Moller Guest: Justin Marozzi Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Colorgraph Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_

Aug 4

48 min

In this episode Professor Greg Woolf takes us to 146 BCE – the point at which Roman domination of the Mediterranean became inevitable. In the West, the Romans destroyed the city of Carthage, ending the decades of military struggle known as the Punic Wars and finally defeating the Phoenicians. In the East, Roman forces seized control of the important city of Corinth on mainland Greece, giving them a strategic foothold that they would go on to use in building their empire. At the same time, the glittering intellectual capital of the ancient world, Alexandria, was beset by internal power struggles and so began the period of decline that would eventually lead to it, too, being absorbed into the Roman Empire. For much, much more about this episode, head to tttpodcast.com Show notes Scene One: The demolition of Carthage in Spring of 146 Scene Two: At the sack of the ancient city of Corinth in Greece in 146 Scene Three: The decline of Alexandria and the death of Ptolemy VI in 145 Memento: A painting from the Ancient world People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Interview: Violet Moller Guest: Professor Greg Woolf Production: Maria Nolan Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Partner: Colorgraph   The conversation in this episode of Travels Through Time revolves around Woolf’s most recent book, The Life and Death of Ancient Cities.

Jul 28

49 min

In this brilliantly descriptive and entertaining episode of Travels Through Time the award-winning writer and satirist Craig Brown takes us on a cultural tour of 1963. We discuss the Great Train Robbery, the Beatles meteoric rise to fame and the assassination of JFK. For much, much more about the episode and to be the first to see the amazing new colourised photograph of the Beatles in Washington DC at their first US concert – head to our website: tttpodcast.com   Show Notes: Scene One: August 1963, lingering with the robbers in their hide-out at Leatherslade Farm. Scene Two: Second half of 1963, Jane Asher's family home, Wimpole Street, to see/be Paul McCartney, living with the Ashers, at the time of the first flush of the Beatles’ success. Scene Three: November 23 1963. In the Texas School Book depository with Lee Harvey Oswald as he shoots President Kennedy. Memento: Paul McCartney’s handwritten lyrics for ‘Yesterday’   People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Interview: Artemis Irvine Guest: Craig Brown Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Podcast Partner: ColorGraph   Craig Brown’s book One, Two, Three Four: The Beatles in Time is available now from 4th Estate books.  

Jul 28

49 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time, the writer and broadcaster Luke Pepera introduces us to Mansa Musa, a dazzling figure in African history. Mansa Musa was the Emperor of Mali in the fourteenth century. We follow him as he embarks on his spectacular pilgrimage to Mecca in 1325. It was a journey of epic proportions, involving a procession of tens of thousands of people and the transport of extraordinary amounts of gold, the precious metal on which Mali had built its wealth. For much more information about this episode - including illustrations of the places and people featured - head to our website, tttpodcast.com To hear more stories from African history, you can follow Luke on Twitter at @LukePepera and read along with his blog. Show notes: Scene One: Early 1325, as Mansa Musa sets off on his extravagant pilgrimage to Mecca. Scene Two: Mid-to-late 1325, in the court of al-Nasir, the Egyptian sultan, to witness the meeting between the two great leaders. Scene Three: Late 1325, as a scholar in the Djingeureber Mosque at Timbuktu, which was established by the architects and scholars whom Mansa Musa brought back from his pilgrimage. Memento: A book of poetry from the University of Timbuktu People/Social Interview: Artemis Irvine Guest: Luke Pepera Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O   Check out the amazing colourised images made by our podcast partner, ColorGraph!

Jul 21

44 min

In our fascinating season three opener, Peter talks to Professor James Shapiro, one of the world’s leading scholars of the life and work of William Shakespeare. He tells Peter about the origin of the concept of 'Manifest Destiny'. He takes us to meet a young Ulysses S. Grant, and he evokes the life of the greatest Romeo of the age: Charlotte Cushman. The year is 1845. For much more information about this episode, including images of the people and places involved, head to our website, tttpodcast.com The conversation in this podcast revolves around James Shapiro's most recent book,  Shakespeare in a Divided America. It is available now from Faber in the UK and Penguin Press in the USA.   Show notes:   Scene One: August, 1845.  John O’Sullivan, in an essay called “Annexation” introduces the phrase “Manifest Destiny” into the American vocabulary, capturing America’s shift from republic to empire, the repercussions of which are being felt to this day. Scene Two: November, 1845.  Corpus Christi, Texas. Four thousand US troops are awaiting orders in Corpus Christi, Texas to cross the Rio Grande and invade Mexico.  Scene Three: December 1845.  In a revealing act of cross-dressing that speaks to the anxieties about manliness at the time, the star American actress Charlotte Cushman debuts as Romeo - a role that no man at the time was able to perform successfully - at London’s Haymarket Theatre.  Memento: A recording of Ulysses S. Grant speaking Desdomona’s lines in Othello: People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor James Shapiro Producers: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O   Check out the amazing colourised images made by our podcast partner, ColorGraph!

Jul 21

56 min

In this thrilling episode of Travels Through Time, Owen Matthews takes us back to 1941 to see Richard Sorge, the ‘spy to end all spies’, operating at the highest level in the most dangerous months of the Second World War. ~ Two events in 1941 did more than anything else to settle the shape and outcome of the Second World War. The first was the most fateful decision of Adolf Hitler’s life: the launching of Operation Barbarossa against the USSR on 22 June. The second was the surprise Japanese aerial attack on the US naval base of Pearl Harbour, six months later on 7 December. These events appear crystal clear to us in retrospect, but for many living at that time they came like a flash out of the blue. A few people, though, did know what was coming. One of them was one of the most extraordinary communist underground operatives of the twentieth century: Richard Sorge. Sorge ran a Soviet spy group in Tokyo from the 1930s onwards that achieved astonishing access into the Nazi war machine. A drinker, a womaniser, a risk-taker, all on a breath-taking scale, one journalist has classified Sorge ‘as an example of the rare species we might call Homo undercoverus – those who find the dull, unclassified lives that the rest of us lead simply not worth living.’ Our guest on Travels Through Time today is Owen Matthews, author of a new biography of Sorge. Owen studied Modern History at Oxford. His book, Stalin's Children, was translated into twenty-eight languages and was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award. The scenes and subjects described in this episode feature in Owen Matthews biography of Richard Sorge, An Impeccable Spy. The book is available in paperback from Bloomsbury now. Show notes: Scene One: 31 May 1941, The Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. Richard Sorge receives final confirmation that Operation Barbarossa will shortly be launched. Scene Two: 22 June 1941. The Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. Sorge’s bitter fury when he hears news of the German invasion. Scene Three: One night in August, 1941. The Embassy Ballroom with Sorge and Eta Harich-Schneider Memento: Richard Sorge’s lighter People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest; Owen Matthews Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: Artemis Irvine Titles: Jon O == Follow us on Twitter @tttpodcast_ Check out the best colourised images from our new partner, Dynamichrome.

