IJGC Podcast

BMJ Group

The International Journal of Gynecological Cancer publishes content on novel and relevant topics in the field of gynecologic cancer. IJGC Podcast features short interview segments with leading experts discussing the latest research in their respective areas. The podcasts will serve as an interactive and education experience for all our listeners.

* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

All Episodes

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Andreas du Bois. Professor du Bois completed his medical degree in 1987 at the University of Freiburg, Germany. He subsequently trained in general surgery at Krankenhaus Wolfach Personalwohnheim and gynaecology and obstetrics at the University of Freiburg, leading to his registration as Fellow for Gynaecology and Obstetrics in 1993. In 1993, Prof. du Bois became a Consultant in the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe. He then served as Director of the Department of Gynaecology and Gynaecologic Oncology, Horst-Schmidt-Kliniken, Wiesbaden (19992010) before taking up his current roles as Director of the Departmenf of Gynaecology and Gynaecologic Oncology at Kliniken Essen-Mitte, and Associate Professor at Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany. Prof. du Bois has been the Principal Investigator of several pivotal and practice-changing international clinical trials in gynaecological oncology. He founded the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynaekologische Onkologie (AGO) Study Group in 1993 and co-founded the European Network of Gynaecological Oncological Trial groups (ENGOT) in 2007. He has previously been a member of the German Guideline Comittee for guidelines in breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer, Chairman of the German quality assurance programme for ovarian cancer (QS-OVAR), and member of the Gynecological Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) executive board and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) council. Prof. du Bois has been Chairman and a member of the Scientific Committee of the Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the GCIG, and served as a member of the Scientific Committee of the 1st European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO)-ESGO Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference 2018. Prof. du Bois is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), ESGO, International Gynecologic Cancer Society (ISGC), German Cancer Society, and AGO. He has authored more than 500 publications with more than 33,500 citations, and has a Google Scholar h index of 86. Prof. du Bois has received multiple honours and awards in recognition for his work, including the Arthur Walpole Award (German Cancer Society, 2006), Ernst Wertheim Award (Austrian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, 2006), MD Anderson Madrid Lifetime Award (2016), Wilhelm-Warner Prize for Cancer Research (2019), German Cancer Prize (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft, 2020) and honorary membership of the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (2020); 2021 he received the ESGO Lifetime Achievement Award (European Society of Gynaecological Oncology).

Nov 24

40 min 2 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Jason Wright to discuss SLN in endometrial atypical hyperplasia. Dr. Wright is the Sol Goldman Associate Professor and Chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Columbia University. Highlights: -Performance of sentinel lymph node mapping is increasing in women undergoing hysterectomy for complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia. -Sentinel lymph node mapping in women with atypical endometrial hyperplasia does not increase perioperative morbidity or mortality. -The addition of sentinel lymph node mapping to surgery for endometrial hyperplasia is associated with increased hospital costs.

Nov 19

29 min 57 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Irina Tsibulak discusses the contents of the November issue of IJGC in Russian.

Nov 15

12 min 43 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Mario Leitao to discuss prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy RCT. Dr. Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Dr. Mario Leitao is currently an Attending Surgeon in the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College. He currently serves as Program Director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. Dr. Leitao is also the Director for the Minimal Access and Robotic Surgery Program in the Department of Surgery for MSKCC. Highlights 1. SSI is a common postoperative complication that leads to significant healthcare costs in the near- and far-term 2. In our RCT, the use of a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system did not improve wound complications (Superficial SSI) in a cohort of patients undergoing mostly laparotomy for gynecologic malignancies with closed laparotomy incisions. 3. There was also no signal of benefit in the small subgroup of morbidly obese patients. 4. Increasing BMI was the only independently associated risk for the development of a wound complication @leitaomd @sloan_kettering

Nov 12

30 min 5 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Sara Nasser discusses the contents of the November issue of IJGC in Arabic.

Nov 9

18 min 11 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Cecilia Darin and Natalia Rodriguez discuss the contents of the November issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Nov 9

10 min 36 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Emma Allanson and Natalia Rodriguez discuss the contents of the November issue of IJGC in English.

