PeerView Gastroenterology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education

PeerView (PVI) is a leading provider of high-quality, innovative continuing education (CME/CE/CPE and MOC) for clinicians and their interprofessional teams. Combining evidence-based medicine and instructional expertise, PeerView activities improve the knowledge, skills, and strategies that support clinical performance and patient outcomes. PeerView makes its educational programming and expert-led presentations and symposia available through its network of popular podcast channels to support specific specialties and conditions. Each episode includes a link to request CME/CE credit for participation. PeerView is solely responsible for the selection of topics, the preparation of editorial content, and the distribution of all materials it publishes.

All Episodes

Go online to PeerView.com/AZH860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in eosinophilic esophagitis discusses the latest research, data, and guidelines on novel and emerging targeted therapies. Upon completion of this CE activity, participants will be able to: Interpret recent developments in clinical research and treatment guidelines regarding the management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), Employ the latest clinical data, including evidence concerning novel and emerging targeted therapies, into treatment plans for the management of patients with EoE as they become available.

Nov 23

19 min 26 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/JEN860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, a panel of experts discuss clinical decision-making, current guideline recommendations for biomarker testing, and the potential utility of such testing in improving disease management and clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the latest clinical data informing the use of available targeted, immune, and chemotherapeutic agents in upfront and recurrent settings for patients with advanced/metastatic CRC, Summarize key clinical trial data on emerging agents and combinations for patients with advanced/metastatic CRC, and consider their utility in improving disease management and clinical outcomes, Apply current guideline recommendations for biomarker testing—including testing for RAS and BRAF mutations, MSI/MMR status, HER2 overexpression, and NTRK fusions—to guide the selection of targeted and immune-based therapies for patients with advanced/metastatic CRC, Implement personalized treatment algorithms for patients with advanced/metastatic CRC—including the consideration of clinical trial enrollment—based on clinical evidence, practice guidelines, and collaboration with members of the care team.

Nov 16

1 hr 10 min

Go online to PeerView.com/PGX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, experts in blood and marrow transplantation illuminate the roles of various members of the transplant team in the overall approach to diagnosing and treating VOD/SOS, while also offering learners a window into how hematologist-oncologists, transplant specialists, advanced practice clinicians, radiologists, pathologists, nurses, pharmacists, and other team members can collaborate to overcome the many challenges of VOD/SOS. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the clinical signs, symptoms, and medical burden of VOD/SOS to patients preparing for transplantation, Apply team-based approaches to risk assessment and diagnostic confirmation of VOD/SOS, including interpretation of clinical symptoms/disease onset and use of techniques such as ultrasound imaging or other strategies as appropriate, Use modern adverse event severity grading models to determine the presence and severity of organ dysfunction in patients with a VOD/SOS diagnosis, Recommend appropriate team management options for adult and pediatric patients with VOD/SOS in the post-HCT setting.

Oct 11

51 min 32 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/WNZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As the treatment landscape for gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers continues to evolve, patients with these heterogenous and aggressive malignancies are benefiting from improved outcomes. Targeted therapies, such as anti-angiogenic agents, have had a beneficial role in the second-line gastric and GEJ cancer settings after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy, while novel combinations with anti-angiogenesis agents, chemotherapy, and/or immunotherapy are showing promise in clinical trials. Furthermore, first-line therapy with an immune checkpoint inhibitor in combination with chemotherapy recently demonstrated improved outcomes over chemotherapy alone, and these data led to an FDA approval that is ushering in a new immunotherapy-based standard of care in the frontline treatment of newly diagnosed gastric and GEJ cancers. Join PeerView for an innovative, case-based activity designed to bring participants the latest data on established targeted therapies and emerging combination strategies for patients with gastric and GEJ cancers and expert guidance on incorporating treatment advances into day-to-day clinical practice. With a focus on multidisciplinary care of patients with gastric and GEJ cancers, the faculty panel will address selection and sequencing of treatment regimens along with symptom management, psychological support, nutritional considerations, and a variety of other issues that affect patients’ quality of life and outcomes. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the latest clinical evidence on established targeted therapies (eg, anti-angiogenic agents) and emerging combination strategies (eg, with chemotherapy or immune checkpoint inhibitors) for patients with advanced gastric or GEJ cancer, Discuss the clinical implications of recently approved and emerging first-line treatment strategies in the settings of advanced gastric or GEJ cancer that take into consideration the potential impact of treatment selection and sequencing beyond first-line therapy, Implement a tailored approach to treatment selection and sequencing over multiple lines of therapy, based on the latest clinical evidence, current practice guidelines, and patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific factors, for patients with advanced gastric or GEJ cancer, Integrate multidisciplinary, interprofessional, and holistic care strategies that address nutritional needs, emotional and psychological concerns, treatment-related adverse events, the risk of disease progression, and other issues into the management of patients with advanced gastric or GEJ cancer.

Sep 15

59 min 50 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/XRQ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this animated activity, an expert in obesity reviews current evidence for incretin-based weight-loss pharmacotherapy and offers evidence-based approaches to individualizing care for patients with obesity. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the pathophysiology of obesity and the role of weight-loss pharmacotherapy to address the metabolic adaptation that is related to weight loss, Evaluate recent evidence for current and emerging incretin-based weight-loss pharmacotherapies, including efficacy and safety data and anticipated effects in the context of obesity pathophysiology, Individualize the management of obesity consistent with current guidelines and in accordance with best practices in shared decision-making by incorporating incretin-based weight-loss pharmacotherapy as appropriate to overcome barriers to long-term weight-loss success.

Aug 6

24 min 46 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/FQJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, which is based on a recent live web broadcast, two obesity experts discuss weight-loss pharmacotherapy in the context of bariatric surgery as part of practical, case-centered sessions, designed to mimic the treatment considerations faced in real-world practice and illustrate how incretin-based agents can be used to individualize long-term obesity management and improve patient outcomes. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Recognize the roles of treatment options used adjunct to lifestyle interventions, particularly weight-loss pharmacotherapy and surgery, in addressing obesity pathophysiology, including metabolic adaptation, Assess the available evidence on current and emerging options in incretin-based weight-loss pharmacotherapies, including long-term efficacy and safety data, Integrate incretin-based pharmacotherapy into individualized, evidence-based treatment plans for long-term obesity management.

Jul 22

57 min 16 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/SXS860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, experts in GI cancer discuss current and emerging roles of immune checkpoint inhibitors in GI cancers, including their biologic rationale and the latest practice-informing clinical trial evidence. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for and current guidelines regarding the biomarker-guided use of immune checkpoint inhibitors, including via testing for PD-L1, MMR/MSI status, TMB, and other molecular features, in appropriate patients with advanced GI cancers, Evaluate the most recent clinical trial data on validated dual- and single-agent immune checkpoint inhibitor strategies for patients with advanced GI cancers, Summarize emerging evidence and current guideline recommendations on the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors as part of novel combination regimens and in earlier disease, including first-line and perioperative settings, for patients with GI cancers, Apply recent evidence and guideline recommendations on the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors to the management of patients with early- to advanced-stage GI cancers, including the option of clinical trial participation when appropriate.

