45 Forward

Ron Roel

Thanks to advances in medicine and health, most of us are just at half-life when we reach our mid-40s, with many potentially productive years ahead. But there’s no road map to prepare us for this period. That’s where 45 Forward comes in. My show provides you with strategies to shift the traditional waiting-for-retirement model to a journey of compelling life chapters. Each show tackles an aspect of health, finance, family and friends, housing, work and personal pursuits as part of an integrated plan. Experts discuss topics like revitalizing relationships, creating mini-retirements, managing the maze of technology, finding your next homestead and caring for aging parents.

The show instills confidence, and hopefully some comfort, amid the stresses permeating today’s society. Fear of the future is not knowing how to prepare for it. 45 Forward does not proffer prefabricated answers, but helps you shape your life amid the daily anxieties of our time.

Todos os episódios

We are in the midst of a Parkison’s pandemic—and yet, this pandemic is a relatively silent one. Parkinson’s is the world’s fastest growing neurological disorder, increasing in virtually every region in the world. In the U.S. alone, the economic cost of the diseases exceeds $50 billion a year—a staggering $50,000 per person with the disease. In today’s episode, we talk with Dr. Ray Dorsey, Professor of Neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center and co-author of a thought-provoking new book, “Ending Parkinson’s Disease: A Prescription for Action.” As one of four leading physicians who co-author this book, Dr. Dorsey calls for a bold, comprehensive approach to help end Parkinson’s called PACT, which stands for Prevent. Advocate for, Care, and Treat the disease. He will talk about the most promising treatments on the horizon, from immune therapies to vaccines, surgical treatments, and new developments in nutrition and microbiome research. He’ll discuss the troubling use of pesticides and toxic chemicals linked to the disease, which particularly affect farmers, veterans, and high-tech manufacturing workers, as well as the rest of us. Dr. Dorsey will also outline some of the latest advances in care, including the dramatic increase in the use of telemedicine to treat Parkinson's patients. And he will examine the lessons learned from other health crises, from polio to AIDS and COVID-19—and how we might apply them to this pandemic. And finally, he will give us an action plan for what the average citizen can do right now to help end Parkinson’s. “Parkinson’s disease is not an inevitable disease that happens with age,” he notes. “It is a preventable disease, and we need to get around to preventing people from developing it in the first place.”

29 de nov.

55min 58s

Retirement is dead. Long live retirement! For many Americans these days, traditional retirement, as we’ve known it, is gone—or disappearing. We no longer work for one employer for decades, then leave the workforce with a pension, kick back and relax. At least not all the time. For one thing, we’ve living much longer, so many retirees need to think beyond filling their days with a lot of golf. But how to reimagine about this chapter of life, a time of both vulnerability and opportunity—and Covid? In today’s episode, Carol Waldman, who retired (sort of) from a long career managing a large senior center, and Vicki Ellner, who started to retire from a wide-ranging career in health care and patient advocacy and decided to “rewire” instead, thought better of it, talk about the roller-coaster of emotions as they navigate their so-called retirement years. Carol and Vicki talk about the vulnerability of losing one’s work identity, the stress and anxiety of feeling a lack of control. At the same time, this can be the most open part of life, a sense of never feeling so free, with no set plans and restraints on our time—except that there’s ultimately less of it. Long-time friends and colleagues, Vicki and Carol talk about their individual searches for meaning and purpose, finding new experiences and ways to give the most and get the most out of this sometimes-strange place in life. Retirement can be a time of dealing with grief and grievances; acknowledging loss and letting go of things. Yet, it also allows us to become more of who we are, to find new space for joy and enjoyment in our lives. And as we transform retirement from a time of sheer leisure to one of renewed activity, we need to find ways to rebalance ourselves and make sure we’re not so busy in retirement that we long to go back to work!

22 de nov.

55min 21s

About a decade ago, Michael Potteiger and his sister, Nacole, decided to teach their 85-year-old grandmother how to use an iPad. Not only did their Gram learn how, but she is still an active iPad user and loves seeing her grand (and great) grandchildren on FaceTime. Inspired by “Gram the Great,” Michael and Nacole founded Generation Connect, a cutting-edge firm that integrates health care with technology to help people with dementia, their families and their caregiving team through “digital therapeutics”—the use of technology as a tool to implement effective non-drug therapy treatments. In today’s episode, as part of National Family Caregivers Month, we talk with Michael and Robin Lombardo, Generation Connect’s director of business development, about their commitment to senior care and to developing new tools for the caregiving community. Michael has spent his entire career working in technology consulting, and today he continues to work closely with seniors, their families, and care organizations to better understand how technology can help support care teams. Robin, a geriatric and dementia specialist, is a veteran of the senior care field, serving in leadership positions in various healthcare settings and at nationally recognized nonprofits for people with Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Having exclusively worked with older adults, it is her passion to foster joy in their lives. Together, Michael and Robin will explain how Generation Connect provides a system of mobile apps, tablets, digital engagement and reporting features to help home care providers improve well-being and enhance caregiver relationships through personalized therapeutic routines and rituals. And while they believe that technology can greatly enhance the caregiving experience, technologists, too, have much to learn from the caregiving community. Thus, research remains a central component to Generation Connect’s mission, and Michael and Robin will describe their ongoing research and key findings from studies around the country—and their views on how technology will profoundly affect the future of health care.

15 de nov.

54min 21s

As we prepare to celebrate Veterans Day this month, today’s episode features veteran Jim Smith, who served as an Army correspondent for Stars and Stripes, the Defense Department’s daily newspaper, during the Vietnam War, reporting from every major city in Vietnam, from the Delta to the Demilitarized Zone. Whether it was observing training of South Vietnamese troops by U.S. advisers, watching massive U.S. firepower take out enemy targets or reporting on efforts to repel the North Vietnamese Easter Offensive, Jim was there to witness the events.He laughed at Bob Hope’s jokes, took cover during rocket attack, pulled guard duty at night in the jungle, got in trouble with the brass, and got caught up in the adrenaline rush of war. In today’s conversation, Jim will draw on a number of these vignettes, which appear in his gritty 2015 memoir, “Heroes to the End.” He witnessed many acts of bravery and commitment, as well as the frustrations and incongruities of the Vietnam War—dozens that were published in Stars and Stripes, and dozens that previously never made it into print. A dedicated journalist to the end, Jim will also discuss his long civilian career as a sportswriter and editor for Long Island’s daily newspaper Newsday, covering the New York Giants, the New York Rangers and New York Islanders. And coming full circle, Jim will reflect on his changing views on the Vietnam War—and subsequent wars—over the years, as well as his advocacy on behalf of social and racial justice causes, and his tireless support of the United Veterans Beacon House, which provides housing for hundreds of homeless veterans and their families at 47 locations on Long Island.

8 de nov.