Nov 9

12 min 30 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Ate van der Zee and Brian Slomovitz to discuss the GROINSS-V-II/GOG 270 Trial. Dr. Brian Slomovitz is a Gynecologic Oncologist at Broward Health and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University. He is an internationally recognized leader in gynecologic oncology clinical trials, specifically in immunotherapy and novel biomarker therapeutics. He also is a leader in sentinel lymph node detection for gynecologic malignancies. Dr. Ate Van der Zee is Chairman of the Board of Directors at the University Medical Center Groningen and professor of Gynaecological Oncology. His current research focuses on translational and clinical research in vulvar cancer. Together with Dr. Oonk he leads a world-wide consortium (GROINSS-V), which performs landmark clinical studies in vulvar cancer. Dr. van der Zee combines his current position chairman position with clinical work and academic research. Highlights •Radiotherapy instead of inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy is a safe treatment option for vulvar cancer patients with a metastasis < 2 mm in the sentinel node •Radiotherapy instead of inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy is associated with less treatment-related morbidity in vulvar cancer patients with a metastasis < 2 mm in the sentinel node •Prospective phase II treatment trials with stopping rules are excellent tools to explore new diagnostic and therapeutic options and to provide evidence-based medicine in rare tumors such as vulvar cancer. •Leading a world-wide consortium (GROINSS-V) is very rewarding and great fun! Ate van der Zee and Brian Slomovitz (@AteZee / @gyncancermd / @umcg / @browardhealth, @FIU)

Nov 5

46 min 2 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Katherina Grette and Nathaniel Jones to discuss racial inequities in immunotherapy trials and their article, “Not immune to inequity: minority under-representation in immunotherapy trials for breast and gynecologic cancers,” which is the Lead Article in IJGC’s November 2021 issue. (https://ijgc.bmj.com/content/early/2021/09/21/ijgc-2021-002557) Dr. Katherine Grette attended medical school at the University of Washington, then completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of South Alabama prior to joining faculty. She currently practices as a generalist and serves as the Assistant Director of Resident Research for the department. Dr. Nate Jones completed residency at Mountain Area Health Education Center in Asheville, NC followed by fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology at New York Presbyterian Hospitals: Columbia and Cornell. He currently serves as Assistant Professor in Gynecologic Oncology at the University of South Alabama Mitchell Cancer Institute. His research interests center on targeted cancer therapies, molecular and genomic characteristics of gynecologic malignancies, and addressing racial disparities in gynecologic cancer care. Highlights •Minority women are poorly represented in immunotherapy clinical trials for breast and gynecologic cancers •Enrollment of black women is especially low, accounting for only 5% of participants •Minority participation in clinical trials must increase to improve equity in health outcomes @natejones333 / @katgrette / @usamci

Oct 29

30 min 21 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Nicoletta Colombo to discuss pembrolizumab for persistent, recurrent, metastatic cervical cancer: KEYNOTE 826. Professor Nicoletta Colombo graduated in medicine in 1980, completing specialty training in obstetrics and gynaecology in 1984 at the University of Milan, Italy. After a training period at Charing Cross Hospital and Royal Marsden Hospital in London, she became a Clinical Research Associate at the Kaplan Cancer Center, New York University, where she worked from 1984 until 1986. Professor Colombo then worked as a member of the Junior and later the Senior Faculty at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Milan. In 1994 she became Deputy Director and in 2001 Director of the Medical Gynaecologic Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy. Since 2002 she has held the position of Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Milan-Bicocca. In 2008, she became Director of the Ovarian Cancer Centre at IEO and in 2014 Chair of the Program of Gynaecology. Principal investigators of several international clinical trials, Professor Colombo is also author of several publications in the field of gynaecologic oncology, and a member of various professional societies such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the Society of Gynaecologic Oncologists (SGO) and the International Gynaecological Cancer Society (IGCS). She is also Past President of the European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology (ESGO) and was Chair of the first ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference in endometrial cancer ( 2015) and the first ESMO-ESGO Consensus Conference in ovarian Cancer ( 2018). From 2016-2020 she was Subject Editor of ESMO Clinical Guidelines for Gynecological Malignancies and she is currently member of the steering committee of ESMO Clinical guidelines. Highlights 1)adding pembrolizumab to chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab provides statistically significant, clinically meaningful improvements in progression-free and overall survival in patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer 2)The addition of pembrolizumab was also associated with a higher response rate and a longer response duration 3)The safety profile for pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab was manageable 4)data from KEYNOTE-826 suggest that pembrolizumab plus platinum-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab may be a new first-line standard of care for the treatment of persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer.