Jul 21

1 hr 4 min

Go online to PeerView.com/PSN860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. As key members of the interdisciplinary care team, thoracic surgeons play an essential role in collaborating and coordinating with their colleagues from other specialties to assess and manage patients with esophageal/GEJ cancer and determine the most appropriate treatment plans based on new evidence inclusive of local and systemic treatment modalities. Thoracic surgeons must also engage patients in shared decision-making to select appropriate treatment according to stage, tumor characteristics, and patient values and preferences, among other key factors. This activity will provide a comprehensive, practically oriented, multidisciplinary overview on the expanding role of immunotherapy in esophageal and GEJ cancer. The experts discuss essential evidence supporting clinical decisions and offer practical guidance on key clinical issues concerning the continued integration of immunotherapy into individualized management plans for patients with esophageal/GEJ cancer. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the biologic rationale for the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the multimodal treatment of locally advanced and early-stage esophageal/GEJ cancer, Appraise the latest safety and efficacy evidence and guideline recommendations on the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with locally advanced or early-stage esophageal/GEJ cancer, Implement a collaborative care model among surgical, medical, and radiation oncology specialists and the greater multidisciplinary team to integrate immunotherapy into multimodal treatment plans for eligible patients with locally advanced or early-stage esophageal/GEJ cancer based on recent evidence, patient- and disease-related factors, and guideline recommendations.

Jun 23

58 min 44 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/CYY860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Cancer immunotherapies have transformed the treatment of many tumors. With the remarkable expansion of checkpoint inhibitors and combinations across the cancer spectrum, reliable predictive biomarkers are essential to guide clinical decisions about treatment selection. PD-L1 expression is the most established immunotherapy biomarker, and several others are in clinical use or showing promise. However, many research questions and practical challenges remain about biomarker testing, scoring, and interpretation in different tumors to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapies. This PeerView Clinical and Laboratory Accelerator based on a recent web broadcast provides practical guidance for navigating the complexities of cancer immunotherapy biomarker testing. Oncology and pathology experts focus on the nuances of PD-L1 expression assessment, along with other relevant biomarkers, in different solid tumors and how to use this information to direct clinical decisions regarding treatment selection for appropriate patients. Ongoing research efforts and innovations to refine and expand the role of cancer immunotherapy biomarkers are explored as well. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Assess the latest evidence on PD-L1 as a pan-tumor biomarker and the rationale for its use to predict benefit from cancer immunotherapies, Analyze practical considerations and complexities of PD-L1 biomarker testing and interpretation, including benefits/limitations of different testing methodologies/platforms/assays, standardization/harmonization options, cut points, digital pathology, artificial intelligence/machine learning, and other nuances, Incorporate the latest evidence and recommendations for PD-L1 biomarker testing in clinical and laboratory settings across tumor types, Integrate appropriate strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration and coordination among all members of the healthcare team to optimize the selection and interpretation of PD-L1 biomarker testing to guide clinical decision-making.

Jun 21

1 hr 33 min

Go online to PeerView.com/GAQ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in immuno-oncology discusses modern management of patients with a range of cancers using immune checkpoint inhibitors, focusing on dosing and administration schedules based on the latest safety and efficacy considerations. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Describe the mechanisms of action, rationale, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and established and updated dosing recommendations for available immune checkpoint inhibitors and combination therapies for patients with cancer, Identify key safety and efficacy considerations among other pros and cons related to immunotherapy dosing and dose schedules, particularly with regard to extended-interval dosing, flipped dosing, dosing based on tumor type, and dose modification to minimize toxicity, Develop a plan to personalize immunotherapy selection, dosing, and administration for patients with cancer, taking into account pros and cons of relevant standard and alternative dosing approaches, current recommendations, appropriate immune-related adverse event monitoring strategies, and the clinical constraints that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jun 18

27 min 5 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/FFU860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Modern precision oncology practice relies on detecting molecular alterations that drive specific cancers to target them with matched therapies that yield the best possible outcomes for patients. HER2 alterations are key therapeutic targets in breast cancer, as well as in gastric, colorectal, and non–small cell lung cancers, among other solid tumors. In addition to established HER2-targeted therapies, a number of new agents with unique mechanisms of action have recently received regulatory approval, and further investigations are ongoing. HER3 and TROP2 are also emerging therapeutic targets in several cancers for which novel therapeutics are being developed. This PeerView educational activity based on a recent web broadcast reviews relevant HER2 alterations along with HER3 and TROP2 as targets of interest in different tumors, assesses recent therapeutic advances, and provides practical guidance for optimal testing and interpretation of results to guide therapeutic decisions. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe HER2, HER3, and other emerging therapeutically targetable alterations relevant in different cancers, and evolving testing approaches to identify these alterations, Discuss the characteristics, mechanisms of action, and clinical evidence on approved and emerging HER2-targeted therapeutic agents for the treatment of patients with HER2-altered solid tumors, as well as available data on emerging therapies targeting HER3 and other novel targets, Implement relevant methods and best practices for predictive testing to facilitate effective integration of the latest HER2-targeted and other promising therapies into personalized management plans for appropriate patients with solid tumors either in the context of clinical practice or clinical trials.

Jun 11

51 min 4 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/DCZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. With several available treatment modalities, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires a multidisciplinary approach that is based on disease stage and patient factors. The role of the interventional radiologist, always vital in managing intermediate-stage disease via locoregional approaches, has become increasingly more important in the treatment of advanced-stage disease, as oncologists, interventional radiologists, and transplant hepatologists work together to improve patient outcomes. Join PeerView’s multidisciplinary team of liver cancer experts for an in-depth analysis of the latest data on approved and emerging systemic treatment options for HCC and recent evidence on locoregional and multimodal approaches in various treatment settings. Through an engaging “tumor board” discussion, the expert panel will draw upon their clinical experience to provide guidance on optimal selection and transition between locoregional and systemic therapies, with a focus on guideline recommendations, underlying liver disease, biomarker information, and other patient-related factors. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the safety and efficacy of available systemic treatment options, including multikinase inhibitors, anti-angiogenic agents, and checkpoint inhibitors alone and in combinations, across multiple lines of therapy for patients with advanced HCC, Review the latest evidence and ongoing trials on established and emerging combination approaches (eg, dual immune checkpoint blockade, immunotherapy plus targeted therapy, systemic agents plus locoregional therapy) for patients with intermediate- and advanced-stage HCC, Develop safe and effective multidisciplinary treatment plans for patients with intermediate- and advanced-stage HCC that are based on expert guidance, available evidence, underlying liver disease factors, biomarker information, and recommendations on timely transitions from locoregional to systemic options.

