Authentic Leadership for Everyday People

Dino Cattaneo / Hoolibean

The word authenticity is overused and can feel abstract, but when you look at its true meaning, it has a very practical and pretty clear cut application to leadership. Authentic means “the true self”. Authentic leaders clearly articulate their core values, and use them to guide every action they take. This clarity brings effectiveness, confidence and the ability to be vulnerable. In this interview based show, guests open up about how they discovered and developed their core principles and built a more successful and fulfilled life by being consistent with their values. Filled with candid moments and practical advice, Authentic Leadership for Everyday People is for everyone who wants to become a better leader and a better, more fulfilled human.

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Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, , the podcast where we investigate the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. If you are looking for inspiration and tips on how to become a better leader by being your true self, you are in the right place. Today we talk to Andy Alsop, the President and CEO of The Receptionist, the company that made the original iPad based visitor management system. Andy is a serial entrepreneur. In the past 30 and more years, he was part of the founding or c-level team of at least 6 different startups. He acquired The Receptionist in April of 2015, and he used all his previous experiences to adopt a new approach to leadership. He calls it "Employee Supremacy", and it is grounded in the principle that if run a company with the primary goal of helping the employees flourish, in the long run the company will be more successful and more profitable. Key Takeaways [02:20] - Andy, welcome, I am very excited to have you on the show. Why don’t we start, why don’t you give me a sort of a sense of your background. [05:32] - That is fabulous. I assume by removing the name iPad maybe at some point you can do the android version as well? [06:17] - What are like the biggest lessons from Pre Receptionist that you brought in terms of what to do and what not to do with The Receptionist as setting up the company? [08:29] - I wanted to have employees that felt satisfied and that felt fulfilled. [11:36] - What are you seeing in your employee base, in terms of your retention and sort of the results of this investment that you obviously decided to make in them? [13:02] - As you were starting the company and, if you took the time to think about what were the values of the company, and what was the process to determine those values? And then starting making sure that the people within the company lived according to those values. [15:42] - We do have them on the walls. But more importantly through this exercise, I recognized  that I wanted to make sure that everybody in the company adhered to those core values. [18:12] - How do you personally define authenticity and then what’s the definition within the core values and the expectations within, for your employees? [19:04] - How deeply do you go into definitions as you sort of socialize the employees to them? So you give them one definition of authenticity and then do you have, for the values, do you also have practical examples of situations, and how the values live in there? [21:29] - There is a decision that needs to be made that may impact the company negatively in the short term but if you take the decision to keep the company in a positive state, the decision goes against the core values. Did you have to navigate any situation like that? [23:40] - How large is your team overall? [23:52] - What do you think would be some of the challenges maintaining that strength if you were like, scaling it X times, not going from 16 to 20 but if you were to 160, 1600? [26:19] - How can we make a company that is really the long game, not just a short term we’re going to be growing as quickly as we can but as something that can last for the long time? [27:24] - I remember that I was on this one walk that I came to the point of what my why was. [30:12] - The ones who suffer the most from that are employees, right? Employees become part of the balance sheet. [36:00] - In a situation where it is a public corporation, where shareholders have the option of where they put their capital, how that would play? Have you, is that something you have asked yourself? [39:24] - That’s what I want to do, I want to start thinking about running my company using employee supremacy as a criteria, what are the two or three things that you would recommend they do? [42:28] - Do you have any interest or hobby outside of work that is important to you? And how is that potentially impacted your work? [43:40] - Every era has business jargon and...

Nov 22

51 min 44 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, , the podcast where we investigate the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. If you are looking for inspiration and tips on how to become a better leader by being your true self, you are in the right place. The featured guest of this episode is Dorie Clark, who was named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50, and was recognized as the #1 Communication Coach in the world by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards. She is also a Wall Street Journal Bestselling author. In this episode we discuss how leaders can become better communicators, how to think about setting personal goals for success, and how to become a recognized expert. Key Takeaways [01:14] - Today I am thrilled to get back to the interviewer side of the mic and welcome a fabulous guest, Dorie Clark.  [02:33] - I announce the winner of my favorite review for October. [03:31] - Why don’t you give your background and your story to our listeners? [05:03] - How did you end up there? And how did you find your passion in that? [07:17] - What are some of the sort of three or four most important things that people need to think about as they develop their communication styles and how to build effective communication? [09:14] - What are some examples of situations where you had to work with leaders with to deliver a very difficult message or, you know, get your organization to, to make a decision that on the surface could have been controversial? And what is some of the advice that you would give to somebody who is in that situation? [11:33] - What were some of the differences that you observe in terms of, like getting people to act between the two worlds and some of the challenges that people may face in the two worlds? [13:19] - If you, you know, talking to somebody who is thinking about starting their own business. What would be some of the steps that they should take, to make sure that they're pricing themselves within the correct band? [15:38] - How did you do it when you first got started, Dino?  [17:32] - What is the right client for them? Did you go through that process? And what were some of the key steps for you to identify, what an ideal client would be for you? [19:19] - What were some of the key moments in your journey where you sort of developed your authentic self? Who your true person is and how that person shows up in your work? [21:28] - What are your magic, secret, things that you love doing? [22:51] - How do you think about goals? And how do you help your clients think about their goals? [25:29] - If you're somebody that is starting out and maybe does not have a clear view of what their passion is, or also doesn't want to optimize solely for money, what are some of the steps that you could take? [26:53] - Do you have some interesting stories of maybe clients, once again, always, without revealing, that explore something unusual, and found out that it was either great or not so great? [29:28] - For the people who are thinking about maybe expanding from just being great leader, to also becoming a recognized expert through through publishing and writing. What are the first steps to take? [31:32] - Once you have understood this framework, is there a sequence in these three steps, three areas? Is this something that needs to happen at the same time?  Are they self-sustaining with each other? [33:39] - What are your hobbies or interests outside of your work? And is the one particularly that maybe has also helped you with your work? [35:19] - What are the business jargon / expressions that drive you crazy? [36:09] - Food for the body or food for the soul Dorie Clark Links https://dorieclark.com/thelonggame (dorieclark.com/thelonggame) http://linkedin.com/in/doriec (linkedin.com/in/doriec) http://twitter.com/dorieclark (twitter.com/dorieclark) http://facebook.com/dorieclark (facebook.com/dorieclark)...

Nov 8

44 min 22 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. In my show my guests are asked to share their story, be authentic, transparent and vulnerable. It is only fair that I do the same for them and for you, my listeners. This is part two of the episodes where I am turning the microphone over to my new friend Randy Wilburn, who will ask me the same questions I ask my guests. How do I define authenticity? What is my definition of success? What makes a good leader? Key Takeaways [02:37] - What do you consider your leadership style to be? [05:23] - I was always treated as an equal, my voice was treated as an equal. [07:41] - You don’t always have to be the smartest person in the room. [09:40] - As a leader you have the responsibility to set direction, and then you have the responsibility to make the decision, and you have the responsibility to understand the style of the people that work for you. [12:10] - It’s your responsibility as a leader, to serve your team. [13:43] - Not only do you need to fundamentally understand your leadership style but you need to understand leadership styles of people around you. That will make for a much better work environment. [16:22] - When things just didn’t go your way, what were the challenges and what were the lessons learned from that personal crisis or failure? [18:41] - It does matter for me, in terms of the work that I do, the amount of belief that I have in the actual work. [21:42] - I’m curious to know, were you able to go through or did you participate in any type of therapy? [23:22] - I think getting help, having a sounding board, having somebody that you can actually talk to, to walk you through these situations is critically important for our mental and our physical well being. [25:01] - I want you to give three leadership tips for our listeners.   [26:24] - I think we all have a lot more career and life in front of us than we perceive. [28:12] - What are some of your passions outside of the workspace and how do they shape the leader that you are? [31:20] - Certain keywords that are so overused they become hollow, and I have several in my head right now, but which ones are the ones that bother you the most and what images do they conjure up? [33:07] - I think one of the most important questions to ask, this whole idea of food for the body or food for the soul, which one would you choose? [35:54] - These are people that are really unhappy with their state, their station in life but they are starting to do something about it. [38:07] - What did it feel like being on the other side of the equation when it came to the interview? Authentic Leadership For Everyday People / Dino Cattaneo Website: https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/episodes/ (al4ep.com) or https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/ (authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com) Dino’s Email – dino@al4ep.com  Dino on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dinocattaneo (linkedin.com/in/dinocattaneo) Podcast Instagram – https://instagram.com/al4edp (@al4edp ) Podcast Twitter – https://twitter.com/al4edp (@al4edp)  Podcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/al4edp (facebook.com/al4edp) EPISODES MENTIONED: Episode 4: https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/2021/01/28/004-david-edelman-fortune-50-cmo-marketing-strategist-and-innovator-leading-with-different-styles/ (David Edelman) Randy Wilburn Randy on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randywilburn/ (LinkedIn.com/in/randywilburn) Randy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/randywilburn (@randywilburn) Randy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/randywilburn (@randywilburn) Podcast: https://iamnorthwestarkansas.com/ (I Am Northwest Arkansas) On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iamnorthwestarkansas/ (facebook.com/iamnorthwestarkansas/) On Twitter: https://twitter.com/iamnorthwestar1 (@iamnorthwestar1)...

