Native Stories

Indigenous people of the world

Yesterdays shared indigenous knowledge

All Episodes

SundaySeptember 20, 20207AM HST Native Stories with Nanea Lo (@eananealo) and Melissa Mayo Child (@missy_mayy) Welfare System Advocate for our COVID-19 Series Community Work in the Hawaiian Kingdom! Follow them:Ig: @youthpartners808, @hihopes808, @missy_mayy https://www.instagram.com/hihopes808/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hihopes808Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hihopesinitiative/www.epicohana.org HI H.O.P.ES. Youth Advocacy Document: https://www.epicohana.org/s/YAD-2020-SprdFNL-HR.pdfFoster Youth Bill of Rights: https://www.epicohana.org/s/Foster-Youth-Bill-of-Rights.pdfHI H.O.P.E.S Youth Leadership Application: https://www.epicohana.org/s/hi-hopes-oahu-board-application.docx Learn more at www.nativestories.org You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone) Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native Stories Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-gSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDwApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629 #ournativestories#hawaiianhistorymonth#kānakamaoli#manawāhine#childwelfareadvocacy#youthleaders#melissamayo#hihopes#nativepeoples#nativeknowledge#communitywork#communitybuilding#nativelove#nativepodcasts#podcasts#podcastshow#thehawaiiankingdomstillexists#ʻikekūpuna#alohaʻāina

Sep 20

36 min

SundaySeptember 13, 20207AM HSTNative Stories with Vehia Wheeler (@_vehia_) introduces Hetereki Huke is from Rapa Nui. He is an architect and territorial Planner, Presidential Advisor on Indigenous Issues in Chile, and the Director of Keho Studio, a territorial planning studio that operates in Rapa Nui. Learn more at www.nativestories.orgYou can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone)Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native StoriesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-gSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDwApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629#ournativestories#nativestories#rapanui#tepitootehenua#urbanplanner#indigenousurbanplanner#pacificurbanplanner#pacific#moana#pacificocean

Sep 13

50 min

SundaySeptember 6, 20207AM HST Native Stories with Vehia Wheeler (@_vehia_) introduces Vaheana Chang from Tahiti, project leader with Anāvai Foundation. Anāvai is a local Tahitian NGO that collects and redistributes money to other grass roots organizations and non-profits to do their work in local communities. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FondationAnavai Learn more at www.nativestories.org You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone) Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native Stories Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-gSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDwApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629 #ournativestories#nativestories‪#moorea‬#anavaifondation#FondationAnāvai#VotreDonFeraLaDifference#anavai#associationsenfrance#association#nonprofit#tahiti#frenchpolynesia#maohinui#anāvai

Sep 6

35 min

SundayAugust 30, 20207AM HSTNative Stories with Vehia Wheeler (@_vehia_) introduces Prisca Amaru (@mooreairiataisurfschool)is the owner of the first surf school in Mo'orea, French Polynesia. She grew up in Mo'orea and became a professional surfer in the early 2000's in Tahiti, travelling the world participating in competitions, and then coming back to her home island to start the first surf school on the island for the local population.Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mooreasurfschool/Learn more at www.nativestories.orgYou can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone)Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native StoriesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-gSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDwApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629#ournativestories#nativestories#moorea#surfschool#bodyboards#softboards#shortboards#bodysurf#beachbreak#localsonly

Aug 30

30 min

Sunday August 23, 2020 7AM HST Native Stories with Nanea Lo (@eananealo) introduces for our COVID-19 Series Community Work in the Hawaiian Kingdom. Brandon Makaʻawaʻawa (@hawaiiannational)— Aloha ʻĀina Patriot + Deputy Head of State of the Nation of Hawaiʻi — The oldest Hawaiian Independence Organization in Hawaiʻi in Puʻuhonua o Waimānalo.  U.S. Public Law 103-150 The Apology Law https://www.nationofhawaii.org/legal/1993-u-s-public-law-103-150/ https://www.facebook.com/PuuhonuaOWaimanalo Learn more at www.nativestories.org You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone) Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Search: Native Stories Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-g Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDw Apple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629

Aug 23

71 min

SundayAugust 19, 20207AM HST Native Stories introduces cartographer and urban planner Victor Gregor Limon (@cartographer.ph + @plannersofhawaii) where he shares about ways to rethink and remap indigenous spaces and futures, links between Filipino and Kānaka Maoli movements against US imperialism, and how native peoples can be allies to each other. (@plannersofhawaii @anakbayanhawaii ) Learn more at www.nativestories.org You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone) Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native Stories Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-gSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/39RGYscMKrGHWMD29ZYz9w?si=h40-0P61Q1KkHSYo3-whDwApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/native-stories/id1438471629