Jun 11

41 min 12 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/HKY860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, a leading expert in the management of acute hepatic porphyria (AHP) discusses recent evidence and recommendations for treating AHP and highlights the rationale and role of a new siRNA-based therapeutic option. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Recognize AHP and associated disease burdens that may be experienced by patients (eg, health impact, quality of life, daily activities), Describe evidence-based interventions for AHP, including the rationale and trial data for recently approved siRNA therapy, Apply evidence-based diagnostic and treatment approaches to minimize disease impact and burden for individuals with AHP.

Jun 2

31 min 57 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/URQ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, a vascular medicine expert discusses real-world evidence (RWE) for treating patients with or at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Explain the role of RWE and the impact it may have on improving care and outcomes in patients with VTE, Assess the quality and validity of the evidence collected as part of real-world studies comparing the DOACs with warfarin in patients with VTE (eg, efficacy, safety, cost-effectiveness, quality of life), Incorporate RWE into clinical decision-making for patients with VTE to design individualized treatment plans, especially for patients who may not be well represented in randomized clinical trials.

May 10

26 min 52 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/ZKC860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, experts in oncology and respiratory medicine share insights on how to best integrate novel blood-based cancer diagnostic technologies into clinical practice in order to facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment initiation.Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Review the scientific principles of liquid biopsy as a tool for cancer diagnosis, including relevant biomarkers, as well as strengths and limitations compared with conventional diagnostic techniques, Describe the role and clinical implications of emerging blood-based diagnostic aids for cancer in secondary and tertiary care settings, Adapt current diagnostic workflows for cancer based on recent evidence on emerging blood-based diagnostic tests in an effort to expedite cancer discovery and subsequent treatment, Apply a patient-centered approach to the diagnosis and transition of care for patients with cancer, including educating patients on potential blood-based testing options.

Apr 30

27 min 50 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/AXW860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Experts in liver cancer discuss changes to the treatment algorithm for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with an emphasis on selecting and sequencing treatment strategies based on the evidence, guidelines, and patient-related factors. Topics include pivotal safety and efficacy data on multikinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents, and immune checkpoint inhibitors used as monotherapy and in combinations with other immunotherapeutic agents or TKIs, clinical trials testing novel strategies and systemic therapies in various settings, and insights from the faculty members on translating treatment advances into clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review pivotal safety and efficacy data on available multikinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents, single-agent checkpoint inhibitors, and immunotherapy combinations as first- and second-line treatment options for advanced HCC, Assess the validated and potential roles of immune checkpoint inhibitors, including strategies of monotherapy, dual checkpoint inhibition, and combination with targeted therapy, in the advanced HCC disease setting, Summarize ongoing clinical trials testing systemic therapies in the adjuvant setting and in combination with locoregional therapies across the disease spectrum of HCC, Develop safe and effective personalized treatment algorithms for patients with HCC, across multiple lines of therapy, based on current clinical evidence, guideline recommendations, treatment history, underlying liver disease, AFP levels, and individual patient needs.

Mar 17

34 min 16 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/PXC860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In recent years, the identification and development of targeted therapies that address specific driver alterations—such as HER2/3 amplification and PD-L1 amplification, among others—has reshaped our approach to cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, opening opportunities for personalized medicine for patients with advanced disease. This innovative educational activity will highlight the importance of molecular testing, help synthesize the latest advances of novel therapeutics, and provide practical guidance on the role and use of current and molecular-directed strategies in gastric, colorectal, and other GI cancers. Brief scientific segments will be coupled with "Translating Science, Transforming My Practice" segments, which will offer a personal look at the way experts translate and interpret emerging scientific data as they look to adopt newer therapeutic strategies into practice and optimally navigate patient care for individuals with GI cancers. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the rationale for a biomarker-driven approach to therapy in gastric, colorectal, and other GI cancers, such as the use of HER2, BRAF, NTRK, PD-L1, FGFR, MSI, and TMB status, Review expert and guideline-based recommendations to accurately test for biomarkers in GI cancers that can guide appropriate treatment selection, Assess the latest safety and efficacy data on established and emerging targeted therapeutics for gastric, colorectal and other GI cancers, such as HER2-directed antibody-drug conjugates, BRAF inhibitors, NTRK inhibitors, FGFR inhibitors, PARP inhibitors, checkpoint inhibitors, and others, Develop personalized treatment plans, utilizing validated or emerging therapeutic strategies, for patients with advanced GI cancers based on treatment history, biomarker status, performance status, and patient preferences.

Mar 1

1 hr 39 min

Go online to PeerView.com/UFG860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated superior benefits in a spectrum of GI malignancies, including colorectal, esophageal, and gastric cancers. In this educational activity, experts will present a MasterClass featuring in-depth analysis of the latest evidence on the present and future use of checkpoint inhibitors in the management of GI cancers, along with practical guidance on incorporating these agents into clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the rationale for use of checkpoint inhibitors, including when testing for PD-L1, MMR/MSI status, and other predictors of response is needed, across the spectrum of GI cancers, Appraise the latest safety and efficacy evidence on available dual and single agent checkpoint inhibition strategies for patients with advanced GI cancers, including gastric, esophageal, GEJ, and colorectal cancers, Review emerging data regarding the use of checkpoint inhibitors in combination regimens and in early treatment settings, including first-line and perioperative settings, for patients with GI cancers, Develop safe and effective treatment plans incorporating immune checkpoint inhibitors, including enrollment within clinical trials, for eligible patients with advanced and earlier-stage GI cancers.

Feb 26

1 hr 29 min

Go online to PeerView.com/MHP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, two experts in anticoagulation and bleeding mitigation discuss evidence-based strategies for safe reversal of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) therapy.Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review current guidance regarding appropriate and safe reversal of DOACs, Explain the mechanisms of action of current and emerging DOAC reversal agents and universal antidotes to factor Xa inhibitors, Critically evaluate recent clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety data pertaining to the use of current and emerging DOAC reversal agents.

Feb 12

28 min 32 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/BFV860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in cardiovascular diseases and heart failure (HF) research presents a patient case to explore current evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing iron deficiency (ID) to encourage timely and appropriate treatment to improve outcomes in patients with HF. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the prevalence of ID in patients with HF and its impact on patient outcomes and quality of life, Interpret laboratory results for diagnosing and monitoring iron status in patients with HF, Apply current clinical guidelines and clinical trial results for iron therapies to improve outcomes in patients with ID and HF.

