RCI | English : Columns

By RCI | English

With our columns, learn more about topics as diverse as Canada’s place in the world, the Arctic, health, art, culture and the environment.

  1. 1.
    Canadian adults get a failing grade for physical activity
    3:38
  2. 2.
    Climate change will challenge new minority government
    4:36
  3. 3.
    Depression link to inflammation explained in book
    7:45
  4. 4.
    Exercise can help with cancer and help prevent it, says panel
    4:24
  5. 5.
    Bias, discrimination prevent people getting obesity care: study
    8:18
  6. 6.
    Do we trust science? McGill professor weighs in
    6:39
  7. 7.
    Extinction rebellion action in Canada: measured success
    4:26
  8. 8.
    Eye scan may soon permit early detection of Alzheimer’s
    5:25
  1. 9.
    Art: the amazing Canadian artist you never heard of
    10:51
  2. 10.
    Partying hard, drinking soft: revolutionising your nights out
    7:24
  3. 11.
    Indigenous participation key to Arctic development, Inuit activist tells Economic Forum of the Americas
    6:10
  4. 12.
    Better wildfire management would help reduce black carbon pollution say Arctic experts
    7:20
  5. 13.
    Canada files submission to establish continental shelf’s outer limits in Arctic Ocean
    7:47
  6. 14.
    Science lacks evidence on depression in women, find researchers
    4:10
  7. 15.
    Belugas use personalized sounds to identify themselves: researcher
    5:08
  8. 16.
    Arctic experts tackle black carbon risk posed by wildfires
    11:13
  9. 17.
    U.N. Year of Indigenous Languages: Spotlight Nunavut
    10:23
  10. 18.
    Alaska drilling, China, and the Arctic Council handover to Iceland : Northern news to watch for in 2019
    10:24
  11. 19.
    ITK, an Arctic Council rejig and the summit Finland won’t let die : Northern news to watch for in 2019
    8:14
  12. 20.
    Trade troubles dominate 2018 in Canada
    9:56
  13. 21.
    Canada: Becoming a Senior Society
    9:28
  14. 22.
    Interactive Canadian ebook seeks to make Arctic climate science accessible
    10:15
  15. 23.
    Notable book recommendations from across northern Canada
    6:28
  16. 24.
    Major trauma linked to higher risk of mental illness, suicide
    4:50
  17. 25.
    Increasing ocean acidification ushering in an era of uncertainty for Arctic, says report
    6:14
  18. 26.
    Book: Waddington-tracing the Group of Seven
    9:18
  19. 27.
    Canada only recycles 11 per cent of plastic waste
    5:01
  20. 28.
    Indigenous Cultural Tourism: How the North is learning from community success in southern Canada
    8:24
  21. 29.
    Policing infrastructure rejig in Canada’s northwestern Yukon territory
    4:38
  22. 30.
    Feature Interview: Is Arctic climate research missing the big picture?
    6:33
  23. 31.
    Feature Interview: International Inuit leader stresses importance of Indigenous voices on world stage
    11:35
  24. 32.
    Is climate change luring sharks north? Communities wrestle with bite mystery off Arctic coast
    5:47
  25. 33.
    Climate destruction on Ellesmere Island – Canada’s shrinking glaciers
    7:24
  26. 34.
    From the Arctic to Atlantic, a photographer documents seal hunting in Canada
    6:45
  27. 35.
    Arctic Indigenous food culture takes the day at international cookbook awards
    4:54
  28. 36.
    Canada invests $1.2 million to help solve mystery of dwindling char numbers in Arctic
    6:03
  29. 37.
    Hockey- use the right words eh?
    6:54
  30. 38.
    Children fleeing DR Congo conflict to Uganda report widespread rape
    14:29
  31. 39.
    Canada wants to list mysterious Arctic petroglyphs as UNESCO World Heritage Site
    14:55
  32. 40.
    South Sudan faces another famine, aid groups warn
    12:14
  33. 41.
    Canadian province of Ontario contributes $96,000 towards update of Inuit art trademark
    5:53
  34. 42.
    Fat people who are fit have the related health benefits: study
    4:28
  35. 43.
    Canada plans to toughen arms-export rules but will honour Saudi arms deal: Freeland
    12:14
  36. 44.
    North American Arctic is failing compared to Russia, Nordics, warns think tank
    7:25
  37. 45.
    The LINK Online, 20-21 Jan. 2018
    30:02
  38. 46.
    Non-fiction: 30 years as a prison guard
    7:04
  39. 47.
    UN and humanitarian agencies sound alarm on Saudi-led blockade of Yemen
    5:47
  40. 48.
    Canadian photographer sounds alarm on crisis in South Sudan
    7:56
  41. 49.
    Chemical attack in Syria upends prospects of Russia-U.S. detente
    12:43
  42. 50.
    15 years after deadly Afghan ambush reporters face new threats
    18:00

Listen to RCI | English : Columns now.

