Culture Gap

THRUUE with CEO, Daniel Forrester

PODCASTS WITH LEADERS MAKING DRAMATIC CHANGE HAPPEN IN THEIR ORGANIZATIONS

Culture Gap will explore stories of leaders driving massive change and building movements through purpose, values, and vision.

Todos los episodios

Dee Ann Turner is a retired veteran of Chick-fil-A who spent 33 years rising to be one of the first female officers of this iconic company. Dee Ann started in HR before eventually leading the talent and franchisee selection and the sustainability division, in the last part of her career at Chick-fil-A. She also helped to design the talent systems and processes of the culture of Chick-fil-A, and in July 2018, Dee Ann ventured out on her own to start her own company. Today, she is an author, speaker, consultant and coach at helping organizations globally strengthen their organizational culture and talent systems.   In the second part of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Dee Ann sheds light on how she helped Chick-fil-A to design an intentional culture in which every single customer experience went above and beyond expectations, and how principles rather than rules helped make this possible. She also shares her wisdom about accountability, scaling for growth, and the intersection of customer and employee experience. Find out more about some of the many lessons she has reflected on in writing her three books. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:45] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Dee Ann Turner. [1:26] People don’t get behind rules, they get behind principles. What are Dee Ann’s beliefs about rules and principles and how to balance them? [6:38] Dee Ann shares an anecdote about Chick-fil-A where putting rules over principles almost ended really badly. [10:54] What advice does Dee Ann have about knowing when to invest more effort into growing an employee vs. just calling it quits? [15:40] What distinguishes a customer experience from employee experience? What should CEOs know about the intersection of experience for customers and employees? [18:21] Dee Ann shares some anecdotes of how customer experience and employee experience were intertwined at Chick-fil-A. [23:25] What is Dee Ann’s next book going to be about? [25:40] What are some common questions Dee Ann gets asked about corporate culture? [29:18] What wisdom would Dee Ann impart to her younger self?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Dee Ann Turner Chick-fil-A Bet on Talent: How to Create a Remarkable Culture and Win the Hearts of Customers, by Dee Ann Turner It’s My Pleasure: The Impact of Extraordinary Talent and a Compelling Culture, by Dee Ann Turner S. Truett Cathy, Founder of Chick-fil-A The Culture Gap Podcast Episode: “Dee Ann Turner, Veteran of Chick-fil-A, Inc. (Part 1 of 2)”

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may 2020

31 min 54 seg

Dee Ann Turner is a retired veteran of Chick-fil-A who spent 33 years rising to be one of the first female officers of this iconic company. Dee Ann started in HR before eventually leading the talent and franchisee selection and the sustainability division, in the last part of her career at Chick-fil-A. She also helped to design the talent systems and processes of the culture of Chick-fil-A, and in July 2018, Dee Ann ventured out on her own to start her own company. Today, she is an author, speaker, consultant and coach at helping organizations globally strengthen their organizational culture and talent systems.   In the first of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Dee Ann reveals some of her background and values that shaped her growing up, that she brought with her on her Chick-fil-A journey. She shares more about her 33-year journey through different departments in Chick-fil-A, and how culture played a part in the organization, from early on. Dee Ann also provides insights about finding the right big ideas, what it takes to keep alignment between strategy and culture, and what she learned from the founder of Chick-fil-A himself. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Dee Ann Turner. [1:43] Who is Dee Ann? [3:02] What are some of the values that were imprinted on Dee Ann that she still carries with her today? [7:09] How did Dee Ann end up as a part of the Chick-fil-A brand? [11:39] Culture now is everywhere, but back then, what was Chick-fil-A's approach to culture? [12:57] What was Dee Ann's experience as a part of Chick-fil-A as the big ideas and culture were starting to take shape? What does it take to get the right big ideas and culture? [17:26] What was it like to be one-to-one in a room with Truett Cathy and what advice did he give Dee Ann? [20:44] Alignment is hard. What has Dee Ann learned about keeping alignment between the strategy and the culture at Chick-fil-A through growth? [26:03] What is the difference between culture and strategy?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Dee Ann Turner Chick-fil-A Bet on Talent: How to Create a Remarkable Culture and Win the Hearts of Customers, by Dee Ann Turner It's My Pleasure: The Impact of Extraordinary Talent and a Compelling Culture, by Dee Ann Turner S. Truett Cathy, Founder of Chick-Fil-A The Culture Gap Podcast Episode: “Ginger Hardage, Former Senior Vice President of Culture and Communications at Southwest Airlines (Part 1 of 2)” The Culture Gap Podcast Episode: “Ginger Hardage, Former Senior Vice President of Culture and Communications at Southwest Airlines (Part 2 of 2)”

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may 2020

29 min 24 seg

Susan Bratton is the Founder and CEO of Savor Health, a start-up that harnesses the power of data and algorithms to provide an unprecedented service of personalization of nutrition for those dealing with multiple types of cancer. By leveraging data science, expert knowledge, and scientific literature, Savor Health delivers prescriptive nutrition interventions to cancer patients, helping them on their road to recovery.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, Susan talks about her upbringing and past life in Corporate America that led her down the path of starting Savor Health. She shares more about the challenges she faced in getting funding for her enterprise, the team she has built to make this company a reality and the critical role of artificial intelligence in her business model. Susan has some insightful takeaways from her time as CEO of a startup, and how industry trends are shaping the future of her business. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Susan Bratton. [1:21] Who is Susan? [2:14] What are some of the values that shaped how Susan sees the world? [5:35] How did Susan decide to start Savor Health? [10:38] How did Susan get the funding to kickstart her idea? [15:25] What does Susan’s team look like now? [18:25] How is Savor Health using AI in the business? [23:17] What is the business model for Savor Health? [29:24] There are a lot of moving parts to Susan’s business. She explains some of the trends in the industry that are having an impact on it. [34:08] What is Susan’s advice to other CEOs who want to have the type of thinking, culture, and strategy that she has synthesized in her company?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Susan Bratton on LinkedIn Susan Bratton on Twitter Savor Health

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abr 2020

42 min 29 seg

Tracey Brown is the CEO of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and a dynamic and transformative leader. As the sixth CEO in five years for the ADA, Tracey had to deal with an organization in decline and one that had endured a lot of disruption caused by the frequent changes in leadership. She has risen to the challenge in an incredible way and is changing lives and impacting others with her work at the ADA.   In the second of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Tracey gives us an inside look into the transformation of this organization. She shares how focusing on the customer experience is taking a center stage at the ADA, and how she is reshaping her organization’s culture to reflect this. Tracey also shares more about her experience with collaboratively designing strategy, communicating with stakeholders, and building out a team that will tackle the challenges of the future. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Tracey Brown. [1:22] How did Tracey frame the case for change at the ADA in the first few months of her leadership? [9:05] The customer experience is taking center stage in a lot of organizations, including at the ADA. What are Tracey's thoughts on how this will play out in the future of the organization? [13:21] Tracey talks about how she started creating the values for the organization, why those values were chosen, and how they have shaped the activities of the ADA. [19:48] Quantifying the impact of different activities is important to determine which activities take priority. [23:58] Getting the right team together to lead a transformation can be tricky. Tracey shares her experience with getting the right people in the right roles. [27:57] Tracey explains why it is so important to maintain clear communication of the facts and data during a period of transformation. [32:00] Tracey breaks down her four-year blueprint for change for the ADA. [38:24] What would Tracey tell her younger self?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Tracey Brown American Diabetes Association The Culture Gap Podcast Episode: “Tracey Brown, CEO of the American Diabetes Association (Part 1 of 2)” Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, by Simon Sinek

