Rattlecast

Rattle Poetry

Rattle is a publication of the Rattle Foundation, an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to promote the practice of poetry, and is not affiliated with any other organization.

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David Kirby is the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of English at Florida State University. He has received many honors for his work, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his work appears frequently in the Best American Poetry and Pushcart Prize volumes. Kirby is the author of numerous books, including The House on Boulevard St.: New and Selected Poems, which was a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award in poetry. His Little Richard: The Birth of Rock 'n' Roll was named one of Booklist's Top 10 Black History Non-Fiction Books of 2010, and the Times Literary Supplement called it "a hymn of praise to the emancipatory power of nonsense." His most recent books are Help Me, Information and The Knowledge: Where Poems Come From and How to Write Them. Find the book and more at: https://english.fsu.edu/faculty/david-kirby As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a snake or serpent. Next Week's Prompt: Coin a word or a phrase, then make the the title of your poem. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Nov 29

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Brittney Corrigan is the author of the poetry collections Breaking, Navigation, 40 Weeks, and most recently, Daughters, a series of persona poems in the voices of daughters of various characters from folklore, mythology, and popular culture. Solastalgia, a collection of poems exploring climate change, extinction, and the Anthropocene age, is forthcoming from JackLeg Press in 2023. Brittney was raised in Colorado and has lived in Portland, Oregon for the past three decades, where she is an alumna and employee of Reed College. She is currently at work on her first short story collection. Find the book and more at: https://brittneycorrigan.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: “A guy walks into a bar” is one of the most common joke intros. Write a poem that starts with that line. (It does not have to be a humorous poem.) Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem about a snake or serpent. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Nov 22

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Ananda Lima’s poetry collection Mother/land (Black Lawrence Press, 2021) was the winner of the Hudson Prize. She is also the author of the chapbooks Vigil (Get Fresh Books, 2021), Tropicália (Newfound, 2021, winner of the Newfound Prose Prize), Amblyopia (Bull City Press, 2020), and Translation (Paper Nautilus, 2019, winner of the Vella Chapbook Prize). Her work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, Poets.org, Kenyon Review Online, Gulf Coast, Colorado Review, Poet Lore, Poetry Northwest, Pleiades, and elsewhere. She has served as the poetry judge for the AWP Kurt Brown Prize, as staff at the Sewanee Writers Conference, and as a mentor at the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Immigrant Artist Program. She has been awarded the inaugural Work-In-Progress Fellowship by Latinx-in-Publishing, sponsored by Macmillan Publishers, for her fiction manuscript-in-progress. She has an MA in Linguistics from UCLA and an MFA in Creative Writing in Fiction from Rutgers University, Newark. Find the book and more at: https://www.anandalima.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write an apology poem. Nextx Week's Prompt: “A guy walks into a bar” is one of the most common joke intros. Write a poem that starts with that line. (It does not have to be a humorous poem.) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Nov 15

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Clemonce Heard was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. He is the winner of the 2020 Anhinga Robert Dana Prize, selected by Major Jackson. His poetry collection, Tragic City, which investigates the events of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, is forthcoming from Anhinga Press in October 2021. Heard’s work has appeared or is forthcoming from Obsidian, The Missouri Review, Cimarron Review, Iron Horse, World Literature Today, Poetry, Rattle, Ruminate, and elsewhere. He earned a BFA in graphic communications from Northwestern State University, and an MFA in creative writing from Oklahoma State University. Heard was a recipient of a 2018-2019 Tulsa Artist Fellowship and was the 2019-2020 Ronald Wallace Poetry Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He currently lives in San Antonio, Texas, and serves as the Sala Diaz artist-in-residence. Find the book and more at: https://www.clemonceheard.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let’s do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. Next Week's Prompt: Write an apology poem. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Nov 8

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Ernest Hilbert’s debut poetry collection Sixty Sonnets (2009) was described by X. J. Kennedy as “maybe the most arresting sequence we have had since John Berryman checked out of America.” His other books include All of You on the Good Earth (2013); Caligulan (2015), which was selected as the winner of the 2017 Poets’ Prize; and Last One Out (2019). Hilbert currently keeps a heavily-encrypted dark web poetry site called Cocytus and a more public website to promote emerging poets called E-Verse Radio. Hilbert graduated with a doctorate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University, where he edited the Oxford Quarterly. Hilbert later served as poetry editor of Random House’s magazine Bold Type in New York City and editor of Contemporary Poetry Review, published by the American Poetry Fund in Washington DC. He works as an antiquarian book dealer in Philadelphia, where he lives with his wife, Keeper of the Mediterranean Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and their son, Ian. Find the book and more at: https://www.ernesthilbert.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a spooky poem for Halloween. Next Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let’s do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Oct 31

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Jenny Qi is the author of Focal Point, winner of the 2020 Steel Toe Books Poetry Award. Her essays and poems have been published in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Tin House, ZYZZYVA, Rattle, and elsewhere, and she has received fellowships and support from Tin House, Omnidawn, Kearny Street Workshop, and the San Francisco Writers Grotto. Born in Pennsylvania to Chinese immigrants, she grew up mostly in Las Vegas and Nashville and now lives in San Francisco. She completed her Ph.D. in Biomedical Science (Cancer Biology) from UCSF, where she studied novel drug candidates in preclinical models of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. She currently works with life science and biopharma groups as a competitive intelligence manager, with a focus on ovarian cancer. Find the book and more at: https://jqiwriter.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A ballad is a music-based poem that tells a story. This form isn’t especially complicated but it does have very specific requirements. Webexhibits.org has great instructions on how to write your own ballad. (If you google “webexhibits” and “ballad,” webexhibit.org’s “Make Your Own Ballad” page will be the first hit.) “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred Tennyson and “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer are examples of ballad poems. Next Week's Prompt: Write a spooky poem for Halloween. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Oct 25