54min 37s

Over the years, have you found yourself increasingly frustrated, saying “yes” to people just to keep them happy? Are you tired of hearing yourself described as a pushover or “too nice”? Or emotionally exhausted by the unreasonable demands of friends, family or co-workers? Well, then, it’s time you listened to life coach and best-selling author Michelle Elman, known as “The Queen of Boundaries” by her half-million social media followers. In today’s episode, Michelle, the author of the recently published “The Joy of Being Selfish,” explains how upholding strong boundaries will teach others how to treat you, rid your life of drama and toxic relationships, and allow you to care for yourself in the best way possible. She provides guidance for people who have trouble saying “no” or who frequently find themselves on the receiving end of “emotional dumps”—when someone is transferring their unfiltered emotions on you. The creator of the “In All Honesty” podcast, Michelle offers advice on what to do if you feel guilty after setting a boundary, as well as what we should do when our boundaries are crossed. She will also describe some of her acclaimed work as an influencer, including her notable “Scarred Not Scared campaign” to bring awareness to surgery scars and help women to embrace their bodies. And as we start to come out of the pandemic, Michelle will address the need to re-examine boundaries and perhaps set new ones, as people deal with different levels of comfort, concerns and socialization. Whatever your situation, she’ll provide a practical guide to help you take back your time, while maintaining your sense of safety and self-worth.

1 de nov.

54min 18s

About three years ago, Debbie Ginsberg was working as a professional organizer when she was asked to teach organizing and life management skills to help a college student improve his grades and function better all around. Six months later, the student graduated on the Dean's List—and OrganizeU4Life was born. In today’s episode, Debbie, talks about her remarkable journey as a serial entrepreneur, from her early days as president of a utility bill auditing company; to founder of Uncluttered Domain, a senior move management and aging-in-place consulting firm; to organizing mentor and CEO of OrganizeU4Life. In her current venture, Debbie offers breakthrough education with 1-to-1 techniques and tools to mentor high school and college students, as well as adults. Her main objective is to help chronically disorganized people, many from the ADHD and neurodiverse communities, take control of their lives. Debbie will describe her unique blend of individualized educational lessons and brain exercise training to increase focus, improve cognitive skills, and control the ups and downs of emotional dysregulation. Her techniques are designed to help people be more productive; reduce procrastination; master time-management; and improve study and work habits. When you teach a person how to organize and function, Debbie says, you give them the fundamental tools to organize their mind, their space, and their life.

25 de out.

51min 27s

For many older Americans, moving to an assisted living community offers a bridge between aging in place with occasional—but not really enough—socialization, and starting another phase in life, exploring new relationships and being engaged in activities suited to their needs. But how can families choose recreational programs that they believe will truly enhance the lives of our loved ones? In today’s episode, Maria Leonardo, who has spent several decades as a professional working specialist in the field of life enrichment programs and activities for seniors, will talk about her wide-ranging career and insights. Maria has planned, designed and implemented original programming, monthly calendars, special events and newsletters for numerous adult care, including independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing facilities. She’ll explain how activity and recreational professionals work together with families and staff to discover and maximize the positive abilities of residents—to meet people where they are,” as she says. Maria, who also has an eclectic background in adult ed teaching and communications (she is a voice-over talent, having created and voiced numerous radio commercials), will describe how this influence shaped some innovative programs she created in adult communities across Florida and New York: Programs that cross into the generational divide, like a senior girl scout group that joined with a local girl scout troop in activities like making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches together. Reading programs with school kids of different ages and art projects with preschoolers. Programs commemorating 9/11 program, with thought-provoking, personal questions for both young and old about how to achieve peace in the world. Programs that let kids find out about senior residents, and residents find out about kids—the hope for our future. Maria will also talk about what families need to watch for when checking out the life enrichment programs of prospective communities—a chance a chance to experience new things, whatever their abilities.

18 de out.

56min 10s

Across the country, most older people say they want to “age in place,” living in their current home as long as possible. But the ability to remain in one’s own home and community — safely and independently — often requires modifications in their home as people move from their 60s into their 70s and 80s and beyond. Successful aging in place is best achieved with deliberate planning that includes both older family members and their caregivers, as well as professional experts like Kim Kuester. In today’s episode, Kim, the owner and president of 101 Mobility of Long Island and Queens, talks about one critical piece of aging in place: making sure that your loved ones’ home continues to have the appropriate design features that provide a safe and comfortable environment — particularly to prevent accidents and potentially life-threatening falls. Kim is dedicated to help people find the best accessibility solutions, big or small, to fit their needs. She and her team assess a family’s whole house, starting with getting in and out of the home, and moving from room to room. In today’s conversation, Kim, a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist, will describe how she works with families to install various home modifications and adaptations, from bathtub cutouts and walk-in showers to wheelchair ramps, stair lifts, elevators, and widening of doorways—any and all means of accessibility. Ultimately, Kim’s goal is to ensure that families have peace of mind that they can age in place safely for as long as they wish to stay in their homes.

11 de out.

54min 52s

Most will unknowingly give away about 10 years of healthy living—our “healthspan” years—and the opportunity to continue enjoying daily living to the fullest. We know this, says longevity expert and educator Scott Fulton, based on data gathered from hundreds of millions of people. We don’t hear a lot about it, Scott adds, because the things that promote longevity aren’t deeply rooted in anti-aging products or retirement resorts, but rather in simple, accessible lifestyle choices. In today’s episode, Scott—a researcher, innovator, and engineer by training—talks about how millions of us could easily live healthy to 95, with just some basic education on how interconnected our bodies are with our lifestyle choices and our environment. No pills or potions; just informed natural choices, resulting in both immediate and sustainable lifestyle benefits. Scott will explain how people can “reverse engineer” the life they dream of, improve the quality of life today and achieve additional healthier years in the future by balancing what he calls the “Five Pillars of Longevity Success”: Mind, Environment Diet, Exercise and Community. Scott, who established Home Ideations, a livability consulting company, is also a dedicated educator at heart, and he will describe his dynamic adult education courses, the Longevity Advantage™, and Whealthspan™, a balanced investment approach to both health and wealth. Life happens, and if decisions are left unaddressed, they make themselves. Ultimately, longevity isn’t about doing one thing right, or about perfection, or just for the chosen few, Scott notes. It’s available to almost all of us and it’s just about making informed choices along the journey of life.

4 de out.