Jan 8

35 min 34 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/CWP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is in the midst of a therapeutic paradigm shift. Partial hepatectomy, liver transplantation, ablation, radiation therapy, and embolization procedures remain important interventions for localized HCC, whereas sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, was the cornerstone of therapy for patients with extrahepatic disease. Recently, several single and combination agents (eg, atezolizumab with bevacizumab, cabozantinib, lenvatinib, nivolumab with and without ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, ramucirumab, regorafenib) have been approved and validated for treating patients with advanced HCC. Moreover, several emerging trials (eg, CheckMate -9DW, HIMALAYA, LEAP-002, and COSMIC-312) indicate that therapeutic advances for this malignancy are increasingly centered around exploiting the benefits of combination regimens with immunotherapy, as well as investigating innovative strategies such as adjuvant immunotherapy, tumor-treating fields, and combinations of systemic agents with locoregional therapies like TACE and TARE. This MasterClass and Tumor Board program will pair insightful commentary on cutting-edge science that has validated innovative systemic options in HCC with clinical insights from different disciplines. Each Tumor Board discussion will feature reflective case-centered discussion on the increasingly important role that hepatology professionals play for patients across the HCC continuum. This activity features an in-depth examination of how the HCC management team can successfully collaborate to offer the best possible care for their patients. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review the key clinical evidence on available systemic treatments, including multikinase, immune checkpoint, and anti-angiogenic inhibitors, for advanced HCC, Assess available and emerging combination strategies, such as targeted therapies with immunotherapy, dual checkpoint inhibition, and systemic agents with locoregional modalities across the disease spectrum of HCC, Develop personalized therapeutic plans in the first and subsequent lines of treatment for patients with advanced HCC, Incorporate multidisciplinary care approaches for the optimal management of patients with HCC, including those along the intermediate-to-advanced stage disease continuum.

Jan 4

1 hr 32 min

Go online to PeerView.com/QBE860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this CME/MOC-accredited video activity, Josep Tabernero, MD, PhD, gives his perspective on the latest evidence on novel HER2-targeted and other molecular-directed therapies in gastric cancer. Hear about recent data presented on gastric cancer and how precision medicine may improve gastric cancer patient care. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review the biologic rationale for targeting molecular signatures of gastric cancer, such as HER2 or PD-L1 overexpression, Examine expert and guideline-based biomarker testing recommendations in gastric cancer that can guide optimal treatment selection, Assess the latest safety and efficacy evidence of novel therapeutics for gastric cancer, such as checkpoint inhibitors, cytotoxic agents, and HER2-directed antibody-drug conjugates, Develop safe and effective validated or emerging therapeutic strategies for advanced gastric/GEJ cancers based on treatment history, patient preference, performance status, and biomarker status for patients who have progressed following first-line treatment.

Nov 2020

35 min 26 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/VJP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, oncology experts explore the potential of the next wave of novel HER2-targeting therapies in various HER2-altered cancers, including breast, gastrointestinal, lung, and other tumors. Watch as the panel share their insights into the data that support therapeutic targeting of HER2 and consider other critical research questions and future directions. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review evidence-based guidelines and expert recommendations regarding HER2 testing and interpretation of results in breast, gastric, colorectal, and non–small cell lung cancers, Evaluate the characteristics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy/safety evidence of established and emerging HER2-targeted agents for the management of patients with advanced HER2-expressing or ERBB2-mutant cancers, Identify novel approaches to overcome mechanisms of resistance to HER2-targeted therapies, Integrate the latest HER2-targeted therapies into individualized treatment plans for patients with advanced HER2-expressing or ERBB2-mutant breast, gastric, colorectal, and non–small cell lung cancers, either in the context of clinical practice or through clinical trial participation.

Sep 2020

1 hr 29 min

Go online to PeerView.com/VBJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this new CME/MOC-accredited video activity, Josep Tabernero, MD, PhD; Geoffrey Ku, MD; and Kohei Shitara, MD, synthesize the latest data of emerging and available novel therapies and consider the future of gastric cancer care. These experts also examine best practices for testing biomarkers such as HER2, PD-L1, and MSI, and provide guidance on integrating scientific advances and novel therapeutics into sound, evidence-based management strategies to improve outcomes for patients with gastric cancer. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review the biologic rationale for targeting molecular signatures of gastric cancer, such as HER2 or PD-L1 overexpression, Examine expert and guideline-based biomarker testing recommendations in gastric cancer that can guide optimal treatment selection, Assess the latest safety and efficacy evidence of novel therapeutics for gastric cancer, such as checkpoint inhibitors, cytotoxic agents, and HER2-directed antibody-drug conjugates, Develop safe and effective validated or emerging therapeutic strategies for advanced gastric/GEJ cancers based on treatment history, patient preference, performance status, and biomarker status for patients who have progressed following first-line treatment.

Aug 2020

58 min 49 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/BBD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Targeted therapies have had a beneficial role in the advanced gastric or GEJ cancer setting, and several novel strategies of combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy are evolving the treatment landscape. While medicine continues to scientifically advance, the holistic care of patients with gastric/GEJ cancers is becoming more complex, and factors such as symptom management, psychological support, and nutritional considerations, in addition to effective treatment selection, need to be considered to offer the best clinical and quality of life outcomes to patients. This three-part educational activity offers learners an exclusive look at how science and care merge in the clinic to enhance the multidisciplinary, multidirectional management of patients with gastric/GEJ cancers. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Summarize clinical evidence on established targeted therapies, such as antiangiogenic agents, and emerging combination strategies, such as with checkpoint inhibitors, for advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, Select appropriate second-line targeted therapies based on treatment history, patient preference, performance status, and biomarker status for patients with advanced gastric/GEJ cancers who have progressed following first-line chemotherapy, Develop a holistic treatment plan that addresses nutrition/diet concerns, emotional distress, treatment-related adverse events, and risk of disease progression, among other issues, with a multidisciplinary and interprofessional team of clinicians who care for patients with advanced gastric/GEJ cancers.

Aug 2020

1 hr 14 min

Go online to PeerView.com/DWV860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex liver malignancy for which a variety of treatment modalities, based on disease stage and patient factors, are available. Traditionally, interventional radiologists (IR) have had a key role in managing intermediate-stage disease through the use of locoregional approaches, while oncologists have employed systemic therapy in the realm of advanced-stage disease. However, an improved understanding of HCC pathology has led to the realization that optimal approaches to selecting, combining, sequencing, and transitioning between different modalities has the potential to improve outcomes across disease settings, underscoring the importance of a multidisciplinary team-based approach to HCC management. As approvals for new drugs (eg, TKIs, antiangiogenic agents, immunotherapy, combinations) and positive clinical trial outcomes with novel multimodal strategies continue to impact the HCC treatment paradigm, clinical decision-making has become complicated, with many questions arising about optimal approaches to administering various therapies to the appropriate patient in a timely manner within a team-based care model. In this CME-certified online activity, a multidisciplinary panel of interventional radiology, hepatology, and oncology experts offers insights on how to navigate the intermediate- to advanced-stage HCC landscape in an era of evolving treatment—from use of modern IR approaches to newer systemic therapies and combination strategies—to provide the most benefit for patients with HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review pivotal clinical evidence on newly available systemic treatment options, including multikinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents, and checkpoint inhibitors, for newly diagnosed and previously treated patients with advanced HCC, Examine the potential role of combination systemic therapy approaches (eg, dual immune checkpoint blockade, immunotherapy plus targeted therapy) for advanced HCC, Assess emerging evidence on novel multimodal approaches for intermediate- and advanced-stage HCC, Develop optimal multidisciplinary treatment plans based on available evidence, patient- and disease-related factors, and recommendations on timely transitions from locoregional to systemic options for patients with intermediate or advanced HCC.