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Joseph Fasano is a writer and educator. He studied mathematics and astrophysics at Harvard University before changing his course of study and earning a degree in philosophy, with a focus on philosophy of language after Wittgenstein. He did his graduate study in poetry at Columbia University, where he now teaches. Fasano is the author of the novel The Dark Heart of Every Wild Thing (Platypus Press, 2020), which was named one of the "20 Best Small Press Books of 2020." His books of poetry are The Crossing (Cider Press Review, 2018), praised by Ilya Kaminsky for its "lush drive to live, even in the darkest moments"; Vincent (2015); and Fugue for Other Hands (2013), which won the Cider Press Review Book Award. A winner of the Rattle Poetry Prize, he serves on the Editorial Board of Alice James Books, and he is the Founder of the Poem for You Series, a digital space offering recitations of listeners' favorite poems by request. He is also a songwriter, and his songs and performances can be found on his social media platforms. Find these books and more at: http://josephfasano.net/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem in second person. (One of the most famous poems written in second person: “Wild Geese” by Mary Oliver.) Next Week's Prompt: A ballad is a music-based poem that tells a story. This form isn’t especially complicated but it does have very specific requirements. Webexhibits.org has great instructions on how to write your own ballad. (If you google “webexhibits” and “ballad,” webexhibit.org’s “Make Your Own Ballad” page will be the first hit.) “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred Tennyson and “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer are examples of ballad poems. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Oct 18

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Mark Jarman is the author of eleven books of poetry. The Heronry is his most recent. He has also published two books of essays and reviews, most recently Dailiness. His book Questions for Ecclesiastes (Story Line Press, 1997) won the 1998 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Jarman's other awards include a Joseph Henry Jackson Award and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. In 2011, he received the Balcones Poetry Prize for Bone Fires: New and Selected Poems. He recently retired as Centennial Professor of English at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he lives with his wife, the soprano Amy Jarman. Find these books and more at: https://www.markjarmanpoetandcritic.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem without using articles (a, an, the). Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem in second person. (One of the most famous poems written in second person: “Wild Geese” by Mary Oliver.) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Oct 11

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Marissa Davis is a poet and translator from Paducah, Kentucky, now residing in Brooklyn, New York. Her poetry has appeared or will soon appear in Sundog Lit, Poem-A-Day, Glass, Frontier Poetry, Nimrod, Great River Review, New South, Southeast Review, and Mississippi Review, among others. Her translations are published or forthcoming in Massachusetts Review, New England Review, Mid-American Review, The Common, American Chordata, and RHINO. Her chapbook, My Name & Other Languages I Am Learning How to Speak (Jai-Alai Books, 2020) was selected by Danez Smith for Cave Canem’s 2019 Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady Prize. Davis holds an MFA from New York University. Find more the book and more at: https://www.marissa-davis.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: “To Autumn” by John Keats is one of the most highly regarded poems in the English language. It is richly imagistic and descriptive. Write your own ode to autumn. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem without using articles (a, an, the). The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Oct 4

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Deborah P Kolodji is the California regional coordinator for the Haiku Society of America and former moderator of the Southern California Haiku Study Group. The former president of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association, Kolodji is also is a member of the Haiku Poets of Northern California , the Yuki Teikei Haiku Society, Haiku Canada, the British Haiku Society, and the California State Poetry Society. Author of four chapbooks of poetry, her first full-length book of haiku and senryu is Highway of Sleeping Towns, from Shabda Press. Debbie has published more than 1000 haiku in publications such as Frogpond, Modern Haiku, The Heron’s Nest, Bottle Rockets, A Hundred Gourds, Acorn, Rattle, and Mayfly, as well as speculative poetry in Strange Horizons, Star*Line, and others. Her work has been anthologized in such publications as The Rhysling Anthology, Red Moon Anthology, Dwarf Stars, Aftershocks: Poetry of Recovery, New Resonance 4, and The Nebula Awards Showcase: 2015. Debbie co-organized the 2013 Haiku North America conference aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California, and joined Haiku North America as a director in 2016. Find more the book and more at: http://www.deborahpkolodji.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: You’ve been driving for hours on a long, empty stretch of highway. It’s miles and miles of nothing but desert landscape--no rest stops, no gas stations. Just when you’re starting to think you’ll never see civilization again, a building comes into view. What is it? Write a poem about it. Next Week’s Prompt: “To Autumn” by John Keats is one of the most highly regarded poems in the English language. It is richly imagistic and descriptive. Write your own ode to autumn. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Sep 27

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Rattlecast 110 features Vince Gotera and his new book, The Coolest Month. Vince Gotera is a Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa where he served as Editor of the North American Review (2000-2016). After that, he served as editor of Star*Line, the print journal of the international Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association. His collections of poems include Dragonfly, Ghost Wars, Fighting Kite, and the upcoming Pacific Crossing. Find more on Vince at his website: https://vincegotera.blogspot.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that contains an anagram. An anagram is created by rearranging the letters of a certain word or phrase to make another word or phrase—for example, an anagram of “anagram” is “nag a ram.” Bonus points if the title of your poem is part of the anagram. Next Week's Prompt: You’ve been driving for hours on a long, empty stretch of highway. It’s miles and miles of nothing but desert landscape--no rest stops, no gas stations. Just when you’re starting to think you’ll never see civilization again, a building comes into view. What is it? Write a poem about it. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts. Bonus Links Register for Tim's editor interview with Lit Mag News on Friday 9/17 here: https://litmagnews.substack.com/p/save-the-dates-upcoming-editor-interviews Register for Rattle's Poetry Day in Wrightwood here: https://www.wrightwoodarts.com/poetryday/ Find the Renaissance Heart performance featuring Francesca Bell and Douglas Manuel here (October 2nd in Los Angeles): https://stickfigureproductions.live/

Sep 13

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Gil Arzola’s first book of poetry, Prayers of Little Consequence, was published in 2019 by Passager, who named him their Poet of the Year. His story “Losers Walk” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2018, and other work has appeared in Dash, Palabra, Whetstone, The Tipton Review, The Elysian Review, Crosslimb, and Slab, among others. His chapbook, The Death of a Migrant Worker, is included for all Rattle subscribers with the fall issue. Find the chapbook here: https://www.rattle.com/chapbooks/the-death-of-a-migrant-worker/ Find his first book here: https://www.passagerbooks.com/prayers-of-little-consequence-by-gilbert-arzola/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem set in a time period of at least one hundred years ago. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem that contains an anagram. An anagram is created by rearranging the letters of a certain word or phrase to make another word or phrase—for example, an anagram of “anagram” is “nag a ram.” Bonus points if the title of your poem is part of the anagram. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Sep 6