Oct 25

47 min 28 sec

Dino Cattaneo - My Story Part 1 - Authenticity and Measuring Success Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. In my show my guests are asked to share their story, be authentic, transparent and vulnerable. It is only fair that I do the same for them and for you, my listeners. So in the next two episodes, I am turning the microphone over to my new friend Randy Wilburn, who will ask me the same questions I ask my guests. How do I define authenticity? What is my definition of success? What makes a good leader? When I created the podcast, I knew that this would be an important episode to create at some point. The question was: who would be the right interviewer? The first requirement was that this person would be someone who still didn’t know me very well, to create opportunity for the two of us to surprise each other. The perfect interviewer would also be someone with a strong background in podcasting, able to conduct a good interview. And finally, it needed to be someone that I connected with, so that they would create a space that made me feel safe being fully authentic and transparent.  When Randy and I met this summer at Podcast Movement (a podcasting conference), it was immediately clear that he was the right person for the job. And the interview did not disappoint. As a matter of fact, we had so much fun in our conversation that we ran a lot longer than my episodes normally do, so I decided to break the episode in two parts. Part 1 focuses on my story, my definition of authenticity, and how I measure success. You will hear about my career choices, the good ones and the bad ones, what I learned from going through a major episode of depression, and the parallels between teaching clients how to look at their digital marketing campaigns and setting measures for success in your own life.   Key Takeaways   [03:16] - Randy, I’m turning the mic over to you. [04:10] - This is a podcast that you started back in December of 2020. So are we calling this a pandemic podcast? [06:11] - I’ve always learned that you need to look at the, there’s some silver linings in this pandemic that I think a lot of people are going to experience. [07:20] - One of things I wanted to mention as we move into this interview is I thought it was interesting the way that we met. [10:38] - I like to always ask about your superhero origin story, but I want to find out from you, what is authenticity to you? And how did you find your authentic self? [13:46] - Could you share some key moments, some a-ha moments for you where you found your true voice? And how that informed your leadership style? [17:00] - As much as I love my work, I didn't want to be somebody who was fulfilled only by work. [20:25] - How do you now measure success? How do you keep yourself in line with that measure? [23:35] - As a coach, your role is not really to tell people what to do, but it’s to help them figure out what they want to do. [24:20] - What are the challenges that you have dealing with that, and not staying focused and true to yourself? [27:20] - Do you really want to be doing that? And really think about the activities that it takes to be successful at the job.   Authentic Leadership For Everyday People / Dino Cattaneo Website: al4ep.com or authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com Dino’s Email – dino@al4ep.com  Dino on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/dinocattaneo Podcast Instagram – @al4edp  Podcast Twitter – @al4edp  Podcast Facebook: facebook.com/al4edp EPISODES MENTIONED: Episode 3: Rishad Tobaccowala - Bringing Human Back Episode 12: Alisa Cohn - From Startup to GrownUp Episode 19: Randy Wilburn - Entrepreneurship, Intrapreneurship and Leadership   Randy Wilburn Randy on Linkedin: LinkedIn.com/in/randywilburn Randy on Twitter: @randywilburn Randy on Instagram: @randywilburn...

Oct 11

34 min 30 sec

Episode 19: Randy Wilburn - Entrepreneurship, Intrapreneurship and Leadership Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Our guest today is Randy Wilburn. Over the course of his career, Randy developed deep expertise in multiple disciplines. In a world that pushes people to specialize, Randy has followed his entrepreneurial passion to create a firm where he can integrate all the facets of his personality. He is the founder of Encourage, Build, Grow, a leadership consulting, coaching and training firm that serves the construction, design and architecture industries. Randy is also the host and producer of I Am Northwest Arkansas, a podcast with over 130 episodes. During our conversation Randy tapped into his experience as an intrapreneur first, and entrepreneur later, to discuss what qualities make a great leader. We also talked about building trust with your team and within your community. At the core of Randy’s leadership is the idea of character, and the importance of keeping one’s word. We dove into Randy’s long journey, started at a young age, when he was delivering newspapers. We cover his years working at a firm where he was greatly empowered, becoming essentially an intrapreneur, and we follow with the years when he started his own business. Randy shares the lessons he learned throughout, and how his understanding of what it means to be a leader, and an authentic leader evolved as he navigated these different experiences. An important part of Randy’s ability is his full awareness of all the parties involved at any point in time, whether it is clients or the internal teams. He also stresses the importance of giving back, and the importance of keeping an open mind. This is a special multi-part episode. Here, I am interviewing Randy. In the next, he will interview me. Key Takeaways [02:06] - Today’s guest is Randy Wilburn. [03:26] - Randy, welcome. It is great to have you on the show and why don’t we start and give our listeners your background. [05:48] - Randy always understood how to get out and hustle and do some things. Randy also fully embraced working for other people. [06:33] - You graduated from college, took your first job, and then there was a point I believe when you started your own firm for the first time. And, and that’s probably a different perspective when you are doing that after having been in the workplace and deciding, “okay no, now I want to go on my own”, tell me about that moment. [09:45] - Randy explains what an intrapreneur is and how it is different from an entrepreneur [10:52] - When did you start thinking about who you wanted to be as a leader? [12:39] - What were some of the moments, when you started formulating: this is who I am as a leader, I am in this position, and these are like the key 3 or 4 things that I’m going to try and do and communicate. [15:33] - When Randy did leadership training years ago, he would tell people, tell leaders, “your job as a leader is to work yourself out of a job”. [16:23] - Was there any leader that you worked with that did that for you? [17:50] - Randy shares the moniker he lives by, “if you’re the smartest person in the room you need to find a different room”. [19:31] - How do you measure success and has that definition changed over time? [22:35] - You mention the need to ask yourself, what you need to do better and that you’re fallible. Is there a moment of crisis or something that you know went wrong, that you think of as a point where you actually got a lot of learning? [25:36] - How do you build trust? [27:04] - Tell our listeners a little bit about what you’re doing with encourage, build, grow. [29:50] - We learn from Randy that he encourages firms to tell their story through voice. [32:21] - Why don’t you tell our listeners about your podcast. [35:07] - Somebody who’s listening right now is thinking about launching a podcast....