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Elio Antunes says physical activity needs to be a vital part of everyday life to all Canadians.","id":"2z4fPfJjauKIBTEUKikTig","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian adults get a failing grade for physical activity","release_date":"2019-10-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2z4fPfJjauKIBTEUKikTig"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8c4a94cf110c3f1cdb988690714af323429899b0","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"In Canada’s federal election, 63 per cent of voters chose parties with strong platforms on mitigating climate change. The Liberal Party will form the government but, since it does not have a majority of seats, it will have to seek the support of other parties in order to govern. Two of these parties strongly favour tougher measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  The New Democratic Party and the Green Party both campaigned hard for major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. (iStock) Two opposition parties seek stronger climate action “We see that the Liberals, the New Democratic Party...the Green Party...all agree that this country needs to step up the ambition of our climate commitments,” says Catherine Abreu, Executive Director of the Climate Action Network of Canada, a coalition of groups concerned about climate change.  “We need to meet that 2020 deadline set out by the UN to come back to the table with a stronger commitment under the Paris Agreement. We need to legislate..emissions reduction targets...that help us get there, as well as holding ourselves accountable for those commitments and establishing institutions that keep us on track.   But the Conservative Party ran on a promise to kill the carbon tax that the previous Liberal government levied on provinces. The leaders of the oil-rich, western provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan are opposed to the tax and other environmental measures that would weaken the oil industry.  The challenge of the new minority government will be to reconcile those conflicting visions.  Political parties recognize there will be a need for a transition from oil industry jobs to greener alternatives. (iStock) Parties agree job diversification needed Some of the parties emphasized a need for economic diversification and job creation as the country moves away from fossil fuel industries and toward what they call a climate-safe future.  Abreu likens the situation to the collapse of the cod fishing industry in the 1970s in eastern Canada that forced families to leave and seek work in other parts of the country. “Even though politicians foresaw the collapse of the cod fishery, they didn’t plan for it. And I want us to make sure that we are not in the same position in the next couple of decades, that we see that the oil and gas industry...does need to wind down gradually...over time, and that we need to plan and prepare for it, have conversations with workers and communities about what they need to prepare for it and invest in the industries of the future that are going to protect people and the planet.” The Liberals will form a government with 157 seats, leaving it short of the 13 required for a majority. For support on climate issues, it can seek the help of the NDP which obtained 24 seats, the Bloc Quebecois which garnered 32 seats, and/or the Greens with three. Conservative Party is a strong supporter of the oil industry The Conservative Party which supports the oil industry obtained 32 seats and so, does not have enough to topple the government if it disagrees with climate policy.  However, even though his Liberal Party did not win any seats in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Prime Minister Trudeau has said he wants to serve people there as well and he plans to go ahead with the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline to bring oil product to tidewater. The NDP, the Bloc Quebecois and the Greens are opposed.  The prime minister has made no formal alliance with any party and says he will seek their support on a case-by-case basis. It will be interesting to see how he manages. A minority government in Canada typically falls in about 18 to 24 months. Catherine Abreu says there will be much opposition party support for strong action to mitigate climate change.EN_Interview_2-20191024-WIE20","duration_ms":276792,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/26hLAd5TObzMqirXq20kkZ"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/26hLAd5TObzMqirXq20kkZ","html_description":"

In Canada’s federal election, 63 per cent of voters chose parties with strong platforms on mitigating climate change. The Liberal Party will form the government but, since it does not have a majority of seats, it will have to seek the support of other parties in order to govern. Two of these parties strongly favour tougher measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

\n
\"\"

The New Democratic Party and the Green Party both campaigned hard for major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. (iStock)

\n
Two opposition parties seek stronger climate action
\n

“We see that the Liberals, the New Democratic Party…the Green Party…all agree that this country needs to step up the ambition of our climate commitments,” says Catherine Abreu, Executive Director of the Climate Action Network of Canada, a coalition of groups concerned about climate change. 