Jul 2020

1 hr 18 min

Go online to PeerView.com/NPH860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Chronic visceral acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD), also referred to as Niemann-Pick disease type B, is a rare and progressive autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that causes progressive accumulation of sphingomyelin and other lipids in tissues throughout the body and is associated with significant morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis of chronic visceral ASMD is often delayed by months or years, because its complex signs and symptoms overlap with other diseases. In this activity, leading experts review current consensus recommendations for the diagnosis of ASMD in pediatric and adult patients. The faculty also review the latest safety, efficacy, and tolerability data on emerging therapies and explore patient cases to offer practical strategies on how to optimally manage patients with chronic visceral ASMD. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Diagnose individuals with ASMD through the application of recent consensus recommendations, Cite available efficacy, safety, and tolerability data on emerging therapeutic modalities for the treatment of patients with ASMD, Examine the potential impact that ongoing clinical trials of emerging therapeutic approaches may have on the future treatment of patients with ASMD.

Jun 2020

1 hr 2 min

Go online to PeerView.com/KNT860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an immuno-oncology expert describes the basic biology of how the immune system responds to tumor activity, reviews the pathophysiology of the tumor microenvironment, provides up-to-date data supporting the use of cancer immunotherapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors, and discusses investigational immuno-oncology pathways, putative targets for novel therapies, and current and emerging prognostic biomarkers to inform clinical treatment decisions. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Describe the foundational aspects of the immune system’s response to tumor activity through innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms, Review the pathophysiology of the tumor microenvironment and its relationship to tumor evasion and resistance, Characterize the mechanisms of action of the immune checkpoint inhibitors (ie, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) and how they differ in their activity and adverse effects from conventional anticancer therapies, Summarize the current FDA-approved indications and investigational approaches with the immune checkpoint inhibitors across different tumors, Discuss investigational immuno-oncology pathways and potential new therapies that may be able to expand on the current therapies or overcome immune evasion and resistance, Assess current and emerging immuno-oncology biomarkers and their potential roles/uses, Integrate the latest immunotherapies and biomarker approaches into cancer care in the context of clinical practice or trials.

Jun 2020

1 hr 3 min

Go online to PeerView.com/SMP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In the evolving era of precision cancer care, increasing emphasis is placed on detecting molecular alterations driving the development of specific cancers and targeting them with matched therapies or combinations that can yield the best outcomes for patients. Such is the case with HER2—and, more recently, also HER3 and TROP2—which are gaining growing interest as relevant targets in different malignancies. This is particularly important now, as a number of new targeted therapies have started to reach the clinic and are expected to change practice, and many others are showing great promise in clinical trials in breast, gastrointestinal, lung, and other tumors. Pathology professionals play an essential role in realizing the potential of precision cancer care by carrying out optimal predictive testing. This PeerView on-demand activity, based on a recent symposium at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) 108th Annual Meeting, features a panel of leading pathology and oncology experts, who share their insights into recent advances in testing and treatment of various HER2-altered cancers, including breast, gastrointestinal, lung, and other tumors. The emerging roles of HER3 and TROP2 as potential new targets are reviewed as well. In addition, they provide useful guidance to improve testing and best practices for interpretation, as well as interdisciplinary collaboration, all for the benefit of the patients. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review evidence-based guidelines and expert recommendations regarding HER2 testing and interpretation of results in breast, gastric, colorectal, non–small cell lung, and other cancers, Evaluate the characteristics, mechanisms of action, and efficacy/safety evidence of established and emerging HER2-targeted agents for the management of patients with advanced HER2-expressing or HER2-mutant cancers, Implement appropriate methods and best practices for HER2 testing and interpretation to guide integration of the latest HER2-targeted therapies into individualized treatment plans for patients with advanced HER2-expressing or HER2-mutant cancers either in the context of clinical practice or through clinical trial participation.

May 2020

1 hr 8 min

Go online to PeerView.com/BXY860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has significantly evolved in recent years with the approvals of multikinase, antiangiogenic, and checkpoint inhibitors. Moreover, the treatment landscape is poised to broaden as emerging strategies focus on unmet clinical needs (eg, the use of combination regimens with immunotherapy and targeted agents, dual checkpoint inhibition, and systemic treatment in early disease). This PeerView onDemand activity, based on an engaging CaseBook symposium, features a collection of patient case scenarios detailing critical clinical decision points along the HCC disease spectrum, including ideal sequencing of targeted agents and immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced HCC and optimal timing of transition from locoregional to systemic therapy for those with early-/intermediate-stage HCC. Each CaseBook segment has been paired with expert analysis of the clinical evidence on available therapeutic strategies and ongoing research on novel combinations in clinical trials. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the safety and efficacy evidence on available multikinase inhibitors for newly-diagnosed patients with HCC, Review the available treatment options, such as targeted and immune checkpoint therapies, and their associated clinical data for patients with advanced HCC who have progressed after first-line treatment, Describe ongoing clinical trials that are studying combination strategies, including immunotherapy with targeted therapy, dual checkpoint inhibitor therapy, or others for patients with HCC, Examine the potential use of systemic treatments, including multikinase and checkpoint inhibitors, in earlier HCC disease settings, Develop safe and effective treatment plans across multiple lines of therapy for patients with advanced HCC based on guideline recommendations and validated evidence.

Apr 2020

1 hr 25 min

Go online to PeerView.com/QDR860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The past decade has brought substantial advances in the management of IBD. Nevertheless, under current therapeutic options, half of patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) fail to achieve sustained remission. After years of IBD treatment dominated by monoclonal antibodies, we are currently witnessing promising developments of small molecules for UC and CD. Among them, Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors are a promising new class that have demonstrated efficacy with a favorable safety profile in clinical trials. Utilizing a mix of didactic presentations and prerecorded patient videos, this activity based on a live symposium will explore current and emerging treatments and guidelines for UC and CD. The faculty panel provides a thorough examination of current and emerging JAK inhibitors, as well as insight into patient-centered, treat-to-target management approaches in IBD. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Examine the burden of illness and unmet needs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, Summarize efficacy and safety data related to current and emerging JAK inhibitors for the treatment of Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), Treat CD and UC in accordance with current evidence and guidelines, recognizing the role of non–anti-TNF therapies in inducing and maintaining remission in patients with moderate to severe disease, Incorporate JAK inhibitors into treatment plans for individual patients with CD or UC, recognizing the importance of achieving therapeutic targets and a patient-centered approach to care.