Oct 21

36 min 16 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Irina Tsibulak discusses the contents of the October issue of IJGC in Russian.

Oct 18

12 min 37 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Emma Allanson and Natalia Rodríguez discuss the contents of the September issue of IJGC in English.

Oct 18

14 min 47 sec

Dr. Bradley Monk is a member of Arizona Oncology and part of the US Oncology Network and continues to practice in Phoenix. Most recently, he has been appointed the US Oncology Medical Director of Gynecologic Oncology Research. Dr. Monk is also a Professor on the Clinical Scholar Track at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and works at Arizona Oncology (US Oncology Network). Dr. Monk’s research interests include the prevention and treatment of gynecologic cancers. Dr. Monk is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, as well as being an active member of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, International Gynecologic Cancer Society, and American Society of Clinical Oncology. He has authored more than 330 peer-reviewed articles along with more than 30 book chapters dealing predominantly with the prevention and chemotherapy of gynecologic malignancies and patient quality of life.

Oct 15

41 min 38 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Sara Nasser discusses the contents of the October issue of IJGC in Arabic.

Oct 14

14 min 8 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Cecilia Darin and Erick Estrada discuss the contents of the October issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Oct 6

12 min 13 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Kathleen Schmeler to discuss the ConCerv Trial. Dr. Schmeler is the lead author of ConCerv: a prospective trial of conservative surgery for low-risk early-stage cervical cancer, which is the Lead Article of IJGC’s October 2021 issue. Dr. Schmeler is a Professor in Gynecologic Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She provides care to women with gynecologic malignancies including surgery, chemotherapy and preventive services. Dr. Schmeler is also the Executive Director of Global Oncology for the MD Anderson Cancer Network. Her research interest is in cervical cancer prevention and treatment, particularly for resource-constrained countries and medically underserved communities in the US. ( https://ijgc.bmj.com/content/early/2021/09/06/ijgc-2021-002921.share ) @kmschmeler @MDAndersonNews Highlights: •The ConCerv trial is the first prospective study of conservative surgery in women with low-risk cervical cancer. It included 14 sites in 9 countries. •Findings from the ConCerv Trial offer prospective data supporting a more conservative approach to low-risk patients, sparing them the early and late morbidity associated with radical procedures. •It will also allow for safer cervical cancer surgery in low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of cervical cancer is highest. •In the our study, conservative surgery was associated with a 3.5% recurrence rate in women with low-risk cervical cancer. In addition, the rate of positive lymph nodes was 5%, with lymph node assessment recommended in this low-risk population. •Further study is needed to determine long term outcomes and optimal pathologic criteria for conservative surgery."

Sep 29

48 min 4 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Christina Fotopoulou for another installment of the Mentor’s Podcast. Professor Fotopoulou works at the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, UK. She is an elected ESGO council member and Chair of the ESGO guidelines committee. Christina Fotopoulou (@CF_PC_OvCaGroup / @HopkinsMedNews) Highlights: - Early support from mentors and "giants" in the field, national and international networking and early focusing/specialization in the field of interest are keys to success - Try to turn your weaknesses and failures to learning points and opportunities to make you stronger - Hard work, kindness and caring for patients, team spirit, professionalism and dedication are the main keys of success next to any talent and luck that anyone might be fortunate enough to have

Sep 29

38 min 49 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Yuefeng Wang and Matthew Ballo to discuss role of hysterectomy in stage IVB uterine cancer. Dr. Yuefeng Wang is a radiation oncologist and Dr. Matthew Ballo is a radiation oncologist, and the Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, West Cancer Center and Research Institute, Memphis, TN. Yuefeng Wang and Matthew Ballo (@YuefengWang2 / @west_cancer) Highlights: -For uterine cancer with pelvic/abdomen metastasis, there is survival benefit associated with total abdominal hysterectomy, in addition to systemic therapy. However, we do not know if there is any role of total abdominal hysterectomy for patient with distant organ metastasis. -In this retrospective, hypothesis-generating study including 3,200 uterine cancer patients with distant organ metastasis, total abdominal hysterectomy plus chemotherapy was associated with significant longer survival (19.8 vs 11.0 months, p < 0.05) compared to patients had chemotherapy alone.