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mar 2020

43 min 24 seg

Tracey Brown is the CEO of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and a dynamic and transformative leader. Prior to her current role at the ADA, Tracey was working with Sam’s Club and Walmart and made some significant strides during her tenure there. Today, she is changing lives and impacting others with her work at the ADA. In the first of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Tracey shares a little about her childhood and how her parents shaped her value system from a young age, including her thoughts around what it means to be a leader. She also shares insights about what it takes to grow a membership model business like Sam’s Club and highlights some of the key principles of Walmart that are often overlooked but that influenced her decision-making process to join the ADA. Purpose, passion, and position have aligned for Tracey who continues to shine her light in the world and change the lives of others. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:41] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Tracey Brown. [1:33] Who is Tracey Brown? [2:53] What are some core values that shaped Tracey as a child? [6:34] Who is the first person Tracey thinks of when she thinks of a leader, and why? [9:23] What was Tracey’s time working at Walmart like? Tracey explains more about the concept of membership and how it played out at Sam’s Club. [17:39] Tracey shares how she moved from working with Walmart to joining the American Diabetes Association. [24:28] Tracey and Daniel discuss some of the social good that is done by Walmart and its subsidiaries, and how that influenced Tracey’s decision-making process. [26:42] Purpose, passion, and position have aligned for Tracey to do great work in the American Diabetes Association. [27:19] Tracey relates a life-changing moment with her daughter and how she turned her life around from that point.   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Tracey Brown American Diabetes Association Walmart Sam’s Club Doug McMillon John Ferner

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feb 2020

33 min 23 seg

Heather McGowan is an extraordinary leader, thinker, and future-of-work strategist. She is an author and speaker who has a lot of insight about the future of work, the future of our relationships with one another, and the skills it will take to thrive in the fourth industrial revolution. Heather is not one to tout a dystopian future but believes that humans need to think differently about how we prepare for work and how we work in order to thrive in the future of it.   In the second of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Heather shares more about the culture needed to survive and thrive in this modern context, as well as the role of technology and machines in influencing corporate culture. She shares some insights about her new book coming out in spring, The Adaptation Advantage, and some advice for the leaders and the youth of today. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Heather McGowan. [1:28] What kind of culture should a new company adopt in order to survive and thrive in this new global context? [3:26] What would be one value or behavior that would be the linchpin to achieve the goals and vision Heather has for her hypothetical company? [6:17] What are the relationships between the workforce and machines, and how does that play out in the company's culture? [9:05] What is Heather's advice to help them and their workforce move past the fear that technology will take over your job one day? [13:43] Heather's new book, The Adaptation Advantage, comes out in spring. Why did Heather write it and what is the biggest reason CEOs should read it? [16:55] What would Heather's advice be to her younger self? [17:29] What are some things Heather would advise a future president to say at her inaugural address? [19:09] What advice does Heather have for a young girl?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Heather McGowan Parasite [Movie] Start with Why, by Simon Sinek “The Top 20 Business Transformations of the Last Decade,” HBR The Adaptation Advantage, by Chris Shipley and Heather McGowan

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feb 2020

23 min 33 seg

Heather McGowan is an extraordinary leader, thinker, and future-of-work strategist. She is an author and speaker who has a lot of insight about the future of work, the future of our relationships with one another, and the skills it will take to thrive in the fourth industrial revolution. Heather is not one to tout a dystopian future but believes that humans need to think differently about how we prepare for work and how we work in order to thrive in the future of it.   In the first of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, Heather shares how her own upbringing shaped her as a thinker and leader, as well as some of her key observations about the changes that are taking place at an individual, organizational, and societal level. Heather explains why our current structures do not support our human needs for connection and community, how social media might provide a solution, as well as how leaders should be approaching strategy in their organizations to adapt to the future of work. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Heather McGowan. [1:38] Who is Heather? [2:25] What are some of the values that have shaped Heather as a person and a leader? [5:58] What is the moment of change that individuals, organizations, and institutions are living through? [8:27] What happens to the psyche of the worker when the structures we have do not support our needs for membership, belonging, and a sense of community? [12:48] What is Heather optimistic about in relation to what is possible in building up authentic human connections? [15:09] What are Heather’s thoughts on how leaders should be approaching strategy and strategic planning? [20:35] Cognitive diversity and psychological safety are two essential elements to a competitive and successful organization. What is Heather’s advice to leaders to cultivate these in their organizations? [24:26] Knowing vs. learning mindset — Heather breaks down the differences and explains why it is so important for us to adopt a learning mindset to move into the future of work.   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Heather McGowan Articles by Thomas Friedman (NY Times) Between Two Ages: The 21st Century and the Crisis of Meaning, by William Van Dusen Wishard Alone Together, by Sherry Turkle Brené Brown The Two Traits of the Best Problem-Solving Teams, by Alison Reynolds and David Lewis (HBR) Peter Senge

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ene 2020

29 min 6 seg

Adrienne Penta is the Executive Director for the 200-year-old company and oldest private bank on Wall Street, Brown Brothers Harriman and their Center for Women and Wealth. A lawyer by training, Adrienne joined Brown Brothers in 2008, and in 2014, spearheaded the launch of the Center for Women & Wealth, dedicated to serving women and the wealth that they control.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, Adrienne and Daniel dive deep into the topic of values, values-based investing, and why this is becoming more and more important as more women enter the industry of wealth management as clients. Adrienne reveals some of the key trends in the wealth management space that are bringing women to the forefront of the discussion, and also why inclusiveness and diversity are the way forward. Tune in to find out where the culture gaps exist in an industry that is valued at over $40 trillion. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:42] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Adrienne Penta. [1:28] Who is Adrienne, and what are the values that have shaped her as a person? [4:39] Adrienne shares a little about Brown Brothers Harriman, its history, and how she ended up there. [6:04] The wealth management industry is transforming, as is every other industry. Adrienne explains more about the industry and the trends within the customer base right now. [9:34] Adrienne stresses the importance of thinking in a more inclusive way and being more deliberate about how they serve clients to create a trusted adviser relationship. [10:55] How does Adrienne approach the idea of influencing and cultivating the supply chain of future leaders that represents that client base of the future? [16:13] What is the Center for Women & Wealth, and who is its target audience? [22:16] How did Adrienne make the case for change in Brown Brothers Harriman around topics like diversity and inclusion? [26:01] How has the Center for Women & Wealth intersected with the Me Too movement? [29:37] What have been some of the most eye-opening insights Adrienne has had from running the Center for Women & Wealth? [32:30] What does Adrienne anticipate and predict for the future of the wealth management industry?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Adrienne Penta Brown Brothers Harriman Center for Women & Wealth Ray Dalio Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, Women’s Philanthropy Institute Center for Talent Innovation