Oct 11

51 min 44 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Today, I am speaking with my former professor from Harvard Business School, Debora Spar. In addition to her role at Harvard, Debora served as the President of Barnard College from 2008 to 2017, where she led initiatives to highlight women’s leadership and advancement, including the creation of the Athena Center for Leadership Studies and the development of Barnard’s Global Symposium series. Her current research focuses on issues of gender and technology, and the interplay between technological change and broader social structures.  Debora and I engage in an insightful conversation about the leadership lessons she learned in leadership throughout her career. Debora gets specific and talks about how listening and delivering are crucial to any leader’s success. Debora goes into detail about the Case Method and how she’s applied those tactics from academia to the business world. Finally, Debora provides very practical and powerful advice on how to successfully transition into a leadership role and speaks to some of her latest research as well as all of the trends of which we should be aware.  Key Takeaways: 04:32 – This episode is dedicated to the memory of two of my former classmates, Jay and Greg  06:13 – Today, I’m speaking with Debora Spar who shares her extensive background in academia and business and the major lessons she learned about leadership along the way  11:20 – The Case Method  16:13 – How leading a Case Method class is similar to leading a symphony orchestra  17:57 – Key traits that make up Debora’s leadership style  21:53 – Becoming a leader as an outsider to an organization  23:46 – Listening and getting early wins  26:24 – Biggest lessons Debora learned throughout her career  30:58 – Debora goes into detail on her research  38:23 – Trends we should all be paying attention to  40:30 – Debora’s passions and hobbies outside of work and how they influence how she shows up at work  41:40 – The business clichés that drive Debora absolutely crazy  43:13 – Debora shares some food for your soul  46:39 – And now here’s ‘Haunted Heart,’ a song written and performed by my wife, Susan Cattaneo Tweetable Quotes: “I think it’s actually a brilliant way of bringing groups of people to a decision because that’s essentially what the Case Method is.” (15:10) “One of the things I try to do is find people who, in fact, have different leadership styles because I’ve always felt like I need to balance who I am.” (18:20)  “I think there’s a big difference in terms of growing up in a place and becoming a leader versus coming in as a leader when you’re also coming in as an outsider.” (21:53) “People are only gonna follow you if you deliver some things early on. So, I was always looking for sincere opportunities to understand what people really need and what they want and how to fix that. Trying to see where you can get the early wins is really important.” (25:22) “Economics is not just an abstract, dismal science. Economics affects the lives of people, particularly poor people. And we need to bring those people into our understanding of economics, otherwise we’re gonna fail them or fail the system.” (34:37) Links Mentioned:    Debora’s Website – deboraspar.com Debora’s Twitter – @deboraspar  Linkedin – linkedin.com/in/deboraspar  Debora’s Books (also available on her website) Work Mate Marry Love How - Machines Shape Our Human Destiny Wonder Women – Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection Ruling the Waves: - From the Compass to the Internet, a History of Business and Politics along the Technological Frontier The Baby Business – How Money, Science, and Politics Drive the Commerce of Conception  Debora’s LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/deboraspar/  Link to ‘Memory of the Light’ by Susan

Sep 27

50 min 13 sec

We continue the discussion with Harvey Seifter & Fred Mandell. Harvey & Fred are the founders of Creating Futures That Work, a company that uses creative arts and teaching specifically creative arts to people as a way to foster and develop innovation and the ability to work with others.  In this Part 2, Harvey and Fred share the story of how they met and what inspired them to launch Creating Futures That Work. They talk about creating an arts-based learning program and the lessons and insights they learned through the process. Harvey and Fred highlights each other’s strengths and why they were integral in starting their company. Finally, Harvey and Fred speak to the importance of reflection and provide some food for your body and soul.  Key Takeaways: 03:19 – Harvey Seifter & Fred Mandell speak to the journey that led them both to launch Creating Futures That Work 07:39 – Fred’s initial interest in the Arts and the moment he realized he wanted to experiment with bringing the Arts into leadership  13:53 – Trial and error in Arts-based learning and lessons learned through the process  18:09 – Bringing their unique strengths to achieve a common goal  20:06 – The power of reflection  23:11 – Harvey and Fred share some food for your body and food for your soul  31:06 – And now here’s ‘Love Alone,’ a song written and performed by Honest Mechanik  Tweetable Quotes: “The Arts can be powerful, resonant, immersive learning experiences that are fully transferable into the secular role of leadership in organizations.” (09:37) (Fred)  “It’s a very deep, powerful kind of learning that people go through when they work with the arts. And one of the reasons is because it’s kind of a universal alphabet of creative expression. We all know how to speak this language. We all belong in this. Once we bring ourselves to it, it changes us.” (12:32) (Harvey) “Fred has always had a really powerful and wonderful focus on the power of reflection.” (20:06) (Harvey) “For my whole life the most powerful artistic food for my soul has been Mozart. And it has been throughout this time and I’m sure will be tomorrow as well.” (25:49) (Harvey)  Links Mentioned:  Dino’s Email – dino@al4ep.com  Dino’s Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/al4edp/  Dino’s Twitter – https://twitter.com/al4edp  Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website – https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/  Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/al4ep/?ref=page_internal  Creating Futures That Work Website – https://futuresthatwork.com/  Harvey’s LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/hseifter/  Fred’s LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredmandell/  Harvey’s Email – hseifter@futuresthatwork.com  Fred’s Email – fred.mandell@futuresthatwork.com  Link to ‘Love Alone’ by Honest Mechanik – https://honestmechanik.bandcamp.com/track/love-alone   This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Sep 13

34 min 1 sec

Harvey Seifter & Fred Mandell are the founders of Creating Futures That Work, a company that uses teaching creative arts to people as a way to foster and develop the ability to innovate and collaborate with others. Harvey and Fred share each of their unique leadership journeys and lessons and insights they gleaned along the way. Harvey speaks to his experience working with Orpheus, an orchestra made famous because it’s a conductor-less orchestra. Fred shares his experience working in the Financial Services industry and how it has shifted to focus more on the consumer. They both discuss the parallels they observed between the creative process and how it impacts organizations and organizational decisions. Finally, they provide advice to executives on how to implement successful conflict resolution strategies across their organizations.  Key Takeaways: 01:38 – Today, we have a two-part episode where I’m speaking with Harvey Seifter & Fred Mandell, founders of Creating Futures That Work  08:45 – Seminal moments from Harvey and Fred’s leadership journey  12:07 – Ensuring missions and shared visions get communicated to the team  16:53 – Insights gleaned from working in the conductor-less orchestra, Orpheus  24:03 – Fred speaks to how the Financial Services industry has evolved throughout the years  28:36 – Advice Harvey and Fred would give to executives on implementing conflict resolution strategies   Tweetable Quotes: “For me, theatre was an incredible laboratory into all kinds of things, but especially into leadership. The whole process of bringing a bunch of people together and taking a script and exploring it and understanding the motivations of different characters, that was a constant set of opportunities and challenges and learning experiences.” (09:03) (Harvey) “What I tried to do at the beginning of my relationship with the team, whether it was a newly formed team or an intact existing team, was share with them my aspiration that the work that we do together as a team would be the very best work experience they’d ever had.” (10:44) (Fred) “One of the hardest things is overcoming something that we’ve tended to culturally learn as a business society. And that is that you actually are helping people when you give them clear and direct feedback. And the best way to give feedback is to answer questions honestly, sincerely, directly and as helpfully as you can.” (20:03) (Harvey) “There has been, I believe, a positive shift in the relationship between the Financial Services providers and the consumer. The consumer today is much more empowered.” (25:25) (Fred) “Every time that you present an idea, you have tremendous opportunities to learn more and ultimately to make it better. And that’s where feedback comes in.” (30:51) (Harvey) “It is harder to be a leader today than at any other time that I’ve been around. And that’s because the general context within which leaders operate has become so disruptive, uncertain and complex. And the impulse in that environment too often, that I’ve been able to observe, is that leaders take the ‘ready, fire, aim’ approach. In other words they jump to action. One of the things I would encourage would be not to act right away but to reflect.” (31:44) (Fred)  Links Mentioned:  Dino’s Email – dino@al4ep.com  Dino’s Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/al4edp/  Dino’s Twitter – https://twitter.com/al4edp  Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website – https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/  Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/al4ep/?ref=page_internal  Creating Futures That Work Website – https://futuresthatwork.com/  Harvey’s LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/hseifter/  Fred’s LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredmandell/  Harvey’s Email – hseifter@futuresthatwork.com  Fred’s Email – fred.mandell@futuresthatwork.com  This podcast uses the following...