54min 30s

Planning for retirement triggers all sorts of thoughts: excitement, hope, expectation—and yes, a dose of anxiety. We worry about financial security (did we save enough?) but we’re often not prepared for the emotional and social aspects of this major life transition. In today’s episode, Leah Frankel— who has created the entrepreneurial role of “Retirement Journey Advocate”—offers a sharp and refreshing perspective on how to prepare for this next chapter of life. Whether you want to launch a second career; have a side-job or hobby, volunteer, travel, or just sit back and relax, Leah will guide and support you through a stress-free workplace exit, prepared for a new identity and fulfilling experiences. Leah, herself, retired three years ago from a highly successful 30-year career with L’Oreal, and in the process discovered how to transfer her skills and talents into a meaningful second act—and guide others how to do the same. In today’s conversation with host Ron Roel, Leah will explain her simple, 3-step process for leaving a long-time career—a common-sense approach that combines attention to administrative and procedural details with strategic goals and priorities. She’ll also provide a list of 7 key tips and insights to start your retirement journey, from creating a list of “hard and soft skills”; to adapting from a corporate structure to flexible time schedules; creating new relationships and social networks; and learning how (and when) to take breaks to recharge. Finally, drawing from her own personal experiences, Leah will talk about the importance of finding fulfillment, not just happiness, in retirement—finding ways to continue making a difference, imparting your experiences to the next generations, and feeling that life is important and meaningful.

27 de set.

54min 34s

After earning her undergraduate and master’s degrees specializing in marketing, public relations and advertising, Hilary Topper embarked on a corporate career working for major PR agencies in New York City, in addition to two large non-profit organizations as director of public relations and development. Then, some 30 years ago, Hilary went out on her own, founding HJMT Public Relations and building a roster of prominent clients across the country. Along the way she became an expert and widely recognized influencer in social media marketing, writing one of the earliest books on the subject, called “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Social Media, but were afraid to ask.” In her late 40s, she decided to give herself a real run for the money—literally. She was never an athlete, but decided to start running, and by age 53, she found that running was not enough. She became a triathlete. In today’s episode, Hilary talks about the daily challenge of organizing and managing the multi-hyphenate life as entrepreneur-author-podcaster-blogger-adjunct professor-marathoner-triathlete-coach. It has been a successful journey, but often a roller-coaster, as she has been forced to make major adjustments in response to life-altering events, like 9/11, the 2008 economic meltdown, and most recently, of course, the pandemic. Three years ago, Hilary reorganized her business; she no longer managing a staff of 25 people but continues to run a concierge PR firm. She also produces two blogs and a weekly podcast and has written a second book (a third is on the way), while preparing for the next triathlon and coaching beginner triathletes. No longer as engaged in her former high-adrenaline business world, Hilary points out one unmistakable benefit: She’s much happier now.

20 de set.

55min 36s

When the pandemic shut down most of America last year, the arts and entertainment community was faced with a monumental challenge. How could they survive without attracting in-person audiences to their events? Surely, they could try to create online facsimiles of their events—virtual tours, exhibitions, concerts and performances—but would these activities be dynamic enough to attract broad interest from the public? That’s when Holly Gordon and Waldo Cabrera came up with a provocative new approach to the virtual art show. In today’s episode, Holly and Waldo describe their unique collaborative journey, creating exhibitions featuring artists aged 50 and older at a prominent Long Island museum. Holly, a nationally recognized fine art and documentary photographer, served as curator of these exhibits, which were sponsored by AARP New York. Waldo, an award-winning journalist with years of experience in advertising, marketing and video production, handled the many technical tasks. The resulting presentations are no mere pictures at an exhibition. Together, Holly and Wally tell the story of how they pieced together an assemblage of images, music, graphics, narration and commentary from dozens of artists into a cohesive, entertaining experience. “I’m the composer, Wally is the conductor who interprets the work,” says Holly. Both artists also stress the importance of the arts across the generations. Holly has long been an ardent advocate for older populations. And Waldo regularly bridges the generations through his years of work with film and video productions for children, including 4Kids Entertainment, the company that brought Pokémon to the United States. Indeed, their next exhibit focuses on intergenerational collaboration among artists. “We’re all 6-year-olds,” says Waldo. “We’re using art the same way. It’s entertaining, it has elements of surprise. It’s a roller coaster ride.”

13 de set.

54min 45s

When we plan for our later years, most of us consider factors like health, housing, financial security, lifestyle and caregiving, but we tend of overlook one distinct possibility: What if end up aging alone? Recent studies have found that between 30 and 35% of older adults in the U.S. are expected to age alone within the next decade. About 45% of older women will find themselves aging solo. Many of these “elder orphans” have no assistance in making financial decisions, no designated caregiver, little access to transportation, and no help in times of crisis. In today’s episode, host Ron Roel talks with Carol Marak, one of the nation’s premier experts in solo aging, about how to plan a safe and independent older life — even without family. Drawing initially from the experiences taking care of her parents, Carol created her own plan for self-care, self-reliance, and creating a family-like community; now she teaches other solo adults how to do the same. Carol will explain how to avoid some of the potential adverse effects of aging alone; describe specific ways to map out a solo aging plan; and how to access unique resources, such as her Group Coaching Support services and Elder Orphan Facebook Group. The ultimate goal: Helping people build the kind of strong support system they’ll need to solo age with confidence.

6 de set.

54min 22s

For many seniors, their retirement years mean a time when they eagerly look forward to doing whatever they want, whenever they want—and that often means seeing the world, unencumbered by work or family obligations. That plan, of course, was abruptly put on hold by Covid-19, which socially isolated most of us for months, and shuttered much of our economy, hitting the travel and hospitality industry especially hard. In recent months, life has returned— sort of—to normal, but this new normal is still filled with uncertainty and anxiety, as the pandemic has taken unexpected turns with the Delta variant and large portions of our population who remain unvaccinated. Clearly, we’re seeing a pent-up desire to travel, but how do we do so, when health requirements, government policies and industry protocols seem to change from week to week? In today’s episode, Bruce Frankel, the President of The Mindful Traveler, tackles the many challenges facing the today’s traveler, offering a wealth of sound, pragmatic advice, the latest technology, resources and information, and ways to plan rewarding vacations—while managing the inevitable things you DIDN’T plan for. Bruce first entered the travel industry in 1989, but he brings a broad perspective to the field, with a career that has included running retail storefront businesses and home-based companies, as well as a 10-year stint in corporate banking industry, specializing in marketing and management. He sees himself as a travel “consumer advocate,” working closely with clients to help them choose vacation options that are best for them—never mind what the reviewers and pundits say on social media. In today’s conversation, Bruce will outline key steps to being well-prepared for today’s shifting travel protocols, health and safety requirements, masks, testing and other documentation, whether going abroad or across the country. And he will talk about the latest consumer travel trends, from small, personalized “bubble groups,” to self-drive country tours and “city stays” that focus on one urban location, with day trips to other places Whether his travelers are over-45 or under, Bruce’s ultimate goal is not simply to arrange trips, but help them fulfill dreams, creating unique, enduring experiences, wherever they may go.

30 de ago.