Aug 16

51 min

Mareikura Whakataka-Brightwell is a child of Tahiti Nui and Aotearoa. A freelance photographer, videographer and artist, Mareikura bases his work on indigenous advancement. He is currently living and working in Tūranganui-a-Kiwa as the Communications Lead for the Rongowhakaata Iwi Trust developing innovative digital communication strategies for Māori and beyond.   FB: www.facebook.com/rongowhakaata.iwiFB: www.facebook.com/poemoanatahitiFB: www.facebook.com/mareikuravisual/IG:  rongowhakaata_iwi__trustIG: poemoana_tahitian_dance_expert

Aug 9

53 min

This is another episode that is a part of our COVID-19 Series on community work in the Hawaiian Kingdom. Native Stories introduces Hiʻilani Shibata. Who has been sharing the essence of ALOHA with those who work in the visitor industry of Hawaiʻi for over 20 years. An educator, cultural consultant, practitioner of lomilomi. She also is theco-founded Ka Mahina Project, a startup that connects the stories of the moon to people. https://issuu.com/wpcouncil/docs/hi_lunarcal2019_final/1?e=7174896/64565905

Aug 2

49 min

Hawaiʻi is in many ways not just the start of US overseas empire, but also the last time the US seemed to actually pay any real regard to the will of native peoples when looking at expansion.  Essentially the withdrawal of the first treaty of annexation by Cleveland and the defeat of the second one in the Senate signaled a basic failure of the imperialists to push through the isolationist and at least nominally pro-democracy sentiments of 19th century US foreign policy. Spanish-American War The Spanish American war, however, opens up the floodgates.  Though reluctant to get into the war, it getʻs McKinley the chance to grab Hawaiʻi, which he had wanted when he signed the second treaty, and then the massive popularity combined with the expansionist group within his own admin leads him to embrace empire, both in the war itself (Seizing the Philippines, Guam, and PR in the Treaty of Paris and also completing the long stalled negotiations with Germany and the UK over Sāmoa) and in his reelection campaign in 1900. Filipino-American War The Philippine American war is really the conclusion of all this and sets the tone for the US’s foreign wars of occupation up through the present day.  Getting into the war we actually supported Filipino Nationalist like Aguinaldo, we saw them as the same as the Cuban independence fighters we were supposedly helping when we attacked Spain.  But really Quickly it turns, and McKinley grabs it in treaty negotiations and sends out guys like Otis with the express purpose of putting down any nationalist forces and creating a colony.  The atrocities that followed are typical of wars of occupation, which we see in the US plains before that, but also in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, etc.  

Jul 26

60 min

This episode highlights the one year anniversary of no construction on Maunakea and the resurrection of @puuhuluhulu@protectmaunakea . Native Stories was blessed to have held space with other kiaʻi and allies last year where we recorded the moʻolelo of front line Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) there. Check them out on our app + podcast! This episode we introduce Terrill James Kānealiʻikeikiokaʻāina Williams on Aloha ʻĀina Warrior and Kiaʻi of Maunakea. Board of Regents Schedule:July 22 - Public Engagement and Development Committeehttps://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/meetings/index.html Submit testimony to the Board of Regents for the University of California here: regentsoffice@ucop.edu Follow to stay connected: @unr_now@puuhuluhulu@protectmaunakea