Sep 13

41 min 8 sec

This is the second of two episodes featuring leaders still in the early phases of their trajectories. Entrepreneurs who founded their businesses fairly young, in underserved niches, and who are only a few years into their journey. Today’s guest is Vikrant Shaurya, the Founder and CEO of BestSellingBook.com. As you can tell by the name of his business, Vikrant found a very interesting niche.  His company helps aspiring authors conceptualize, write, self-publish, and market books.  Vikrant started his first business at 18 and, like many entrepreneurs first starting out, he failed very quickly.  In this episode we have a candid conversation about the lessons he learned through the failure of his first business and how he applied them in building BestSellingBook.com.  We talk about Vikrant's philopsohpy and approach to building his team and all the processes he put in place to build and manage it. Ultimately, Vikrant his business from one person to over 50 people.  He also talks about the self reflection process that he went through to figure out the things he liked to do and the skills and activities he wanted to delegate to other people. Vikrant Shaurya is a #1 best-selling author and the CEO and Founder of BestSellingBook.com, a done-for-you book writing service that helps entrepreneurs and thought leaders save time and turn their ideas into best selling books.  He has assisted thousands of thought leaders over the last decade bring their dreams of writing and publishing a book to reality.  Vikrant’s self-publishing expertise has been featured in ABC, CBS, Fox, and the CW.  VIKRANT Instagram:  instagram.com/vikrant.shaurya/ Facebook: facebook.com/bestsellingbookdotcom Website: bestsellingbook.com Free checklist: bestsellingbook.com/checklist Podcast: AUTHORity on demand     DINO Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/dinocattaneo/ Instagram: @al4edp Twitter: @al4edp Facebook: facebook.com/al4edp Website: al4ep.com Susan Cattaneo Music: susancattaneo.com BOOKS Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki How to Write a Bestseller: Become a Bestselling Author, Attract High-Value Clients, and Skyrocket Your Authority by Vikrant Shaurya POWER: The Success Mantra: Secrets to Creating Business Success by Vikrant Shaurya The One Thing by Gary Keller   This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Aug 30

46 min 40 sec

This is the first of two episodes featuring leaders still in the early phases of their trajectories. Entrepreneurs who founded their businesses fairly young, in underserved niches, and who are only a few years into their journey. Matt Wigler is a jazz musician who saw an opportunity in a specific entertainment market and launched a successful business. When that market was hit by the pandemic, he turned the sales experience he gained running his first business into a sales consulting business, and now he is the founder and CEO of two thriving companies.    In this insightful conversation, he talks about how he spotted the opportunities, and the philosophy he followed in building his businesses. He offered some interesting parallels between the process of making music in a band and building and running a team. And he shared plenty of insight on how to build a bootstrapped business without any outside financing. Finally, as a jazz musician, he talked about one of his favorite recordings and what he learned from it.   BIOGRAPHY   Matt Wigler is an entrepreneur, musical artist, and public speaker based in Miami, Florida. He is Founder & CEO of MHW Live Music and Wigler Group. Matt has an active career as a jazz & blues artist, and performs with his trio at venues and festivals around the world. He also speaks on topics including entrepreneurship, business-to-business sales, and building strong company culture in a remote work environment. Originally from Baltimore, Maryland, Matt began his music career at the young age of 13, with the release of his first studio album. In 2009, Matt’s second album, “Epiphony”, was nominated for Best Jazz CD by the Washington DC Area Music Association. As a musical artist Matt has performed at major venues including The Kennedy Center, Strathmore Music Center, Adrienne Arsht Center, Detroit Music Hall, Blues Alley, Birdland Jazz Club, Monterey Blues Festival, and Motor City Blues & Boogie Woogie Festival. Matt attended one year of college at Manhattan School of Music in New York City before transferring to University of Miami Frost School of Music, where he completed his BA. Matt received his MBA from University of Miami Herbert Business School. In 2016, Matt founded MHW Live Music, which provides entertainment for dozens of luxury hotel food & beverage outlets around the United States. In 2020, Matt founded Wigler Group, which provides business-to-business sales consulting, prospecting, and appointment setting services for media, advertising, and PR agencies.    LINKS http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattwigler (linkedin.com/in/mattwigler) http://www.mattwigler.com/ (mattwigler.com) http://www.wiglergroup.com/ (www.wiglergroup.com) http://www.mhwlivemusic.com/ (www.mhwlivemusic.com) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Aug 16

45 min 50 sec

Gabriella Arcadu is a political scientist and the co-founder of 4 Change, a leadership training organization. Gabriella spent over 20 years working with leaders and institutions of countries who have gone through war and unrest and helps them transition to peace. As result, she has been in the field and deeply involved in many of the significant international crises that our planet experienced in the past 30 years. She spent significant time in various African countries, in Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq and Indonesia among others. Over time, she specialized in mediation and in training leaders at all levels, ranging from functionaries to members of parliament to the members of the Crisis Task Force of the Arab League. In our fascinating conversation, she told the story of how she became involved in this type of work. She explains how her experiences in the field under highly stressful conditions and managing significant human crises informed her approach to leadership. Not surprisingly, some of the fundamental principles she shares apply to any situation, whether it is a guerrilla camp in Angola or your first day of work at a new company. In the final part of the episode, Gabriella explains how she and her co-founder have blended their experiences and backgrounds into a new approach to leadership training, which starts from the development of the individual to create an impact on teams, organizations and countries. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Aug 2

48 min

Alisa Cohn has been recognized as the Top Startup Coach and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. Her book "From Startup to Grownup" (Kogan Page) will be released in Oct 2021. In our conversation, we talked about her decision to leave corporate America to start her own business and some of the factors that people facing a similar decision should be taking into consideration. We then talked about how CEOs and leaders can navigate difficult business decisions while staying true to their own values, and how to stay connected with and motivate the talent in your firm.  Since she is talking daily to CEOs and founders, Alisa also shared some of the issues that are top of mind for leaders right now as we enter the post-pandemic recovery. Finally, she previewed for us one of the examples she uses in her upcoming book. Key Takeaways: 01:23 – Today, I’m speaking with startup coach Alisa Cohn who talks about her background, journey and key moments in her career that have gotten her to where she is now  04:02 – The decision to leave Corporate America and branch out on her own  06:03 – Alisa defines what authenticity means to her and how she’s helped CEOs maintain their authenticity when navigating difficult moments and choices  12:59 – Alisa speaks to why she avoids snap judgements when evaluating clients for the first time  16:26 – Advice Alisa would give to those reevaluating their client relationships  18:47 – The core elements that make up Alisa’s leadership style  20:07 – Alisa gives a brief preview to her upcoming book, From Start-Up to Grown-Up  23:58 – How Alisa helps founders with the difficult transition from founder to CEO  26:49 – Challenges that startups and other organizations are facing in this post-COVID world  29:19 – Alisa expounds on how her clients are attaining and acquiring top tier talent  31:12 – Alisa shares some of her other passions and how it impacts the way she shows up at work  34:09 – The business phrase that drives Alisa absolutely crazy  35:26 – Alisa shares some food for your body and food for your soul  38:21 – And now here’s ‘Revival,’ a song written and performed by Boston singer-songwriter Susan Cattaneo    =======   Full BIO: Named the Top Startup Coach in the World at the Thinkers50/Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards in London and the number one Global Guru for Startups in 2021, Alisa Cohn has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. Her book "From Startup to Grownup" (Kogan Page) will be released in Oct 2021.   A one-time startup CFO, strategy consultant, and current angel investor and advisor, she has worked with startups such as Venmo, Etsy, Draft Kings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as  Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, and Calvin Klein. Most recently, she was named one of the top voices in thought leadership for 2021 by PeopleHum.   Alisa is a sought-after speaker and has keynoted events for companies such as IBM, PwC, Dell, Standard Chartered Bank, and Citi. Inc named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers.    Alisa is a regular guest lecturer at Harvard and Cornell Universities, Henley Business School and the Naval War College. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches - a gathering of the top coaches in the world. She is the executive coach for Runway--the incubator at Cornell NYC Tech that helps post-docs commercialize their technology and build companies. She serves on the board of the Cornell Advisory Council. She has coached public and political figures including the former Supreme Court Chief Justice of Sri Lanka and the first female minister in the transitional government of Afghanistan.   Her articles have appeared in HBR,...