55min 38s

Louis Theodore may be a retired professor, but he is anything but the retiring type. After a distinguished career teaching chemical engineering at Manhattan College and serving as director of the Graduate Program (primarily responsible for his program achieving a No. 2 national ranking) Lou has continued to lead an extraordinarily productive life as educator, scholar, author, basketball fan, coach, consultant mentor, grandfather—and most recently, inventor. At 87, he is hardly slowing down. In today’s episode, Lou describes a life story that started out in New York City’s Hell’s Kitchen and took him to the top of a complex scientific field as an internationally recognized expert in environmental management. Lou has written 131 text and reference books, covering an expansive range of topics, including environment ethics, air pollution control equipment, nanotechnology, and most recently, a second edition of “Introduction to Environmental Management,” which he co-wrote with his wife, Mary. He currently serves as a part-time consultant to Theodore Tutorials, a firm specializing in providing training needs to industry, government and academia. Along the way, Lou has also maintained his lifelong passion for basketball, supporting youth leagues and publishing a decidedly non-technical book, “Basketball Coaching 101,” an eclectic compendium of personal stories, a short history of the game and a spray of tips and commentary from other coaches, player, writers and fans. (Not surprisingly, he’s working on a second edition of this book, too.) Lou’s life highlights the importance of keeping close social connection over the year, with colleagues, former students and basketball players—long-standing friendships as well as new ones. And as a testament to his enduing curiosity and creativity, Lou has just been awarded two U.S. patents relating to processes for obtaining drinking water from geothermal energy and the combustion of fossil fuels. There’s a growing shortage in potable water across the planet, and Lou is intent on joining the search for solutions.

23 de ago.

53min 5s

Like it or not, the pandemic has pushed many of us into the virtual world every day—a constant barrage of technology, from Zoom meetings, to webinars, online programs and projects, internet searches, emails, texts and social media. Of course, in a time of social distancing and often isolation, technology has been an essential tool in keeping us connected and productive. At the same time, it’s often challenging, complicated, confusing, and well, exasperating, when we can’t figure out how to use our devices at critical moments. And it can be especially hard for older folks—those who are decidedly not “digital natives” and may struggle to learn and keep up with high tech skills. In today’s episode, two experienced experts, Wendy Weiss and Robyn Berger-Gaston, will talk about how to help seniors (and perhaps the rest of us) embrace technology and avoid being overwhelmed by “techfusion.” Wendy, a former Wall Street professional, is an entrepreneur who provides personalized technology training to individuals and businesses on the use of everyday technological devices. Robyn, for her part, oversees several programs for a large Long Island nonprofit agency, including SeniorNet, which provides computer and technology training for people ages 50 and over. Together, they will address a range of issues, programs and approaches to help seniors learn new tech skills. What are the biggest challenges and needs? What kinds of courses, one-on-one classes and intergenerational programs are most effective? Where can people get “tech tips” and other useful resources? And when people are overwhelmed, how can you encourage and instill the confidence in them, that they can manage technology—and enhance their lives in the process?

16 de ago.

54min 31s

As with many challenges in life, having the right mindset is the key to success. And so it is with the process of aging. Understanding the mindset of seniors—not just at a clinical level—is vital to providing the services they need and ensuring that they live the best lives possible. But how do you know what seniors really want? What are they thinking at a deeper level and how do we ask questions that get to these answers? In today’s episode, Deanne O’Rear-Cameron, a personal development consultant, aging-in-place specialist and senior advocate, relates how her many experiences in the senior and health care fields have helped gain valuable insights into both the mindset of seniors, as well as the mindset of the culture that cares for them. Deanne, who serves as chair of the Las Vegas Senior Citizens Advisory Board, as well posts on multiple other councils and organizations, talks about how to teach seniors (and the rest of us) through a distinctive process of repetitive education—but repetition that’s fun, not just the same old dry information and advice. Share, care, and ask a lot of questions of seniors—and if you’re not sure what the answers are, ask again. Deanne’s approach teaches seniors how to be proactive about their life, rather than reactive. Not being prepared for getting older in life creates anxiety, but we can use motivating solutions to address the inevitable challenges of aging. If you want to be a dancer at 90, Deanne says, you need to be active in your 50s and 60s. And even as you get older and less active, you can enjoy things in a different way. You can go there in your mind; where the mind goes, the body follows, she says. Aging in place should always include mindset among its guiding principles. Indeed, the best anti-aging tool we have is our mind.

9 de ago.

55min 59s

As your parents get older, there may come a time when it’s clear they would lead a safer, healthier, and more productive life by transitioning from their current home to an assisted living community. But how do you handle the many issues surrounding such a move? It’s complicated. And emotional. There are lots of choices, and a host of questions. In this episode, Julie Wexler, who has spent more than 25 years in a variety of eldercare settings, walks us through the process — step by step — of finding the right community for your parents. Julie, the Director of Business Development for The Bristal Assisted Living, spells out the spectrum of housing options, describing different kinds of services, care, amenities, and lifestyle features that individual communities may offer. How do you assemble a list of potential places, and are there professionals and other resources to help you assess the best fit for your parents? Then there’s the continuing Covid question: What factors should we consider and what questions should we ask about health and safety protocols when we visit prospective communities? Making the transition to assisted living can often be hard on the entire family, but by being proactive and not waiting for a crisis, the move can offer an exceptionally positive experience, creating a new sense of independence, better health and social engagement for our loved ones. Indeed, Julie believes that all seniors, even as the face the physical challenges of aging, deserve to live a full, active, supportive, and meaningful life.

2 de ago.

54min 47s

When Hudson Cooper entered college, he majored in biology, intending to prepare for a career in medicine. But medicine wasn’t for him, so he went to law school. The practice of law wasn’t for him either, except for a diverting stint as an administrative law judge for the New York Taxi & Limousine Commission. Instead, Hudson decided to embark on a career taking on a series of job challenges with the equivalent risk somewhere between hang-gliding and bungee-jumping. In today’s episode, Hudson recounts how he launched his writing career with exactly one published article to his name, landing a job writing a book about baseball for young adults that went into 10 printings and led to another book about football, and eventually 11 other books. Then another leap of courage and confidence—as a stand-up comic. Serendipitously, an agent in the audience one night approached him an offered him a role in the Matthew Broderick version of Godzilla. From there he went on to a series of roles on TV shows like “Law and Order,” “Madame Secretary” and “Bull.” And once again in his latest chapter, he's returned to writing, landing a job as a weekly newspaper columnist, through his usual combination of persistence, resilience, risk-taking and readiness to act when unexpected opportunities arise.

26 de jul.