Sep 24

26 min 41 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Kemi Doll to discuss racial disparities in endometrial cancer screening with ultrasound. Dr. Kemi Doll is a gynecologic oncologist, health services researcher, and Associate Professor at the University of Washington, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Her expertise is in Black-White disparities in endometrial cancer outcomes in the United States. Kemi Doll (@kemidoll / @uwmedicine / @uwashobgyn)

Sep 17

32 min 21 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Andreas Obermair to discuss the ENDO3 Trial. Dr. Obermair is a gynaecological oncologist in Brisbane, Australia, promoting surgery with proven better patient outcomes. Highlights •ENDO3 exemplifies the need to question current standard clinical practice if this practice – while performed routinely - has not shown patient benefit. •ENDO3 employs meticulous methodology and has been designed with input from gynaecological oncologists, medical and radiation oncologists, behavioural scientists, exercise physiologists, statisticians, translational scientists, including the patient perspective. •ENDO3 will offer unique insights into clinically meaningful outcomes that will shape our approach to surgical treatment of endometrial cancer in the future. Andreas Obermair (@AndreasObermair / @UQ_gynae_cancer)

Sep 8

37 min 6 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Sara Nasser discusses the contents of the September issue of IJGC in Arabic.

Sep 7

11 min 16 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Irina Tsibulak discusses the contents of the September issue of IJGC in Russian.

Sep 7

7 min 2 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Cecilia Darin and Erick Estrada discuss the contents of the September issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Sep 3

8 min 22 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Emma Allanson and Erick Estrada discuss the contents of the September issue of IJGC in English.

Sep 3

8 min 40 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Oliver Zivanovic and Roisin O'Cearbhaill. Dr. Roisin O’Cearbhaill, MD, is a medical oncologist and the Research Director of the Gynecologic Medical Oncology Service and the Clinical Director of the Solid Tumor Program, Cellular Therapy Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, with a joint faculty appointment at Weill Cornell Medical College. Nationally, she serves as the Chair, Developmental Therapeutics, NRG Oncology. Dr. Oliver Zivanovic MD is a Gynecologic Oncologist at the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Ketteting Cancer Center with a joint faculty appointment at Weill Cornell Medical College. He serves as the Institutional Principle Investigator for NRG Oncology. @ROCearbhaill / @zivanovicmd / @TeamOvary_MSK / @sloan_kettering Highlights: -HIPEC with carboplatin at secondary cytoreductive surgery for first platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer was not superior to secondary cytoreduction without HIPEC. -HIPEC for recurrent ovarian cancer should be conducted in the setting of a clinical trial

Aug 27

44 min 13 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Christina Fotopoulou to discuss the ESGO Guidelines on Perioperative Management Ovarian Cancer. Professor Fotopoulou is the lead author of “European Society of Gynaecological Oncology guidelines for the peri-operative management of patients with ovarian cancer,” which is the Lead Article of IJGC’s September 2021 issue. Professor Fotopoulou works at the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, UK. She is an elected ESGO council member and Chair of the ESGO guidelines committee. Highlights - Patients with advanced ovarian cancer need to have a holistic care assessment and detailed discussion about risks and benefits of surgical treatment tailored to their individual profile. - A multidisciplinary team approach and complications management is crucial for the safe delivery of cytoreductive procedures - Maximal infrastructural expertise and specialization are keys to surgical success Christina Fotopoulou (@CF_PC_OvCaGroup)

Aug 19

49 min 51 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. James Stuart Ferriss to discuss advances and novel approaches in uterine serous cancers. Dr. Ferriss is an assistant professor in the Kelly Gynecologic Oncology division, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is the program director of the Montz fellowship in gynecologic oncology. Highlights: •Uterine serous carcinomas represent less than 10% of all uterine cancers, but 39% of disease specific deaths. •Surgery remains the cornerstone of treatment. •Our understanding of the molecular drivers of this uncommon cancer supports new, targeted therapies. •Adjuvant treatment of advanced and recurrent uterine serous carcinomas should be based on HER2 expression. • Ongoing clinical trials will further define the role of immunotherapy, WEE1 inhibitors, and PARP inhibitors in uterine serous carcinoma.