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jul 2019

35 min 16 seg

David Mead is an Igniter with and is tied to one of the great minds of our time in the world of culture, purpose, mission — Simon Sinek and his company. David is globally recognized as the How guy to Simon’s Why, and co-authored Find Your Why. He also has years of practical experience working with organizations in different roles and uses this expertise in his current position to help other companies discover and articulate their ‘why.’   In the second of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, David and Daniel expand the conversation beyond just the purpose and why of an organization. David puts culture into context, relating it to vision and values, and explains why the CEO plays a critical role in driving that vision. David also makes the case for culture change driven by the CEO and shares his thoughts on how people across different generations and countries value purpose. Tune in also for a sneak peek into Simon Sinek’s new book, The Infinite Game. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — David Mead. [1:35] What is the difference between a ‘why’ and a vision? [3:26] David shares the distinction between purpose and vision with the example of his company, Start with Why. [4:57] It can be very difficult for people to make the leap from mission to vision in a single day. What are David’s thoughts on this, and what is the role of the CEO in driving that vision? [8:20] What are some of the surprising things that David has been asked by audiences around the world at his speaking events? [10:18] David and Daniel discuss how they deal with public dissent or differing opinions that they’re afraid to bring up in front of the group. [12:55] How would David make the case for culture change driven by the CEO? [16:54] What is special about the Millennial generation, and how are Millennials and the next generation after them pushing for these ideas of purpose and vision? [19:32] Simon Sinek is releasing a new book soon — The Infinite Game. David gives us a short preview of the book and its message. [23:31] What advice would David give his younger self?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: David Mead Simon Sinek, The Infinite Game

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mar 2019

25 min 56 seg

David Mead is an Igniter with and is tied to one of the great minds of our time in the world of culture, purpose, mission — Simon Sinek and his company. David is globally recognized as the How guy to Simon’s Why, and co-authored Find Your Why. He also has years of practical experience working with organizations in different roles and uses this expertise in his current position to help other companies discover and articulate their ‘why.’   In the first of this two-part episode of The Culture Gap, David and Daniel discuss David’s core values that shape him and why his experiences in business school led him to the conclusion that what was being taught was contributing to poor leadership. David also elaborates on how his partnership with Simon Sinek began and blossomed. They discuss why purpose matters, why culture matters, and why it’s so difficult for individuals and organizations to understand and articulate their ‘Why,’ so be sure to tune in. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — David Mead. [1:32] Who is David Mead? [2:29] What are some of David's core values that he has held from his earliest days that shape him as a leader? How did he come upon these values? [4:02] What was David being taught at business school that was contributing to poor leadership? [6:39] What happened to David the day that he was in the audience and heard Simon Sinek speak? What happened for Simon that moved him to approach David? [9:32] Why does ‘the why’ matter? [12:31] Why is it so difficult for people and organizations to understand and articulate their ‘why’? [14:52] David shares an example to illustrate why it's so difficult to articulate ‘why.’ [17:25] Daniel and David discuss the example of the mission statement of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: David Mead Simon Sinek, Start with Why Simon SInek, David Mead, and Peter Docker, Find Your Why Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

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feb 2019

20 min 7 seg

Ginger Hardage is the just-retired Senior Vice President of Culture and Communications from an iconic American company with one of the most celebrated cultures of all time, Southwest Airlines. With her background in marketing, Ginger started her career in the oil industry, then moved to the insurance industry before serving for 25 years at Southwest. Her latest venture is Unstoppable Cultures, an organization dedicated to helping build and sustain brands that are truly unstoppable.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, Ginger shares more about her time at Southwest Airlines and the mission, vision, values, and purpose of the organization. As a company well-known for their culture and ethos, she shares more about how Southwest formulated their vision statement and an interesting personal anecdote illustrating the core values of the organization. She also dives into her thoughts on navigating the post Me Too movement landscape, and her newest venture, Unstoppable Cultures. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Ginger Hardage. [1:25] Daniel and Ginger discuss the mission, vision, values, and purpose of Southwest Airlines. What is the distinction between mission and purpose? [5:46] Vision is critical to a company. Why does it matter, and why is it so difficult for companies to formulate their vision statements? [8:18] Ginger relates the experience of formulating the company’s vision statement. [10:15] Ginger shares an unexpected example of the core values of Southwest Airlines. [13:23] How did Ginger measure the culture of Southwest Airlines? [15:50] As a leader and an expert in culture, what is Ginger’s approach to navigating the post Me Too movement landscape? [20:27] Ginger’s new venture is Unstoppable Cultures. She explains more about the mission of the organization. [23:03] What advice would Ginger give her younger self, with all the wisdom that she has now?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Ginger Hardage on LinkedIn Southwest Airlines Gary Kelly

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dic 2018

26 min 3 seg

Ginger Hardage is the just-retired Senior Vice President of Culture and Communications from an iconic American company with one of the most celebrated cultures of all time, Southwest Airlines. With her background in marketing, Ginger started her career in the oil industry, then moved to the insurance industry before serving for 25 years at Southwest.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, Ginger shares more about the earliest days of her life that shaped her personal values, and how she thinks about corporate culture. She discusses her time and experiences at Southwest Airlines, giving some insights into how Southwest connects with its employees. She also shares a powerful case for culture that would convince the most skeptical CEO, so be sure to tune in. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Ginger Hardage. [1:49] Who is Ginger Hardage? [2:40] What were some of Ginger's personal values that were instilled her as a child? How did that help her navigate inside a company like Southwest Airlines? [5:07] How would Ginger define ‘corporate culture’? [7:15] There is no way to really import the culture of another organization. [7:34] Southwest only hires about 2% of all applicants. What is it like to be part of the 2%? [9:45] How would Ginger make the case for the power of culture to a skeptical CEO? [11:55] What are Ginger’s thoughts on the gaps between the strategy of a firm and the culture of a firm, particularly at Southwest Airlines. [14:36] The CEO should be the Chief Culture Officer. What is Ginger’s perspective on that? [17:17] Ginger speaks to the importance of leaders supporting and engaging with their employees.   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Ginger Hardage on LinkedIn Southwest Airlines Gary Kelly