Apr 2020

1 hr 7 min

Go online to PeerView.com/Precision20?Promocode=860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Cancer immunotherapies are demonstrating remarkable clinical activity in an increasing number of malignancies, and as the immunotherapy arsenal has continued to expand, it has become clear that reliable biomarkers are needed to guide clinical decisions regarding treatment selection and identification of patients who are most likely to benefit from specific agents or immune-based combinations. A number of proven and putative biomarkers have been and continue to be evaluated, including PD-L1 expression, MSI/MMR, and others. Testing for these biomarkers has significant implications for pathology practice. This PeerView Live Seminars and Tumor Board symposium will provide participating pathology professionals with evidence-based and practical expert instruction on biomarker testing in the era of precision cancer immunotherapy. In the Seminars segments, our expert panel will review evidence on current and emerging immunotherapies and biomarkers, and the Tumor Board will focus on the nuances of applying this evidence to pathology practice, as well as strategies for collaborating with oncology professionals in interpreting biomarker testing results when making clinical decisions for patients with cancer. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Characterize the efficacy/safety profiles and clinical roles of current and emerging immunotherapies and combinations across different malignancies, along with relevant biomarker alignments, Evaluate the latest evidence supporting the use of PD-L1, MSI/MMR, TMB, and other emerging biomarkers and multiparametric approaches as predictors of benefit from cancer immunotherapies, Discuss the practical aspects of immunotherapy biomarker testing and interpretation in pathology practice, including companion diagnostic use requirements, benefits/limitations of different testing methodologies, assays, cutpoints, and other nuances, Implement best practices for cancer immunotherapy biomarker testing and interpretation in collaboration with oncologists and other relevant professionals to guide and refine the use of cancer immunotherapies in current practice

Apr 2020

1 hr 22 min

Go online to PeerView.com/BJU860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have become essential components of the treatment arsenal for gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, and ongoing studies are expected to further refine and expand their role. This video features a MasterClass from the 2020 GI Cancers Meeting in San Francisco where top GI specialists assessed the current state of the science and future potential of immunotherapies and combination treatments, and offered practical guidance in the integration and use of immunotherapies in gastric, esophageal, and colorectal cancers. Don’t miss this discussion so you can better navigate the increasingly complex immunotherapy and biomarker landscape. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the rationale for the biomarker-guided use of checkpoint inhibitors, including via testing for PD-L1, MMR/MSI status, and others across the spectrum of GI cancers, Assess the latest safety and efficacy evidence on immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers, Examine emerging data regarding the potential of checkpoint inhibitors in combination regimens and in early treatment settings, including first-line and perioperative, for patients with gastrointestinal cancers, Recommend personalized treatment plans incorporating immune checkpoint inhibitors, including possible enrollment in a clinical trial, for eligible patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers

Mar 2020

1 hr 31 min

Go online to PeerView.com/QAF860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Innovations in the management of pancreatic cancer have increased hope for patients with this aggressive malignancy. New and promising treatment advances include novel chemotherapy platforms, such as gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan–based regimens; targeted systemic approaches, including PARP inhibitors, stroma-targeting agents, and immunotherapies; and other novel modalities, such as tumor treating fields. Modern chemotherapy regimens have improved outcomes for patients in the first- and second-line advanced settings, while practice-changing data on targeted strategies continue to emerge, offering more personalized prospective treatment plans. How has the treatment of pancreatic cancer changed in the first- and second-line metastatic settings? What are the roles of mutation testing and PARP inhibitors in the frontline maintenance setting? What novel solutions are on the horizon for unmet clinical needs in locally advanced and metastatic settings? Through collaboration with Let’s Win, an affiliate of the Lustgarten Foundation, this PeerView Live on-demand activity answers these key questions and others with a “How I Think, How I Treat” educational design, providing a personal look at the way experts consider important new and emerging data while navigating the current pancreatic cancer treatment landscape to enhance patient care and outcomes. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review the latest clinical evidence on use of novel chemotherapy platforms, immunotherapy, PARP inhibitors, stromal-targeting agents, and tumor treating field therapy, among others, for pancreatic cancer, Examine the emerging role of PARP inhibitors in frontline, maintenance setting for patients with BRCA-mutant pancreatic cancer, Summarize ongoing clinical trials investigating innovative therapies, including immunotherapy, tumor treating fields, combinations with chemotherapy platforms, among others, for patients with pancreatic cancer, Recommend optimal treatment plans, including the enrollment of clinical trials, across multiple lines of therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer based on validated evidence, guideline recommendations, and disease- and patient-specific factors

Mar 2020

1 hr 43 min

Go online to PeerView.com/GZX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this infographic-based activity, an expert in hepatology discusses current and emerging strategies to diagnose, treat, and manage patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Correctly diagnose and stage nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), distinguishing the subset of patients with NASH for disease monitoring and prognostication, Apply best practices in the management of patients with NASH based on evolving data on lifestyle modification and medical treatment, Evaluate data on emerging therapies for NASH, including evidence of reversal of fibrosis, risks and benefits, and their potential utility in the treatment of patients with NASH

Mar 2020

27 min 55 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/YTB860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The rarity and heterogeneity of biliary cancers (eg, cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer) make this group of malignancies a clinical challenge in GI oncology. Fortunately, recent scientific developments on the genetic and molecular level have led to the clinical testing of several targeted agent classes, including FGFR, IDH, HER2, TRK, and multikinase inhibitors, in patients with biliary cancers. This educational activity, based on a recent PeerView “MasterClass” symposium presented in collaboration with the Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation, provides an in-depth examination of the latest science on the biologic rationale for targeting biliary cancers and the important evidence that is validating potent therapies in a setting where conventional chemotherapy often has limited efficacy and value for patients. Each segment will conclude with expert insights on patient-centric care and strategies for translating new evidence and data into clinical practice for the optimal management of biliary cancers. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize the biologic rationale for targeting biliary cancers, including multikinase tumor pathways, NTRK gene fusions, IDH2 mutations, FGFR translocations, and immune checkpoint pathways, Examine the latest efficacy and safety evidence on the use of novel therapeutic strategies, such as multikinase, TRK, IDH, and FGFR inhibitors, in patients with biliary cancers, Describe ongoing clinical trials investigating novel approaches, such as chemotherapy platforms, targeted agents, and immunotherapy, that are recruiting patients with biliary cancers, Apply current and emerging therapeutic strategies into personalized treatment plans for patients with biliary cancers, including in the context of a clinical trial

Mar 2020

1 hr 18 min

Go online to PeerView.com/QXV860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in medical genetics and inborn metabolism errors discusses novel strategies and emerging evidence for the identification and management of patients with long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Recognize the signs and symptoms associated with the clinical presentation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (LC-FAOD), Review current recommendations for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with LC-FAODs, Summarize the mechanism of action and emerging evidence for novel agents designed to address unmet needs among patients with LC-FAODs