Apr 8

55 min

In this thought-provoking episode of Travels Through Time, historian Kelcey Wilson-Lee takes us to the court of the English King Edward I in 1297 to meet his daughters at a dramatic moment in their lives. ~ King Edward I’s daughters did not conform to the modern stereotype of medieval princesses. They weren’t delicate, wistful girls, passively waiting to be rescued by a handsome prince. Eleanora and her sisters were true Plantagenets. They were headstrong, passionate characters who spent as much time hunting, managing estates and travelling around England and the Continent as they did doing needlework in their chambers. Their lives reveal the breadth of experience of royal women in the medieval period through the various roles they played. They represented their country and championed the needy. They promoted monastic houses, were brides in strategic alliances, rebellious daughters, landowners, patrons of culture, mothers, wives and most important of all in this story, sisters. In this episode of Travels Through Time, the historian Kelcey Wilson-Lee takes Violet Moller to meet Eleanora, Joanna, Mary, Margaret and Elizabeth in the year 1297. Kelcey Wilson-Lee’s Daughters of Chivalry: the forgotten children of Edward I is published by MacMillan Show notes:  Scene One: January, 1297, and the royal family has gathered in Ipswich for Elizabeth's wedding to Johan, Count of Holland, after which she is supposed to sail for her new husband’s lands. Scene Two: July 1297, King Edward I’s court at St Albans. Joanna comes to plead her case after having eloped and secretly remarried a nobody without her father's permission. She makes a dramatic speech that is (very unusually) recorded and is forgiven by her Father. Scene Three: Christmas 1297, in Ghent where Elizabeth (who eventually went to Holland) is reunited with her sisters who have married into Europe in years before. Memento: A gold ring presented to Margaret by Edward I at Harwich. People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Kelcey Wilson-Lee Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: John Hillman Titles: Jon O Made in partnership with the brilliant photo colourists at Dynamichrome

Mar 10

45 min

In this invigorating episode of Travels Through Time, the award-winning Zimbabwean novelist Petina Gappah takes us in pursuit of the Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone in the year 1871. ~ David Livingstone was one of the towering figures of Victorian Britain. He was a missionary who became an explorer, who believed that he was divinely appointed to solve the puzzle of the geography of Africa. Livingstone made his name in the 1850s when he became the first recorded Briton to set eyes on Victoria Falls. In 1855 he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Geographical Society, and the next year he published his huge bestseller, Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa. Victorian Britons grew used to consuming stories of Livingstone’s travels as heroic adventure narratives. He was portrayed as a dynamo of energy and an oracle of vision who chased after the loftiest prizes: mysterious lakes or hidden rivers in a vast continent. But what of the African people who travelled with Livingstone? What did they think of this peculiar wandering mzungu? What kind of lives were living at that time? What did Livingstone’s intervention in their societies mean for them? The Zimbabwean novelist Petina Gappah raises these questions during the course of this episode as she takes us back to the year 1871. She tells us how glamorous Livingstone’s adventures were for his contemporaries. She shows us the magic and peril of strangers encountering one another for a first time. She explains how Livingstone’s expeditions worked as logistical enterprises. Then she depicts some of the more disturbing aspects of the period: the east African slave trade, and the massacres it generated. The scenes and subjects described in this episode feature in Petina Gappah’s new novel, Out of Darkness, Shining Light, which tells the story of Dr Livingstone’s final journey. The book is available in hardback from Faber. Show notes: Scene One: 21 March 1871, Bagamoio, a port on the east coast of what is now Tanzania. The American journalist Henry Morton Stanley sets out from Bagamoio for a daring mission into the African interior. Scene Two: 15 July 1871, A day market in Nyangwe, a village in Manyema, on the right bank of the Lualaba River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Livingstone witnesses a massacre. Scene Three: October 1871, Ujiji in present day Tanzania. Stanley finally meets Livingstone, having marched 700 miles to reach him. Memento: The instruments that David Livingstone used, later ‘purloined’ by Lt Cameron People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest; Petina Gappah Producer: Maria Nolan Reading: Makomborero Kasipo Editorial: Artemis Irvine Titles: Jon O == Follow us on Twitter @tttpodcast_ Check out the best colourised images from our new partner, Dynamichrome.

Mar 3

48 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time, Marcus du Sautoy The Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford takes us back to the 1830s to meet one of his heroes: the brilliant and tragic Évariste Galois.  ~ Évariste Galois is a fascinating figure in the history of mathematics. An unpromising and secretive student who became embroiled in the revolutionary politics of the 1830s, Galois was dead at the age of twenty. Yet the work he completed in his few active years of study has influenced the subject of mathematics ever since. Galois was born on the outskirts of Paris during the period of Napoleon’s rule in 1811. From the beginning he was known for his unusual, ‘bizarre’, character that led him into time and again into dangerous situations. At some point during Galois’s undistinguished school career he fell, ‘under the spell of the excitement of mathematics’. Here he found a realm of certainty and fascination, where he could feel safe and escape the perils of human interaction and everyday life. During his teenage years Galois’s fascination for his subject became ever deeper. He began to conceive entirely new ways of approaching an age-old mathematical problem – that of solving the quintic. So begins one of the thrilling stories in the history of mathematics. Marcus du Sautoy takes us back to see Galois as his young life reached its intellectual peak and tragic conclusion in the early 1830s. It's a story of beguiling genius in tumultuous times. The Creativity Code by Marcus du Sautoy is out now. Show Notes: Scene One: 9 May 1831, Paris. At a banquet to celebrate the acquittal of 19 members of the revolutionary Société des Amis du Peuple, a young Galois gets carried away by the atmosphere and the alcohol. Scene Two: 23 October 1831 , Sainte-Pelagie Prison, southern Paris. Galois is thrown in jail, having been found guilty of wearing a banned National Guard uniform, carrying weapons – and graffitiing his holding cell with political cartoons. Scene Three: 30 May 1832, Paris: Early one morning a peasant on his way to work finds a young man lying beside a pond bleeding from a gunshot wound. People Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Marcus du Sautoy Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: Artemis Irvine Titles: Jon O == We've set up a Twitter account at long last! Please say hello @tttpodcast_

Feb 25

46 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time, Catherine Nixey, author of the international bestseller The Darkening Age, guides Violet Moller back to the ancient city of Alexandria in the year 415. They talk about the simmering tensions between Christians, Jews and Pagans at that time. Among the characters they meet is the gifted, beautiful and powerful Hypatia of Alexandria. ~ Hypatia of Alexandria has always been a compelling figure. Her glittering life and brutal death have inspired writers, poets and film makers for centuries. But what lies behind the myth and speculation? Hypatia’s murder was a particularly horrific episode in the gradual triumph of Christianity over classical culture, a slow and painful process that was played out across Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. In this episode Catherine Nixey isolates and analyses 415, one dramatic year in this complex story. Catherine Nixey is a journalist and author. The Darkening Age won an award from the Royal Society of Literature and was an international bestseller. Her journalism has appeared in The Economist, The Financial Times, The Times and The New York Times. The Darkening Age is available from MacMillan now. Show notes: Scene 1: Cyril becomes Bishop of Alexandria and begins to impose his policy on the city. He regulates theatrical entertainment and the Jews react, killing a Christian in the process. Scene 2: Cyril orders his followers to attack the synagogues and seize Jewish property. Orestes, secular ruler of the city, is attacked by Christians (even though he is one himself) but manages to escape. Scene 3: The violence escalates. Hypatia is rumoured to have cast a spell on Orestes, public feeling against her is stirred up. She is pulled from her coach and murdered. Memento: One of Hypatia's astrolabes. People/Social Presenter: Artemis Irvine Interview: Violet Moller Guest: Catherine Nixey Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O

Feb 18

45 min

For our Valentine’s Day Special episode of Travels Through Time, we visit Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, to talk to Dr Sophie Ratcliffe about Anna Karenina, Kate Field, Sofia Tolstoy and the year 1876. ~ Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina is one of the dazzling achievements of nineteenth century literature. It is a story of power, ambition, fidelity and lust, ‘a warning against the myth and cult of love’, with the ill-starred relationship between the Russian socialites Anna and Count Vronsky at its centre. In this episode of Travels Through Time, Sophie Ratcliffe shows how Anna was very much a child of the 1870s. Various historical figures can be found in her character. A well-known inspiration is Anna Stepanovna Pirogova, a jealous lover who threw herself under a freight train. A lesser-known one is the American journalist, lecturer and early telephone pioneer Kate Field. Field was hugely charismatic and popular. The Chicago Tribune judged her ‘perhaps the most unique woman the present century has produced.’ She was among the first celebrity journalists. She was acquainted with Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Anthony Trollope, and George Eliot. For a time in the 1870s, she was employed as the first public relations manager for Alexander Graham Bell’s new invention, the telephone. Here Ratcliffe explains how Field’s legacy stretched further still. As she explains in her new book, The Lost Properties of Love: ‘Parts of Kate Field live on in Anna Karenina. Anna Karenina is part Kate Field. That’s what writers do. They change lives.’ In this conversation, Ratcliffe guides us back to 1876 and to a historical past suspended between fact and fiction. She describes how trains were viewed as an invasive new technology; how time operates in intriguing ways in Tolstoy’s fiction, and she speculates about what was hidden in Anna’s red handbag as she stepped off the railway platform. Dr Sophie Ratcliffe's The Lost Properties of Love is published by William Collins. Show notes: Scene One: A warm Sunday evening in late May 1876 (probably Sunday 30 May by the Russian calendar), the platform of Obiralovka Train Station, Russia. Scene Two: The Gaiety Theatre, London, late April 1876, to watch Kate Field in a play called The Honeymoon by John Tobin Scene Three: 17 March, 1876, Sofia Tolstoy’s bedside, Yasnaya Polyana Russia. Memento: The front page of the Times (with the classified ads) for Tuesday 13 June, 1876 People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Sophie Ratcliffe Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O