Aug 19

35 min 1 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Professor Ignace Vergote joins us for the Mentor’s Podcast. Professor Ignace Vergote is Chairman of the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the Catholic University Leuven since 2003. He published more than 900 papers on gynecologic cancer in peer-reviewed journals and his work has been cited more than 50,000 times. He served as President of IGCS, ESGO, EORTC-GCG and ENGOT. Ignace Vergote (@UZLeuven)

Aug 13

45 min 19 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Irina Tsibulak discusses the contents of the August issue of IJGC in Russian.

Aug 11

13 min 16 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Rebecca Previs and Benjamin Albright to discuss primary cytoreduction for advanced endometrial cancer. Dr. Rebecca Previs is an assistant professor within the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecologic at Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. Her translational research interests include understanding how the immune microenvironment and molecular characterization of gynecologic cancers influences disease biology and treatment outcomes. Outside of medicine, she enjoys spending time with her menagerie of pets, gardening, hiking, harvesting honey from her bee hives, and playing the piano. Dr. Ben Albright is a second-year fellow within the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecologic at Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. His research interests include health policy and economics, health services research, systematic review, and cost-effectiveness analysis. Outside of medicine, he enjoys trail running, tennis, hiking with his wife and two big dogs, and University of Kentucky basketball. @BeccaPrevisMD / @BenAlbrightMD / @dukeobgyn / @DukeCancer Highlights 1. The objective of our study was (1) to assess the frequency of reported proportions of maximal (R0, no gross residual disease) and optimal (<1 cm or <2 cm residual disease cytoreduction in patients with advanced stage endometrial cancer, and (2) to describe the impact of achieving these levels of surgical debulking on progression free survival and overall survival. 2. Our analysis included a total of 34 studies, which included 2,920 total patients with stage III or IV endometrial cancer undergoing primary cytoreductive surgery. Overall, 52% of patients were reduced to no gross residual disease, while 75% reached optimal debulking with <1 cm of residual disease. 3. Submaximal and suboptimal cytoreduction to be significantly associated with worse progression-free survival with a hazard ratio of 2.2 and 2.6, respectively. Studies that included Stage III patients had higher rates of maximal cytoreduction, 69.8% versus 41.4% for studies of Stage IV patients alone. While stage was clearly important, histology was not associated with the extent of cytoreduction, with generally similar rates across endometrial, serous or clear cell, and carcinosarcoma histologies. 4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women with advanced stage uterine cancer is increasing, although prospective data for this approach are limited. 5. Women with advanced stage endometrial cancer should be encouraged to enroll on clinical trials when available.

Jul 27

41 min 44 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Dimitrios Nasioudis to discuss minimally invasive surgery in stage IA cervical cancer and his article, "Minimally invasive hysterectomy for stage IA cervical carcinoma: a survival analysis of the National Cancer Database," which is the Lead Article in the August 2021 issue of IJGC. Dr. Nasioudis is a resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. His current interests include population science and outcomes research with an emphasis on rare gynecologic tumors. Dimitrios Nasioudis (@Dnasioudis / @PennMedicine)

Jul 27

26 min 53 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Sara Nasser discusses the contents of the August issue of IJGC in Arabic.

Jul 27

14 min 59 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Emma Allanson and Erick Estrada discuss the contents of the August issue of IJGC in English.

Jul 27

13 min 9 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Cecilia Darin and Natalia Rodriguez discuss the contents of the August issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Jul 27

12 min 19 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Enrique Chacon discusses the contents of the June issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Jul 23

14 min 35 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Shannon Westin to discuss Phase II Trial of IUD in conservative management of endometrial cancer. Dr. Westin focuses on developmental therapeutics and the use of biomarkers to predict response and recurrence in gynecologic malignancies. She currently serves as the Director of Early Drug Development and Phase I trials in her department and is a Co-Director of the Ovarian Cancer Moonshot. She is currently the PI or co-PI for greater than 30 novel treatment trials in gynecologic malignancies. Shannon Westin (@ShannonWestin / @mdandersonnews) Highlights: 1. A fertility-sparing, non-surgical approach is increasingly necessary for individuals diagnosed with early endometrial neoplasia due to increasing prevalence of significant comorbidities and proportion of premenopausal women diagnosed with this disease. 2. Out of 57 treated patients, 47 were evaluable and 12-month response rate was 83% overall (90.6% for complex atypical hyperplasia and 66.7% for grade 1 endometrioid endometrial cancer). 3. Adverse events associated with the IUD were mild, and quality of life was not negatively impacted. 4. This study used a rigorous 12-month endpoint to demonstrate durable response rates in women with early endometrial neoplasia and identified potential biomarkers for therapy resistance.