Jul 19

41 min

New to Native Stories is Interviewer @_vehia_Miri Vidal lives in Papetoai, Mo'orea. She is a Tifaifai-quilt maker (traditional Tahitian quilt maker), an activist for nuclear reparations and justice, a mother and a grandmother. Miri was living on O'ahu, Hawai'i during the 1990's at the height of the Nuclear Free and Independent Pacific (also known as NFIP) era. During this time, France had been conducting nuclear tests on Tahiti, French Polynesia for decades. France started nuclear testing in French Polynesia in 1966 until 1996, conducting between 175-188 nuclear tests on Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls. France was taking part in the world “nuclear arms race” where nuclear tests were being developed by large industrial countries as a means of warfare. Other examples would be the US nuclear tests on Bikini Island in Micronesia during the 1950’s. Miri was a representative of Tahiti and the NFIP activists of Tahiti in Hawai'i. She gave speeches with Mililani Trask during NFIP marches and protests, and frequented Kekuni Blaisdell's house for discussions on Pacific sovereignty. And during the 90's, she brought over a group of Kanaka Maoli activists to Tahiti to bridge the islands and build solidarity during the anti-colonial military movement. Miri Vidal was born in the south of France from Tahitian parents in 1953 during the French Algerian War, a war of Algerian resistance to French nuclear testing on their land. Being in the military, her father was then transferred to Madagascar, and they travelled by a French cruise ship through the Suez Canal to the island of Madagascar, who were at the beginning of their Independence from France in 1962-65. Her travel through the Suez Canal, stopping in the Middle East on different port stops gave her an opportunity to experience and see many different cultures from around the area. She moved to Tahiti in 1966, and lived with her Aunty and Uncle. Her Uncle was a renown photographer for a French magazine among other things. Her experience living in Tahiti brought her into contact with many politicians from Tahiti and France and many others from local bourgeoise class and navy, there to implant the nuclear testing in Moruroa, Hao & Fangataufa.You can contact Miri on her FB pageshttps://www.facebook.com/miritifaifaihttps://www.facebook.com/tifaifaimiriPictured on Top: (L-R): Man with hat is from Rapa Nui (name unknown), Imai Kanahele, Miri Vidal, Soli Niheu, Aunty Terry KekoʻolaniNative Stories previously interviewed Imai and Terrilee.

Jul 12

51 min

July 5, 20207am HST We introduce Sanoe Marfil and Noelani Napuelua Patronis from INPEACE Hawaiʻi (@inpeacehawaii)! These mana wāhine talk to us about their work with Kānaka Maoli families, individuals, and people of Hawaiʻi for the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture — INPEACE. Located on the Waiʻanae Coast of Oʻahu a part of our COVID-19 community work in the Hawaiian Kingdom Series! Learn more on the amazing programs they offer, innovative educational techniques during COVID19, and connecting Hawaiian Culture to present day work! Check out their website: https://www.inpeace.org You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone) Listen to our podcast on Google Play, iTunes Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Search: Native Stories Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ournativestories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ournativestories/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPZFv2ja8Dn6AreTWcQ7m-g

Jul 6

58 min

We introduce Cortney Gusick of Pāhiki Eco-Caskets (@pahikicaskets)! https://www.instagram.com/pahikicaskets/ She informs us on death work, burial rights, advocacy, and education in the Hawaiian Kingdom for our COVID-19 community work series! Tune in for this super interesting and enlightening episode on how we can reconnect to ʻāina. Check out the Funeral Rule here!: https://www.ftc.gov/…/media-…/truth-advertising/funeral-rule

Jun 28

60 min

This episode is a part of Native Stories COVID-19 Series highlighting community work within the Hawaiian Kingdom. Kūʻike Kamakea-Ohelo is the son of HULI leader Kalani Ohelo. He shares with us on his work in his community highlighting the health crisis happening in Hawaiʻi and updates with Hūnānāniho (@hunananihouniversity). Learn more at www.nativestories.org

Jun 21

46 min

Meala Bishop retired as a community arts specialist role in Ko'olaupoko, O’ahu after spending 23 years in the community, teaching, not just art, but many things impressed upon living in the islands oceans, mountains, and lo'i. From Meala "Art helps create ways of knowing and understanding. It helps us express our internal mo'olelo through external expression. Visual literacy explains through creative processes our visions of how we see the world and our relationship to the environment. The artist by sharing the spiritual essences that surround our environment through visual language & symbolism celebrates their connection to life and place. Through art we can explore Hawaiian culture, history and cultural diversity - culture through art. Kaona, metaphors, 'olelo, and hōʻailona help connect us to language and culture. I feel compelled to express hope, honor the past, immerse myself in my natural surrounding and share its knowledge. My wahi pana are Waiehu, Maui, Koko Head, Kaʻalaea, Waiāhole, and Punaluʻu,Oʻahu." You can find Meala’s art at Kaiser Moanalua, The Dawson Collection, Honolulu, Disney’s Aulani Resort, South Shore Market Ward Stores, for purchase at Na Mea Hawaii, private collections and on Instagram under the hashtag #mealaaloha You can email her at maoliartinspirehawaii@gmail Recording credits Windward Community College @windwardcc Journalism Class Marielle Lewis (Editing) Sangha Webster (Recording) @thewebgem24 Noa Helela (Interviewer) @noa_isagirlsname Kimberlee Bassford (Journalism instructor) Ikaika Bishop (Podcast instructor) @ikaikaflies Mahalo Atherton and Castle Foundations @hkl_castle for the financial support