Feb 14

47 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time, Artemis takes us inside Durham University in a fascinating conversation with one of her tutors, Professor Giles Gasper. Together they reflect on the year 1215, and attempt to understand some of the most significant political, religious and intellectual developments of the medieval period. Gasper is Professor of High Medieval History at Durham University, and a specialist in intellectual culture. He chose to explore this year through three, era-defining documents: Magna Carta, the Canons of the Fourth Lateran Council, and an astronomical treatise written by Robert Grosseteste. Grosseteste is the most intriguing figure to emerge in this episode. A polymath and scholar whose influence on the development of scientific knowledge in the West has continued to impress modern scholars even today, although little is known about him. Grosseteste was the first person that we know to correctly identify refraction as the phenomenon that produces a rainbow, rather than it being reflection, as Aristotle thought. The Ordered Universe Project has also been able to show how Grosseteste’s writings illustrate a nascent understanding of the theory of a multiverse, and also of the Big Bang. Giles exploration of this lesser known figure, alongside his analysis of such famous historical events, such as the creation of Magna Carta and the meeting of the Fourth Council of the Lateran, is what makes this episode so illuminating in understanding medieval history. Show notes: Scene One: June 1215, the Magna Carta is drawn up and sealed (not signed!) by King John after a dispute between his nobles over the rights of the King. Scene Two: November 1215, The Lateran Palace, Rome. 71 patriarchs and metropolitan bishops, 412 bishops, 900 abbots and priors as well as the representatives of various monarchs meet for the Fourth Council of the Lateran where, amongst many issues, the doctrine of transubstantiation is made official. Scene Three: 1215, somewhere in England. Robert Grosseteste composes his On The Sphere, an astronomical treatise which seeks to understand the movement of the stars.  Memento: The lost annotated copy of Abu Maʿshar’s writing on astrology which Robert Grosseteste glossed. People/Social Presenter: Artemis Irvine Guest: Professor Giles Gasper Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O.

Feb 11

45 min

For this insightful and evocative episode of Travels Through Time, Peter Moore heads to the historian Sarah Wise’s flat in central London, to talk about left wing politics, life and labour in the imperial capital in the year 1889. * London in 1889 lay at the heart of the most extensive empire the world had ever seen. But though there was fabulous wealth in many areas of the capital, it was unequally distributed. Many were worried that those who lived and worked in the East End and docklands were being pushed increasingly into chronic poverty and further towards revolution. Among those to be concerned were the businessman turned social reformer, Charles Booth. Following a series of breakdowns, in the 1880s Booth began his series of social investigations into the East End which would result in his pioneering series of colour-coded poverty maps. As Booth trod the East End streets, assigning each one a social status, other reformers were at work. In one of the most deprived parishes in the country, the Reverend Arthur Osborne Jay re-modelled his church so it included a boxing ring and a music hall platform, so there was a positive outlet for the energies of his congregation. For the last twenty five years the award-winning social historian Sarah Wise has been researching histories like these. Inspired by passionate, thoughtful leftish politicians like Henry Hyndman and William Morris, in this episode of Travels Through Time Sarah guides us into the turbulent East End streets in search of ‘moralised capitalism.’ The nineteenth-century, Wise says, ‘was an era in which there were lots of secrets and lots of mystery and lots of drama.’ Here she takes us to meet figures like Booth and Rev. Jay, who were trying to make sense of the riddles, as well as showing us how close the country came to complete social breakdown. This episode of Travels Through Time was recorded on location at Sarah flat. If you want to see some of Booth’s poverty maps, along with other photographs and archives that we spoke about during the course of the conversation, please visit our website at www.tttpodcast.com The Blackest Streets is available in paperback from Vintage Books. Show notes: Scene One: Charles Booth walking around the market of Slater Street, Club Row and Brick Lane, one Sunday morning in 1889. Scene Two: 14 August 1889, Wapping and Limehouse, by the River Thames Scene Three: 25 February, 1889, a boxing match at Reverend Jay’s Holy Trinity Church, Bethnal Green. Memento: The entire Charles Booth Map of London People/Social Presenter: John Hillman Interview: Peter Moore Guest: Sarah Wise Producers: Maria Nolan

Feb 4

44 min

This deeply moving episode of Travels Through Time tells for the very first time the absolutely extraordinary story of Hans Neumann, a young Jewish man from Prague, who managed to outwit the Nazis and survive the Holocaust. Ariana Neumann grew up in the Venezuela of the 1970s and 1980s. It was a land of possibility and progress. Her father Hans Neumann - a hugely successful industrialist and patron of the arts – epitomised both these characteristics. But while Hans was outwardly the epitome of success and strength, there were parts of his private self that were unsettling to his close family. He would wake at night screaming in a language his daughter did not understand. He hardly ever mentioned his childhood in central Europe. He never said that he was Jewish. ‘Life,’ he would tell his daughter, ‘was to be lived in the present.’ On his death in September 2001, Ariana discovered a box of papers and photographs that her father had left her. They became the starting point for a personal investigation into her father’s European family and an unspoken history of horrific persecution and enthralling survival during the Holocaust. This episode of Travels Through Time was recorded on the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp in Poland. During the course of this conversation Ariana guides us back to the drama and tragedy of the year 1944: a defining year for the Neumann family of Prague. To see Hans’s doll, Zdenka ring and the Jan’s identity card – some of the objects discussed during the course of this conversation – please visit our website at tttpodcast.com When Time Stopped will be published in the UK and internationally in February 2020. Show notes: Scene One: June 23 1944, Red Cross Visit to the Camp of Terezín, CZ. The place is beautified. Thousands are sent to Auschwitz to ease overcrowding and a charade is enacted to fool the International Red Cross inspectors. Scene Two: September 29/30 1944, The arrival of transport EI in Auschwitz, Poland. Scene Three: October 9 1944, Berlin Germany. Hans Neumann has been hiding in plain sight and using a fictitious identity. He receives a summons (issued October 5th) to appear in the Nazi District Court in Prague. Going back to Prague and appearing in court would, almost certainly, mean death. Memento: The sound of Otto Neumann humming the folk song Golem. People/Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Ariana Neumann Producers: Maria Nolan/John Hillman Titles: Jon O.  