Jul 23

30 min 51 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez is joined by Dr. Dimitrios Nasioudis to discuss the impact of SLN biopsy versus lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer. Dr. Nasioudis is a resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. His current interests include population science and outcomes research with an emphasis on rare gynecologic tumors. Dimitrios Nasioudis (@Dnasioudis / @PennMedicine) Highlights: - Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been established as a minimalistic approach to endometrial cancer staging, with excellent diagnostic accuracy. - Data on the long-term oncologic and patient reported outcomes are greatly warranted. - For patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer, based on a large dataset, overall survival was comparable between the sentinel lymph node biopsy alone and systematic lymphadenectomy groups.

Jul 16

27 min 58 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Anna Collins and Nicolò Bizzarri discuss the contents of the July issue of IJGC in English.

Jul 14

15 min 14 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez is joined by Dr. Roni Nitecki to discuss pregnancy outcomes after ovarian cancer. Dr. Nitecki is a gynecologic oncology fellow at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. She received her MD from Dartmouth medical school in 2015 and completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in 2019. Highlights - Fertility considerations in young women with ovarian cancer are becoming increasingly relevant. - Fear of pregnancy and adverse obstetric outcomes may be one reason that women do not pursue pregnancy after fertility sparing surgery. - Counseling about pregnancy outcomes is an important part of shared decision-making about fertility sparing surgery for ovarian cancer. - In this study, patients who conceived at least 3 months after fertility sparing surgery for ovarian cancer did not have an increased risk of adverse obstetric outcomes.

Jul 12

19 min 2 sec

Andrew Clamp (@TheChristieNHS and @OfficialUoM) In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez is joined by Dr. Andrew Clamp to discuss rucaparib maintenance in recurrent ovarian cancer (ARIEL3). Dr. Clamp is an author of “Rucaparib maintenance treatment for recurrent ovarian carcinoma: the effects of progression-free interval and prior therapies on efficacy and safety in the randomized phase III trial ARIEL3,” the Lead Article for IJGC’s July 2021 issue. Dr. Clamp is a Consultant and Honorary Senior Lecturer in Medical Oncology subspecializing in the treatment of gynaecological cancers. He is Chief Investigator for the MRC ICON8 Trials Programme and leads the gynaecological cancers clinical research team at The Christie. Highlights - Rucaparib provides a clinically significant prolongation of progression-free survival when used as maintenance treatment for platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. - In the ARIEL3 trial, rucaparib extended progression-free survival versus placebo regardless of the length of the penultimate platinum-free interval, number of prior chemotherapy regimens or previous use of bevacizumab. - After extended follow-up, rucaparib was well-tolerated and its safety profile was not impacted by prior treatment history. - Maintenance PARP inhibitors should be considered for all PARP inhibitor naïve patients with recurrent high grade ovarian cancer after response to platinum-based chemotherapy.

Jul 1

31 min 21 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Anna Collins, Irina Tsibulak, Nicolò Bizzarri, Alex Mutombo, Enrique Chacon, and Arthur Hsu interview Professor Denis Querleu for an extended discussion of his experiences in gynecologic oncology, the importance of mentorship, and pathways for development in the field.

Jun 25

35 min 39 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Alex Mutombo discusses the contents of the June issue of IJGC in French.

Jun 18

14 min 29 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Irina Tsibulak discusses the contents of the June issue of IJGC in Russian.