Jul 19

42 min 45 sec

This is a special episode for the 4th of July holiday. It brings together all the answers from the previous episodes to the question: which business expression or cliche or jargon drives you crazy? In addition to the answer from previous episodes, this also includes a preview of episode 12, as well as my own personal answer to the question! This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Jul 5

32 min 57 sec

Our guest today is Armin Molavi, Principal of Amolavi Consulting, a Marketing Strategy firm, and CEO of Hotel Business Magazine. We talked about finding the balance between being your authentic self and fully embracing who you are, and being able to work with a diverse group of stakeholders - peers, direct reports, bosses, clients. We also discussed his experience managing a distributed team while working remotely for 3 years, and how those lessons apply to managers who are navigating the new post-pandemic hybrid model. Given his experience at the heart of the hospitality industry as the publisher of a business to business magazine for the sector, Armin also shared the industry perspective and expectation for the return of travel.   Armin has more than 20 years of experience in marketing and advertising. After coming up through the ranks in two of the best advertising agencies in the country, Armin spent almost 3 years running global media for Hilton. In that capacity, he managed a distributed team of 70 people, scattered all over the globe. And he did that working mostly remotely. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Jun 21

54 min 44 sec

Today we delve deep into authenticity, vulnerability and the power of resetting your life. Our guest is leadership mentor and branding coach, Kasey Jones. Kasey helps entrepreneurs to gain clarity on what they are doing and where they’d like to go. In June of 2020, was almost killed by a dog attack. Today, she opens up about the experience how it changed her, and the incredible gifts that came from her overcoming this challenging time. We speak about trauma, living life without fear and what we all can do to be better versions of ourselves. We also talk about how the experience informed her work with her clients, and how when tackled the right way, personal branding is actually a way to become a better and more focused leader. Key Takeaways: 01:59 – Introducing today’s guest, Kasey Jones, who speaks to the work she does as a business coach and shares her harrowing near death experience  10:51 – Kasey recalls what went into the decision to speak publicly about her experience  16:56 – Kasey talks about living life without fear and things in her life that now move her to tears  20:32 – I share a story connected with my own bout with depression   23:55 – How Kasey helps her clients discover their own superpowers  26:19 – Kasey provides best practices for making positive changes in your life  30:34 – Kasey speaks to her passion for personal branding  33:34 – The business practices that drive Kasey absolutely crazy 35:22 – Kasey shares some food for your body and food for your soul  40:25 – And now here’s ‘Carried,’ a song written and performed by my wife, Susan Cattaneo and featuring Jenee Halstead Tweetable Quotes: “As I got through it, I felt like I had been given this second chance. It felt like I had this reset button on life. And I’ll be honest, it’s very hard for people to understand this, but this experience turned into – and I am not exaggerating – the greatest blessing of my life.” (08:38) “I remember having this ‘Aha’ moment where I realized that if I didn’t start talking about this, it would become exponentially harder for me every single day to talk about it at all.” (13:50) “I’m not afraid anymore. I’m not afraid of things. That doesn’t mean that I don’t have little fears that come up but I have a vision for the kind of life that I want to lead, and the kind of business that I’m building and the kind of impact I want to make. And it makes whatever little fears that come up feel like nothing.” (17:15) “Yeah, there’s a rawness. But what that means is that I connect more deeply with people, I feel more deeply, I am inspired more easily. I am connected to life and to others in a way that I think I avoided for so much of my life. And to me it’s the greatest gift that I ever could have asked for.” (19:28) “For me, there is no greater purpose than helping somebody else feel the strength and the courage to show up authentically and holistically as themselves.” (23:24) “I am a big believer in treating yourself to a decadent meal and savoring every single bit of it.” (36:13)  Links Mentioned:    Kasey Links LinkedIn –  linkedin.com/in/abetterjones/  Kasey’s Twitter – @abetterjones Instagram: @abetterjones  Kasey’s Website – abetterjones.com  Kasey's 5 Easy Steps to Unapologetically Build a Powerful Personal Brand: go.abetterjones.com/ppb   Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Email: dino@al4ep.com Website: al4ep.com Facebook  - facebook.com/al4edp  Twitter: @al4edp.com Instagram: @al4edp   Ted Lasso – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10986410/  ‘Carried’ – https://susancattaneo.bandcamp.com/track/carried-feat-jenee-halstead  The Happiness Advantage: How A Positive Brain Fuels Success in Work and Life by Shawn Acor This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Jun 7

44 min 50 sec

Our guest today is Marcel Quiroga, Founder and CEO of TQM Wealth Partners, a registered investment advisory firm. Marcel is not your typical founder of a wealth management firm. First of all, she is a woman in an industry that is still very much a male dominated industry. Second, she has a unique international perspective. She grew up in the US from Bolivian parents, went back to Bolivia to start her career and then came back to the US. Finally, she put herself through college while raising her kids as a single mother, and working her way up in the industry.  All of these experiences have given her a uniquely empathetic view of the role of a financial advisor, and have led her to start a firm where success is measured not just by the numbers, but by how wealth management can improve her clients’ overall quality of life. Marcel is also the Founder of The Legacy Dialogues, a program geared at helping people to find a path towards living their legacy and making a difference in the world. In this episode, Marcel opens up about her leadership style, the inspiration to launch her own investment advisory firm and her experience navigating the male-dominated field of finance. Marcel shares her thoughts on authenticity, leaving a legacy and why everything she does is in service of her clients’ values.  Key Takeaways: 01:27 – Introducing today’s guest, Marcel Quiroga, who speaks to the inspiration to start her own investment advisory firm and her personal leadership journey  10:05 – Marcel speaks to navigating a heavily male-dominated field and how it has shaped her experience as a leader  15:59 – Marcel shares her thoughts on authenticity and her mission to help others  26:36 – Marcel expounds on the work she’s doing at her latest initiative, The Legacy Dialogues  35:10 – Marcel talks about other passions of hers that influence the way she shows up at work  37:50 – The business phrase that drives Marcel absolutely crazy 39:56 – Marcel shares some food for your body and food for your soul  44:23 – Dino leaves the audience with the acoustic version of ‘Work Hard, Love Harder,’ a song written and performed by his wife, Susan Cattaneo  Tweetable Quotes: “Oftentimes I felt like the places where I was working were not led by individuals who had as much focus on the human element as they did on the money element, for lack of a better term.” (04:24) “I think one thing that helped me realize what kind of a leader I wanted to be is becoming aware of the type of leader I did not want to be from a personal perspective. Meaning, the first time I had a team that I was in charge with, I didn’t have enough self-confidence, I believe, at that time to lead the team.” (06:31) “Ultimately, I think humility is a key trait in leadership which means I can recognize the good, the bad and the ugly. I know where my strengths are. I know where my weaknesses lie, and I’m gonna work on improving those.” (09:38) “I want to attract other people who have that desire to do well and do good at the same time. And I want my clients to know that what we’re doing for them is beyond the numbers.” (19:00) “The Legacy Dialogues seeks to empower and enable people to think about how they want to live their lives because we actually live our legacies. The way we live is going to influence our legacy more than what we leave behind.” (27:18) “It’s also not easy to hear constructive criticism, but it’s so important for growth. If everybody tells us how great we are all the time, we might actually believe it. Yes, we may be good, but we can always be better.” (39:36) Links Mentioned:  Marcel’s LinkedIn – https://linkedin.com/in/marcelquiroga/ (linkedin.com/in/marcelquiroga/)  TQM Wealth Partners - https://www.tqmwealthpartners.com/ (tqmwealthpartners.com/ ) Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/tqmwealthpartners/ (...