Jun 14

24 min

Wahinehula Kaʻeo is a koʻokua, or birth and postpartum doula from Waiohuli, Maui. A proud graduate of ke Kula Kaiapuni o Maui and a former preschool teacher at Pūnana Leo o Maui. She is a Co-founder and the Development Director of Kalauokekahuli, a nonprofit organization that supports Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander families by providing culturally-based prenatal, birth, and postpartum education and services.c

Jun 7

54 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Delia Parker Ulima has worked over the last decade with non-profit organization, EPIC ‘Ohana, helping to lead the work with child welfare reform, youth engagement and advocacy, public will and policy and communication efforts. She holds a BA in Political Science from Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i, an MA in Pacific Island Studies, a Juris Doctorate from the William S. Richardson School of Law and a Graduate Certificate in Conflict Resolution from the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, all from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.She also serves as the current chair of the Juvenile Justice State Advisory Council. Delia is a Kalihi girl, a Kamehameha alum, a local musician, a wife to Fosi and mom to Sonny, Makana and Snoop. IG: hihopes808FB: @hihopesinitiativeFoster Care Resources:www.fostercareresources808.orgwww.epicohana.org and www.hihopes.orgwww.pidf.orgwww.familyprogramshawaii.orgCatholic Charities Hawaiiwww.halekipa.org

May 31

50 min

ʻOpio ProgramInterviewed by Kailua High (@kailuahigh) School Early College course in Journalism 201.At Ulupō Heiau (@uluponui) in Kailua Oahu, student from Kailua High School interview Kihei de Silva. He shares his families history in taking care of heiau and land, the mele he wrote for Ulupō and those that take care of it, and his journey to becoming a well known storyteller in Kailua.

May 24

43 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Kyle Harmon (@xfactorsports22) describes history and his involvement with Nanticoke Nation (www.nanticokeindians.org) He is from Salisbury, Maryland and is a member of the Nanticoke Nation; He currently lives in Columbia, Maryland with his wife Cat and their three children Dominique, Preston, and Julius. Mr. Harmon was elected to serve as a Tribal Council Member in January 2016. He has taken an active role in strengthening the community through education and wellness programs. His term ended in December 2018. He was chosen to serve on the board of directors of Native American Lifelines Inc. in January 2020. He is a veteran teacher and basketball coach of 14 years. Mr. Harmon has done consultation work and travels to schools, organizations, and communities across Turtle Island or Northern America to teach his traditional Indigenous knowledge and Native culture. He is the author of a book Preston Lee Morris: A Soldier, A Man, A Father. Currently writing his second book which is a timeline of Eastern Shore Natives of the Delmarva Peninsula.

May 17

58 min

Physical copies can be purchased at hawanerios.com.Happy Motherʻs Day to all the makuahine. Ikaika Bishop (@Ikaikaflies) interviewed Hāwane Rios (@hawanemusic). Mahalo to @puacase mama of Hāwane for setting up this interview. Hāwane is a kanaka ʻōiwi (native Hawaiian), mana wahine, kiaʻi of Mauna o Wākea, singer and songwriter from Waimea, Hawaii. She shars her journey to the mauna, as a songwriter and singer, and she thanks the many people that have come before. Congratulations for the Nā Hōkū Hanohano nominations in 6 categories this year.Her music is available on Apple Music, iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music, and Deezer. Physical copies can be purchased at hawanerios.com.

May 10

35 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Daryn is Diné (Navajo), N’dé (Mescalero Apache) as well as Ashkenazi Jewish and Spaniard. He is a current student at Arizona State University studying Sustainable Community Development and currently resides in O’odham territory (Phoenix, AZ). His interests are in environmental planning with an emphasis on sustainable ecosystems. He is a native practitioner and does beadwork pieces in which he sells through my Instagram shop @oceansun.bear. He donates 10% of my sales to the Navajo Water Project who provides running water and electricity for Navajo Families.

May 3

42 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Steven Hernandez of Detroit, Michigan. Steven is a CRA Compliance Specialist, Philanthropist, and Nonprofit Specialist that works with indigenous, native, and people of color. He shares his work on philanthropy, working in the nonprofit sector, and relationship building with one another, your partner, and yourself.