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Brendan Constantine was born in Los Angeles, the second child of actors Michael Constantine and Julianna McCarthy. An ardent supporter of Southern California’s poetry communities and one of its most recognized poets, he has served as a teacher of poetry in local schools and colleges since 1995. His first collection, Letters to Guns, was released in February 2009 from Red Hen Press to wide acclaim. This was followed in 2011 by Birthday Girl With Possum, under the performance based publisher Write Bloody, and established Mr. Constantine as a poet equally at home on the page and the stage. His work can be found in many of the nation’s standards, including Poetry, Tin House, Best American Poetry, Poem-a-Day, Virginia Quarterly, Rattle, Prairie Schooner, Field, Chautauqua, and Poetry Daily. His most recent collections are Dementia, My Darling (2016) from Red Hen Press and Bouncy Bounce (2018), a chapbook from Blue Horse Press. He currently teaches creative writing at the Windward School. In addition, he brings poetry workshops to veterans, hospitals, foster care centers, & shelters for the homeless. He is also very proud of his work with the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project. Since 2017, he has been working with speech pathologist Michael Biel to develop the first poetry workshop for people dealing with Aphasia. Brendan has appeared in four issues of Rattle and was interviewed in issue #52. Find more info and all the books here: https://brendanconstantine.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A portmanteau is a blend of two words that combines their meaning. For example, brunch, spork, and sitcom are portmanteaus. Write a poem containing one or more portmanteaus. (Feel free to make up your own!) Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem set in a time period of at least one hundred years ago. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 30

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Marcela Sulak has published four titles with Black Lawrence Press–three poetry collections, including City of Skypapers (2021), Decency (2015) and Immigrant (2010), as well as her lyric memoir, Mouth Full of Seeds (2020). She’s co-edited with Jacqueline Kolosov the 2015 Rose Metal Press title Family Resemblance. An Anthology and Exploration of 8 Hybrid Literary Genres. Sulak, who translates from the Hebrew, Czech, and French, is a 2019 NEA Translation Fellow, and her fourth book-length translation of poetry: Twenty Girls to Envy Me: Selected Poems of Orit Gidali, was nominated for the 2017 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation (University of Texas Press). Her essays have appeared in The Boston Review, The Iowa Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Asymptote, and Gulf Coast online, among others. She coordinates the poetry track of the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Bar-Ilan University, where she is an associate professor in American Literature. She also edits The Ilanot Review and hosts the TLV.1 Radio podcast, Israel in Translation. Find more info and all the books here: http://www.marcelasulak.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about unrequited love. Next Week's Prompt: A portmanteau is a blend of two words that combines their meaning. For example, brunch, spork, and sitcom are portmanteaus. Write a poem containing one or more portmanteaus. (Feel free to make up your own!) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 22

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Edison Jennings lives in the southwestern corner of Virginia and works as a Head Start bus driver. He served thirteen years active duty in the Navy, and after separation he completed his education and began teaching and writing. His poetry has appeared in several journals and anthologies. He is also the author of three chapbooks, Reckoning, Small Measures, and A Letter to Greta. His first full-length book is Intentional Fallacies. Find the book here: https://www.broadstonebooks.com/shop/p/intentional-fallacies-poems-by-edison-jennings As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: I love the way Joni Mitchell’s song “Circle Game” uses the image of a carousel to illustrate the passing of childhood. Choose a symbol we associate with childhood innocence--a teddy bear, a jump rope, etc.—and let your poem unfold from there. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem about unrequited love. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 16

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Maria Mazziotti Gillan is a recipient of the 2014 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature from AWP (Association of Writers & Writing Programs), the 2011 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award from Poets & Writers and the 2008 American Book Award for her book, All That Lies Between Us (Guernica Editions). She is the Founder and Executive Director of the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College in Paterson, NJ, and editor of the Paterson Literary Review. Maria Gillan is Bartle Professor and Professor Emerita of English and creative writing at Binghamton University-SUNY. She has published more than twenty books of and about poetry, and has edited four anthologies. Her most recent book is When the Stars Were Still Visible (Stephen F. Austin University Press, 2021) Find more info and all of Maria's books here: http://www.mariagillan.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: At the library. Next Week's Prompt: I love the way Joni Mitchell’s song “Circle Game” uses the image of a carousel to illustrate the passing of childhood. Choose a symbol we associate with childhood innocence--a teddy bear, a jump rope, etc.—and let your poem unfold from there. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 9

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Rattlecast 104 features Roy Bentley and his new book, Hillbilly Guilt. Roy Glenn Bentley is an Appalachian-American poet and university creative writing professor. The lives of the poor in America are the primary focus of his work. He has been published in poetry journals as well as in four books of poetry and ten chapbooks. He currently resides in Pataskala, Ohio, in the USA. Roy Bentley's poems have appeared in Blackbird, Shenandoah, Rattle, The Southern Review, and Prairie Schooner--as well as many other notable journals and magazines. He is the recipient of a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and fellowships from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs and the Ohio Arts Council. Hillbilly Guilt is the winner of the Willow Run Poetry Book Award. Find the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Hillbilly-Guilt-Roy-Bentley/dp/0999491563/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A nonce form is one you make up yourself. Make up your own nonce form and write a poem using it. Be sure to include a short explanation of the rules. Next Week's Prompt: At the library. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Aug 2

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Rattlecast 103 features frequent contributor Jack Ridl and his two most recent books, Saint Peter and the Goldfinch and Practicing to Walk Like a Heron. As always, we'll start with a brief look at current events with Poets Respond Live, and the second hour will feature open lines. Jack Ridl taught at Hope from 1971 until retiring in 2006. He is the author of several collections of poetry, and has also published more than 300 poems in journals and has work included in numerous anthologies. He has given readings of his work and led workshops at colleges, universities, art colonies and other venues around the country. More than 85 of Ridl’s former students are now published authors, and nine of his students appeared in “25 under 25,” in blind judging, edited by Naomi Shihab Nye. Ridl grew up in both the world of basketball where his father was a well-known head coach at Westminster College and the University of Pittsburgh, and the world of the circus, inherited from his mother’s family. Ridl lives a short walk from Douglas Beach, arguably the most beautiful of Lake Michigan’s disappearing public beaches, with his wife, the writer and artist Julie Ridl, and a few barely domesticated beasts. His daughter is the artist, Meridith Ridl. Find the book and more on Jack here: https://ridl.wordpress.com/books/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: When the sun goes down at the county fair. Next Week's Prompt: A nonce form is one you make up yourself. Make up your own nonce form and write a poem using it. Be sure to include a short explanation of the rules. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jul 26