May 24

48 min 4 sec

If you enter the phrase “top digital marketers in the world” in a google search, chances are you will get a list with 10 names, and among those names, you will find Rand Fishkin, our guest for today. Rand is an entrepreneur and author. Currently he is CEO of SparkToro, an organization that helps entrepreneurs, marketers, and product folks of all stripes uncover the publications and people that influence their target audience. In this episode, Rand talks about the importance of building organizations with strong core values and best practices for being a conscientious, thoughtful and empathetic leader. Rand presents a vision of the tech start-up world very different from what you hear in the predominant discourse. And in sharing the origin story of his latest startup, SparkToro, he details how his vision has informed the strategic choices he made in the process and how his definition of success has evolved throughout his career.    Key Takeaways: 01:12 – Introducing today’s guest, Rand Fishkin, who shares his thoughts on authenticity and seminal moments from his career where he discovered who he was as a leader  08:06 – Rand reflects on what he learned throughout the journey of building his software company, Moz  09:23 – The importance Rand placed on building out company values at Moz  11:47 – Rand talks his struggles with Imposter Syndrome  14:16 – Rand provides advice to those who are considering entrepreneurship or launching startups  18:14 – How Rand’s personal definition of success has evolved throughout his career  23:45 – Rand speaks to the evolution of content, SEO and building brands through digital marketing tactics  28:03 – Rand tells the origin story of his latest startup, SparkToro  32:18 – How Rand built SparkToro and the key decisions that were instrumental to the success of his company  34:07 – Rand talks about the importance of being a conscientious, thoughtful and empathetic leader and founder  36:18 – Rand talks about some of his passions and how they impact how he shows up at work  37:42 – The business phrases that drive Rand absolutely crazy 41:07 – Rand shares some food for your body and food for your soul  47:28 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Outsider,’ a song written and performed by Honest Mechanic, a band featuring Dino’s wife, Susan Cattaneo    Tweetable Quotes: “I think it’s really terrible to have a set of stated values – of expressed values that you put on the wall or the website – that are not lived up to internally.” (11:20) “I suspect that some of it is biology and some of it is culture and some of it is upbringing. Those are generally the forces that shape us as human beings.” (12:22) “I would urge folks that if you want to focus on the financial side, I would focus on profits over sales and revenue. If you want to focus on happiness, I would worry much less about size. Most entrepreneurs I know who have businesses between five and fifty employees are much happier than those that have five hundred to five thousand.” (16:23) “I love proving people wrong. Oh man. When someone tells me ‘You can’t do this. No way that’s gonna work,’ oh my God, there’s nothing more I like more than proving them wrong.” (23:37) “What does it mean to be a conscientious and thoughtful and empathetic leader and founder and company? And what is the way we want to participate in the world around us. Those are big picture conversations.” (35:29) “I think it’s pretty darn obvious to anyone and everyone that if all you’re after is Google rankings: A.) That might not be the best thing in the world, you might want to diversify your marketing and B.) Links are not all there is to Google.” (39:23)   Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email Dino’s Instagram Dino’s Twitter Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook SparkToro’s Website Rand’s LinkedIn Rand’s Book Whiteboard Friday Good to Great Book Lead from...

May 24

51 min 16 sec

The Power of Voice Roundtable This is the first special edition roundtable episode. These episodes provide an in depth look at an interesting topic. They feature guests who are experts in the specific area, who share their experience and then discuss the connection between that area and leadership Today’s topic is the connection between voice, creativity and leadership. Allison Bennie, Jenee Halstead and Ruby Rose Fox have one thing in common. Each one of them started their career as a singer and performer. And each one of them found an interesting way to expand beyond voice to use their experience to help people in different areas of their life. We start from their stories, what attracted each one of them to sing and how they went on the journey to be an artist. It is a pretty raw and candid discussion. Along with the passion and the joys, they cover some of the less known and less glamorous realities of life as an independent artist and as a woman in show business. From there, we talk about the moment when they realized that their expertise in voice and performance could actually benefit people who are not artists, and how the three of them has used this platform to expand career into new areas . Spoiler alert: everyone can sing, no matter what they have been told. You will hear about the physiology of voice, and what impact realizing they can sing has on adults who were told their whole life they couldn’t. Of course, we talk about some of the connections between voice and leadership. And they share some exercises that you can use in your everyday life to improve your overall presence as a leader, in any situation. As usual, we close the episode with some great recommendations for food for the soul. Enjoy this episode, it is a good one.   Key Takeaways: 04:14 – Dino introduces today’s special roundtable episode, featuring Jenee Halstead, Allison Bennie and Ruby Rose Fox  07:25 – Jenee, Allison and Ruby share the moment they realized they wanted to become performers  11:37 – The less glamorous side of being an independent artist  23:28 – Jenee, Allison and Ruby talk about what led them to pursue more powerful and meaningful initiative through their collective experiences as artists  40:45 – Jenee, Allison and Ruby provide advice for those looking to truly be seen more  54:15 – Jenee, Allison and Ruby share some food for your soul  59:38 – Dino thanks Jenee, Allison and Ruby for all joining the show 1:02:25 – Dino leaves the audience with two songs: ‘Solitary People,’ by Jenee and ‘Matador,’ by Ruby     Tweetable Quotes: “I’m a musical artist of various kinds and storyteller of various kinds.” (05:09) (Ruby) “So, here were these white men who were telling me how to get my dream as how I saw it. And I said, ‘Ok, cool. I’ll stop eating.’ So I did and I lost a ton of weight very quickly. I got very ill, very weak, and lost my voice. By the age of twenty-four my voice was gone and my singing career was over.” (13:50) (Allison) “I didn’t know why, but my heart was calling me somewhere else. And, I think I could have stayed in theatre if I had wanted to but there was so much negativity there. And I knew that I could produce my own shows, put my name on the marquee so they know a woman is coming through the door. And it just empowered me in a way that made me feel like an entrepreneur.” (18:16) (Ruby)  “Since that time, it’s just been really a process of facing my own insecurities and my own fears around being seen.” (22:47) (Jenee)  “Just all these little pieces of saying yes, and saying yes, and saying yes, and realizing that all of this stuff that I had been through and all of this training that I had was still within me.” (26:43) (Allison) “Everybody can sing. The fact that we’re putting people on a pedestal that only certain people are born to sing and...