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dic 2018

19 min 16 seg

Gen. Stanley McChrystal is best known for his command of Joint Special Operations in the mid-2000s, in the context of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a nationally and internationally known speaker and thinker on the subject of leadership, with multiple best-selling books, including a new book, Leaders: Myth and Reality. In 2011, he founded McChrystal Group, a leadership advisory services firm that helps organizations navigate leadership challenges.   Leadership, Vision, and the Role of Followers In this episode of The Culture Gap — the second of two episodes featuring Gen. McChrystal — he and Daniel discuss his best-selling book Team of Teams, and how the team dynamic plays out in boardrooms across the world. Gen. McChrystal has also recently launched a brand new book, Leaders: Myth and Reality. He shares more about his inspiration to write the book and his insights on how Coco Chanel and Margaret Thatcher were similar. He has some surprising revelations about the importance of reflection in leadership, and how leaders can best handle criticism. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:44] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode - Gen. Stanley McChrystal. [1:28] As the author of Team of Teams and with a wealth of expertise serving on boards, what are Gen. McChrystal's observations on boards as teams? [5:30] What kind of questions does Gen. McChrystal ask CEOs in a boardroom? [7:33] Gen. McChrystal has recently launched a new book, Leaders: Myth and Reality. What inspired him to put it out, and why now? [12:16] Gen. McChrystal sheds some insights about choosing to compare Coco Chanel and Margaret Thatcher as leaders. [19:35] What is the role of reflection in leadership? [22:18] What is a healthy way for a leader to handle criticism? [25:55] What advice would Gen. McChrystal give to his younger self, and the next generation of leaders today?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Gen. Stanley McChrystal McChrystal Group Team of Teams, by Gen. Stanley McChrystal Leaders: Myth and Reality, by Gen. Stanley McChrystal My Share of the Task: A Memoir, by Gen. Stanley McChrystal

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nov 2018

28 min 54 seg

Gen. Stanley McChrystal is best known for his command of Joint Special Operations in the mid-2000s, in the context of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a nationally and internationally known speaker and thinker on the subject of leadership, with multiple best-selling books, including a new book, Leaders: Myth and Reality. In 2011, he founded McChrystal Group, a leadership advisory services firm that helps organizations navigate leadership challenges.   Leadership, Vision, and the Role of Followers In this episode of The Culture Gap — the first of two episodes featuring Gen. McChrystal — he shares his definition of leadership, and its relationship to vision, strategy, and culture. He also highlights the role of followers as part of the leadership equation, and why the concept of agency is so powerful and important in leadership. Gen. McChrystal shares examples from his own experiences, including deconstructing a famous vision statement from President Trump. He also speaks to the role of corporate culture as it relates to leadership and agency within an organization. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:41] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Gen. Stanley McChrystal. [1:45] Who is Gen. Stanley McChrystal? [2:22] What are Gen. McChrystal’s core values? Was it nature or nurture that brought them forth? [4:36] Can leadership be defined? What is Gen. McChrystal’s definition of leadership? [6:24] What is the chemistry for followers in the formula of leadership? [8:51] Gen. McChrystal shares some insights on vision, and how leaders can bring vision to even chaotic situations. [11:28] Gen. McChrystal highlights why President Trump’s vision in 2016 was so effective. [14:36] How does the concept of “agency” relate to leadership? [18:06] What is the connection between corporate culture, leadership, and agency? [24:11] What would Gen. McChrystal’s approach be going into a company in an uncomfortable and difficult situation? [27:17] How does Gen. McChrystal see closing the gap between strategy and culture? [29:39] CEO turnover is becoming a bit of a national crisis. Why is CEO turnover at an all-time high, and how can this trend be reversed?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Gen. Stanley McChrystal McChrystal Group The Culture Gap Podcast Season 1 Episode 2: “Colonel David Sutherland, Former Military Leader and Founder of Sutherland Partnership” Leaders: Myth and Reality, by Gen. Stanley McChrystal

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nov 2018

33 min 45 seg

Jillian Grennan is an academic with a specialty in corporate finance and she teaches at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. She has produced some incredible work about looking at and measuring corporate culture without even being inside the firm. She has done a lot of research on culture to try and understand the value added by culture for firms and also has a strong corporate background that lends itself to her areas of expertise.   In this episode of The Culture Gap — the second of two episodes featuring Jillian — she explains more about some of the foundational ideas of her research and what some of her colleagues are working on in the same field. She also shares some insights about why so many CEOs see culture as important yet the gap between what they see and what they make happen is vast, and her thoughts on the Me Too Movement and its impact on corporate culture. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Jillian Grennan. [1:26] Jillian explains more about the technology behind computational linguistics and how she applied it to bring data to life in her study of external culture measurement. [4:09] Daniel and Jillian discuss the gap between the values of the company that are proclaimed and what employees are really seeing as the values in the company. [7:01] Who are some of Jillian’s colleagues focused on this same area of study? How does their work tie in with hers? [11:13] Why do some CEOs not believe that having a healthy corporate culture is important, particularly when the evidence points to great benefits companies will reap from it? [14:50] You can study other cultures but you can’t import another culture into a firm. [16:27] What is Jillian’s perspective on not hiring based on culture fit to avoid creating a monolithic organization that is essentially an echo chamber? [19:34] What are Jillian’s thoughts on the Me Too Movement and how that plays into companies’ cultures? [23:47] Are there alternative models to the hierarchical pyramid structure that most companies tend to adopt and seems to be the tyranny of business? [27:29] If Jillian were asked to be the Chief Culture Officer at Nike, what would her advice be to the C-suite? [29:40] What research is Jillian working on next? [31:41] What advice would Jillian give her younger self, prior to starting her career?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Jillian Grennan Jillian Grennan on LinkedIn Me Too Movement on Wikipedia “The Economic Implications of Corporate Financial Reporting,” by John R. Graham, Campbell R. Harvey, and Shiva Rajgopal “Corporate Culture: Evidence from the Field,” John R. Graham, Campbell R. Harvey, Jillian Popadak, and Shiva Rajgopal Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, by Adam Grant

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sept 2018

33 min 29 seg

Jillian Grennan is an academic with a specialty in corporate finance and she teaches at the Fuqua School of Business at the Duke University. She has produced some incredible work about looking at and measuring corporate culture without even being inside the firm. She has done a lot of research on culture to try and understand the value added by culture for firms and also has a strong corporate background that lends itself to her areas of expertise.   Economics, culture, culture measurement In this episode of The Culture Gap — the first of two episodes featuring Jillian — she shares more about why she approaches culture from the CFO’s perspective, rather than the CEO’s perspective. She also has some insights into how economics and mathematics contribute to culture and culture measurement, and about economics as a driving force in corporate culture. Jillian also discusses the topic of culture risk and the role of technology in shaping and driving culture in companies today. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Jillian Grennan. [1:29] Who is Jillian? [2:20] Jillian approaches culture from the CFO’s perspective, not the CEO’s perspective. Why is that? [4:09] What are some of Jillian’s personal values and how has her upbringing and background shaped them? [5:57] Why did Jillian choose economics and mathematics as her areas of study? [8:21] What is Jillian’s definition of corporate culture? What does it take for a person joining a new organization to fit in? [10:09] What is Jillian’s perspective about the levers of economics in driving corporate culture? [13:03] The topic of culture risk is very pertinent today. [16:55] A company’s culture is live on the internet right now. How much faith does Jillian have in data sets presented on the internet about companies?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Jillian Grennan Jillian Grennan on LinkedIn