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Rattlecast 102 features long-time contributor Ace Boggess and hew new book, Escape Envy. As always, we'll start with a brief look at current events with Poets Respond Live, and the second hour will feature open lines. Ace Boggess is author of six books of poetry, including The Prisoners, Ultra Deep Field, and I Have Lost the Art of Dreaming It So, as well as the novels States of Mercy and A Song Without a Melody. He earned his B.A. from Marshall University and his J.D. from West Virginia University. He serves as Senior editor at The Adirondack Review and Associate Editor at The Evening Street Review. His poems have appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Harvard Review, Notre Dame Review, J Journal, North Dakota Quarterly, and many other journals. His awards include the Robert Bausch Fiction Award and a fellowship from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. In addition, he was locked up for five years in the West Virginia prison system, an experience which has been the basis for much of his writing. He currently resides in Charleston, West Virginia. Find the book and more on Ace here: https://aceboggess.wixsite.com/aceboggess As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that explores a common argument you have (with yourself or someone else). Next Week's Prompt: When the sun goes down at the county fair. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jul 19

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Rattlecast ep. 101 features our first returning guest, Bro. Yao, and his new book, One Shoe Marching Towards Heaven. This week's episode will jump straight to the guest with Poets Respond Live and the open lines coming in the second hour. Bro. Yao (Hoke S. Glover III) is the former founder and co-owner of one of the nation’s largest African American Bookstores from 1993-2008, and currently works as an Assistant Professor at Bowie State University in the Department of Language, Literature, and Cultural Studies. He is currently working on a book of essays called The Wuhan Soundtrack based on his experience living in Wuhan, China. He appeared on Rattlecast #12 with his first book, Inheritance. His most recent book is One Shoe Marching Towards Heaven. Visit his blog at: http://freeblackspace.blogspot.com/ For find the new book here: https://africaworldpressbooks.com/one-shoe-marching-towards-heaven-by-bro-yao-hoke-s-glover-iii/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem based on, or containing, an idiom. If you need help finding an idiom, try the idiom generator at randomword.com/idiom. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem that explores a common argument you have (with yourself or someone else). The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jul 13

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Rattlecast ep. 100 features Alison Luterman and her newest book, In the Time of Great Fires. As always, the first half-hour is dedicated to Poets Respond Live. Alison Luterman is a poet, essayist and playwright. Her books include the poetry collections In the Time of Great Fires (Catamaran Press), Desire Zoo (Tia Chucha Press), The Largest Possible Life (Cleveland State University Press) See How We Almost Fly (Pearl Editions), and a collection of essays, Feral City (SheBooks). Luterman's plays include Saying Kaddish With My Sister, Hot Water, Glitter and Spew, Oasis, Touched, and the musicals, The Chain (with composer Loren Linnard), The Shyest Witch (with composer Richard Jennings, and song cycle We Are Not Afraid of the Dark (with composer Sheela Ramesh). Alison Luterman was raised in Massachusetts, the oldest of four children. She began writing poetry at the age of six or seven and has never stopped. Since 2000, she has taught Memoir and Poetry through The Writing Salon in Berkeley, California, as well as at Esalen and Omega Institutes, at the Great Mother Conference, and at poetry festivals and conferences around the country. She lives in a rambling old house in Oakland where she tries and fails to keep the cat from clawing the couch, and writes poems, essays, plays, and song lyrics. For more on Alison Luterman, visit: https://www.alisonluterman.net/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem in which the speaker is aboard a moving train. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem based on, or containing, an idiom. If you need help finding an idiom, try the idiom generator at randomword.com/idiom. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jul 7

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Rattlecast #99 features Tina Parker and her new book Lock Her Up. As always, the first half-hour is dedicated to Poets Respond Live. Tina Parker is the author of three books of poetry. The poetry collection Mother May I and the poetry chapbook Another Offering were published in 2016. Her newest collection, Lock Her Up, is forthcoming from Accents Publishing. Tina’s work has received support from the Kentucky Foundation for Women. Individual poems have been published in Appalachian Heritage, Still: The Journal, Pen+Brush, Rattle, and Literary Mama. She grew up in Bristol, VA, and now lives in Berea, KY. For more on Tina Parker, visit: http://tina-parker.org/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem based on a folk tale or fairy tale. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem in which the speaker is aboard a moving train. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jun 28

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Rattlecast #98 features Wyn Cooper, whose poem "Smoke" appears in the summer issue of Rattle. As always, the first half-hour will is Poets Respond Live. Wyn Cooper has published five books of poetry, most recently Mars Poetica. His poems, stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, AGNI, The Southern Review, Five Points, Slate, and more than 100 other magazines. In 1993, "Fun," a poem from his first book, was turned into Sheryl Crow's Grammy-winning song "All I Wanna Do." Cooper has taught at the University of Utah, Bennington College, Marlboro College, and at The Frost Place. He is a former editor of Quarterly West, and the recipient of a fellowship from the Ucross Foundation. For two years he worked at the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute, a think tank run by the Poetry Foundation. He lives in Boston and works as a freelance editor. For more on Wyn Cooper, visit: www.wyncooper.com As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Macro photography is the close-up, highly-detailed photography of small objects or organisms—common subjects include an insect wing or a blade of grass. Write a “macro poem.” Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem based on a folk tale or fairy tale. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jun 20

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Rattlecast #97 features the former Utah Poet Laureate and Rattle Poetry Prize Finalist Lance Larsen. As always, the first half-hour will feature Poets Respond Live. Born in Idaho, Lance Larsen was educated at Brigham Young University, where he earned both his BA and MA, and at the University of Houston, where he earned a PhD in literature and creative writing. He is the author of several collections of poetry, including Erasable Walls (1998); In All Their Animal Brilliance (2005), winner of the Tampa Review Prize; Backyard Alchemy (2009), and What the Body Knows (2018). His poems touch on Mormon heritage while examining everyday encounters. Larsen has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and in 2012, the governor of Utah appointed him the state poet laureate. He is a professor of English at Brigham Young University. To order the book, visit: https://utampapress.org/product/what-the-body-knows As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A pivotal moment in your childhood. Next Week's Prompt: Macro photography is the close-up, highly-detailed photography of small objects or organisms—common subjects include an insect wing or a blade of grass. Write a “macro poem.” The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jun 14