Apr 29

1 hr 9 min

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Kathy Dyer has decades of experience managing large global firms and serves on a number of corporate and non-for-profit boards. Kathy talks about how she developed and cultivated her leadership style throughout the years, lessons she’s learned from key mentors and the importance of being well-rounded. Finally, Kathy talks about the work she’s done at CARE, shares her passion for travel and provides advice and best practices to listeners on how to hone and develop their leadership skills.  Key Takeaways: 01:07 – Dino introduces today’s guest, Katharin Dyer, who joins the show to discuss lessons she’s learned throughout her career, including an abrupt exit from Advanta  07:38 – Katharin speaks to how her leadership style has been rooted in courage  11:06 – What authenticity means to Katharin and mentors who have shaped who Katharin has become  14:54 – Katharin shares what success means to her and how she measures it  17:17 – Katharin speaks to the work she does with CARE and lessons she’s carried over into her business career  22:03 – Katharin defines her leadership style and identifies which traits she looks for in other leaders  25:19 – Katharin recalls a personal crisis she faced and how it shaped her as a leader  27:32 – Advice Katharin would give to listeners on leadership  30:49 – Katharin talks about her how her passion of travel has influenced her personally and professionally  32:28 – A key business phrase that Katharin absolutely hates 34:09 – Katharin shares some food for your soul  38:08 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Can’t Chase a Train,’ a song written and performed by Susan Cattaneo    Tweetable Quotes: “In my case, it was to really find myself that I could always act with courage. And the courage might be to talk about things that aren’t easy to talk about whether it’s giving someone feedback or speaking truth to power or speaking up at a time when if you don’t there will be bad consequences for others later.” (08:15) “People invested in me in my career. And, it’s just so easy and gratifying to know that you might invest in others and because of it there may be a skip in their step or wind at their back.” (12:05) “Success for me is really two things: Has my tenure in a role resulted in progress for the business? Has it resulted in progress for the people I have been entrusted with?” (15:10) “I think it’s important to be a whole person, not perhaps just narrow and focused on a career or an industry.” (18:49) “In a leader I look for energy. I look for ambition. I look for integrity. And, importantly – consistent with this whole conversation – I look for what I call, ‘whole people.’ Yes, I want people who are good at their jobs, but it is my belief that people are more effective and seen as a role model and an aspirational leader to their team if there are multiple dimensions.” (24:11) “I think good leaders master feedback in an advocacy mode. So learn to give feedback so that people want it from you and are not dreading it from you.” (27:51) “How many times have you heard an organization say, ‘Our mission is to exceed our customers’ expectations?’ Do you know what that means to me? That organization has punted on strategy. The hard work is to actually do the work to set the proper expectations and meet them.” (32:49) Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email https://www.instagram.com/al4edp/ (Dino’s Instagram) https://twitter.com/al4edp (Dino’s Twitter) https://authenticleadershipforeverydaypeople.com/ (Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website) https://www.facebook.com/al4ep/?ref=page_internal (Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook) https://www.care.org/ (CARE) https://www.last.fm/music/Susan+Cattaneo/_/Can%27t+Chase+a+Train (‘Can’t Chase a Train’)...

Apr 26

42 min 24 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Today, Dino is sitting down with speaker, author and catalyst, Dr. Steve Yacovelli, a.k.a. “The Gay Leadership Dude.” Steve is the Founder and Principle of Top Dog Learning Group, a firm that provides guidance and solutions in leadership, change management, diversity and inclusion. Steve is an expert practitioner in leadership, change management and diversity and inclusion, a published author, and a sought after keynote speaker. He’s worked one-on-one with some of the most prestigious global firms and institutions, including Disney, IBM, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and The Ohio State University.  In this episode, Steve opens up about how he came to embrace his identity as LGBTQ+ and the impact that had on how Steve showed up to work. Dino and Steve talk about trends Steve has noticed in twenty years as a leadership trainer in Corporate America, the value that equity, diversity and inclusion bring to an organization and the connection between authenticity and courage.    Key Takeaways: 01:28 – Dino opens the episode by sharing his connection with today’s guest, Dr. Steve Yacovelli, who speaks to discovering his true authentic self and the role that equity has in the workplace  08:07 – What led Steve to focus on training and development  10:10 – Steve expounds on The Top Six Leadership Competencies he helps his clients develop  14:26 – Steve provides insights and advice on leadership  16:37 – The significant shifts in leadership that Steve has observed throughout his career  18:15 – Steve speaks to equity, diversity, inclusion and belonging in the workplace   22:13 – Advantages to having a more equitable and diverse workforce  25:44 – Steve talks about the conscious choice to brand himself as The Gay Leadership Dude  32:31 – The connection between authenticity and courage  39:04 – How Steve built up his own courage  42:19 – Practical steps that can be taken to enhance the voices of marginalized groups  44:51 – The business phrases that drive Steve absolutely crazy 45:48 – Steve shares some food for your soul  49:01 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Let the Music Deliver Me,’ a song written and performed by his wife, Susan Cattaneo   Tweetable Quotes: “I started spending my focus trying to help folks really see that leadership is important – regardless of if you’re an army of one or an army of a thousand – and what can you do to be more effective in that leadership journey that you’re on.” (09:56) “The number one strategy that I share with any leader, regardless of the level that you’re at, is your job is to cultivate the garden.” (14:51) “Several studies show that if you have diverse Boards of Directors and C-Suites, your profits are better.” (25:02) “If you focus on these competencies that I identify, which are authenticity, courage, empathy, effective communication, relationships and shaping culture, you’re gonna be just awesomely inclusive and really successful.” (30:02) “To be authentic is to be courageous and to own it and to be yourself.” (34:23) “If you’re a rock star at what you do, where you live won’t matter.” (37:43) “I could take my three hundred and fifty-six page book, put it to one page, one word. And that’s trust. Best, authentic, effective leaders have trust with those around them. And that’s not just direct reports, that’s 360.” (40:11) Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email Dino’s Instagram Dino’s Twitter Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook Dr. Steve’s Website Dr. Steve’s LinkedIn Dr. Steve’s Book  Dr. Steve’s Instagram ‘Let the Music Deliver Me’ by Susan Cattaneo    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Mar 2

52 min 28 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Today, Dino is sitting down with musician, activist and educator, Erin Barra. Erin is an authoritative voice in music, tech and education and currently serves as the Director of Popular Music at Arizona State University. Today, Dino and Erin’s vision for the new music program she launched aimed at giving access to world class music education to the underserved. They discuss her journey to discovering her identity and coming to terms with a big shift in her career. Finally, Erin opens up about the connection between her passion for fine wine, science fiction, music production and the design of education.    Key Takeaways: 01:03 – Dino introduces today’s guest, Erin Barra, who shares her background in music, tech and education and what inspired her to launch Beats by Girlz  07:23 – Erin speaks to the identity crisis she faced as an artist and the challenges she faced  12:31 – Erin talks about overcoming scarcity mentality and her strong belief in community service  17:25 – Key lessons Erin’s imparted on artists she’s worked with  22:23 – How Erin regulates and promotes participation among her students  27:55 – Erin speaks to the importance she places on vision  32:53 – How Erin defines and measures success  36:29 – Erin talks about the vision for the Popular Music program at Arizona State University  42:14 – Erin provides the audience with three pieces of advice  44:54 – How Erin’s passions outside of work impact the way she shows up at work  47:02 – The business phrases that drive Erin absolutely crazy 48:53 – Erin shares some food for your body and your soul  51:14 – Dino leaves the audience with a song written by today’s guest, Erin Barra    Tweetable Quotes: “There was a day – a very hard day for me – when I realized that people were way more interested in how I was making music than listening to my music. And that was a tough pill to swallow, but once I swallowed it that’s when all the good stuff in my life started happening.” (07:05) “Once I had been at Berkley for a few years, I realized that my real power is in helping people. And that by being that person who facilitates another person to succeed, that is actually one of the most powerful positions you could be in.” (14:08) “I think that creating culture is a really important thing, in a classroom and a workplace, because you want to facilitate people to be their best selves.” (18:03) “For me, success means that when I hear about somebody else winning, especially if I identify as somebody similar to them, that the only emotion I feel is pride and being happy for another individual. Shedding that sense of competition that the music industry embedded in me, that’s success.” (35:58) “It’s important to create a culture in your workplace where people feel safe. And that just helps you because then they’ll feel safe to tell you when something’s wrong.” (43:48)   Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email Dino’s Instagram Dino’s Twitter Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook Erin’s LinkedIn  Erin’s Website Beats by Girlz Website This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Feb 10