Jun 18

14 min 48 sec

Linda Mileshkin (@Mileshkin / @anzgog) In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez is joined by Dr. Linda Mileshkin to discuss the OUTBACK Trial. Dr. Mileshkin is the Deputy Director of Medical Oncology at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and a board member of the Australia and New Zealand Gynaecological Oncology Group (ANZGOG). She is a clinician researcher with a particular interest in gynaecological cancer and cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Highlights - Adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy given after standard chemoradiation to women with locally advanced cervical cancer did not improve survival or relapse rates and should not be given. - There is a major unmet need to improve outcomes and access to treatment for women with cervical cancer, as this is a major cause of death and suffering worldwide, most notably in LMICs. - International cooperation is needed to complete international clinical trials in cervical cancer so that we can robustly answer important questions about how to treat this disease.

Jun 18

28 min 1 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Enrique Chacon discusses the contents of the June issue of IJGC in Spanish.

Jun 11

14 min 22 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellow Nicolò Bizzarri discusses the contents of the June issue of IJGC in Italian.

Jun 10

13 min 29 sec

Christina Fotopoulou (@CF_PC_OvCaGroup) In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Professor Christina Fotopoulou to discuss the ESGO-ISUOG-IOTA-ESGE Consensus statements on the pre-operative diagnosis of ovarian tumors. Prof Fotopoulou works at the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, UK. She is an elected ESGO council member and Chair of the ESGO guidelines committee. Highlights - Multidisciplinary, specialized and expert diagnostic pathways of crucial importance to stratify patients adequately to the right management and team - Objective diagnostic algorithms combining imaging, clinical, and biochemical features are now in place to characterize adnexal masses in a more standardized way with less subjective bias - Our aim to homogenize, optimize and standardize diagnostic strategies across European Centers and beyond

Jun 8

33 min 18 sec

In this episode of the IJGC Podcast, Editorial Fellows Anna Collins and Irina Tsibulak discuss the contents of the June issue of IJGC in English.

Jun 4

14 min 8 sec

(@K8SLN_MDMBA / @MLiangMD / @BIDMC_ObGyn / @UABOGYN / @ONealCancerUAB) In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Katharine Esselen and Margaret Liang to discuss financial toxicity in gynecologic cancers and their article, “Evaluating meaningful levels of financial toxicity in gynecologic cancers,” which is the Lead Article of IJGC’s June 2021 issue. Dr. Esselen, MD, MBA, is a gynecologic oncologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. She is the Associate Fellowship Program Director and Director of Clinical Research for the Division of Gynecologic Oncology. Dr. Liang, MD, MS, is a gynecologic oncologist and health services researcher at University of Alabama at Birmingham and O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is Network Relations Lead for the newly established Emotional Well-being and Economic Burden Research Network (EMOT-ECON). Highlights - ~50% of gynecologic cancer patients report financial toxicity and ~15% experience severe financial toxicity - Patients with severe financial toxicity are 4.6 times more likely to report medication non-compliance - More work needs to be done to understand the impact of financial toxicity on clinical outcomes including adherence to treatment and cancer survival - Proposed interventions include development of screening tools, provider training in cost conversations, enhanced financial navigation, insurance optimization, improved workplace leave policies, and value-based care healthcare models"

Jun 4

43 min 46 sec

In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Emma Crosbie to discuss urine cytology in detection of endometrial cancer. Dr. Crosbie is an NIHR Advanced Fellow, Professor and Honorary Consultant in Gynaecological Oncology at the University of Manchester. Her research focuses on screening, prevention and early detection of gynaecological cancer. Highlights: • Current diagnostics for endometrial cancer are poorly tolerated by some, painful for others and unnecessary for most because only 5-10% of women with postmenopausal bleeding have endometrial cancer • This proof-of-concept study showed that endometrial cancer cells can be collected from the urogenital tract using non-invasive sampling technologies and detected by cytology • If confirmed in larger studies, this concept could form the basis of a simple, pain-free, easily administered test with potential for rapid, same day results to triage women for urgent investigation of suspected endometrial cancer, whilst safely reassuring healthy women • Such a test could substantially reduce the psychological, physical and financial burden of the current diagnostic pathway for endometrial cancer Emma Crosbie (@ProfEmmaCrosbie / @ECTeamSMH G25 / @ManchesterBRC / @UoMDCS / @MCRCNews / @FBMH_UoM / @MFT_SMH / @MFT_Research)

May 27

25 min 35 sec