54min 29s

There has long been a gap in the U.S. economy between the needs of employers and the skills and aspirations of available workers. While the pandemic has eased, the gap has grown even larger as employers face the challenge of getting people back to work, only to discover that the jobs they need are no longer the same, and workers, for their part, have discovered that they often don’t want to return to the same jobs—or even the same careers. In today’s episode, Lisa Strahs-Lorenc, the owner of Let Go Career Compass, will talk about how people can navigate this unsettling landscape to their next career journey. From early on in her own career, Lisa, herself, experienced the frustration of getting little professional guidance, as she pursued a path in early childhood education, only to find that it was a shrinking field with few job prospects. Having spent more than 25 years in workforce development in the business, nonprofit and education sectors, Lisa offers a broad and insightful perspective on how people can use their unique skills and interests to help create the best version of themselves for today’s job market—and for jobs in the future, which may look very different. She offers several signature interactive workshops, such as “The Road Less Traveled,” and “How Do You Stand Out?” that lead people to a better understanding of their career goals and personality traits related to the career paths they might select. Whether she’s working with students, or unemployed workers, seasoned professionals or those looking to use their transferable skills to explore new passions or careers, Lisa’s motto is “Do what you love, and you will love what you do.”

19 de jul.

55min 18s

As we live longer and healthier lives, this question has become our biggest worry: How do we make sure we don’t outlive our retirement savings? Of course, it’s important to live our current life to the fullest—as we’ve learned from the sudden losses inflicted by the pandemic. But it’s also important to put together our best plan to meet the challenges, known and unknown, we’ll probably face in the later chapters of life. In today’s episode, Ronald Rogé, a widely recognized wealth manager and Certified Financial Planner, talks about how to create such a plan, starting with the key questions we all need to ask ourselves: How does our plan relate to our personal pursuit of happiness? What’s things are really important in our life, and what aren’t? And what do we want our legacy to be? Ron, the author of the incisive, yet down-to-earth book, The Banker and the Fisherman: Lessons in Life, Happiness & Wealth for the 21st Century, will take us through changing strategies for saving and investing during these volatile times, as well as the new rules of retirement planning we may need to explore as we move 45 Forward. Ron will also offer some lessons in “financial geriatrics,” what we should consider in “right-sizing” our senior lifestyle, planning for later-life health care needs, and passing on of our estate. Ultimately, Ron notes, we should be calculating what it will take for us to live to 100. Will we make it? Who knows, but the odds are getting better all the time.

12 de jul.

55min 48s

Over the last 40 years, China has increasingly wreaked havoc on U.S. manufacturers, undercutting their business with high-volume, low-cost products. So when Lance Cheney, the fourth-generation owner of Braun Brush Company on Long Island, took the reins from his father, he sensed that he had to make a risky strategic shift—or the company might never make it to the fifth generation. Lance decided that Braun would no longer compete in the inexpensive “commodity brush” market. Instead, they would produce highly specialized brushes that accomplished unique tasks for companies that needed them done exactly right. Since that decision, Lance, who as a young man had gone to school to be a sculptor, has blended his artistic talents with his business acumen to take Braun Brush on an extraordinary creative journey. In this thought-provoking conversation with Host Ron Roel, Lance talks about the company’s many forays into innovative brush-making—from producing brushes dedicated to putting a sheen on chocolate; to others that keep the pigeons off the top of New York City’s Freedom Tower; to tiny brushes that have helped the Mars rovers dust debris away from drilling sites. And along the way, Lance has continued to find new avenues for his artistic sensibility, creating fiber-based projects for major companies and fabricating dozens of sculptures for a renowned American artist, the late Richard Artschwager.

5 de jul.

54min 34s

As we close out the month of June—Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month—today’s episode features Judy Cornish, an author and founder of the Dementia & Alzheimer’s Wellbeing Network (DAWN). Several years ago, Judy, a retired elder law attorney, had planned to lead a quiet life a small Idaho town. Instead, through a chance encounter with a neighbor, she became deeply involved in the world of dementia care, creating an unusual approach she calls the DAWN Method. This “patient-centered approach” focuses not on a medical model of dementia, but on an understanding of how people experience the disease, particularly how they respond to the loss of skills such as memory, language, judgment and perception--and how this response affects their emotions and subsequent behaviors. In confronting this devastating disease, the DAWN method acknowledges the impact of these losses, but also emphasizes the skills that remain. Skills like intuitive thinking and “mindlessness”—automatic mental tools like muscle memory that can extend a person’s ability to function. Judy, who has written two books, The Dementia Handbook and Dementia With Dignity, will explain how finding the strengths in these remaining skills can help shape how people react and enhance companionship with caregivers. In the process, we can discover the unexpected gifts of dementia, appreciating the ability to be fully present in the “now,” enjoying life’s beauty together, while ensuring a sense of safety, security and dignity for our loved ones.

28 de jun.

55min 3s

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, and today’s episode features Elizabeth (Beth) Smith-Boivin, the Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association Northeastern New York Chapter. Each year at this time, the Alzheimer’s Association helps promote a global dialogue about Alzheimer’s, which affects more than 6 million people across the U.S., two-thirds of them women. Today’s episode coincides with The Longest Day—the summer solstice —a special day when thousands of participants from across the world create unique programs to raise funds and awareness for the care, support and research efforts of the Alzheimer’s Association. In her conversation with Host Ron Roel, Beth Smith-Boivin focuses on the latest research aimed at combating this devastating disease. Covering the research landscape as a whole, she will highlight the latest major development—the recent approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of a new drug, Aducanumab, produced by Biogen, as a treatment for Alzheimer’s. This is the first FDA-approved therapy that, while not a cure, may potentially delay cognitive decline from the disease, compared to current medications that only address symptoms. Beth will also describe significant research studies, including a major European research project known as the FINGER study and similar ongoing research in the U.S. known as the Pointer Study. These studies examine how improved diet, increased exercise, and enhanced cognitive training and social activity may have a significant impact on reducing the risk of dementia. In addition, Beth will explain how members of the public can advance Alzheimer’s research by participating in clinical trials through a service called Trial Match, which connects individuals with Alzheimer’s, caregivers and healthy volunteers to current research studies.

21 de jun.

54min 46s

When you talk to health experts about the factors that promote human longevity, they invariably cite good nutrition, in addition to regular exercise and an active, socially engaged, lifestyle. In today’s episode, host Ron Roel will be talking about key health and nutrition issues with Keri Ann Lipperini, Director of the Office of Nutrition and Health Promotion Programs at the U.S. Administration on Aging. Keri, a proud Navy Veteran, was initially trained as a Hospital Corpsmen, taking the oath to care for sick sailors, a commitment she remains passionate about today. Since then, she has spent 20 years developing programs that promote health and nutrition in both government and nonprofit sectors. In today’s conversation, Keri will go beyond talk about the latest diets to help us set the stage for healthy aging. She will outline nutrition and health concerns affecting all of us, but particularly the challenges we encounter in our 45+ years, whether we’re taking care of ourselves, or our 75+ parents. And Kerri will describe her agency’s various health, prevention and wellness programs; where to find these resources; and how they also can help address growing issues like social isolation and loneliness.

14 de jun.