56 min 7 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Today, Dino is sitting down with executive advisor, consultant and former CMO of Aetna, Dave Edelman. Dave has been a partner at a couple of top consulting firms and a key member of the team that built Digitas into a major digital agency. Dino begins by speaking to the profound lessons he learned from Dave throughout their time working together at Digitas. Dave provides examples of how he’s gotten intentional and deliberate with leadership and key traits he looks for in other leaders on his team. They touch on Dave’s passion for musical theater and how it’s shaped his personality and leadership style, specifically the concept of always bringing energy into the room. Finally, Dave opens up about a health scare he experienced and how it’s impacted the way he approaches his professional and personal life.    Key Takeaways: 01:09 – Dino opens the episode by sharing his connection with today’s guest, Dave Edelman, and shares lessons he learned from him during his time at Digitas 07:29 – Dave provides insights into his background as a business leader  11:55 – What authenticity means to Dave and how his passion for musical theater shaped his personality and leadership style   15:16 – Dave recalls the moment he got intentional and deliberate about leadership  19:28 – Dave speaks to challenges he overcame in transitioning from a traditional consulting firm to Digitas  24:07 – Leadership traits Dave looks for in members of his team  26:54 – Dave opens up about a health scare he endured and how that impacted his outlook on his life and leadership  29:59 – How Dave defines and measures success  32:09 – Dave provides insights and advice on leadership  36:00 – The business phrases that drive Dave absolutely crazy 38:08 – Dave shares some food for your soul  41:27 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Wrecking Ball,’ a song written and performed by his wife, Susan Cattaneo    Tweetable Quotes: “I think authenticity is when your natural, passionate energies come out in your interactions. It’s really you. It’s what’s driving you.” (12:10) “Before you show your own expertise, you’ve got to diagnose the situation around you. You’ve got to ask questions. You’ve got to investigate. You’ve got to understand, because what right do you have to say anything until you understand the context you’re in.” (23:00) “The other thing about a leader is you’ve got to have a sense of what’s gonna be around the corner. It’s important to be in the moment and understand what’s happening in the moment, but you do have to think about two steps forward.” (26:03) “For me, one of the most important things success has been about has been helping people around me move forward in various ways.” (30:13) “The number one leadership tip is ask questions. Don’t just think you’ve got the answers. And you’ve really got to listen. Sometimes what you hear may not be the words that are said.” (32:18)   Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email Dino’s Instagram Dino’s Twitter Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook Dave’s Twitter  Dave’s Article Branding in the Digital Age Dave’s Segment-of-One  ‘Station to Station’ by David Bowie  This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Jan 28

45 min 12 sec

Welcome to Authentic Leadership for Everyday People, the podcast that investigates the connection between effective leadership and authenticity. Today, Dino is sitting down with business leader and author of Restoring the Soul of Business, Rishad Tobaccowala. Rishad is currently a senior advisor to the Publicis Groupe, where he’s had a remarkable career, most recently serving as the Chief Growth Officer and Chief Strategist. Dino and Rishad talk about Rishad’s career journey, his expertise in bridging the world of data and technology with the human element of business and the importance of defining success for yourself. They discuss best practices for leadership and how the pandemic has affected and will affect the way we think about our priorities.    Key Takeaways: 01:07 – Dino introduces today’s guest, Rishad Tobaccowala, who joins the show to talk about his business background, his approach to leadership and his passion for writing  08:32 – Rishad reflects on turning points in his career where he encountered authentic leadership and lists the five characteristics that comprise a great boss   14:31 – The importance of defining success for yourself rather than letting others define it for you  22:26 – Rishad shares how he defines and measures success  28:00 – Rishad provides insights and advice on leadership  39:57 – The business phrases that drive Rishad absolutely crazy 42:53 – Rishad expounds on the concept of ‘the new strange’  48:28 – Rishad shares some food for your soul  50:31 – Dino announces a special giveaway to listeners who write a review for this episode  51:50 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Abide,’ a song written and performed by his wife, Susan Cattaneo    Tweetable Quotes: “I found this really insightful saying that working for a fantastic boss in a smelly bathroom is better than working for a terrible boss in a rose garden.” (09:56) “We tend to regret errors of omission more than we regret errors of commission. We regret the things we wish we had done much more than things we did that didn’t work out.” (17:09) “The way I sort of define success is the ability for a person to spend their time the way they want to. If you are spending your time the way you want to, that’s success.” (22:42) “To be a good leader, you have to have as many of these five characteristics. You have to have a sense of craft and expertise. You want to have integrity. You want to have empathy and think about other people. Vulnerability is willing to say you’re wrong. And inspire people, especially when times are tough.” (28:45) “When a client believes that you are backing up your people, they believe that you run a great team.” (37:38) “The way you form a habit is either you start or stop doing something for sixty days.” (44:34)   Links Mentioned: Dino’s Email Dino’s Instagram Dino’s Twitter Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Website Authentic Leadership for Everyday People Facebook Rishad’s LinkedIn  Rishad’s Website  Rishad’s Newsletter Rishad’s Book  ‘Abide’ by Susan Cattaneo  This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Dec 2020

55 min 45 sec

Our guest today is venture capitalist and serial entrepreneur Raj Kapoor, who joins the show to share a conversation about authenticity, vulnerability and leading by making adjustments. Raj is the Chief Strategy Officer at Lyft and Founder of World Without Covid, a nonprofit health initiative with a goal to connect individuals to urgent clinical research trials to end the pandemic. In this episode, Raj talks about how the values of the founders at Lyft set the tone for its vision of making the world better through transportation. He goes deep into how these values influence the way choices are made daily at Lyft. They discuss Raj’s personal journey as a leader, how he’s adjusted and evolved, and his passion for giving back. Raj opens up about his experience contracting COVID-19 and the decision to launch, World Without Covid. Finally, Raj provides listeners with advice on personal development and shares how his passions outside of work influence how he shows up at work.  Key Takeaways: 01:11 – Dino introduces today’s guest, Raj Kapoor, who joins the show to discuss authenticity, his strengths and weaknesses and the biggest challenges he faced when he joined Lyft  10:16 – Raj discusses how the values of Lyft’s founders have influenced the way choices are made daily at Lyft  12:20 – Raj speaks to how Lyft maintains its culture and hires the right people  15:46 – Facing and overcoming the challenges posed by COVID-19 20:10 – Raj discusses how Lyft has fostered a sense of transparency and trust throughout this global pandemic  21:51 – How Raj defines success and what initiatives are most important to him  26:03 – Raj opens up about his frightening battle with COVID-19  29:48 – Dino takes a moment to let listeners know where they can learn more about World Without Covid 30:02 – Raj describes his ever-evolving leadership style  31:26 – Raj talks about his experience as a serial entrepreneur and venture capitalist  36:48 – Advice Raj would give to listeners on personal development and vulnerability 38:16 – Raj talks about how his outside passions have influenced how he shows up at work  39:58 – Key business words and phrases of this era that Raj absolutely hates 40:56 – Raj shares some food for your soul  42:03 – Dino thanks Raj for joining the show and Raj encourages listeners to learn more about World Without Covid  43:59 – Dino leaves the audience with ‘Work Hard, Love Harder,’ a song written and performed by his wife, Susan Cattaneo    Tweetable Quotes: “Authenticity is really being, acting and saying who you really are versus what you think others want you to be. Being authentic is really doing it from a place that is devoid of fear of judgement and devoid of fear of reprisal.” (04:24) “I would say that getting a company that’s kind of in somewhat of a rut, but to get out of that and go into the virtuous cycle was a great learning just to observe that and playing a little role in that along the way.” (10:03) “At its core, [Lyft] is a founder-driven company and it came from the founders. They have strong beliefs that we’re here to improve people’s lives with transportation, not just provide transportation.” (11:29) “Now that activity is resuming in some areas, we made it a ceremony of asking for their hand back and we put out a carpet and asked them if they will come back to us. And it was quite beautiful to see that.” (21:26) “I think the hardest part in going through that [battle with COVID-19] was the emotional toll of waking up every morning and wondering if it’s gonna be worse and not knowing what’s gonna happen the next day.” (26:58) “The parts of my leadership style that I think have worked are being direct, setting clear goals and being involved at the right time, but not all the time.” (30:23) “It’s good that I got some of that harsh feedback as a venture capitalist, because it helped me understand...

Dec 2020

47 min 18 sec

This episode introduces Authentic Leadership for Everyday people. It also features a segment from an episode where Raj Kapoor, Chief Strategy Officer and Head of  Business for the self-driving division at Lyft talks about his World Without COVID initiative.   Learn more about Worldwithoutcovid.org This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Dec 2020

11 min 36 sec