Mar 2020

30 min 31 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/GZS860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in gastrointestinal oncology provides an update on targeted therapies for patients with biliary tract cancers. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Review the rationale of newly discovered targets, such as multikinase tumor pathways, NTRK gene fusions, and FGFR translocations, for biliary tract cancers, Appraise emerging efficacy and safety evidence on the use of novel targeted agents, including multikinase, TRK, and FGFR inhibitors, in patients with biliary tract cancers, Incorporate novel targeted agents safely and effectively into treatment plans for biliary tract cancers, including in the context of a clinical trial

Feb 2020

23 min 47 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/UHH860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, experts in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) discuss how to effectively care for patients with HCC using multidisciplinary strategies in the context of an expanded and novel treatment arsenal. The faculty discusses pivotal clinical evidence of approved targeted and immune checkpoint inhibitor agents and how to effectively select and integrate therapies into individualized treatment plans for patients with HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Appraise pivotal safety and efficacy data on approved targeted and immune checkpoint therapies for advanced HCC, Describe the significance of emerging data that continue to evolve the standards of care for patients with HCC, including biomarker-driven therapies, combination strategies using immunotherapy and targeted therapies, and novel therapeutic approaches for locoregional disease, Manage anticipated adverse events associated with targeted therapy and immunotherapy for patients with advanced HCC, Select optimal therapeutic options, including consideration of clinical trials, in the first and second lines of treatment for patients with advanced HCC, Incorporate multidisciplinary care approaches for the management of challenging patients with HCC, including those with locoregional disease who are candidates for early transition to systemic therapy or those with Child–Pugh B status, among others

Jan 2020

1 hr 17 min

Go online to PeerView.com/GWD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. This PeerView MasterClass and Tumor Board video activity, based on an educational session from The Liver Meeting® (American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases) in Boston, features a panel of hepatology, oncology, surgery, and interventional radiology experts, who provide their clinical perspectives on cutting-edge science that has validated, newly available systemic treatment options in HCC. Coupled with each MasterClass, the Tumor Board segments feature reflective case-centered discussions on the crucial role that hepatology clinicians serve across the HCC continuum of care. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Evaluate the safety and efficacy data of multikinase and checkpoint inhibitors and antiangiogenic therapy indicated for advanced HCC, Summarize emerging clinical evidence on the use of novel systemic options in conjunction with or as an alternative to continued LRT for patients with intermediate HCC, Implement multidisciplinary team-based approaches to develop safe, personalized treatment algorithms that utilize novel components for patients with HCC

Jan 2020

1 hr 30 min

Go online to PeerView.com/XKX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive, complex disease and is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Research endeavors to mitigate HCC mortality have led to rapid advances, especially in the past two years. Today, clinicians specializing in HCC have various treatment options to select for their patients across the spectrum of the disease, and the therapeutic landscape continues to evolve with promising results from ongoing clinical trials investigating novel approaches. This PeerView MasterClass and Tumor Board on-demand educational activity, based on a symposium held adjunct to the 13th Annual Conference of the International Liver Cancer Association (ILCA 2019), features a panel of multidisciplinary HCC experts who review pivotal evidence on available TKI, antiangiogenic, and checkpoint inhibitor therapies and their optimal treatment sequencing strategies, as well as emerging data on novel combinations and innovative modalities for early- to advanced-stage disease. The experts weave the science into real-world case scenarios, helping to translate the data into practical experiences in the HCC clinic. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize recent safety and efficacy evidence of available targeted therapies, such as multikinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, for HCC, Evaluate the significance of new data and ongoing clinical trials with checkpoint inhibitors as treatment options for HCC, Review the potential use of systemic treatments in novel multimodal strategies for intermediate HCC, Construct safe and effective treatment plans across multiple lines of therapy for patients with HCC based on multidisciplinary team–based strategies

Dec 2019

1 hr 15 min

Go online to PeerView.com/APQ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. While much of cancer therapy development focuses on systemic drugs and the mitigation of associated adverse events, new avenues utilizing innovative multimodal solutions have demonstrated the benefit of efficacy with minimal toxicity in solid tumors. New treatment modalities such as tumor treating fields (TTFields) and innovative combination strategies have emerged and entered into the management paradigms of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and are set to evolve the standards of care for patients with other solid tumors as well. In this activity, based on a recent live symposium held in Chicago, Illinois, radiation and medical oncology experts review cutting-edge advancements in cancer technology, such as TTFields, and offer insight and case discussions illustrating the appropriate integration of innovative solutions into cancer management. Moreover, the expert panel reviews multimodal strategies in GBM and examines the impact of novel treatment modalities available for MPM, as well as new approaches that are emerging for other tumors, including thoracic, pancreatic, liver, and ovarian cancers. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Describe the rationale for the use of novel technologies, such as tumor treating fields (TTFields), as a cancer therapeutic strategy, Assess the latest safety and efficacy evidence on innovative strategies available for the therapeutic management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), Cite the latest evidence and ongoing clinical trials on novel treatments, including combining TTFields or radiotherapy with systemic therapy, in multiple tumor types, such as lung, pancreatic, liver, and ovarian cancers, across different treatment settings, Plan strategies to integrate novel technologies into the therapeutic management of patients with cancer, including through enrollment in clinical trials

Dec 2019

1 hr 19 min

Go online to PeerView.com/AMF860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Treatment of cancer has been transformed by the new immune checkpoint inhibitor class of agents that have shown remarkable benefit in many different types of tumors, but they can also cause unusual immune-related adverse effects (irAEs) that can affect any organ system. Expanding use of these immunotherapies in oncology means that emergency medicine professionals can expect to encounter an increasing number of patients experiencing various irAEs in emergency departments. Timely recognition, accurate diagnosis, and effective management of irAEs can ensure that patients derive maximum benefit from these therapies, and emergency nurses have an important role to play in evaluating and triaging these patients. This CNE educational on-demand activity combines lessons on everything emergency nurses need to know about cancer immunotherapies and irAEs with case discussions and practical guidance for keeping patients with cancer safe in the era of immuno-oncology. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Describe the basic principles of harnessing the human immune system in the treatment of cancer, including the mechanistic aspects of immune checkpoint inhibition and development of immune-related adverse effects (irAEs), Characterize the presenting symptoms of the spectrum of irAEs associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors and combinations, including those most likely to be encountered by emergency nurses and other professionals in the emergency department (ED), Outline the general and organ/site-specific recommendations for the recognition, evaluation, diagnosis/differential diagnosis, and management of irAEs in the ED, Implement recommended strategies for triage, evaluation, diagnosis, and management of relevant irAEs in EM settings in collaboration with oncology specialists

Nov 2019

45 min 41 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/XEJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Multiple new drug approvals and positive clinical trial outcomes have set the stage for the wider integration of novel therapeutics across the treatment spectrum of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These developments have established multiple targeted and immunotherapy agents as options in advanced disease while also mapping potential future applications in intermediate stage HCC and beyond. Future care will depend on the successful integration of newer tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-based approaches with established and emerging immune checkpoint inhibitors across patient populations and lines of therapy. This PeerView “How I Think, How I Treat” activity, based on a symposium held during the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, offers an inside look at how experts translate important new data and navigate the current HCC landscape in order to provide the most benefit for their patients. This activity also features important insights on how to utilize newly approved TKIs and checkpoint inhibitors across disease and treatment settings, as well as provides expert thoughts on the next wave of emerging solutions that leverage the power of novel therapies across the continuum of HCC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize emerging clinical evidence on the use of novel systemic treatments, including targeted and immunotherapeutic agents, in a range of HCC treatment settings and populations, Apply recent safety and efficacy data on targeted therapies into clinical practice to enhance aspects of HCC care, including treatment sequencing and managing treatment-related adverse events, Integrate immunotherapeutic strategies for the management of patients with advanced HCC, including through optimal treatment selection and via management of immune-related adverse events, Identify innovative treatment strategies currently being assessed in clinical trials across the spectrum of HCC, such as immunotherapy combinations, combinations of novel agents with locoregional therapies, and early transition to systemic treatment, among others.