56min 23s

When we plan for our later years, most of us consider factors like health, housing, financial security, lifestyle and caregiving, but we tend of overlook one distinct possibility: What if end up aging alone? Recent studies have found that between 30 and 35% of older adults in the U.S. are expected to age alone within the next decade. About 45% of older women will find themselves aging solo. Many of these “elder orphans” have no assistance in making financial decisions, no designated caregiver, little access to transportation, and no help in times of crisis. In today’s episode, host Ron Roel talks with Carol Marak, one of the nation’s premier experts in solo aging, about how to plan a safe and independent older life — even without family. Drawing initially from the experiences taking care of her parents, Carol created her own plan for self-care, self-reliance, and creating a family-like community; now she teaches other solo adults how to do the same. Carol will explain how to avoid some of the potential adverse effects of aging alone; describe specific ways to map out a solo aging plan; and how to access unique resources, such as her Group Coaching Support services and Elder Orphan Facebook Group. The ultimate goal: Helping people build the kind of strong support system they’ll need to solo age with confidence.

7 de jun.

54min 22s

We celebrate friendship as one of the true joys—and necessities—of life, from our childhood through our elder years. But what does true friendship really mean, and how to we sustain it in our fast-paced and changing world — especially in these difficult times of social distancing and social unrest? Host Ron Roel and Dr. Andrea Gould-Marks, a clinical psychologist with decades of experience guiding people through relationships and life transitions, share wide-ranging thoughts about the many “nutritional values” and facets of friendship. How do we preserve and renew relationships with cherished old friends, and how do we find and develop dynamic new friendships as our lives and locations change? What are realistic expectations from different kinds of friendships — at work, at school, in our places of worship, and community? And how do we deal with loneliness —which experts say has become a has become an epidemic worldwide, despite the profusion of social media and technology?

31 de mai.

55min 14s

It’s not often that someone can recite the verses of Walt Whitman, then belt out the motto of the U.S. Marine Corps—Semper Fedelis! (Always Faithful). But that’s Evelyn Kandel, the Poet Laureate of Nassau County, who enlisted in the Marines 70 years ago right out of high school on the whimsical advice of an aunt who told her, “Why not join the armed services and see the world?” In today’s conversation with host Ron Roel, Evelyn talks about how she became one of the few, the proud-- actually very few — women Marines during the Korean War. She’ll tell what it was like to be one of these pioneering women as she worked in public relations and recruiting, travelling across the West Coast to speak to young college women about officer training. Afterward, Evelyn went to college on the G. I. bill, and continued to pursue her passion in painting, sculpture and teaching. Evelyn will talk about how she evolved through her art as a poet, expanding on how she views her craft, how she finds inspiration (and joy) in her work, and her philosophy of teaching aspiring adult poets. And of course, Evelyn will recite some of her favorite poems from four published books and anthologies, reflecting on various periods of her life, from childhood to the pandemic—and her continuing proud association with today’s Marine Corps. She was recently honored as a Marine veteran by “Heroes Among Us,” an organization helping veterans in need started by “Gold Star Mothers.”

24 de mai.

55min 17s

Patricia King has had a long, extraordinary career —and she continued to evolve over the last decade, taking on a new literary identity as Annamaria Alfieri. In Part 1 of Ron Roel’s conversation with Pat earlier this year, she talked about her time as an international management consultant, working with Fortune-50 companies like PepsiCo, Chase Bank, and Pfizer and publishing five business books, including Never Work for a Jerk, which landed her on the Oprah Winfrey show. In today’s conversation with Pat — Part 2 of her extraordinary journey — she talks about how she made the transition to yet another career as a historical mystery writer Annamaria Alfieri. It wasn’t easy. Pat will reveal how she used her writing and research skills to produce finely detailed historical mysteries—and get a publisher to take a chance on a first-time novelist. Pat will take us through her early mysteries, set in South America, which have garnered critical acclaim. Some years later, she moved across the Atlantic to set her second series of historical novels in British East Africa. Described as Out of Africa meets Agatha Christie, Strange Gods, The Idol of Mombasa, and The Blasphemers are stories that capture the beauty and complexities of imposing a colonial culture on a foreign land. These adventures, in turn, have led to a surprising chapter in Pat King/Annamaria Alfieri's real-life story: a transcontinental effort to radically change the future of young Maasai girls in Kenya.

17 de mai.

53min 55s

There’s no place like home—especially as folks get older. A recent AARP survey found that more than three-quarters of adults aged 50 and older want to stay in their homes and communities for as long as possible, yet many don’t see that happening. Enter NAIPC—the National Aging In Place Council. This organization was founded on the belief that although an overwhelming majority of Americans say they want to age in place, they lack awareness of the resources, services and expertise that make independent living possible. In today’s conversation with Host Ron Roel, Tara Ballman, Program Director for NAIPC, will explain how this organization has grown to provide a dynamic network of 400 members who are experts in health care, financial services, elder law design, home remodeling and dozens of other fields dedicated to supporting seniors. Tara, who is has worked in the aging services market for almost two decades, is passionate about connecting and supporting professionals serving older Americans. She’ll talk about the array of valuable NAIPC resources, including virtual educational programs, seminars and events, practical tools and downloadable guides on the organization’s website, and a nationwide directory of service providers that people can search by geographic area. Just as we make plans to go to college and pursue a career, we need to start thinking about a plan to age in place before we retire. And Tara will show us how NAIPC can open the window to that plan.

10 de mai.

54min 43s

Caring for your older loved ones has never been more challenging than it is today. Not only do many adults have to take care of their own young families, but they’re called in to address the complex, evolving needs of their parents as they enter the later chapters of life. There’s so much to handle: pragmatic concerns like elder law and estate planning, health care documents, asset protection, care coordination, not to mention the emotionally-charged concerns of parents and adult children dealing with the reversal of their traditional roles. In today’s conversation, Brian Tully, a widely recognized elder law attorney, and Iris Waichler, an experienced patient advocate and award-winning author, offer a unique opportunity to hear their combined perspectives on these pressing topics. Together, Brian and Iris will provide valuable insights, solutions and resources for creating a holistic care planning approach, tackling thorny tasks like caregiver conversations with family members and coordination of long-term term care. Caring for loved ones is unquestionably rewarding, but it also can be overwhelming and isolating— sometimes leading to burnout. Brian and Iris present a vision of caregiving that stresses the value of a supportive team of family members, health care and social service providers, financial and elder law experts. The challenges may be daunting, but you’re not alone.

3 de mai.