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Rattlecast #96 features the editor of Light poetry magazine, Melissa Balmain. As always, the first half-hour will feature Poets Respond Live. Melissa Balmain is a humorist, journalist, and teacher. Since 2012 she has edited Light, the country's longest-running journal of light verse (founded in 1992 by John Mella). Balmain's poems have appeared in The American Bystander, American Life in Poetry, The Hopkins Review, Lighten Up Online, Literary Matters, Measure, Mezzo Cammin, The New Criterion, The New Verse News, Poetry Daily, Rattle, The Spectator (UK), Verse Daily, The Washington Post, and many anthologies; her prose in The New Yorker, The New York Times, McSweeney’s, Weekly Humorist, and elsewhere. A former columnist for Success magazine and other publications, she's the author of a memoir, Just Us: Adventures of a Mother and Daughter (Faber and Faber). Balmain has received national honors for her journalism, including the National Society for Newspaper Columnists humorous columnist award and multiple Pulitizer Prize nominations. She teaches at the University of Rochester and lives nearby with her husband and two children. Her poetry collection Walking in on People was chosen by X.J. Kennedy for the Able Muse Book Award. Her newest collection is The Witch Demands a Retraction: Fairy-Tale Reboots for Adults, illustrated by Ron Barrett (Humorist Books). For more on the author, and to order the book, visit: https://www.melissabalmain.com/ Visit Light poetry magazine here: https://lightpoetrymagazine.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a a poem in which an inanimate object or concept is personified. (See “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath for a great example.) Next Week's Prompt: A pivotal moment in your childhood. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Jun 7

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Rattlecast #95 features a contributor to last winter's issue, Supriya Kaur Dhaliwal, and her debut collection The Yak Dilemma. She'll join us at noon EDT, but we'll start with a half-hour of Poets Respond Live. Supriya Kaur Dhaliwal was born in the Himalayan town of Palampur, India. She studied at St. Bede’s College, Shimla; Trinity College, Dublin; and Queen’s University, Belfast. Her poems have been translated into Arabic, German and Italian, and have recently appeared in Ambit, Banshee, Gutter, Poetry Ireland Review, Poetry Jukebox, Poetry London, The Bombay Literary Magazine, The Irish Times, The Lonely Crowd, The Pickled Body, The Tangerine and elsewhere. In 2018, she was one of the twelve poets selected for Poetry Ireland’s ‘Introductions’ series. She is the 2021 Charles Wallace India Trust Fellow at the University of Kent. The Yak Dilemma is her first full-length collection. For more on the author, and to order the book, visit: https://www.supriyakaurdhaliwal.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a parasite—be as literal or figurative as you wish. Next Week's Prompt: Write a a poem in which an inanimate object or concept is personified. (See “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath for a great example.) The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts. Segments: 3:03 Richard Westheimer: "An American Jew Fails to Make Sense of the Carnage in Gaza" 12:35 Poets Respond Live continues 30:00 Featured Guest: Supriya Kaur Dhaliwal 1:33:15 Open Lines

May 31

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Rattlecast #94 features frequent contributor Kerrin McCadden and her new book, American Wake. Kerrin McCadden is the author of American Wake, coming in March, 2021, from Black Sparrow Press. Her debut collection, Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes, won the Vermont Book Award and the New Issues Poetry Prize. Her chapbook, Keep This to Yourself, was awarded the Button Poetry Prize. McCadden has received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and the Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry and the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, and in such journals as American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, New England Review, Ploughshares, and Prairie Schooner. She is associate director of the Conference on Poetry and Teaching at The Frost Place and associate poetry editor at Persea Books. She teaches English and Creative Writing at Montpelier High School in Vermont and lives in South Burlington. For more on the author, visit: https://www.kerrinmccadden.com As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Use the random article option on Wikipedia (go to Wikipedia.com and click on the “random article” link on the left-hand side of the page) and write a poem based on your results. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a parasite—be as literal or figurative as you wish. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

May 26

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Rattlecast #93 features frequent contributor Martin Willitts Jr. and his new book, Harvest Time. Martin Willitts Jr. is a retired Librarian living in Syracuse, New York. He was nominated for 15 Pushcart and 13 Best of the Net awards. Martin Willitts Jr. has 25 chapbooks including the Turtle Island Quarterly Editor’s Choice Award, The Wire Fence Holding Back the World (Flowstone Press, 2017), plus 21 full-length collections including the Blue Light Award 2019, The Temporary World. His recent book is Unfolding Towards Love (Wipf and Stock, 2020). He is an editor for The Comstock Review, and he is judge for the New York State Fair Poetry Contest. His newest book, Harvest Time, was just published by Deerbrook Editions. Buy Harvest Time here: https://www.deerbrookeditions.com/harvest-time/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a reverse poem—a poem with lines that can be read both forward and backward. Next Week's Prompt: Use the random article option on Wikipedia (go to Wikipedia.com and click on the “random article” link on the left-hand side of the page) and write a poem based on your results. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

May 19

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Rattlecast #92 features frequent contributor Michael Mark. Michael Mark’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Pleiades, Ploughshares, Poetry Daily, River Styx, Salamander, The Southern Review, The New York Times, The Sun, Verse Daily, Waxwing, American Life in Poetry, and other places. He was the recipient of the Anthony Hecht Scholarship at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. He’s the author of two books of stories, Toba and At the Hands of a Thief (Atheneum). Michael Mark lives with his wife Lois in San Diego. For more info on the poet, visit: http://www.michaeljmark.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: This Lithub article details the 32 “most iconic” poems in the English language. Read, or reread, a few and write a poem that replies to one of these works. https://lithub.com/the-32-most-iconic-poems-in-the-english-language/ Next Week’s Prompt: Write a reverse poem—a poem with lines that can be read both forward and backward. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