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sept 2018

22 min 49 seg

Karen Wawrzaszek is a Certified Financial Planner, a social entrepreneur, and a community activist. She has over 20 years of experience operating at the intersection of business, wealth management, commerce, and social impact and has dedicated her career to connecting the professional space with the community.   In this episode of The Culture Gap — the second of two episodes featuring Karen — she shares more about millennials and how their mindset is driving culture change in organizations, as well as what millennials demand of the organizations they work for and how they impact other generations. Karen also gives her perspective on the #MeToo movement, what it takes to be a leader and the problems she hopes to solve through the Pomona Society, so be sure to tune in. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:42] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Karen Wawrzaszek. [1:13] What is social impact investing? [2:58] Karen shares more about the cultural shift in the mindset of millennials, as it relates to wealth transfer. [6:50] What would it be like as a millennial working for Karen? [9:05] Karen and Daniel discuss how millennials have adapted to the challenges heaped upon them with resilience. [11:13] Millennials crave feedback, not necessarily validation. How can companies incorporate this demand into their culture? [14:46] What is Karen’s perspective on the #MeToo movement? [17:05] What is Karen’s definition of leadership? What is a leader? [18:17] What is the problem the Pomona Society solves, and why was Karen attracted to solving this problem? [21:00] How will Karen measure success over time? [24:10] What advice would Karen give her younger self?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Karen Wawrzaszek on LinkedIn Pomona Society Me Too Movement on Wikipedia

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sept 2018

25 min 37 seg

Karen Wawrzaszek is a Certified Financial Planner, a social entrepreneur, and a community activist. She has over 20 years of experience operating at the intersection of business, wealth management, commerce, and social impact and has dedicated her career to connecting the professional space with the community.   In this episode of The Culture Gap — the first of two episodes featuring Karen — she shares more about her background in finance and what sparked her passion for community activism. She sheds light on the cultural norms in the finance industry, particularly with regard to wealth management, and how culture has changed as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. Karen and Daniel also discuss the role of collaboration and teamwork in the finance industry, and how organizations can move towards instilling these values. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Karen Wawrzaszek. [1:22] Who is Karen? [1:58] Did Karen’s passion for community activism start at an early age? [3:11] Who were some people who shaped Karen’s values? [5:52] What drew Karen to the field of finance? What was her experience as a woman in a male-dominated field? [9:17] Who were some people who “took chances” on Karen that made all the difference? [13:30] What is the culture like in the finance industry, specifically with regard to wealth management? [16:14] What has Karen learned about the role of collaboration and teamwork, and how to instill that value in organizations? [20:00] How did the financial crisis of 2008 bring about culture shifts in the financial industry?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Karen Wawrzaszek on LinkedIn The Culture Gap Podcast “Episode 1: Carly Fiorina, American Businesswoman and Political Figure (Part 1 of 2)”

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ago 2018

24 min 48 seg

Tim Kuppler is a world-renowned expert in culture management, with over 20 years of experience in the industry. After an illustrious business career, Tim now serves as the Director of Culture and Organization Development for Human Synergistics International (HSI), a pioneer in the culture space.   In this episode of The Culture Gap — the second of two episodes featuring Tim — he dives into the measurement of culture as well as the impact of technology and digitization on culture. Tim shares some key insights he has gleaned from his career and experiences, and some surprising takeaways about the connection between strategy and culture from his time at HSI. He also has some great advice to CEOs, board members and other leaders about the role of culture vs engagement. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Tim Kuppler. [1:20] Tim shares some case studies of how he has helped companies have epiphanies and how they have changed the company. [5:09] What is Tim’s advice to CEOs on giving sustained attention to culture, and why is it worth their time? [9:15] Tim shares some insights about digitization, the transformation in technology and its impact on culture. [12:31] Daniel and Tim discuss challenging the norm that failure is okay, and how companies can transition into the “fail fast, learn fast” model. [16:04] What is the most surprising thing that Tim has learned during his time at HSI? [18:01] What is the role of boards vis-a-vis culture, and what is Tim’s advice to board members and leaders about what their responsibilities are regarding engagement vs. culture? [20:40] What are the questions board members should be asking? [23:55] Tim shares some advice to CEOs who may be asking themselves if there’s a Me Too problem in their company. [27:02] What is some advice Tim would give his younger self?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Tim Kuppler on LinkedIn   Human Synergistics International (HSI) Leadership/Impact — Executive Development Edgar Schein Marc Benioff Me Too Movement

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ago 2018

29 min 22 seg

Tim Kuppler is a world-renowned expert in culture management, with over 20 years of experience in the industry. After an illustrious business career, Tim now serves as the Director of Culture and Organization Development for Human Synergistics International (HSI), a pioneer in the culture space.   In this episode of The Culture Gap — the first of two episodes featuring Tim — he shares his experiences and perspectives on corporate culture and the disconnect that sometimes exists in companies between beliefs and values and behavioral norms. Tim and Daniel also discuss what CEOs think about in the context of culture, what they should be thinking about, what it means to measure culture and how to transform organizations through measurement of culture. Welcome to The Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:45] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Tim Kuppler. [1:21] Who is Tim? [2:04] What are Tim’s core values and where do they come from? [3:14] How did Tim’s experience prior to HSI shape his current position as an evangelist for culture and culture change? [5:03] In Tim’s business life before HSI, were there examples of frustrating or toxic cultural norms he experienced? What was the impact of these experiences? [7:00] What is Tim’s definition of corporate culture? [7:47] Tim and Daniel talk through an example of beliefs, values, and behavioral norms. [9:08] How quickly do norms show up in businesses? [10:44] Tim shares more about HSI, and its work in relation to Edgar Schein. [14:48] Why does culture matter, and why should CEOs care about it? [17:09] How much education of CEOs does Tim have to do to help them understand the connection between culture and strategy? [19:29] Why is it so hard for some cultures to unite strategy and culture? [23:10] How can culture and engagement support and interact with each other?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Tim Kuppler on LinkedIn   Human Synergistics International (HSI) CultureUniversity.com The Culture Gap Podcast “Episode 1: Carly Fiorina, American Businesswoman and Political Figure (Part 1 of 2)” Edgar Schein Books by Edgar Schein