Apr 26

47 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Owen Oliver of the Quinault Nation grew up on the Salish Sea where he was able to learn traditions inter-tribally through the annual Canoe Journey. He shares his knowledge and experiences living in Washington and Alaska. Once at the University of Washington, he has been focusing on Indigenous education through community engagement and empowerment. He understands the importance of higher education and the skill sets that Native students can bring to every academic setting, ensuring new ways that success is achieved and determined. He’s been able to achieve a few of these goals through the American Indian Studies program and the undergraduate Native Organization First Nations where he works as the Outreach chair. As a Champion for Change for the Aspen Institute, Owen will be able to look outside the Coast Salish region and develop relationships that will lead to a better understanding of visibility, community work, and successes of Native students across North America.

Apr 19

34 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Tremayne Nez from the Navajo Nation talks about his community and his experience in Washington D.C. for the Native American Political Leadership Program.

Apr 12

30 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo Shavaughna Underwood is a part of the Quinault Nation in Washington. She is a Champion for Change for the Center of Native American Youth at the Aspen Institute in the 2020 cohort. She currently is a human services professional who practices within her community.

Apr 5

21 min

Interviewed by Nanea Lo (@eananealo) via @SkypePeter C Brooks (https://www.facebook.com/peter.c.brooks) describes how his native people on the east parts of north america had merged with other cultures. He talks about his grandfather Cab Callow as black/African American but was also native. You can find Peter on Facebook or Youtube. He provides guided meditations online and other interesting services.

Mar 29

47 min

ʻOpio ProgramInterviewed by Kailua High School Early College course in Journalism 201.At Ulupō Heiau in Kailua Oahu, student from Kailua High School interview Kaleo Wong. He shares that every second Saturday the community is invited to participate in the restoration project, which began over twenty years ago. Kaleo shares his perspectives on Kawainui #Fishpond, and reflects upon his voyages as a #Navigator for the Hokulea. Their non-profit Kauluakalana.org accepts charitable donations to help grow, and develop activities for educational, cultural and social benefits. For more information you can email them at kaleo@kauluakalana.org

Mar 22

29 min

Panel Discussion at Waiwai Collective Recorded on March 6 - Hosted by Hawaii Technology Academy (@htacharter) at WaiWai Collective (@waiwaicollective): Elevating Women keynote and panel with local & global leaders.Agenda:Leadership Panel: Puanani Burgess, Dr. Christina Kishimoto, Dr. Loretta Chen (@drlorettachen), Wasfia Nazreen, Laila Abouoaf (@lailaabouoaf)Closing Remarks - Mary Wenstrom (@marywenstrom), Director of Partnerships and Innovation at Hawaii Technology Academy. You can contact Wasfia via DM to support her non profit or request a speaking engagement. Mount Everest was briefly referred to as "Everest” in western countries, Locally the mountain is known by its Nepali name Sagarmatha, meaning  “forehead in the sky” and in Tibetan as Chomolungma, meaning “goddess mother of mountains” . 

Mar 15

72 min

Dr Rangi Matamua (Tūhoe) is a professor at the University of Waikato, and his research fields are Māori astronomy and star lore, Māori culture, and Māori language development, research and revitalisation. He talks about how observing sun, moon, star alignments helped our ancestors tell us when to plant, fish, when to work or not work, etc. https://www.facebook.com/pg/Livingbythestars

Mar 8

37 min

Interviewed by Ikaika Bishop More info on: https://namakakahiko.wixsite.com/ Nalu first had an interest in carving at the age of six when he was witness to the 1978 voyage of Hokulea.  He borrowed carving and voyaging books from his school library and began to try to make his own canoe with items found around his home.  While still in high school, he was asked to help with the lashing on Hokulea at Pier 40.  During his time with Hokulea he met many artists and carvers that were involved in the new Hawaiian renaissance.  Keone Nunes became his good friend, mentor, and first formal teacher; guiding Nalu in his carving and hula.  Wright Bowman Jr. along with Gil Ane asked Nalu to help with the construction of Hawaii Loa; were he continued his education in carving and lashing. After high school, Nalu began making bone ko'i and makau for craft fairs and for the Bishop Museum gift shop.  In 2015, Nalu created Na Maka Kahiko.  Blending the old with the new; he created his hand carved ohe kapala earrings inspired by designs found at the Bishop Museum.  With his business, Nalu sells not only his earrings, but also hair picks, ohe kapala stamps, bone makau and ko'i pendants, ohe hano ihu, ohe pu, and hu oeoe.  Na Maka Kahiko items can be purchased at the Bishop Museum Gift Shop, Native Intelligence on Maui, Hawaiian Force in Hilo, Merrie Monarch Invitational Craft Fair,  Made in Hawaii Craft Fair, and various other shops and craft fairs.  Nalu also has an online store where he sells his items all over the world.   Nalu also teaches his craft though workshops.  He has done workshops for Punana Leo schools, Keiki o Ka Aina, Kapiolani Community College, Kamehameha Schools, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and many others. Nalu resides in Honouliuli, Ewa with his wife Lisa and their two children.