May 12

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Rattlecast #91 features Tanya Ko Hong and her latest book, The War Still Within: Poems of the Korean Diaspora. Tanya Ko Hong (Hyonhye) is a poet, translator, and cultural curator who champions bilingual poetry and poets. Born and raised in South Korea, she immigrated to the US at the age of eighteen. She is the author of four books, most recently The War Still Within: Poems of the Korean Diaspora (KYSO Flash Press, 2019), and is the recipient of the Yun Doon-ju Korean-American Literature Award. Tanya has an MFA from Antioch University and is a Ph.D. student in Mythological Studies at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She lives in southern California with her husband and three children. For more info on the poet, visit: https://www.tanyakohong.com/ Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Still-Within-Tanya-Hong-Hyonhye/dp/0998037567/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write an ekphrastic poem after one of the ten cards from Hermann Rorschach’s original 1921 inkblot test. Next Week's Prompt: This Lithub article details the 32 “most iconic” poems in the English language. Read, or reread, a few and write a poem that replies to one of these works. https://lithub.com/the-32-most-iconic-poems-in-the-english-language/ The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

May 5

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Rattlecast #90 features Janée J. Baugher and her new book on the creative process, The Ekphrastic Writer. In addition to The Ekphrastic Writer, Baugher is the author of two ekphrastic poetry collections, Coördinates of Yes (Ahadada Books, 2010) and The Body’s Physics (Tebot Bach, 2010). Her writing has been published in journals such as Tin House, The Southern Review, The American Journal of Poetry, Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, Nano Fiction, and The Writer’s Chronicle, and she’s read from her books at the Library of Congress. She regularly collaborates with choreographers, dancers, composers, and visual artists, and her work has been adapted for the stage and set to music at University of Cincinnati–Conservatory of Music, Contemporary Dance Theatre in Ohio, Interlochen Center for the Arts, Dance Now! Ensemble in Florida, The Salon at Justice Snow’s in Colorado, and University of North Carolina-Pembroke. Baugher teaches Creative Writing in Seattle, is the columnist at The Ekphrastic Review, and an assistant editor for the literary journal, Boulevard. For more info on Janée, visit: https://www.janeebaugher.com/ Buy the book here: https://mcfarlandbooks.com/product/the-ekphrastic-writer/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that starts and ends with the same line. Next Week's Prompt: Write an ekphrastic poem after one of the ten cards from Hermann Rorschach’s original 1921 inkblot test. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rorschach_test The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Apr 28

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Rattlecast #89 features 2013 Neil Postman Award winner Eugenia Leigh and her book Blood, Sparrows and Sparrows. Eugenia Leigh's Blood, Sparrows and Sparrows (Four Way Books, 2014), was winner of the Late Night Library's 2015 Debut-litzer Prize in Poetry as well as a finalist for the National Poetry Series and the Yale Series of Younger Poets. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications including The Rumpus, Ploughshares, Waxwing, Pleiades, North American Review, the Academy of American Poets' Poem-a-Day, the Best New Poets 2010 anthology, and the 2017 Best of the Net anthology. Eugenia received her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College, where she was awarded the Thomas Lux Scholarship for her dedication to teaching, demonstrated through her writing workshops with incarcerated youths and with Brooklyn high school students. Since her time at Sarah Lawrence, Eugenia has served as a teaching artist with a variety of organizations including the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund's undocumented youth group, RAISE. For more info, visit: https://www.eugenialeigh.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that begins with the following sentence: Pull over at the next stop. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem that starts and ends with the same line. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Apr 21

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Rattlecast #88 features Kim Addonizio and her new book Now We're Getting Somewhere. Kim Addonizio is the author of seven poetry collections, two novels, two story collections, and two books on writing poetry: The Poet’s Companion (with Dorianne Laux) and Ordinary Genius. Her poetry collection Tell Me was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her poetry has been translated into several languages including Spanish, Arabic, Italian, and Hungarian. Collections have been published in China, Spain, Mexico, Lebanon, and the UK. Addonizio’s awards include two fellowships from the NEA, a Guggenheim, two Pushcart Prizes, and other honors. Her latest books are a poetry collection, Mortal Trash, and a memoir, Bukowski in a Sundress: Confessions from a Writing Life. A new book of poems, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, has just been published. For more info, visit: https://www.kimaddonizio.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that contains the following randomly-selected adjectives: large, knotty, salty. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem that begins with the following sentence: Pull over at the next stop. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast.

Apr 14

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Alice Pettway is the author of The Time of Hunger (Salmon Poetry, 2017), Moth (Salmon Poetry, 2019) and Station Lights (forthcoming 2021). Her poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in AGNI, The Bitter Oleander, The Colorado Review, Poet Lore, Rattle, River Styx, The Southern Review, The Threepenny Review and many others. She is a former Chulitna Artist and Lily Peter fellow. Currently, Pettway lives and writes near Seattle, Washington. For more info, visit Alice's website: https://www.alicepettway.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a letter poem to an abstract concept. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem that contains the following randomly-selected adjectives: large, knotty, salty. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Apr 7

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Denise Duhamel is a distinguished university professor in the MFA program at Florida International University in Miami. Her previous books include Scald, Blowout, Ka-Ching!, Two and Two, Queen for a Day: Selected and New Poems, The Star-Spangled Banner, and Kinky. She is a recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her newest collection, Second Story, has just released from Pitt Press. Find Second Story here: https://upittpress.org/books/9780822966531/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem that explores what it would be like to be someone else. Next Week's Prompt: Write a letter poem to an abstract concept. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Mar 31

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Born in Louisville, Kentucky, Lois Baer Barr lives in Riverwoods, Illinois. A finalist for the 2019 Rita Dove Poetry Award, her chapbook Biopoesis won Poetica’s 2013 chapbook award, and her chapbook of fiction, Lope de Vega’s Daughter, is available from Red Bird Press. An emerita professor of Spanish at Lake Forest College, she is teaching creative writing in Spanish there in the fall of 2019. Her academic publications include two books, articles and reviews on Contemporary Spanish and Latin American fiction in journals such as Anales galdosianos, Hispania, Hispanic Review, and Romance Quarterly. Find more here: https://loisbaerbarr.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a serious poem in limerick stanzas. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem that explores what it would be like to be someone else. A correction from Lois: "I stated that Mary Zimmerman interviewed me for The Chicago Tribune but meant to say it was Transportation Editor Mary Wisniewski." The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Mar 24