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ago 2018

25 min 57 seg

Nikki Barua is a serial entrepreneur who runs Beyond Curious, a digital transformation consulting firm focused on helping big companies be more agile and adaptive. She is a speaker, an author, and a change agent with a really big mission to touch a billion lives — someone who is inspired by human potential and wants to be a catalyst to unlock it.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, the second of two episodes featuring Nikki, she and Daniel discuss the role of communication in bringing people along as digitization and transformation wash over companies. They also touch on the #MeToo movement, and its impact in transforming culture, society and the global perspectives towards women in the workforce. Nikki also shares her inspiration and motivations for her book Beyond Barriers, her relationship with fear and moving past it, and so much more, so be sure to tune in. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Nikki Barua. [1:10] What are some best practices for leaders about being the evangelist for change vis-a-vis communications of the change? Nikki also shares her opinions on under-communication as a sub-domain of execution. [5:18] Daniel and Nikki discuss the distinction between digitization and transformation and the role the CEO plays in driving that change. [9:03] Nikki and Daniel dive into the #MeToo movement and its impact on society, culture, and the world in general, with regards to the equality women deserve in the workforce. [15:04] Who did Nikki write the book Beyond Barriers for and why did she write it? [17:41] What is Nikki’s relationship with fear? [20:28] Where can listeners get their copy of the book Beyond Barriers? [21:34] What is one piece of advice Nikki Barua would give her younger self?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Nikki Barua Beyond Curious “Closing the Gender Pay Gap” — 60 Minutes segment with Marc Benioff of Salesforce Me Too Movement on Wikipedia Beyond Barriers: How to Unlock your LIMITLESS POTENTIAL, by Nikki Barua The Culture Gap Podcast Season 2 “Episode 1: Carly Fiorina, American Businesswoman and Political Figure” The Culture Gap Podcast Season 2 “Episode 2: Carly Fiorina, American Businesswoman and Political Figure”

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jul 2018

24 min 38 seg

Nikki Barua is a serial entrepreneur who runs Beyond Curious, a digital transformation consulting firm focused on helping big companies be more agile and adaptive. She is a speaker, an author, and a change agent with a really big mission to touch a billion lives — someone who is inspired by human potential and wants to be a catalyst to unlock it.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, the first of two episodes featuring Nikki, she shares how her father was a key influence in her early years who inspired her to achieve the level of success she has today, as well as what she believes is the highest calling of not just a CEO, but any leader. She also has some great insights and advice for companies around the world in the intersection of culture, digitization, and transformation, and how to stay relevant in the age of change, so be sure to tune in for that. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:45] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Nikki Barua. [1:29] Who is Nikki? [2:01] What are some of the values that Nikki was born with or that came alive in her due to early experiences or influences? What are some of the values that shaped her into who she is? [4:50] Nikki shares her perspective on her father’s collage as an adult. [6:36] Daniel and Nikki share their perspective on their first interaction with each other, and Nikki’s vulnerability that made an instant impact on Daniel. [11:15] Nikki is a serial entrepreneur. How has her perception of the job of a CEO changed from before she became a CEO, and now? [13:25] It is the CEO’s job to define the vision of the company. What has Nikki learned about defining vision, and what is her advice to other CEOs about the process and journey of defining a bold vision? [16:51] What does Nikki’s company, Beyond Curious, do and who are the clients she works with? [19:19] What are some of the big revelations Nikki and her team have had about closing the gap between culture and strategy inside large organizations?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Nikki Barua Beyond Curious

jul 2018

26 min 25 seg

Shalom “Shal” Jacobovitz is currently the CEO of CiVi Biopharma, a brand new start-up, in his 4th CEO position. Shal was born in Israel, raised in Montreal, has lived around the world, serving in various organizations. He started his career in sales and marketing and has largely been in the field of cardiology and the pharmaceutical industry, eventually becoming the CEO of the American College of Cardiology from 2013 to 2018.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, the second of two episodes featuring Shal, he shares the lessons he has learned from his experience with governance reform and changing the culture of a company. Shal also highlights the importance of innovation, and the role of inclusion and encouraging employees to share alternative opinions in keeping an organization at the forefront of its industry. He has some great advice on how leaders should shape their vision for their companies, so be sure to tune in to find out more. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Shalom “Shal” Jacobovitz. [1:10] What was the process that Shal went through with regards to governance reform at ACC, and what did he learn from it? [5:49] Shal also changed the culture at the staff level. How did he change the culture to be more innovative, and how did this play out on the staff side as the governance process was transforming at the board side? [9:27] Can innovation be incentivized? [10:20] What has Shal learned about groupthink? [12:21] What is in Shal’s consciousness about the Me Too movement? [15:01] What is a biopharma company? [15:54] In his role at Biopharma, Shal gets to set strategy and design a culture from the ground up. How will he align strategy and culture as the company expands? [18:59] What are some behaviors that Shal is setting in motion now, that he hopes will continue to retain as the company grows? [21:46] How is Shal thinking about his vision for his company? [24:43] What advice would Shal give to his younger self, starting out in his professional career?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Shalom Jacobovitz on LinkedIn CiVi Biopharma, Inc. American College of Cardiology Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter, by Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie Me Too Movement on Wikipedia

jun 2018

29 min 19 seg

Shalom “Shal” Jacobovitz is currently the CEO of CiVi Biopharma, a brand new start-up, in his 4th CEO position. Shal was born in Israel, raised in Montreal, has lived around the world, serving in various organizations. He started his career in sales and marketing and has largely been in the field of cardiology and the pharmaceutical industry, eventually becoming the CEO of the American College of Cardiology from 2013 to 2018.   In this episode of The Culture Gap, the first of two episodes featuring Shal, he reveals the strengths that have allowed him to become a “serial CEO,” and his key takeaways from his time as CEO of various organizations. Shal also shares his thoughts on the role of the CEO in shaping strategy and culture, and how empowerment plays into it. He has some valuable insights about the future of membership societies, so be sure to tune in to find out more. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Shalom “Shal” Jacobovitz. [1:24] Who is Shal? [1:58] Shal is in his fourth CEO position. How did he end up as a “serial CEO”? [3:20] Who are some of the people that helped to shape Shal’s values as a person and a leader? [5:56] Shal shares his father’s teachings about fear and resilience as a weapon against fear. [6:48] Why did Shal get involved with cardiology? [9:30] Sales and marketing are where Shal started out in his career. Who were some mentors who taught him the basics of sales? [13:12] What did Shal think the job of a CEO was before he stepped into his first CEO role? [14:23] What is Shal’s definition of a CEO and what is their job? [16:20] What has Shal learned about bureaucracy and hierarchy and what it does/doesn’t do to accelerate ideas within a culture? [19:27] What is Shal’s reaction when people fail even when they have been empowered? How does he incentivize failures as learning moments? [20:55] Why was Shal interested in the position of CEO at the American College of Cardiology? [23:18] Shal shares his experience of the ACC helping the Chinese government? [24:28] In his time leading a non-profit organization, what has Shal learned about membership and what is the future of membership societies?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Shalom Jacobovitz on LinkedIn CiVi Biopharma, Inc. American College of Cardiology