Jan 28

60 min

In this fascinating episode of Travels Through Time, the ‘queen of food historians’ Dr Annie Gray takes us inside Number Ten Downing Street, as the bombs fell in 1940, to meet Winston Churchill’s magnificent cook: Georgina Landemare. We know so much about Winston Churchill’s life during that fateful year, 1940. We know the letters he wrote, the speeches he gave, the meetings he held and the telephone calls he made – all of them in exhaustive detail. But one aspect of Churchill’s wartime life has received very little historical scrutiny until now. That is his relationship with his cook, Georgina Landemare. Hugely-talented and utterly-dependable, Georgina was embedded right at the heart of the Downing Street machine during the Second World War. According to a document drawn up in 1940, she was one of only two members of Churchill’s domestic staff who were to be evacuated with him in the event of a successful NAZI invasion. In this episode of Travels Through Time, Dr Annie Gray takes us in pursuit of the elusive Georgina. We catch sight of her at work in a British country house, cooking old English classics like Boodle’s Orange Fool. We follow her to the Admiralty at the outbreak of war. And then we see her behind Number Ten’s green baize door, creating the enticing menus – roasts and cakes and sponges - that lay at the heart of Winston’s dinner table diplomacy. Dr Annie Gray specialises in the history of British food and dining from c. 1650 to 1950. She's the author of several books, including The Greedy Queen: eating with Victoria, and the bestselling The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook. She's the resident food historian on BBC Radio 4's culinary panel show, The Kitchen Cabinet. Her new book is a biography of Winston Churchill's beloved family cook, Georgina Landemare. Victory in the Kitchen: the life of Churchill's Cook is published by Profile books in Feb 2020. Show notes: Year: 1940 (with a little bit of 1939) Scene One: Summer 1939, Exning House Newmarket. The summer before the war. Scene Two: 2 Feb 1940, Admiralty House. Georgina now working for the Churchills. Scene Three: 14 October, Number Ten at the heart of the Blitz. Memento: Georgina’s menu books. --- Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: Dr Annie Gray Producers: Maria Nolan/John Hillman Titles: Jon O. ---

Jan 21

46 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time the biographer Francesca Wade takes us to the fringes of London’s Bloomsbury, to explore a fascinating generation of poets, writers and publishers who passed through Mecklenburgh Square. In the early decades of the twentieth century the streets and squares of Bloomsbury in inner London were home to a pioneering and provocative generation of writers, poets and artists. Many of these figures would later be celebrated and cherished, but at the time their fortunes were not quite so settled. The transience and fragility of Bloomsbury was captured in a quote by the English novelist Margery Allingham. She called the area, ‘a sort of halfway house. If you lived here you were either going up or coming down.’ This description was particularly appropriate for Mecklenburgh Square, a large residential square on the north eastern edge of inner London. Here, at various important junctures in their lives, lodged five great women: Hilda Doolittle (H.D), Dorothy L Sayers, Jayne Ellen Harrison, Eileen Power and Virginia Woolf. These women and this square are at the heart of Francesca Wade’s new book Square Haunting. In this episode she guides us to Mecklenburgh Square in the year 1917 to meet the poet H.D, the writer Virginia Woolf and her husband Leonard. They were all busy with projects and all contending with the fevered atmosphere of the wartime capital, a 'ghastly inferno which thinks and breathes and lives air raids, nothing else.' As DH Lawrence put it, London had ‘perished from being a heart of the world, and became a vortex of broken passions, lusts, hopes, fears and horrors.’ Francesca Wade is the author of Square Haunting: Five Women, Freedom and London Between the Wars (Faber) Scene One: 44 Mecklenburgh Square, November 1917 - H. D. and D. H. Lawrence in the room while others are out. Or perhaps an evening with them while they're playing charades. Scene Two: Hogarth House, Richmond, April 1917 - to watch the Woolfs bring home their printing press. Scene Three: 4 Gerrard Street, Soho, December 1917. The inaugural meeting of the 1917 Club, founded by Leonard Woolf. Memento: The suitcase of letters from Richard Aldington and D.H. Lawrence to H. D. during the war that was left in the cellar of 44 Mecklenburgh Square and then destroyed --- People / Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Francesca Wade Producers: Maria Nolan/John Hillman Titles: Jon O.

Jan 14

45 min

This panoramic episode of Travels Through Time is set in the year 1920. In it the historian Charles Emmerson guides us from the Free State of Fiume to Moscow and the boisterous beer halls of Munich. He shows us a world of volatile post-war politics and introduces us to three unforgettable figures: Gabriele D'Annunzio, Vladimir Lenin and Adolf Hitler. In the neat and tidy chronology of the classroom, 1920 is often seen as the end of a period of conflict and the start of an entirely new era. But that, argues the historian Charles Emmerson, is a misreading of history. The Great War might have ended. The Treaty of Versailles might have been signed. But right across Europe the old conflicts continued. In 1920, for instance, there was gorilla war in Ireland, civil war in Russia, a putsch in Germany and there were troops on the Rhineland. ‘The war was not over,’ Emmerson says, ‘it had only fragmented into a million different conflicts and upheavals, cultural and political.’ In this episode Emmerson guides us through the tangled politics of this complex year. Charles Emmerson is the author of Crucible: The Long End of the Great War and the Birth of a New World, 1917–1924. Show notes: The Golden Platypus restaurant (or The Golden Stag) in Fiume. Gabriele D'Annunzio and the Fiume adventure. The Second Congress of The Communist International (Comintern) in Moscow in the summer of 1920, shortly after the war against Warsaw had begun. The first floor of Hofbräuhaus beer hall in Munich, which the German Workers Party have hired out for the launch of their new manifesto and where a young Adolf Hitler gives a speech. Memento: Lenin’s hunting rifle wrapped in a tablecloth once owned by Gabriele D'Annunzio --- Presenter: Artemis Irvine Guest: Charles Emmerson Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O. --- Discover more fascinating episodes at tttpodcast.com

Jan 7

41 min

It's Christmas and TTT is one year-old! For this episode of Travels Through Time we went to the pub for a pint to celebrate. One year, twenty six brilliant time travels, the best historians and tens of thousands of downloads from all corners of the world! We thought that all of this was worth celebrating with something a little different to usual. So we decided to toast TTT's first birthday with a drink. In this episode you'll hear Peter and Artemis chatting about the idea for the format, revealing a little bit more about themselves and picking some favourite moments from the last year. At the very end we have some lines of wintry poetry from Sir Michael Palin. Thank you to all of our wonderful interviewees over the past year and to History Today for partnering with us. We'll be back with the usual format on Tuesday 7 January, 2020. Till then, a Merry Christmas to you all from us. Show notes: In the pub; Peter Moore and Artemis Irvine Not speaking but in the pub too: Maria the Producer

Dec 2019

26 min

In this captivating episode of Travels Through Time, we venture back to the year 1199 to see Eleanor of Aquitaine, one of the great operators of the High Middle Ages, at the peak of her powers. Eleanor is a remarkable character. She was queen of France and England and the mother of two English kings. One chronicler, describing her in late life, asserted that she was, “a matchless woman, beautiful yet chaste, powerful and modest, meek yet eloquent … whose power was the admiration of her age.” But how much of this was reputation and what was the reality? Our quest to answer this riddle begins in early spring 1199 when Eleanor’s son King Richard I, “the Lionheart”, is struck in the shoulder by a stray shotgun arrow. Richard’s wound swiftly becomes gangrenous. With death imminent, and the fate of his kingdom uncertain, Richard sends for his mother. Today’s guest Sara Cockerill guides us, in three scenes, through the dramatic and uncertain sequence of events that follows. Show notes: Scene one: 6 April 1199, near Limousin, France. Deathbed of Richard the Lionheart Scene two: 20 July 1199 Tours. Eleanor at the age of 65 performing homage to Philip Augustus. Scene three: Autumn 1199. Fontevraud, Aquitaine. Eleanor burying her daughter Joanna. Memento: A gold ring with a sapphire inset, inscribed with the letters R A. Sara Cockerill’s book, Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of France, Queen of England, Mother of Empires is available in hardback now. People / Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Sara Cockerill Producer: Maria Nolan Digital Production: John Hillman Titles: Jon O.