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Wendy Videlock is the author of the full-length poetry collections Slingshots and Love Plums (2015), The Dark Gnu and Other Poems (2013), and Nevertheless (2011), as well as the chapbook What’s That Supposed to Mean (2010). Videlock lives with her husband and children in Palisade, Colorado. Find more here: https://www.wendyvidelock.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Give your poem a utopian or dystopian setting. Next Week's Prompt: Write a serious limerick. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Mar 17

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Anthony Tao‘s poetry appears in journals such as The Cortland Review, Prairie Schooner, Borderlands, Frontier, Kartika Review, Cha, Poetry East West, among other places, plus an anthology of China writing entitled While We’re Here. He has a “poetry x music” album called The Last Tribe on Earth, which features his original poetry with original compositions on the classical guitar by Liane Halton. He lives in Beijing, where he is managing editor of the New York-based online media company SupChina. Find more here: http://anthonytao.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Homophones are pairs of words which are pronounced the same way but have different meanings, such as “ball” and “bawl.” Write a poem that contains at least one pair of homophones. Next Week’s Prompt: Give your poem a utopian or dystopian setting. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Mar 10

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A.E. Stallings is an American poet who studied classics at the University of Georgia and Oxford University. She has published four collections of poetry, Archaic Smile, Hapax, Olives, and Like, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She also published verse translations of Lucretius’ The Nature of Things, Hesiod’s Works and Days, and the pseudo-Homeric Battle Between the Frogs and the Mice. She has received a translation grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and fellowships from United States Artists, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Having studied in Athens, Georgia, she now lives in Athens, Greece, with her husband, the journalist John Psaropoulos, and their two argonauts, Jason and Atalanta. Find more here: https://aestallings.wixsite.com/aestallings As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about one or more of the four elements: earth, water, air, and fire. Next Week’s Prompt: Homophones are pairs of words which are pronounced the same way but have different meanings, such as “ball” and “bawl.” Write a poem that contains at least one pair of homophones. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Mar 2

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Derek Sheffield is the author of Not for Luck, selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize, and Through the Second Skin, runner-up for the Emily Dickinson First Book Award and finalist for the Washington State Book Award. He is a co-editor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy. His awards include a special mention in the 2016 Pushcart Anthology and the James Hearst Poetry Prize judged by Li-Young Lee. Derek lives with his family on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Central Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org. Find more here: https://www.dereksheffield.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost is arguably one of the most famous poems in the English language. Write a poem that imagines a scenario in which the speaker takes the road more traveled. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem about one or more of the four elements: earth, water, air, and fire. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Feb 24

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Rebecca Starks is the author of the poetry collections Time Is Always Now, a finalist for the 2019 Able Muse Book Award, and Fetch, Muse, forthcoming from Able Muse Press. Winner of Rattle‘s 2018 Neil Postman Award for Metaphor, and past winner of Poetry Northwest‘s Richard Hugo Prize, she is a co-founder of Mud Season Review and a former director of the Burlington Writers Workshop. She works as a freelance editor and workshop leader; teaches in the Osher Institute of Lifelong Learning program at the University of Vermont; and is on the board of Sundog Poetry. In her spare time she takes her dogs for runs in the woods and plays violin in the Me2 Orchestra, in support of its mission to reduce stigma surrounding mental illness. She and her family live in Richmond, Vermont. Find more here: https://rebeccastarks.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a chance encounter with a stranger. Next Week’s Prompt: “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost is arguably one of the most famous poems in the English language. Write a poem that imagines a scenario in which the speaker takes the road more traveled. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Feb 17

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Alison Townsend is the author of two award-winning books of poetry, The Blue Dress and Persephone in America, and a volume of prose, The Persistence of Rivers: An Essay on Moving Water. Her poem "Pantoum from the Window of the Room Where I Write" won the 2020 Rattle Poetry Prize. Professor Emerita of English at the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, she lives in the country outside Madison. Find her books here: https://www.amazon.com/Alison-Townsend/e/B001JS5MN2/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Onomatopoeia is a figure of speech in which a word, when spoken, imitates the sound it describes; tick-tock, clang, or splash are examples of onomatopoeia. Write a poem that include one or more onomatopoeic words. Next Week’s Prompt: Write a poem about a chance encounter with a stranger. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Feb 10

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​Russell Brakefield is the author of FIELD RECORDINGS (Wayne State University Press, 2018). His writing has appeared in the Indiana Review, New Orleans Review, Poet Lore, Crab Orchard Review, Hobart, and elsewhere. He received his MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan’s Helen Zell Writers’ Program. He has received fellowships from the University of Michigan Musical Society, the Vermont Studio Center, and the National Parks Department. He teaches writing at the University Writing Program at the University of Denver. Find more at: http://www.russellbrakefield.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a tourist town during the off-season. Next Weeks' Prompt: Onomatopoeia is a figure of speech in which a word, when spoken, imitates the sound it describes; tick-tock, clang, or splash are examples of onomatopoeia. Write a poem that include one or more onomatopoeic words. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Feb 3

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Rattlecast #77 features former California Poet Laureate Dana Gioia. Dana Gioia is an internationally acclaimed poet and writer. Former California Poet laureate and Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Gioia was born in Los Angeles of Italian and Mexican descent. The first person in his family to attend college, he received a B.A. and M.B.A. from Stanford and an M.A. from Harvard in Comparative Literature. For fifteen years he worked as a businessman before quitting at forty-one to become a full-time writer. His most recent books are 99 POEMS: NEW & SELECTED and STUDYING WITH MISS BISHOP. Find more at: http://danagioia.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write an alphabet poem, a type of acrostic poem in which the first letter of each line spells out the alphabet. If you’re up for more of a challenge, write a double alphabet: the last letter of each line also spells out the alphabet, but in reverse order. Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem about a tourist town during the off-season. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Jan 27