jun 2018

28 min 17 seg

Carly Fiorina is an American businesswoman and political figure known most commonly for her time as the CEO of Hewlett-Packard, and her presidential run in 2016. She started out as a secretary and during the course of her long and illustrious career, worked her way up to become a Chief Executive of the largest technology company in the world. She has run for President, has run charities, and is a mother, author, and leader on many different fronts. In this episode of The Culture Gap, the second of two episodes featuring Carly, she talks about the lessons she learned in closing the culture gaps during her time at HP, and the other leadership takeaways it comes to enforcing company culture across the organization. She also shares her views on the Me Too movement and the importance of considering a company’s social impact. Carly has some words of wisdom about closing the gaps within American society to better engage in discussions about political issues. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Carly Fiorina. [1:14] What is the role that boards play with regard to setting and measuring a corporate culture, and then holding leadership teams accountable for the behaviors in the firm? [5:10] What happens to companies when they keep “culture vampires” around, and when leaders aren't willing to deal with such people? [6:44] What do all CEOs need to know and think about in the context of the Me Too movement as it continues to unfold? [9:15] What is the role of a corporation vis-a-vis profit vs. social impact? [12:55] One of the greatest divides in the country is that people can't have a reasonable conversation about policy in their own families. How can a conversation be started to close the gap where Americans can begin to listen to each other again? [15:22] What would Carly tell her younger self as she was just starting out?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Carly Fiorina Carly Fiorina on Wikipedia Me Too Movement on Wikipedia

jun 2018

19 min 7 seg

Carly Fiorina is an American businesswoman and political figure known most commonly for her time as the CEO of Hewlett-Packard and her presidential run in 2016. She started out as a secretary and during the course of her long and illustrious career, worked her way up to become a Chief Executive of the largest technology company in the world. She has run for President, has run charities, and is a mother, author, and leader on many different fronts. In this episode of The Culture Gap, the first of two episodes featuring Carly, she reflects on the lessons she has learned from life and career. Carly discusses what it means to be a leader and her key takeaways from her time before and during her tenure at HP. She also has valuable advice for leaders seeking to engage in dialogue with their team, and challenge the culture and status quo in an organization, as well as how to deal with fear and criticism as a leader. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Carly Fiorina. [1:18] Who is Carly Fiorina? [1:53] What are Carly's core values and how did those values come to her? [3:35] What is Carly's definition of leadership? What is a leader? [4:00] What are some of the most important lessons Carly learned as a rising businesswoman prior to her time at HP? [8:22] What was Carly's mental mindset about how she was going to lean in and discover how best to lead, in her first 90 days at HP? [11:17] Carly shares a critical experience when she came into HP. [13:29] Did Carly have ground rules for running her leadership team, for engaging in dialogue and conversation to ensure groupthink is avoided? [15:44] What is Carly's advice to CEOs now who are dealing with disruptions? How can they challenge a culture, but also be respectful of its history? [20:59] Carly has some insights about criticisms she faced during her time at HP. [22:46] How does Carly manage fear in her career?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Carly Fiorina Carly Fiorina on Wikipedia

may 2018

27 min 55 seg

Dr. Cliff Hudis is the CEO of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). A medical oncologist by profession, he spent three decades at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, one of the most iconic institutions in the world, and served as Chief of the Breast Medicine Service from 1998 to 2016. In June 2016, he took on the role of CEO at ASCO, where he gets to lead the conversation globally about where the profession is going. In this episode of The Culture Gap, Cliff talks about cancer, the gaps in knowledge that have been closed in cancer discovery and research, and what he has learned from his experiences. He also gives us insight into what it takes to lead a team of brilliant professionals to come together for a larger purpose, and the lessons he has gained as a leader driving strategy and culture change. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:45] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Dr. Cliff Hudis. [1:59] Who is Cliff? [2:47] Who were some of the big influencers in Cliff’s life that helped him become who he is today? He shares some of his background. [9:51] As a young oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, what was going through Cliff's mind? Could he have imagined the changes that occurred over the subsequent decades? [13:13] What are some of the gaps in knowledge that have been closed in cancer discovery, specifically breast cancer? Which of these gaps that have been closed have surprised Cliff the most? [20:30] What was it like for Cliff to be a young leader given an incredible authority and responsibility? How did he balance the individuals on his team and respect their autonomy, while still coming together as a group to discover something larger? [26:39] Cliff shares some of his experiences with his patients. [28:08] Why did Cliff want the job as CEO of ASCO? [34:59] Why did Cliff want to set a strategy in the earliest months of his tenure at ASCO, and what are the changes that have happened to the strategy since its inception? [40:41] If Cliff could have a conversation with cancer, what would he ask it? [43:49] What is Cliff's advice to other CEOs? [49:17] Cliff's wife, Jane, is a successful leader in the retail space. What is the best leadership advice Jane has given Cliff as he has taken on his role at ASCO?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Dr. Cliff Hudis The American Society of Clinical Oncology The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, by Siddhartha Mukherjee The Gene: An Intimate History, by Siddhartha Mukherjee

feb 2018

52 min 16 seg

Mitchell Reiss is the President and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He has a long and illustrious career in various areas – in the private sector practicing law, in the diplomatic space as the ambassador for the U.S.A. in Northern Ireland, in academia, in running Washington College, and for the past three years, in running one of the most iconic institutions in the U.S. In this episode of The Culture Gap, Mitchell shares the things he has learned as a new CEO, his thoughts on moral courage and its importance in an organization, as well as his insights on identifying and closing gaps between culture and strategy. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:42] Daniel’s guest for this episode is Mitchell Reiss, President and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. [1:38] Who is Mitchell Reiss? [2:10] When Mitchell arrived at Washington College, what was in his mindset of how he was going to bring the college into a 21st Century context? Who were some of the groups he met with early on, and why did he do that? [4:41] Mitchell shares his story of how he came to find himself in the kitchen of one of his predecessors. How did the slogan “What is best for Washington College?” become a part of the ethos of how Mitchell led the college? [6:25] The next segment focuses on the idea of moral courage. How did moral courage shape the vision statement for Washington College? What are its implications for driving employee behavior, and creating a sense of trust among people? Mitchell shares his thoughts on this very personal topic. [11:27] What was Mitchell’s mental model of a CEO as he took the helm of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in the first 60-to-90 days? [14:46] Mitchell takes us through the gap-closing process he undertook at Colonial Williamsburg, and the fundamental changes he made within the institution. [18:39] If the gap between the strategy and behaviors in the institution didn’t close, what would that mean for Colonial Williamsburg? [21:29] Mitchell convened groups of leaders across Colonial Williamsburg to define the organization’s vision and mission. How did his process in Colonial Williamsburg differ from his actions at Washington College? How did he empower his employees and deal with that empowerment in terms of letting go? [25:24] What is Colonial Williamsburg’s mission, and what does it mean? [28:22] What is the gap that is happening in larger America today? How can Colonial Williamsburg play a role in closing that gap? [34:05] What advice would Mitchell give himself on his first day at Colonial Williamsburg? [35:45] Mitchell shares some of his thoughts on what a CEO needs to succeed. [38:45] What advice does Mitchell have for other CEOs on how they should structure and begin to close the gap between strategy and culture? [43:15] What has surprised Mitchell the most about being the CEO of an institution? [46:12] What is the most surprising thing that a teacher visiting Colonial Williamsburg for the first time would discover?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE   Learn more about the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation HERE