Dec 2019

46 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time we join one of the world’s leading historians, William Dalrymple, who takes us on a tour of 1764 to try and explain how the East India Company became “An empire within an empire” The history of the East India Company is astonishing. Leo Tolstoy once wondered: How could a commercial company from London manage to enslave a nation comprising 200 million people on the other side of the world?  With the battlefields of the Seven Years War still smouldering across the globe, we journey to the edges of the Moghul Empire along the banks of the Ganges to visit 1764, a year of bloodshed and confusion; a year that would change the history of India forever. William Dalrymple is a British historian and writer, as well as an award-winning broadcaster and critic. His books have won numerous awards and prizes, including the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize, the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award, the Sunday Times Young British Writer of the Year Award, the Hemingway, the Kapuściński and Wolfson Prizes. He has been five times longlisted and once shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction. He is also one of the co-founders and co-directors of the annual Jaipur Literature Festival. His latest work, discussed here, has been described by the Guardian as: “…not just informative but as colourful as a Maratha army in full battle array, as boisterous as a Calcutta boarding house in 1750, and as entertaining as an evening of poetry and music in a Delhi palace.” Show notes: Scenes: February, 1764, Avadh. After years of being played against each other and picked off by the East India Company, Mir Qasim, Shah Alam and Shuja ud-Daula meet in Avadh to unite forces against the Company. 3 May, 1764. The combined forces of the army reach the fortified walls of Patna, an ancient city on the banks of the Ganges. The army of 150,000 warriors comes face to face with 19,000 East India Sepoys. 22 October 1764: The Battle of Buxar, a pivotal moment in history, between the forces under the command of the British East India Company, led by Hector Munro, and the combined armies. Memento: One of Mir Qasim’s treasure chests, abandoned on the fields of Buxar. People / Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: William Dalrymple Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: Artemis Irvine Digital Production: John Hillman Titles: Jon O.

Dec 2019

49 min

The passage of knowledge between the Ancient World and today’s modern one, has not been smooth. In many cases only a fraction of what was once known has reached us today. Just seven out of around eighty plays by Aeschylus survive, seven out of the hundred and twenty written by Sophocles and a similar proportion of those by Euripides. Often knowledge was lost at specific moments of conflict or tumult in the human story. In this episode of Travels Through Time the historian Dr Violet Moller takes us back to one of the most crucial years of all: 529, when the Roman Empire was in its latter days and a new Christian world was emerging. Violet’s travels through the past takes us on a picaresque tour of this significant year. In Constantinople we see the last great Roman emperor. In Athens a “Golden Chain” of learning is about to be severed after many centuries. And on a rocky hill in central Italy, a new monastic order that will have a spectacular future, is founded. Dr Violet Moller is the author of The Map of Knowledge, winner of the Royal Society for Literature’s Jerwood Prize. The Daily Telegraph called it “popular intellectual history at its best.” Show notes: Scenes: Constantinople where Justinian is rebuilding the city, rewriting the legal code and issuing proclamations limiting the practice of Pagan faiths and philosophy. Athens, the Neoplatonist Academy is closing thanks to Justinian’s proclamation, breaking a tradition of learning stretching back hundreds of years. The philosophers pack up their books and leave for Persia where they would be protected by the Sassanid King Khosrow I. Montecassino where St Benedict is building a monastery on the site of an ancient Temple of Apollo, establishing the most important religious order of the Middle Ages. Memento: A crate of books, saved from the Neoplatonic Academy People / Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Violet Moller Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: Artemis Irvine Digital Production: John Hillman Titles: Jon O.

Nov 2019

51 min

This poignant episode of Travels Through Time takes us back to 1916, a year of strife and stoicism at the heart of World War One. The mood across Britain at the end of 1915 was one of disbelief. A war that many had predicted would be over in months was only intensifying. There was stalemate on the Western Front. Newspaper columns were filled with examples of German “frightfulness”, such as the execution of Edith Cavell, and there was growing doubts in Westminster about Prime Minister Herbert Asquith’s ability to lead the country. This was the backdrop to 1916, a year that brought debates over conscription, fears of a general strike and the military fiasco at the Battle of the Somme. The year ended in December with David Lloyd George replacing Asquith in Downing Street and with Britain having embraced entirely the policy of Total War. In this episode of Travels Through Time, the journalist and historian Simon Heffer guides us through the events of this traumatic year. He shows us a Britain on the brink of crisis, yet still oddly resilient to the trials it faces. Show notes:  Scene One: 27 January 1916, Labour Conference in Bristol for the vote on the party’s conscription policy. Scene Two: 12 July 1916, Belfast. The first news of the Battle of the Somme reaches Belfast on the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne. Scene Three: 5 December 1914, Cynthia Asquith dining with her father in-law the prime minister at 10 Downing Street. Memento: A Tommy Staring at God: Britain in the Great War by Simon Heffer is published by Random House books People/Social  Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Simon Heffer Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O.

Nov 2019

50 min

Witches, spells, black magic and shape-shifting combine in unsettling ways for this special Halloween episode of Travels Through Time. Britain, 1862. An age of modernity characterised by pioneering projects like the world’s first underground railway in London; hot air balloons soaring to the top of the troposphere; scientists engaging in the new fad for weather “forecasting”. And in the Midlands a new football club, Notts County, are formed – later to become the oldest of all the association football clubs in the world. Yet running in tandem with this thrilling new world was an older, persistent belief in hidden supernatural forces. It was more than a century since Parliament had repealed the laws against witchcraft but, rather than being eradicated by the Enlightenment, folklore remained an active and potent force in everyday life.  This is where we join Dr Thomas Waters, who takes us on a tour through 1862 to see examples of all of this: from the isolated Scottish islands, to the heart of Imperial London. In doing so he provides a striking and memorable portrait of a lesser-known side to the Victorian world. --- Show notes:  Scene One: Spring, 1862. On the tiny Scottish Western Isle of Gigha. James Smith watches as Catherine McGougan “shapeshifts”Scene Two: 13th April 1862, 31 Charles Street, Westminster. 74-year-old Mary King is attacked by her grandson.Scene Three: A little terrace house in Ancoats, Manchester, 1862. A fortune-teller named Alice is doing a consultation for a client, waxing lyrical about mystical things --- People/Social  Presenter: Peter MooreGuest: Dr Thomas WatersEditorial: Paul Lay / Artemis IrvineProduction: Maria Nolan / John Hillman

Oct 2019

44 min

Ruthlessness and Richard III: Thomas Penn (1483) In this haunting episode of Travels Through Time, Thomas Penn guides us back to the blackest year of them all, 1483. Richard Duke of Gloucester, has seized power. His rivals, the Woodville faction, have fled for their lives. And the uncrowned child Edward V has disappeared into the Tower of London, along with his younger brother. The two would never be seen again. This was the year that Richard Duke of Gloucester conceived a ruthless plan to seize the throne for himself. His actions would make his reputation for cunning, opportunism and recklessness. In retrospect, Penn argues, this was the year that the powerful House of York began to consume itself. The ‘Wars of the Roses’ saw the House of York ranged against their rivals in the House of Lancaster. The complex, long-running conflict played out in a succession of battles, betrayals and beheadings. It was a time when, as the historian Thomas Penn puts it, ‘necessity knew no law.’ So begins the final tragic act in the story of the House of York. ---  Show notes: Scene One: Northampton, the night of April 29/30, Richard and Buckingham’s plot Scene Two: Council chamber, Tower of London, morning of Friday 13 June, Richard’s accusation/Hastings’ execution Scene Three: Lincoln, Sunday 12 October, Richard’s response to news of Buckingham’s rebellion Memento: Edward IV’s will. --- People / Social Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Thomas Penn Producer: Maria Nolan Editorial: Paul Lay / Artemis Irvine Digital Production: John Hillman Titles: Jon O.  