54min 5s

As a young boy, Jack Kupferman was always surrounded by older adults—his parents ran a rest home in upstate New York and his family lived in the back. So it’s no surprise that today Jack is at the center of a major online event next month to honor the nursing home lives lost as a result of COVID-19, while raising awareness of the need for nursing home transformation. As the volunteer President of the Gray Panthers NYC and a former attorney for New York City’s Department for the Aging, Jack has been an indefatigable fighter for the rights of older people. In today’s wide-ranging conversation with host Ron Roel, Jack will offer a healthy slice of his storied career—everything from local programs and projects to improve the lives of older New Yorkers, to global initiatives to tackle illiteracy in Nepal and help older women start microbusinesses in Pakistan. Throughout his life of advocacy, Jack’s passion has been to change the perception of aging—and to promote a deeper understanding of how pervasive ageism really is. You’ll learn of one of his dreams for the future: mobilizing older persons of the world to demand more of their governments, to secure their rights and claim their power. And, oh yes, Jack will reveal what it took to become a mid-life National Aerobics Champion.

26 de abr.

54min 49s

For the first time in U.S. history, people over 60 outnumber people under 18, raising fears of a widening generational divide. But Encore.org sees things differently. It believes that the aging of America isn’t so much of a problem as it is an opportunity to be seized. In this episode, Eunice Lin Nichols, Encore’s dynamic VP for Innovation, talks about how her organization is working to change our culture of age segregation, building a movement to make intergenerational collaboration the norm. Eunice will spell out what it means to live “Gen2Gen,” and how to take part in the “encore career” movement, joining people age 50 and up who are committed to using their experiences to create second acts for the greater good. She’ll explain the inspiring histories of the Purpose Prize, Experience Corps and Encore Fellowships; and offer stories and examples of intergenerational solutions to pressing social problems: the housing crisis facing both young and old; the epidemic of loneliness across generations; the co-location of childcare and eldercare centers; and the need for co-generational leadership in the workforce--to name a few. How can you participate in the encore movement? Find out about the Encore Network, and what you can do to join a coalition of leaders and organizations across the country to create a better future for all.

19 de abr.

55min 31s

As people head toward their traditional retirement years, they often feel conflicting emotions: Part relief and excitement to be done with day-to-day work; and part apprehension, wondering, “What will I do with myself? Sure, I have a few hobbies and grandchildren, and I’d like to travel, but will this be enough to keep me engaged for long?” About 10 years ago, Ed Schwartz, a retired human resources executive, faced these questions and discovered PEIR, Personal Enrichment in Retirement, an organization whose members are passionate about lifelong learning. This approach to learning has become a hot topic in recent years, as research studies have found that continued cognitive engagement is one of the keys to leading a longer and healthier life. And, of course, online learning and virtual workshops have exploded in response to the pandemic. But in today’s conversation, Ed, who is currently chairperson of PEIR, will talk about how PEIR has evolved over 40-plus years as a highly successful and resilient group whose members are not just the audience, but the creators and presenters of all their subject matter. Ed will explain how PEIR has adapted its administration and structure to an online environment. He will be joined by several other call-in members, who will offer examples of the group’s wide offerings. It may be an unusual model for lifelong learning—but perhaps a new model for other enterprising retirees around the country.

12 de abr.

54min 14s

We’re not a country that likes to plan much—more often, Americans rely on their wits to get out of a crisis. Yet as the pace of social and economic change — not to mention climate change — has accelerated over the last several decades, so, too, have the number of crises we face in our lifetime. Many of these situations may not be foreseeable or preventable, but they may be more manageable, if we take the time to put a crisis management plan in place. In this episode, host Ron Roel talks with Linda Fostek, an internationally recognized speaker, author and expert in crisis planning, who will help us successfully manage the personal and natural crises that we will inevitably face, and as she puts it, “Get off the Worry-go-Round.” Linda lays out the four stages of preparation; she will describe how to create your own ICE (In Case of Emergency) files; and identify who needs to know about your plan, and what they need to know about it. She offers examples of plans that have helped avert crises, and cases where lack of planning has led to dire consequences. As a member of her regional Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), Linda also talks about how crisis-management plans can be applied across communities, bringing together people and resources to help recovery efforts —and often save lives. Her approach to planning —inspired by her late father—has been to face crises with one mindset: Be part of the solution, instead of part of the problem.

5 de abr.

56min 5s

Moving is never easy—at any age. Most people want to remain in the comfort of their home and neighborhood for as long as possible. At some point, however, this may not be safe or practical for our parents, and eventually the same may be true for us, too. Moving to some form of supportive housing does not have to be a default choice; in fact, it may be a better path, helping us lead a healthier and more enjoyable life—as long as we know how to do it right. In this episode, host Ron Roel talks with Robin Marks, an expert in the field of aging—from assisted living to Alzheimer’s—about the many issues to consider when choosing an adult housing community. What level of health care does your loved one need? What types of amenities are important? Will they be close to family and friends—and what kind of social engagement and activities will a senior community provide? How can you identify suitable communities—and be sure you can pay for them? Robin Marks will tackle all of questions, and more, explaining various senior housing options across the aging spectrum, from independent living to programs and resources that serve those with dementia. Her Golden Rule: Always focus on what people can do, not what they can’t.

29 de mar.

55min 11s

Over the last 40 years, China has increasingly wreaked havoc on U.S. manufacturers, undercutting their business with high-volume, low-cost products. So when Lance Cheney, the fourth-generation owner of Braun Brush Company on Long Island, took the reins from his father, he sensed that he had to make a risky strategic shift—or the company might never make it to the fifth generation. Lance decided that Braun would no longer compete in the inexpensive “commodity brush” market. Instead, they would produce highly specialized brushes that accomplished unique tasks for companies that needed them done exactly right. Since that decision, Lance, who as a young man had gone to school to be a sculptor, has blended his artistic talents with his business acumen to take Braun Brush on an extraordinary creative journey. In this thought-provoking conversation with Host Ron Roel, Lance talks about the company’s many forays into innovative brush-making—from producing brushes dedicated to putting a sheen on chocolate; to others that keep the pigeons off the top of New York City’s Freedom Tower; to tiny brushes that have helped the Mars rovers dust debris away from drilling sites. And along the way, Lance has continued to find new avenues for his artistic sensibility, creating fiber-based projects for major companies and fabricating dozens of sculptures for a renowned American artist, the late Richard Artschwager.

22 de mar.

54min 34s

Helping a loved one prepare for the end of life is uncharted territory for many of us. But this challenge is also a part of life’s natural journey, which provides a unique opportunity for families to support and honor their loved ones. In this unusually open and inspiring conversation, Susan Capurso, an End-of-Life Doula, and Lisa Strahs-Lorenc, a bereavement specialist, discuss how they guide families emotionally, practically, and spiritually through this difficult phase to a place of calm, peace and acceptance—and yes, celebration. Susan and Lisa also offer comprehensive courses and workshops to help people—no matter what their age—create a legacy of their life through written remembrances, recorded audio and video stories, scrapbooks and other vehicles, so current and future generations will be able to remember and cherish them for who they are. And they provide an array of resources and strategies that enable individuals to live life fully after the loss of a loved one, to move on, accept and discover their own journey.

15 de mar.