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Rattlecast #76 features Jennifer Jean and her new book, Object Lesson. Jennifer Jean's poetry collections include OBJECT LESSON (Lily Books) and THE FOOL (Big Table). She's also released the teaching resource book OBJECT LESSON: A GUIDE TO WRITING POETRY (Lily Books). Her poetry, prose, and co-translations have appeared in: Poetry Magazine, Waxwing Journal, Rattle Magazine, Crab Creek Review, DMQ Review, Green Mountains Review, On the Seawall, Salamander, The Common, and more. She's been awarded a Peter Taylor Fellowship from the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop, a Disquiet FLAD Fellowship from Dzanc Books, and an Ambassador for Peace Award from the Women's Federation for World Peace. As well, she is the translations editor at Talking Writing Magazine, a consulting editor at the Kenyon Review, a co-translator of Arabic poetry and organizer for the Her Story Is collective, the founder of Free2Write Poetry Workshops for Trauma Survivors. Jennifer is the new Manager of the Fine Arts Work Center's 24 Pearl Street Online Writing Program; and she lives in Peabody MA with her family. Find more at: https://jenniferjeanwriter.weebly.com/ As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Dictionary.com named pandemic its Word of the Year for 2020. Users of the online dictionary elected unprecedented as the People’s Choice 2020 Word of the Year. Write a poem using both of these words. Next Week's Prompt: Write an alphabet poem, a type of acrostic poem in which the first letter of each line spells out the alphabet. If you’re up for more of a challenge, write a double alphabet: the last letter of each line also spells out the alphabet, but in reverse order. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Jan 18

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Rattlecast #75 features 2020 Rattle Poetry Prize Finalist Alexis Rotella and her most recent book, Dancing the Tarantella. Alexis received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Drew University, where she did her thesis on Zen Buddhism. She also received a Masters in Classical Acupuncture from The Academy for Five Element Acupuncture, as well as a doctorate in clinical hypnotherapy. In 1984, she served as the President of the Haiku Society of America and edited it's haiku journal Frogpond the same year. In 2009, she founded Prune Juice, an English-language journal for senryu. Rotella is the 2019-2020 honorary curator of the American Haiku Archives at the California State Library in Sacramento. She has authored or coauthored more than forty books and chapbooks, most of which have focused on haiku and related Japanese poetry in English. Find more at: https://alexisrotella.wordpress.com/ As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A circus with no audience. Next Week's Prompt: Dictionary.com named pandemic its Word of the Year for 2020. Users of the online dictionary elected unprecedented as the People’s Choice 2020 Word of the Year. Write a poem using both of these words. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Jan 13

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Rattlecast #74 features Marjorie Lotfi, a frequent contributor to Poets Respond, and her most recent book, Refuge. Marjorie Lotfi was born in New Orleans, spent her childhood in Tehran, then lived in San Diego, Washington DC and New York before moving to London in 1999 and Edinburgh in 2005. She founded and runs Open Book, which organizes reading groups in community settings and with vulnerable adults, and The Belonging Project, a creative writing project considering flight, journey, assimilation and belonging alongside the experiences of refugees and migrants. Her poetry examines journeys and questions of belonging, particularly relating to the experiences of refugees and migrants. Refuge takes its starting point as 1970s Tehran, in an Iran on the cusp of revolution, and explores ideas of flight, journey and assimilation. Find more on Marjorie at: http://www.marjoriegill.com/ Find the Open Book fundraising anthologies at: https://openbookreading.com/donate/ As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: We used randomwordgenerator.com to select three random words: fear, staircase, passage. Use all three words in a poem, or use the Random Word Generator to pick three words of your own. Next Week's Prompt: A circus with no audience. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Jan 5

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Rattlecast #73 features Skye Jackson, one of the 2020 Rattle Poetry Prize finalists, and her recent chapbook, A Faster Grave. Skye Jackson was born in New Orleans. She is currently an MFA candidate in poetry at the University of New Orleans Creative Writing Workshop where she serves as an associate poetry editor of Bayou Magazine. She is the author of the prizewinning chapbook, A Faster Grave, published by Antenna. Find the book here: https://www.antenna.works/product/a-faster-grave/ Find more on Skye here: https://www.skyejackson.com/ As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a poem titled “Astronaut.” Avoid using the words space, spaceship, stars, moon, rocket, planet. Next Week's Prompt: We used randomwordgenerator.com to select three random words: fear, staircase, passage. Use all three words in a poem, or use the Random Word Generator to pick three words of your own. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Dec 2020

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Rattlecast #72 features Amy Miller and her most recent book, The Trouble with New England Girls. Amy has appeared many times in Poets Respond and six times in Rattle's issues, most recently issue 67. Amy Miller's full-length poetry collection, The Trouble with New England Girls, won the Louis Award from Concrete Wolf Press, and her latest chapbooks are I Am on a River and Cannot Answer (BOAAT Press) and Rough House (White Knuckle Press). She won the Cultural Center of Cape Cod National Poetry Competition, judged by Tony Hoagland, the Jack Grapes Poetry Prize from Cultural Weekly, and the Earl Weaver Baseball Writing Prize from Cobalt Review, and has been a finalist for the Pablo Neruda Prize, the Tinderbox Prize, and the 49th Parallel Award. For more information, visit: http://writers-island.blogspot.com/ I Am on a River and Cannot Answer (free PDF): https://bit.ly/3ntVnxb Rough House (free): https://www.whiteknucklepress.com/amy-miller-rough-house As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a Clogyrnach, a syllabic Welsh form with six-line stanzas. Learn more about it here: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-poetry/clogyrnach-poetic-form Next Week's Prompt: Write a poem titled “Astronaut.” Avoid using the words space, spaceship, stars, moon, rocket, planet. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Dec 2020

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Rattlecast #71 features Sarah P. Strong and their new book, The Mouth of Earth. Sarah has appeared in seven issues of Rattle, most recently in this winter's. Sarah P. Strong is the author of two poetry collections, Tour of the Breath Gallery, winner of the Walt McDonald First-Book Prize (Texas Tech, 2013), and The Mouth of Earth (University of Nevada, forthcoming 2020), and two novels, The Fainting Room (Ig, 2013) and Burning the Sea (Alyson, 2002). Their poems have appeared in many journals, including The Nation, The Southern Review, Southwest Review, Poetry Daily, Rattle, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and The Sun. They are the recipient of a Connecticut Artist Fellowship Award, a Promise Award from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Elizabeth Matchett Stover Award from Southwest Review, and their work has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Sarah teaches creative writing at Central Connecticut State University and the University of Hartford. For more information, visit: https://sarahpstrong.com/ As always, we'll also include live open mic for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: A still life is a work of art depicting mostly inanimate and typically commonplace objects. Write a still life poem. Next Week's Prompt: Write a Clogyrnach, a syllabic Welsh form with six-line stanzas. Learn more about it here: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-poetry/clogyrnach-poetic-form The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Periscope, then becomes an audio podcast.

Dec 2020

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