Oct 2019

45 min

Our latest episode of Travels Through Time explores a little-studied but revolutionary group of women at the heart of Dr Patricia Fara’s latest book, A Lab of One’s Own. Patricia takes us back to 1918 where we find them working with great skill, energy and success, against the backdrop of one of the most brutal wars in world history.  They were aircraft designers, surgeons, chemical researchers, military commanders and surveillance operatives. Their work contributed significantly to the British war effort. Patricia is a Fellow of Clare College Cambridge, a prize-winning author and has recently served as President for the British Society for the History of Science. ---- Scene One: 10th Jan 1918, House of Lords. The suffragist Ray Strachey watches them approve the 1918 Representation of the People Act Scene Two: 26 March. Marie Stopes’s Married Love is published and she meets her future husband after he returns from the War with a broken ankle Scene Three: 1 November, Vranje, Serbia. Dr Isabel Emslie takes over a military hospital. She stays there long after the Armistice Memento: Dr Isabel Emslie’s Diary ---  Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Patricia Fara Producers: Maria Nolan & John Hillman Editorial: Artemis Irvine Titles: Jon O. --- Discover more fascinating episodes at Travels Through Time Brought to you in partnership with History Today, the world's leading serious history magazine    

Sep 2019

44 min

In this episode of our podcast Travels Through Time, bestselling author Thomas Harding takes us back to 1930s London and the sinister rise of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists. We go on an extraordinary rags-to-riches journey, from the depths of the East End to the heights of Westminster, in the company of Isidore Salmon, a fascinating Jewish businessman and MP at the head of J. Lyons & Co, the famous catering and hotel empire. This is the story of how Isidore took on Mosely and powerful fascist supporters such as Viscount Rothermere, proprietor of the Daily Mail, during the tumultuous summer of 1934. ---- Scene One: Christmas 1933/1934. Opening of the Lyons' Cumberland Hotel, largest in Europe, royal visit, and then launch party with Viscount Rothermere and Isidore Salmon. J Lyons at its heyday. Scene Two: 7 June 1934. Oswald Mosely’s infamous ‘Olympia Rally’ Scene Three: (Shortly after) Isidore Salmon confront Viscount Rothermere Memento: The cup used by Viscount Rothermere to toast Isidore Salmon Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Thomas Harding Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O. Digital Production: John Hillman --- Discover more fascinating episodes at Travels Through Time Brought to you in partnership with History Today, the world's leading serious history magazine  

Sep 2019

45 min

Travels Through Time launches season two with a blockbuster journey through the Crusades with New York Times bestselling historian Dan Jones. Dan draws on his latest book Crusaders, an epic history of the wars for the Holy Land and broader Christendom, to guide us back to 1147 and the launch of the Second Crusade. We discover how, contrary to popular myth, the Crusades drew hundreds of thousands of people from all walks of life and all parts of Medieval Europe, into a religious conflict spanning five centuries and three continents.  ‘When it comes to rip-roaring Medieval narratives, Jones has few peers’ The Sunday Times --- Scene One: June 1147: Amid great pageantry Louis VII of France and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine set out from Paris towards the Holy Land. Scene Two: July 1147: A month later in Mecklenburg - modern Germany - another crusading army marches in its entirety against the Slavic tribespeople known as the Wends. Scene Three: October 1147: As Louis closes on Constantinople and the first assaults on the Wends wind down for the winter, in Lisbon another crusading army is about to score a major victory. Memento: A shard of the True Cross. Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dan Jones Producer: Maria Nolan Titles: Jon O. Editorial: Artemis Irvine Digital Production: John Hillman ---- Discover more fascinating episodes at Travels Through Time Brought to you in partnership with History Today, the World’s leading serious history magazine

Sep 2019

45 min

In this episode of Travels Through Time the author and cultural historian Mike Jay takes us back to 1799 – a year of anxiety, action and excitement on the cusp of a new century. The 1790s: A Revolutionary Age Although the 1790s is often overlooked, it was an extraordinary, bewildering and formative decade in European history. The early years of the decade were filled with excitement and energy. People of all political stripes realised that the powerful forces that had been set loose by the French Revolution were set to transform the old societies they knew. By the year 1800 this transformation had indeed happened. But it was not as people had anticipated. Many dreams had “crashed and burned” along the way. Mike Jay has written extensively on this period of history, examining the powerful confluence of science, politics and culture in a series of books. In this episode of our podcast he takes us back to 1799 to meet three “admirable and flawed” characters whose stories tell us much about the time. These are the political prisoner Colonel Edward Marcus Despard whose battle with the establishment is retold in the new series of Poldark; an inmate of the Royal Bethlam Hospital called James Tilly Matthews; and Humphry Davy, an inspired young experimenter, whose work on the medicinal properties of nitrous oxide – soon to earn its colloquial name “laughing gas” - would pass into legend. Scene One: New Year’s Day, 1799, Colonel Despard imprisoned without trial in Coldbath Fields, London. Scene Two: 24 June, 1799, Midsummer Day, James Tilly Matthews and John Haslam in the Royal Bethlem Hospital. Scene Three: Boxing Day, 1799, Humphry Davy’s famous experiment on nitrous oxide at the Pneumatic Institution in Bristol. Memento: One of Humphry Davy’s little green bags, used for inhaling gases, as manufactured by James Watt of The Lunar Society. Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Mike Jay Producer: Maria Nolan Read a new piece about Edward and Catherine Despard More from History Today The Unhappy Mansion by Anna Jamieson on the Royal Bethlam Hospital Humphry Davy and the Murder Lamp by Max Adams Myth, Reality and William Pitt the Younger by R.E. Foster Summer holidays ... This is the last episode of the first season of Travels Through Time. Season Two starts on the first Tuesday in September. Thank you for listening!

Jul 2019

45 min

The Fall of Anne Boleyn “I think Anne Boleyn’s fatal mistake was to snigger at the King in the presence of handsome young men. And I don’t think she did anything more than that.” - (Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch) Thomas Cromwell, a self-described “ruffian”, was King Henry VIII’s chief minister in the 1530s. He was clever, driven and ruthless, qualities that have captivated novelists and historians for generations as they have attempted to capture his mysterious essence. The year 1536 saw Cromwell at the peak of his career. As chief administrator of the realm he had vast and wide-ranging powers, but he also had enemies. Prominent among these was the King’s second wife, Anne Boleyn. In one of the most infamous episodes in all of English history, the spring of 1536 saw Cromwell and Anne in combat for their lives. The story concluded with Anne Boleyn’s execution at the Tower of London in May. Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch and Thomas Cromwell In this live episode of Travels Through Time, recorded at the Buxton International Festival, we revisit the high-wire act of Henry VIII’s court with Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch of the University of Oxford. Diarmaid is a hugely respected scholar of Tudor England and the Reformation and last year he published his authoritative Thomas Cromwell: A Life. In three tantalising scenes, Diarmaid guides us through 1536 from Thomas Cromwell’s point of view. He shows us a plot, a rebellion and a triumph: scenes that take us to the very heart of one of the pivotal times in English history. Scene One: 24 May 1536: Ambassador Eustache Chapuys and Thomas Cromwell debriefing after the execution of Anne Boleyn. The inside story of Tudor politics and Cromwell's quiet alliance with the Lady Mary against Queen Anne. Scene Two: The moment (no direct information, so supposition necessary) around 3 October 1536 when King Henry VIII was told of the Lincolnshire Rising, after the government had been looking in the wrong place for trouble. Scene Three: 22 December 1536: Thomas Cromwell sits in his house at the Rolls listening to the sounds of the magnificent procession of the King from Whitehall to Greenwich down Fleet Street. He and the King have apparently yielded to all the demands of the Pilgrims of the North and their leader Robert Aske is due to spend Christmas with the King. In fact, after the remarkable turnaround in November, the King is backing Cromwell and will betray the rebels. Memento: The keyboard that Mark Smeaton played for Anne Boleyn Thomas Cromwell: A Life by Thomas Cromwell by Diarmaid MacCulloch is now available in paperback from Penguin Credits Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch Recording/Live Mix: Hannah Griffiths Post production: Maria Nolan More from History Today Derek Wilson on Thomas Cromwell: Brewer’s Boy Made Good Andy Holroyde on Predicting the Fall of Anne Boleyn Suzannah Lipscomb on Who Was Henry VIII?