feb 2018

48 min 12 seg

Kami Bond is the Senior Vice President of People at Uptake, a Chicago-based predictive analytics company that was recently valued at over $2 billion and was considered one of Forbes’ hottest startups in America. Prior to her role at Uptake, Kami has had a wonderful career in various companies such as Cielo Talent, Aon Hewitt, GE Healthcare and Sapient. She has been in the human capital space for about 20 years in technology or technology-enabled professional services organizations and is now a dedicated career-mom. In this episode of The Culture Gap, Kami talks about the importance of being authentic and real and about the need to develop the people in your team and organization. She discusses the possibility of pushing yourself to things beyond the limits you thought you could reach for and how a mismatch between the culture of an organization and individual values can result in a loss for both parties. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:43] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Kami Bond. [1:43] Who is Kami Bond? [2:35] What are some of Kami's deepest held personal values? Who are some of the leaders that have shaped the some of the values that Kami brings to her organization as a leader? [4:54] Kami has had a long career of working with diverse companies. What is Kami's mental model for people and culture, and identifying gaps that need to be closed through the strategy of the company? [7:55] What has Kami learned in her experiences about the role of communication in closing culture gap? [12:44] Daniel and Kami touch on the reality of the fact that getting company culture to where it needs to be is a full-on, dedicated process. [15:57] What has Kami learned about change management at GE, one of the most iconic companies in America? [20:40] Kami discusses whether the Chief Human Capital Officer is or should be, by default, the Chief Culture Officer? What role does the CEO or President have in this aspect? [23:22] How does Kami approach the duality of internal communications in culture, and the external branding at the same time? [24:52] In her career, Kami has been a champion to minimize and eliminate gender and diversity gaps inside organizations. While progress has been made, how much further do we have to go? [29:10] What is the regional role in terms of values adopted by a company? How does Kami intend to bring in other values that are not traditionally within the region as her company grows? [32:47] Companies need to be unapologetic about their culture and the fact that it is not for everyone. A mismatch between an individual's values and the company culture ultimately results in a loss for both parties. [35:04] How does Kami interpret Uptake’s CEO’s declaration about reducing drama, politics, and bureaucracy in the workplace and how does this translate into concrete actions? [39:53] From a culture and feedback perspective, how does Kami approach working with four generations in the workforce? What is her advice for a multi-generational workforce, with a special emphasis on the power of the Millennial generation? [43:58] What advice would Kami give her younger self?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE Podfly Productions   Learn more about: Kami Bond on LinkedIn Uptake

feb 2018

44 min 57 seg

Colonel David Sutherland served 30 years in the U.S. Army and retired in 2012. He is passionate about the veterans, military families, and families of the fallen. He is also the President and Founder of the Sutherland Partnership, an organization dedicated to developing leaders, values, and culture within other corporations and organizations. In this episode of The Culture Gap, Col. Sutherland reflects on over 30 years of either preparing for or being at war, in some of the most difficult circumstances. He shares his insights about the gaps that he has seen closed in strategy and culture from his time in the military and what he’s learning from being in boardrooms and working with CEOs around the country. He also reminds us of the sacrifices that men and women in the military made for our country, and the challenges they face reintegrating into society. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:45] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Colonel David Sutherland. [1:45] Who is Col. David Sutherland? [2:26] Why did Col. Sutherland choose a career in the military? [3:45] Why did the U.S. Army choose to tackle the issues of what leadership, ethical leadership and values-based leadership meant at the time that it did? Col. Sutherland shares some insights. [11:43] What was going through Col. Sutherland’s mind on the day of 9/11? Could he have imagined where we would be today, so many years after that day? [16:18] Col. Sutherland talks about how, in war, values come alive and stay alive, in the face of unfathomable conditions and immense fear. How does this apply to leaders in corporations and organizations? [20:29] What do commercial executives and leaders gravitate to the most, of what Col. Sutherland has learned about strategy and culture in the military? [23:07] What is Col. Sutherland’s advice to leaders and C-suite teams who choose a set of core values, to ensure that the gap is closed, and values do not remain as a plaque on the wall? [28:56] Col. Sutherland has been working on closing the gap at a society level on two fronts — between general society and the men and women who serve in uniform, and the disconnect that soldiers returning from the battlefield experience when reintegrating into society. What are the consequences if these gaps are not closed? [36:33] What do C-suite leaders need to know about embracing veterans into the ranks of C-suites as fast as possible? [40:15] What advice would Col. Sutherland give to his younger self? [42:04] What would Col. Sutherland want his grandchildren or future generations to know about war and peace?   Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE   Learn more about: Col. David Sutherland Gen. David Petraeus Adm. Michael (Mike) Mullen

feb 2018

43 min 44 seg

Tom Lynch is the current Executive Chairman of the Board of TE Connectivity, a publicly-traded technology company that designs and manufactures electronic and connectivity products used in a variety of industries. Tom has spent many years in business, serving as CEO of TE Connectivity from 2006 to 2017, and subsequently took on the role as Chairman of the Board at TE as well. In this episode of The Culture Gap, Tom reflects on an incredible career as CEO, from building leadership teams to his time as chairman of the board and the future of governance. He discusses the role of transparency, openness, and building trust in the success of a company, as well as what it takes to design a strategy, and to close the gap until every single leader globally knows and lives the strategy. He also shares some insights about making successful acquisitions and the importance of taking the long view of strategy. Welcome to Culture Gap.   Key Takeaways: [:41] Daniel introduces his guest for this episode — Tom Lynch. [1:10] Who is Tom? [2:00] Every leader is shaped by the values they grow up with. What are some of Tom’s personal values that have influenced his career? [3:45] When Tom was building his leadership team, what is the mental mindset he had? How does a CEO go about building his or her leadership team? [6:45] What is TE Connectivity? Where does it fit in the internet of things? [9:15] What does strategy mean to Tom? How was he able to align his leadership team with his strategy? [11:22] Tom took TE from a spinoff to a $13 billion global leader in the market, and TE now has operations across the globe. How did he create a strategy for his future state on a global scale? [17:35] Tom shares how important it is for leaders to communicate with and involve everyone in the organization in the strategy and goals of the company, as well as how their efforts contribute back to the overarching strategy. [20:57] Every leader tries to do the right thing, but mistakes are always inevitable. What has Tom learned about making mistakes in his tenure? [24:21] How does Tom think about acquisition inside a global company like TE? What are some of his insights on making acquisitions that work? [27:29] What have been the biggest differences between when Tom was the CEO and now, when he is a board member? [30:59] What are the questions that elicit the most dialogue from a leader and a leadership team? How does Tom invite conversation as a board member? [34:37] In the face of constant change in organizations and environments, what needs to change about boards and governance? Where do boards need to go to keep up with the changing times? [38:09] What are some things Tom has learned throughout his career? What advice would he give his younger self? [41:31] What is Tom’s advice for the younger generation who may be considering a career in business?     Brought to You By: The Culture Gap Podcast THRUUE   Learn more about: Tom Lynch TE Connectivity

feb 2018

45 min 19 seg