Aug 2019

1 hr 45 min

Go online to PeerView.com/RRU860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Pancreatic cancer has retained its fearsome reputation amidst the clinical advances made in recent years in other solid tumor settings, and it is now the fourth leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. But recently, new science has taken important steps in meeting the challenges posed by this disease. Beginning with the validation of modern chemotherapy platforms, which now can be sequenced to improve clinical benefits, clinicians are increasingly able to select more potent—and soon, more targeted—options for disease management. In the wake of these advances, other innovative therapies are being rapidly developed, from stroma- and BRCA-targeting agents, to immunotherapy and tumor treating fields. In this PeerView CaseBook on-demand activity based on a recent live symposium held at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, our expert panel profiles the modern management of pancreatic cancer, including the evidence for more personalized approaches to treatment decision-making across the disease spectrum. The panelists highlight new directions in therapeutic sequencing, explore the role of clinical trials as a driver for validating innovative strategies, and use real-world cases to crystalize strategies for initial therapy selection and sequencing, the function of biomarker testing, and patient referral to clinical trials. This engaging CaseBook activity also highlights important “patient voice” materials developed in collaboration with Let’s Win, an online community (letswinpc.org) for sharing information about innovative, science-based treatments for Pancreatic Cancer. Let’s Win is an affiliate of the Lustgarten Foundation. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Summarize recent evidence on the use of modern cytotoxic platforms and chemotherapy sequencing approaches, targeted agents, and tumor treating field therapy, among others, in the setting of advanced pancreatic cancer, Recommend appropriate therapeutic platforms across multiple lines of therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer based on available evidence, guideline recommendations, and disease- and patient-specific characteristics, Identify patients with pancreatic cancer who are candidates for experimental therapy in a clinical trial, Manage adverse events associated with established cytotoxic and emerging therapies for pancreatic cancer.

Aug 2019

1 hr 38 min

Go online to PeerView.com/JHZ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, experts in the use of immunotherapies for cancer discuss the expanding role of immunotherapy in oncology, focusing on current and emerging strategies, immune-mediated adverse reactions, and best practices for their identification and management, as well as the use of immunotherapy in more challenging patient populations. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Discuss the current and expanding role of cancer immunotherapies across the oncologic spectrum, Characterize the full range of potential immune-mediated adverse reactions (IMARs) associated with cancer immunotherapies and combinations, Implement best practices for optimal evaluation, diagnosis, and management of IMARs in patients undergoing treatment with cancer immunotherapies and combinations, including less commonly occurring adverse effects and rare manifestations of common toxicities, Establish strategies for assessment, monitoring, and management of challenging patient populations that may benefit from cancer immunotherapies.

Jul 2019

33 min 8 sec

Oncology nurses are at the forefront of care for patients with pancreatic cancer, a much-feared disease whose management was for years characterized by modestly effective treatment options. The recent emergence of new cytotoxic platforms combined with rapid research on potent targeted therapies has made the role of the nurse as a caregiver and educator more important than ever, particularly because these new options differ greatly from conventional chemotherapy strategies. In this activity based on a recent live symposium held in Anaheim during the Oncology Nursing Society’s (ONS) 44th Annual Congress, expert nurse faculty use a patient-voice inclusive MasterClass designed to provide real-world guidance for effective translation of the latest evidence into clinical practice. In addition, the experts offer their perspectives on the unique needs and concerns of patients, and how engagement strategies can shape individualized, patient-centric management plans throughout the continuum of pancreatic cancer care. This activity also features perspectives from pancreatic cancer patients developed in collaboration with Let’s Win, an affiliate of the Lustgarten Foundation. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Summarize updated efficacy and safety evidence on therapeutic strategies in pancreatic cancer, including cytotoxic platforms and chemotherapy sequencing approaches, targeted agents directed against molecular features/mutations, or tumor treating field therapy, among others, Educate patients on the clinical uses and potential of clinical trials investigating novel therapeutics alone and in combination with cytotoxic regimens in the pancreatic cancer setting, Provide guidance to patients on therapeutic sequencing with cytotoxic platforms in advanced pancreatic cancer based upon available evidence, guideline recommendations, and disease- and patient-specific characteristics, Manage adverse events associated with established and emerging therapies for pancreatic cancer.

Jun 2019

1 hr 10 min

Go online to PeerView.com/PST860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, an expert in autoimmune liver diseases uses a novel, interactive talk to guide learners through the diagnosis and treatment of primary biliary cholangitis. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Incorporate appropriate tests to support the diagnosis of PBC Apply guideline-based recommendations to stratify patients at risk for progressive PBC, Outline current treatment options for PBC in the context of mechanism of action, efficacy, safety, and appropriate clinical utilization, Select therapy for individual patients with PBC based on patient-specific and disease characteristics, Employ patient-centered, long-term management strategies for patients with PBC that address extrahepatic diseases manifestations and complications of PBC.

May 2019

17 min 30 sec

Go online to PeerView.com/PDD860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this activity, a multidisciplinary panel of interventional radiology, hepatology, and medical oncology experts provide an in-depth analysis of the latest data for approved and emerging systemic treatment options and recent evidence on locoregional and multimodal approaches for patients with HCC. In addition, the expert panel provides guidance on strategies to optimally select and timely transition between locoregional and systemic therapies. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize recent evidence on the treatment role, efficacy, and safety of approved and emerging immunotherapeutic and targeted systemic options for patients with newly diagnosed and previously treated HCC, Cite recent clinical evidence on locoregional and multimodal approaches in patients with intermediate-stage HCC, Select optimal therapies, including in the context of clinical trials, for patients with intermediate-stage or advanced HCC, with considerations of patient- and disease-related factors, underlying liver disease, and timely transitions between locoregional and systemic options.

May 2019

58 min 25 sec

Breaking the Paradox: Expanding Options and New Questions in HCC Management—Mapping the Pathways to Better Patient Outcomes

Mar 2019

1 hr 14 min