54min 2s

We often hear the mantra, “Stronger Together,” but no one understands the power of these words better than Donna Butts. Currently the Executive Director of Generations United, Donna has worked tirelessly to promote the collective well-being of all generations—children, youth and older adults—around the world. How can we achieve this lofty goal at a time when different generations seem to find themselves increasingly competing for limited public funds and resources? In a wide-ranging conversation with Host Ron Roel, Donna offers examples of unique initiatives like the National Center on Grandfamilies, as well as practical approaches to “shared sites,” where children, youth and older adults participate in programs at the same location or campus. And you’ll hear about unique “Programs of Distinction,” and what it takes to be recognized by the Generations United/MetLife Foundation as one of the Best Intergenerational Communities in the nation.

8 de mar.

55min 33s

Many people talk about “reinventing” themselves over the course of their career, but few do it like Patricia King. At age 9, Pat decided she wanted to be a novelist, and while she would eventually achieve her goal—some 60 years later—she was first hired as a technical writer for a large insurance company. One job led to another, and Pat evolved into a corporate trainer, not only teaching plain-English skills, but opening up a major Wall Street bank to affirmative action programs for women. And then, as a single mother, she decided to leave the corporate nest to start her own consulting company, from scratch. Over time, Pat built up an international management consulting company, and along the way wrote five nonfiction books on business subjects include Never Work for a Jerk, which landed her on the Oprah Winfrey show. And then she left again, for another entrepreneurial venture. This is Part 1 of Host Ron Roel’s conversation with Pat King, as she recounts her extraordinary journey.

1 de mar.

56min

Getting old may not be for sissies, as Bette Davis once said, but that doesn’t mean we should be resigned to going through a long period of decline as we age. Quite the opposite, says Carol Waldman, a gerontologist and former executive director of a large and innovative suburban senior center. Getting older can mean thriving, not just surviving during the later stages of life. How so? Carol provides a step-by-step “Thrival Guide,” with several pragmatic tips, including how to adapt to change, stay open to unseen possibilities, discover new purposes, and adopt a new view of time. Carol offers a wealth of stories and examples of programs that have brought joy and meaning to thousands of seniors over three decades, including a nationally recognized Lifelong Learning Lecture Series. A passionate fighter against ageism, she also has spearheaded an AARP Age-Friendly initiative in her local community, advocating for policies that benefit people of all generations.

22 de fev.

55min 34s

Advances in health care and medicine have added years to our lifespan, but they’ve also made retirement more complicated than ever. How do we plan for this “longevity bonus,” considering the uncertainties of health care, caregiving, housing transitions and savings that may not last as long as we do? In today’s conversation, Host Ron Roel talks with Mark Miller, a widely recognized journalist, podcaster and author who writes extensively about retirement trends and aging — but with a uniquely different perspective. While the field of retirement experts tends to be very investment and saving-oriented, Mark focuses heavily on social insurance, a critical component in ensuring a secure and sustainable life in our later years. The publisher of RetirementRevised.com, Mark offers the latest information about Medicare options and Social Security benefits, as well as incisive thoughts on how to consider housing and work as part of retirement planning.

15 de fev.

55min 21s

While the practices of yoga and meditation have been around for thousands of years, their popularity has surged in recent decades, as part of the ever-growing trend in holistic health, spiritual wellness and mindfulness. But there’s much more to these practices than increasing the flexibility of our aging bodies and finding occasional moments to de-stress our stressed-out lives. Lesa Kingsbury, head instructor at the Amba Yoga Center who has taught yoga for over 20 years, and Ken Taub, a former advertising executive who leads meditation workshops at the Amba center, take a deep dive into how yoga and meditation work together in profound ways. Lesa and Ken will explain the basics of these practices, as well as describe their personal philosophies and approaches. And they will venture far beyond the basics, offering insights and examples of how people of any age, experience or physical condition can benefit from both these practices—and stay with them for life.

8 de fev.

55min 3s

If living through the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that we need to make sure our legal affairs and estate plans are in order, even when we’re not ready for retirement. How do we take care of such critical needs, especially in a time of virtual meetings and social distancing? Host Ron Roel talks with one of America’s top elder law attorneys, Ronald Fatoullah, discussing the latest information you need to know about wills and trusts, advanced directives, Medicaid planning, estate planning and guardianships. He has been advising New Yorkers for over 30 years, helping them plan for sometimes difficult “family conversations” to meet the needs of their elderly loved ones. Whether a client need immediate assistance for long-term care or is looking to create an estate plan for future generations, Mr. Fatoullah’s mission has always been to help families meet the challenges of aging with confidence, grace and dignity.

1 de fev.

52min 54s

We celebrate friendship as one of the true joys—and necessities—of life, from our childhood through our elder years. But what does true friendship really mean, and how to we sustain it in our fast-paced and changing world — especially in these difficult times of social distancing and social unrest? Host Ron Roel and Dr. Andrea Gould-Marks, a clinical psychologist with decades of experience guiding people through relationships and life transitions, share wide-ranging thoughts about the many “nutritional values” and facets of friendship. How do we preserve and renew relationships with cherished old friends, and how do we find and develop dynamic new friendships as our lives and locations change? What are realistic expectations from different kinds of friendships — at work, at school, in our places of worship, and community? And how do we deal with loneliness —which experts say has become a has become an epidemic worldwide, despite the profusion of social media and technology?

25 de jan.

55min 14s

As the economy continues to struggle under the weight of the raging coronavirus, host Ron Roel talks with Scott Passeser, a widely recognized innovator in the staffing field, about how to navigate a job market upended by fear and social distancing. Job-hunting these days is tough for people of any age, but especially for those from their mid-40s and older who face unspoken age discrimination and skepticism about their ability to manage new technologies. Scott, a senior vice president at Executive Alliance, a national recruiting firm, will reveal how to use his unique system to get through the “black holes” of online job applications that often lead nowhere for frustrated job-hunters. Also, he will offer the latest advice on effective interviewing online; how to turn resume obstacles into non-issues, as well as how to strategize career shifts. And he will provide listeners with a list of things that job-hunters should always do (and never do).

18 de jan.

54min 4s

In his inaugural show, Host Ron Roel talks with Kathleen Otte, an award-winning senior official at the U.S. Administration for Community Living, which helps millions of people live independently and stay active as they age in their communities. Kathleen, who has been working to improve the lives of older adults for more than 30 years, will explain how federal and state programs are collaborating to promote the philosophy of “consumer control,” engaging people in the decision-making process about their options, preferences, values and financial resources. Advancing the theme for Older Americans Month in 2021 — “Communities of Strength”— Kathleen and Ron will share stories of how older adults have built resilience and strength over the second half of their lives. Kathleen will also offer examples of how families can connect with local, practical resources they need—services, programs, education or just information — wherever they live.

11 de jan.

55min 36s