Mar 1

48 min

In Kapahulu we learn about Hawaiian feather work at Ne Lima Mili Hulu Noʻeau with Mele Kahalepuna Chun.  For generations this family owns and operates this craft store near Waikiki preparing  for Hawaiian cultural events year round including the 2020 Merrie Monarch Festival.  Along with her students and daughter Leleaʻe Wong Kahalepuna, they create unique, one of a kind creations. Some of  which were designed by her Tutu, Mary Lou Kekuewa, and also by her mother, Paulette Kahalepuna.  Students are encouraged to learn at her store. Much of her wares like the hat band, or humu papa, are available at Merrie Monarch, and also online at www.featherlegacy.com.  This store is located at 762 Kapahulu Avenue, near Waikiki, Oahu. 

Feb 23

28 min

The mission of PIPIT, Inc. is to support community organizations and members that promote the preservation of the Chamorro language and culture. Interview with Vince San Nicolas, T. E.N.D.A. Business Manager and Rudy Rivera, Graphic Specialist at the 2020 ACF Native Grantee Meeting held in Washington DC.https://www.pipitinc.org/abouthttps://www.instagram.com/pipit.inc/https://www.facebook.com/pipitinc671/Store: https://fahanguahan.com/

Feb 16

27 min

Panel Discussion on 2/5/2020 about the artworks composed in response to the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom and 127 years of illegal occupation with Josh Tengan (@libertyhaus), Drew Brodrick (@koa_gallery), and Nanea Lum (@nanealum). Donnie Cervantes introduces the art space at Aupuni (@aupunispace) and its history. Josh describes the curation of the space. Drew talks about his team work on 3254 Waialae Ave. Nanea talks about her Analagous I (2015) and Untitled (Bloody Flag) (2020).

Feb 9

60 min

Tennille Leomana Kanahele describes to us her experiences growing up with a ohana that was prominent in the movement towards sovereignty. She discusses her story growing up as a daughter to Dennis “Bumpy” Kanahele, finding herself after college, and using her baking to share her leomana (powerful voice). Resources:https://www.instagram.com/goodielicioustreatsbytennillel/TEXT ONLY 469-2555https://www.facebook.com/puuhonuahttps://www.hawaii-nation.org/puuhonua.htmlhttps://www.alohacoin.today/hawaii

Feb 2

40 min

Jermayne grew up on the Warm Springs reservation and learned the tribal traditional ways and continues to carry on today. He has worked at #MuseumatWarmSprings in the #Archives department. He has worked on culture education and teaches his heritage language, #Ichishkin, to community classes and high school level. He is currently enrolled @uoregon pursuing a #Masters in #linguistics. He hopes to use his community work and education to revitalize his language.  In this story, we discuss pre treaty of Warm Springs, reasons for the treaty, and current day happenings around language revitalization.  Resources https://www.museumatwarmsprings.org/ Ichishkíin Sinwit Yakama / Yakima Sahaptin Dictionary

Jan 26

70 min

She discusses her advocacy, the issue, and others that are doing great work today. .Native women living on tribal lands are murdered at an extremely high rate — in some communities, more than 10 times the national average. 4 percent of Canada's female population — made up nearly 25 percent of its female indigenous homicide victims in 2012. https://www.npr.org/2018/11/15/667335392/police-in-many-u-s-cities-fail-to-track-murdered-missing-indigenous-women . From a post by @nativein_la: In 2016, 5,712 cases of missing’s were documented by @urbanindianhealthinstitute & 116 of those cases were documented by the Department of Justice. Homicide is the 3rd leading cause of death & 84% of Native Women will experience violence in their lifetime. This isn’t right. @sovereignbodies seeks to build on indigenous traditions of gathering data and knowledge transfer to create the first ever database to find our stolen:.Available now on our mobile app, and Google Play, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌 .Learn more at www.nativestories.org!Search: “Native Stories” #nativestories on all podcast outlets! . . You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone)