Jul 2019

57 min

The Holocaust The Holocaust is the bleakest, blackest, most disturbing moment in our human story. It involved the systematic murder of millions of Jews, minority and vulnerable groups by the Nazis during their reign of terror in Europe in the 1940s. To understand how such crimes could be committed, historians have been forced to engage with this painful past. Few books have laid the crimes and consequences of the Holocaust as bare as Professor Mary Fulbrook’s Reckonings: legacies of Nazi persecutions and the quest for justice (2018). Fulbrook said that she was driven to write the book – which identifies the crimes and traces their effects on the generations that followed – by ‘an enduring sense of injustice’, that the vast majority of those who perpetrated the Holocaust, or who made it possible, evaded responsibility for their crimes. The Wolfson History Prize Last month Reckonings was awarded the Wolfson History Prize, one of the UK’s most prestigious history awards. The judges called it ‘masterly’; a work that ‘explores the shifting boundaries and structures of memory.’ In this special Wolfson History Prize episode of Travels Through Time we talk to Professor Fulbrook about Reckonings, a book that she wrote filled with a sense of ‘moral outrage’. In a twist on our usual format, we examine the Nazi genocide through three human interactions with three crime scenes: a ghetto, a labour camp and an extermination camp. Scene One: Melita Maschman looks at the Litzmannstadt (Łódź) ghetto in the incorporated Warthegau area of Poland, now part of the Greater German Reich, and later reflects on it in her 1963 memoirs. Scene Two: Mielec, southern Poland, part of the General Government under the Third Reich. Perpetrators include Walter Thormeyer and Rudolf Zimmermann, later sentenced in West and East Germany respectively; and implications for their families. Scene Three: Oświęcim (Auschwitz), c. 1943-5, seen through the eyes of a schoolteacher, Marianne B., as recounted in her 1999 memoirs. More about Reckonings at Oxford University Press. Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor Mary Fulbrook Producer: Maria Nolan Read More from History Today Mensturation and the Holocaust by Jo-Ann Owusu Poland and Holocaust History by Cressida Trew Hitler and the Holocaust by Alan Farmer

Jul 2019

46 min

"The most momentous event in Japanese history" Commodore Matthew Perry’s expedition to Japan in 1853 changed the course of the island’s history. Long into the nineteenth century Japan had been regarded by the growing group of Western nations as a hermit kingdom, known for its stubborn resistance to outsiders. Prior to Perry’s Expedition, it was connected to the Euro-centric world of trade and commerce only by a single Dutch outpost near Nagasaki that was visited by a single ship each year. Throughout this period of isolation, Japan’s rich and intricate society had developed under the rule of the shoguns. But interference from outside powers was increasingly feared and anticipated. The crucial moment came in July 1853 when the United States government despatched Commodore Perry on a speculative mission to forge relations. Perry’s arrival in Edo Bay In this episode of Travels Through Time, the writer and historian Lesley Downer takes us back to the moment that Perry’s fleet of ships sails into Edo Bay – modern-day Tokyo. She describes the meaningful coming together of two contrasting worlds: the confusion, the power play and the consequences, in three vivid scenes. The Japanese, as the American’s find out, know more much about the world than they anticipated. Scene One: Friday July 8/Edo Bay. Commodore Perry’s four ‘Black Ships’ steam right up to the little town of Uraga, at the entrance to Edo Bay, threatening the capital, Edo (now Tokyo). Scene Two: Monday July 12th/Edo Bay. Kayama Eizaemon, Police Magistrate of Uraga, is taken on a tour of the flagship to celebrate having negotiated Perry’s delivery of his letter and is shown a globe. The Americans assume he doesn’t know the earth is round. He nonchalantly points out New York and Washington DC. Scene Three: Wednesday July 14th/ Edo Bay. Perry goes on shore to deliver his letter, accompanied by stewards and a squadron of guards playing ‘Hail Columbia.’ This period of history is chronicled in Lesley Downer’s Shogun Quartet of novels. Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Lesley Downer Producer: Maria Nolan

Jun 2019

44 min

The D-Day landings Operation Overlord was one of the critical moments of the Second World War. It began on 6 June 1944 when the Allied forces landed around 150,000 troops on the beaches of Normandy in France. Today, 6 June 1944 is commonly remembered as D-Day. Within a year of that date Europe was liberated, the NAZI regime was totally defeated and its figurehead Adolf Hitler was dead. In this episode of Travels Through Time, the lecturer and military historian Dr Peter Caddick-Adams takes us back to May and June 1944. The D-Day beaches We watch the final exercises for D-Day going forward across the south coast of England and then we travel across the Channel with the Allied forces to the operational beaches: Omaha, Utah, Sword, Juno and Gold. The events that happened at this time and across these places would change the course of twentieth century history. Scene One: 2/3 May 1944, Operation Fabius, south coast of England Scene Two: 15 May 1944, The Thunderclap Conference. St Paul’s School, London. Final briefing for Operation Overlord. Scene Three: 6 June 1944, Sword Beach, Normandy, France. More about Sand and Steel by Dr Peter Caddick- Adams: https://www.penguin.co.uk/authors/1062921/peter-caddick-adams.html Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Peter Caddick-Adams Producer: Maria Nolan Reading: Ryan Bernsten (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/50-states-of-mind/id1458481030)

Jun 2019

46 min

Early one afternoon in the year 79 AD, a seventeen year-old boy looked out from the window of his villa across the Bay of Naples. He saw a great cloud, ‘both strange and enormous in appearance’, rising from the top of a hill over the luxuriant landscape of Campania. This boy would be remembered by history as Pliny the Younger. The event he was about to witness was one of the most shocking and spectacular to ever take place in the ancient world: the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. The hours that followed that first observation were full of drama and tragedy. Pliny decided against joining his uncle – the naval commander and writer Pliny the Elder – as he embarked on a fateful rescue mission across the bay. He himself was caught up in the mass evacuation as panicking crowds fled the burning mountain. In this episode of Travels Through Time, Dr Daisy Dunn takes us back to 79 AD and through the events of those days and surrounding months. While doing so she introduces us to both Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger, two significant characters who together tell us so much today about life in the ancient Roman world. Scene One: Reate, June 79 AD, the death of Vespasian, accession of Titus and introduction of Pliny the Elder Scene Two: Bay of Naples, August/October (timing disputed) 79 AD. Eruption of Vesuvius (survival of Pliny the Younger; death of Pliny the Elder) Scene Three: Basilica Julia, Rome, 79/80 AD Pliny the Younger becomes heir and adopted son of his uncle and embarks upon his legal career in the Court of One Hundred Men in Rome. Dr Daisy Dunn’s website: http://www.daisydunn.co.uk Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Daisy Dunn Producer: Maria Nolan

May 2019

44 min

"The gambler who lost touch with the dangers" Although Letitia Landon – or “L.E.L.’s” – name is scarcely known outside specialist circles today, in the 1820s she was one of the brightest stars of the London literary scene. In the fast-evolving publishing world of literary monthlies and quarterlies, L.E.L. burst onto the scene as a true celebrity. She thrived due to the quality of her verse and the mystery of her persona. For several years the question tantalised. Just who was this writer that hid behind the laconic acronym? It turned out, when L.E.L.’s identity was revealed in 1824, that she was – in her mother’s words – “a girl addicted to writing poetry.” In this episode of Travels Through Time, the literary historian and journalist Dr Lucasta Miller tells us about L.E.L.’s life and then takes us back to 1838 to witness her sad and contested end. It’s a story that ranges from the churches of London to the old slaving posts of west Africa, fusing together contrasting histories in the most unexpected of ways. As with the literary career that had gone before it, the manner of L.E.L’s death was left open to interpretation. Scene One: 7 June 1838, L.E.L.’s wedding to George Maclean in London Scene Two: Late August 1838, Cape Coast Castle, west Africa Scene Three: The morning of 15 October 1838, L.E.L.’s death, Cape Coast Castle L.E.L. The Lost Life and Scandalous Death of Letitia Elizabeth Landon, the Celebrated “Female Byron”  https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/107/1070406/l-e-l/9780224079396.html Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Dr Lucasta Miller Producer: Maria Nolan