Jan 12

40 min

@nanealo and @nohealani16 discuss the history of Native Stories, journey through @thepurpleprize, review of 2019, and some insight into the future. Mahalo to our auction Donators - @honihala, #nanealo, @paahana_wood_designs, @sassa..frass, @dayofconquest, @kapacurious, #makaainana, @makaahinaalohilohi, @sewnani_bylila, @nhss_uhm, @opihionalani, @noegk, @aina_lish, @william_80, @karaboutart, #kaulumaika, #maolijewelry, #kapahawaii, @solomonenos, #pomahinadesigns, #kamanucomposites, @thekeikidept, @nanealum, @kaimarkell, #kealopiko, #Tamera Heine Available now on our mobile app, and Google Play, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌.Learn more at www.nativestories.org!Search: “Native Stories” #nativestories on all podcast outlets!..You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone)

Jan 5

28 min

Recorded at @waiwaicollective on December 13th 2019, a collaboration between Nā Wai Chamber Choir @nawaichamberchoir and the University of Hawaiʻi Music Department’s Hawaiian Music Program—Nā Leo o Tuahine, who will come together in a concert featuring the legacy of musical resistance in Hawaiʻi. Led by Dr. Jace Kaholokula Saplan @katsuandcurry, this concert lecture will survey the #mele and #choral works throughout the history of our #lāhui that have created a platform of sonic mana on which to stand on—and will feature the mele of #Queen #Liliʻuokalani, #Liko #Martin, #Israel #Kamakawiwoʻole, and many more. Available now on our mobile app, and Google Play, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Overcast, PocketCasts, Podcast Addict, Player FM, iHeartRadio, and many other outlets! 🔌 .Learn more at www.nativestories.org!Search: “Native Stories” #nativestories on all podcast outlets! . You can download us on your mobile phones! 📲(Both android + iPhone)

Dec 2019

97 min

Panel discussion on the issues surrounding the historic practices and management of the Hanapēpē Salt Ponds and current conflict over the area's different uses, including Maverick Helicopter's recent request for a zoning permit. Panelists include Malia Nobrega-Olivera (President, Hui Hana Paʻakai o Hanapēpē), Kuʻulei Santos (Vice President, Hui Hana Paʻakai o Hanapēpē), Alan Murakami (Attorney, Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation). PC https://www.civilbeat.org/2018/02/brittany-lyte-the-imperiled-legacy-of-the-hanapepe-salt-flats/

Dec 2019

100 min

Joseph “Nappy” Napoleon (Born 1941) is well known for his participation in waʻa canoe racing in Hawaiʻi. Uncle Nappy paddled in his first Moloka'i Hoe, the annual long-distance open ocean canoe race from Moloka'i to O'ahu, at the age of 17 in 1958. PC https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/7139021/legendary-island-paddler-ready-to-make-new-mark-at-molokai-hoe/

Dec 2019

25 min

The most dangerous time for our people... is institutional racism, which is when an institution, organization, or government has policies, practices, procedures or laws, that give or afford unearned privilege to one group or another, and that is exactly what is happening up on this mauna.

Dec 2019

42 min

See how powerful the people of Hawaii can be, and we wield a real serious force, that we can push in whatever direction we want, and I really hope that we are not just looking back in history to this beautiful time when we all came together and then it stopped, but really look back and see "oh that was another beginning to how we got right here right now in whatever issue we were fighting then."

Dec 2019

36 min

From Keanu Sai's blog https://hawaiiankingdom.org/blog/ In the summer of 1842, Kamehameha III moved forward to secure the position of the Hawaiian Kingdom as a recognized independent state under international law. He sought the formal recognition of Hawaiian independence from the three naval powers of the world at the time—Great Britain, France, and the United States. To accomplish this, Kamehameha III commissioned three envoys, Timoteo Ha‘alilio, William Richards, who at the time was still an American Citizen, and Sir George Simpson, a British subject. Of all three powers, it was the British that had a legal claim over the Hawaiian Islands through cession by Kamehameha I, but for political reasons the British could not openly exert its claim over the other two naval powers. Due to the islands prime economic and strategic location in the middle of the north Pacific, the political interest of all three powers was to ensure that none would have a greater interest than the other. This caused Kamehameha III “considerable embarrassment in managing his foreign relations, and…awakened the very strong desire that his Kingdom shall be formally acknowledged by the civilized nations of the world as a sovereign and independent State.” While the envoys were on their diplomatic mission, a British Naval ship, HBMS Carysfort, under the command of Lord Paulet, entered Honolulu harbor on February 10, 1843, making outrageous demands on the Hawaiian government. Basing his actions on complaints made to him in letters from the British Consul, Richard Charlton, who was absent from the kingdom at the time, Paulet eventually seized control of the Hawaiian government on February 25, 1843, after threatening to level Honolulu with cannon fire. Kamehameha III was forced to surrender the kingdom, but did so under written protest and pending the outcome of the mission of his diplomats in Europe. News of Paulet’s action reached Admiral Richard Thomas of the British Admiralty, and he sailed from the Chilean port of Valparaiso and arrived in the islands on July 25, 1843. After a meeting with Kamehameha III, Admiral Thomas determined that Charlton’s complaints did not warrant a British takeover and ordered the restoration of the Hawaiian government, which took place in a grand ceremony on July 31, 1843. At a thanksgiving service after the ceremony, Kamehameha III proclaimed before a large crowd, ua mau ke ea o ka ‘aina i ka pono (the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness). The King’s statement became the national motto. The envoys eventually succeeded in getting formal international recognition of the Hawaiian Islands “as a sovereign and independent State.” Great Britain and France formally recognized Hawaiian sovereignty on November 28, 1843 by joint proclamation at the Court of London, and the United States followed on July 6, 1844 by a letter of Secretary of State John C. Calhoun. The Hawaiian Islands became the first Polynesian nation to be recognized as an independent and sovereign State. The ceremony that took place on July 31 occurred at a place we know today as “Thomas Square” park, which honors Admiral Thomas, and the roads that run along Thomas Square today are “Beretania,” which is Hawaiian for “Britain,” and “Victoria,” in honor of Queen Victoria who was the reigning British Monarch at the time the restoration of the government and recognition of Hawaiian independence took place. About Keanu Sai found here: https://www2.hawaii.edu/~anu/ Keanu has a Ph.D. in Political Science specializing in Hawaiian Constitutionalism and International Relations, and a founding member of the Hawaiian Society of Law & Politics. I served as lead Agent for the Hawaiian Kingdom in arbitration proceedings before the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague, Netherlands, from November 1999-February 2001. I also served as Agent in a Complaint against the United States of America concerning the prolonged occupation of the Hawaiian Kingd...

Nov 2019

79 min

My manaʻolana for all of this is that people gain a sense of identity and they are able to be proud of who they are, where they come from..."

Nov 2019

18 min

Our intention is to create a nurturing space, a space of empowerment...a brave space for people to feel comfortable truth telling. One of the things we’ve noticed on the Mauna is there’s a lot of historical/cultural trauma going on. I hope that our wahine space is one of those spaces where wahine, māhū, kāne, everyone feels comfortable to come into a nurturing space where they can truth tell, share their own moolelo for how they got here.

Nov 2019

30 min

From 2015 until now I’ve been continuing to organize students, train them on how to approach creating actions on campus, how to confront the university, how to confront President Lassner.

Nov 2019

35 min

Struggling in the hood, figuring out that I’d rather have the ʻāina back then eat spam and have EBT, hip hop solved my problems by expressing it, so I figured I might as well teach youth this craft that helped me learn discipline and bless me with a better outlook on life and help me navigate through struggle.

Nov 2019

26 min

For too long our intimate connection with our environment has been interrupted by western ways of being and knowing that was imposed upon us... so that’s what’s so exciting about Puʻu Huluhulu, is that we are coming back and living in one with our environment and getting to know the elements and the changing of the seasons... and what is more Ea then that?

Nov 2019

24 min

Our intention is to create a nurturing space, a space of empowerment...a brave space for people to feel comfortable truth telling. One of the things we’ve noticed on the Mauna is there’s a lot of historical/cultural trauma going on. I hope that our wahine space is one of those spaces where wahine, māhū, kāne, everyone feels comfortable to come into a nurturing space where they can truth tell, share their own moʻōlelo for how they got here.

Oct 2019

32 min

Outside of public-school sex education, learning about the sexuality, the gender, the sexual practices of my ancestors have helped me as a māhū to decolonize my body, my relationships, so Sex Eaducation is uncovering what is always conscious, we are constantly in a sexual relationship with the ʻāina.

Oct 2019

29 min

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