May 2019

45 min

Saladin and the capture of Jerusalem: Professor Jonathan Phillips (1187) For the Christian crusaders of the twelfth-century, Jerusalem was the ultimate prize. The holy city had been captured from the Muslims in 1099 as part of the First Crusade to the Holy Land. In 1187, the counter-crusade, led by the Sultan Saladin, was at last poised to wrest it back. In this latest episode of Travels Through Time, Professor Jonathan Phillips of Royal Holloway University becomes our guide to the bloody events of the high Middle Ages. He takes us to watch Sultan Saladin’s decisive victory at the Battle of Hattin, which culminated in the dramatic capture of the True Cross. Then we look on as Sultan Saladin - one of the supreme military leaders of any age – marches on Jerusalem to complete the return of the sacred city. What happened next, over the months of September and October, was surprisingly magnanimous. The events of 1187 brought to history not only one of the pivotal moments of the Medieval Age, it also established the reputation that Saladin has enjoyed ever since. Scene One: The evening of 2 July 1187, the tent of Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem. Guy makes his fateful decision to march out to try to lift the siege of Tiberias. This is the prelude to the Battle of Hattin. Scene Two: The Siege of Jerusalem, September 1187 Scene Three: Saladin's entry into Jerusalem on 2 October 1187 The Life and Legend of Sultan Saladin by Professor Jonathan Phillips: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/109/1093190/the-life-and-the-legend-of-the-sultan-saladin/9781847922144.html Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor Jonathan Phillips Producer: Maria Nolan

Apr 2019

46 min

Fifty years ago humankind stepped on the moon for the first time. This is the story of the space suit that allowed them to do it. Millions of Britons stayed up through the night of 20/21 July 1969 to experience one of the most iconic moments of the twentieth century. They watched on their TV sets, part of a global audience of 528 million, as Neil Armstrong edged down a ladder from the lunar module to become the first human to set foot on the moon. It was a definitive moment in the history of humankind and, for those watching, it became a shared experience like few others. This latest episode of Travels Through Time begins at the moment Armstrong’s foot presses down onto the powdery surface of the moon. Most people have a vivid image of the scene: the grey lunar surface, the total blackness of space, the white lights and the fluttering Stars and Stripes. But what about the space suits that enabled Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to survive in such a hostile environment? In three scenes the writer and cultural historian Kassia St Clair takes us from that iconic moment back to the JFK Space Centre and a sewing room floor in Delaware to show how these space suits – quiet wonders of technology themselves – were made, often using traditional techniques. Scene One: Sea of Tranquillity, Lunar Surface, 2.56am GMT July 21st 1969 Scene Two: John F. Kennedy Space Center, US, 3.30am local time, July 16th 1969 Scene Three: Sewing floor of Playtex (ILC) Dover, Delaware, early months of 1969 Kassia St Clair’s website: http://www.kassiastclair.com/ Social: Presenter: Peter Moore (@petermoore) Guest: Kassia St Clair (@kassiastclair) Producer: Maria Nolan Audio extracts from the NASA archive. Used under the terms of their media use guidelines for educational purposes.

Apr 2019

46 min

Walking with Destiny: Winston Churchill becomes prime minister in May 1940 In seventy two hours in the middle of May 1940, Britain’s political leadership was transformed. Out went the undistinguished, dithering government led by Neville Chamberlain, known for its failed policy of appeasement. It was replaced by a new regime of ‘growling defiance’, headed by the pugnacious and polarising Winston Churchill. This political change coincided with the NAZI ‘blitzkrieg’ invasion of western Europe. In this latest episode of Travels Through Time, the historian and biographer Andrew Roberts takes us back to those tense and dramatic days, 8-10 May 1940. We watch as Chamberlain suffers the humiliation of the Norway Debate in the House of Commons and as he attempts to cling to power in Number Ten Downing Street the following day. On 10 May 1940 Churchill was summoned to meet King George VI. This event, Andrew Roberts argues, Churchill had foreseen as he destiny many decades before. === Scene One: The Norway Debate, the House of Commons, 7-8 May 1940 Scene Two: Number Ten Downing Street, 9 May 1940 Scene Three: Buckingham Palace, 10 May 1940 === Andrew Roberts’s website: https://www.andrew-roberts.net/ Churchill: Walking with Destiny: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/284916/churchill/9780241205631.html === Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Andrew Roberts Producer: Maria Nolan

Apr 2019

40 min

An unholy rush: the cavalier, chaotic and catastrophic sequence of events surrounding Indian Independence in the summer of 1947 In the immediate aftermath of World War Two it became clear that the British Raj was no longer sustainable. But how should the British leave the Indian subcontinent after such a long period of colonial rule? Should the territory be divided? How could this be done? The long-contested answers to these questions were finally delivered between June and August of 1947. In this episode of Travels Through Time the writer and artist Aanchal Malhotra ventures back to the bewildering and traumatic events of that summer. We meet British officials like Sir Cyril Radcliffe, the man responsible for drawing the border line between India and Pakistan, and many of the individuals whose lives were altered irrevocably by his decisions. Scene One: 3 June, 1947 India – the announcement of Indian independence and subsequent Partition called the Independence of India Act, 1947 or the Mountbatten Plan.  Scene Two: 8 July, 1947, arrival of Sir Cyril Radcliffe, who goes on to draw the "Radcliffe Line". Scene Three: The days of Partition – roughly, the middle of August, 1947. The northern belt of present-day India and Pakistan. Follow Aanchal’s work on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aanch_m Or get your copy of Aanchal’s book: Remnants of Partition https://www.hurstpublishers.com/book/remnants-of-partition/ Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Aanchal Malhotra Producer: Maria Nolan

Mar 2019

47 min

The philosopher who changed the way we think about the world and the woman who changed him Bertrand Russell wrote that ‘the achievements of Athens in the time of Pericles are perhaps the most astonishing thing in all history.’ And of all Athens’s great figures at this time, few are better remembered than Socrates. Commonly acknowledged as the founder of Western philosophy, he pioneered a new method of constant questioning, famously arguing that ‘the unexamined life' is not worth living at all. In this episode of Travels Through Time we venture back to meet Socrates with the Oxford academic Professor Armand D’Angour. We meet Socrates as the young son of a stonemason, as the intelligent scholar and as the wise old philosopher. Most of all Armand introduces us to a revolutionary new figure into the story of Socrates’s younger life. This is the lover and partner of the statesman Pericles: Aspasia. Scene One: Ancient Athens in 450 BCE when Aspasia, aged 20, arrives from Miletus. Scene Two: The Temple of Apollo at Delphi in 445 BCE, when Socrates visited and was told by the prophetess that no one was wiser than him. Scene Three: The Symposium in 416 BCE when Socrates and his friends discuss the meaning of love. More about Armand D’Angour at his website: https://www.armand-dangour.com/ Armand’s book: “Socrates in Love” https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/socrates-in-love-9781408883914/ Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor Armand D’Angour Producer: Maria Nolan

Mar 2019

29 min

A Botanical Odyssey: the (mis)adventures of the plant hunter George Forrest In this episode of Travels Through Time writer, gardener and panellist on Gardeners' Question Time Matt Biggs travels back to 1905 to see the plant hunter George Forrest as he begins an ill-omened expedition into the mountains of Yunnan. For centuries plant hunters like Forrest had been tempted out into the margins of the landscape in search of prize new specimens. They often travelled at significant personal risk through hostile environments and contested political spaces. George Forrest's 1905 expedition was one of the most fraught of them all. In this episode we watch Forrest in three scenes as the drama of his story unfolds. More about Matt Biggs at his website: http://matthewbiggs.com/ Matt's book: "Secrets of Great Botanists" https://www.amazon.co.uk/RHS-Secrets-Great-Botanists-Gardening/dp/1784724971 Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Matt Biggs Producer: Maria Nolan

Feb 2019

29 min

The Magical Mathematician: Sir Isaac Newton and the Principia Mathematica On a frozen January day in 1684 three friends – Christopher Wren, Robert Hooke and Edmond Halley - met at a London coffee house to confront one of the great questions in knowledge: planetary motion. Their conversation and speculations led, in a few months, to Isaac Newton’s chambers at Trinity College in Cambridge and initiated one of the most thrilling episodes in the entire history of science. In this fourth episode of Travels Through Time, Professor Simon Schaffer of the University of Cambridge takes us to three scenes in the year 1684, and to the genesis of that paradigm-shattering book, the Principia Mathematica. Presenter: Peter Moore Guest: Professor Simon Schaffer Producer: Maria Nolan

Feb 2019

46 min

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