\n

“We need to meet that 2020 deadline set out by the UN to come back to the table with a stronger commitment under the Paris Agreement. We need to legislate..emissions reduction targets…that help us get there, as well as holding ourselves accountable for those commitments and establishing institutions that keep us on track.  

\n

But the Conservative Party ran on a promise to kill the carbon tax that the previous Liberal government levied on provinces. The leaders of the oil-rich, western provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan are opposed to the tax and other environmental measures that would weaken the oil industry. 

\n

The challenge of the new minority government will be to reconcile those conflicting visions. 

\n
\"\"

Political parties recognize there will be a need for a transition from oil industry jobs to greener alternatives. (iStock)

\n
Parties agree job diversification needed
\n

Some of the parties emphasized a need for economic diversification and job creation as the country moves away from fossil fuel industries and toward what they call a climate-safe future. 

\n

Abreu likens the situation to the collapse of the cod fishing industry in the 1970s in eastern Canada that forced families to leave and seek work in other parts of the country. “Even though politicians foresaw the collapse of the cod fishery, they didn’t plan for it. And I want us to make sure that we are not in the same position in the next couple of decades, that we see that the oil and gas industry…does need to wind down gradually…over time, and that we need to plan and prepare for it, have conversations with workers and communities about what they need to prepare for it and invest in the industries of the future that are going to protect people and the planet.”

\n

The Liberals will form a government with 157 seats, leaving it short of the 13 required for a majority. For support on climate issues, it can seek the help of the NDP which obtained 24 seats, the Bloc Quebecois which garnered 32 seats, and/or the Greens with three.

\n
Conservative Party is a strong supporter of the oil industry
\n

The Conservative Party which supports the oil industry obtained 32 seats and so, does not have enough to topple the government if it disagrees with climate policy. 

\n

However, even though his Liberal Party did not win any seats in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Prime Minister Trudeau has said he wants to serve people there as well and he plans to go ahead with the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline to bring oil product to tidewater. The NDP, the Bloc Quebecois and the Greens are opposed. 

\n

The prime minister has made no formal alliance with any party and says he will seek their support on a case-by-case basis.

\n

It will be interesting to see how he manages.

\n

A minority government in Canada typically falls in about 18 to 24 months.

\n
Catherine Abreu says there will be much opposition party support for strong action to mitigate climate change.
","id":"26hLAd5TObzMqirXq20kkZ","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Climate change will challenge new minority government","release_date":"2019-10-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:26hLAd5TObzMqirXq20kkZ"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a4c44264a1b42448ac4ae9d050c4b25dd48f8459","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A new book suggests that depression should be considered an inflammatory illness. That is to say, depression can provoke high levels of stress hormone which cause certain brain cells to stop working properly and to produce proteins that cause inflammation. Inflammation can cause other problems like heart disease, diabetes and obesity. “When you have multiple or very severe episodes (of depression) there’s actually an inflammatory cascade that is set up in the brain and it can lead to real measurable changes in the brain’s structure and functioning,” says Dr. Diane McIntosh, a psychiatrist  and author of the book This is Depression: A Comprehensive Compassionate Guide for Anyone who Wants to Understand Depression. “We can see in the brains of chronically, severely depressed patients that they have shrinkage of particular brain areas, one called the hippocampus. We can measure that in people who have severe and chronic depression and that’s related to an inflammatory cascade.” Severe and chronic depression can cause changes in the brain. says author. (iStock) Treatment must be tailor-made, says psychiatrist McIntosh says there are no specific anti-inflammatory treatments for depression yet and there is much work being done to be more specific in the targeting of depression. However, many current treatments for depression do have an impact on the inflammatory system and neurotransmitters, and they help nourish the brain. Among the treatments are anti-depressants, electro compulsive therapy, and exercise to can have a beneficial effect. The difficulty is that everyone is different and every treatment needs to be tailor-made for each patient. Things like yoga and mindfulness can also help patients manage their symptoms. McIntosh says there is much trial and error involved in finding the right regimen for each patient. Dr. Diane McIntosh says depression is complex and involves inflammation.EN_Interview_2-20191023-WIE20","duration_ms":465576,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1CROtjDeTBQZmQwbWdAbQp"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1CROtjDeTBQZmQwbWdAbQp","html_description":"

A new book suggests that depression should be considered an inflammatory illness. That is to say, depression can provoke high levels of stress hormone which cause certain brain cells to stop working properly and to produce proteins that cause inflammation. Inflammation can cause other problems like heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

\n

“When you have multiple or very severe episodes (of depression) there’s actually an inflammatory cascade that is set up in the brain and it can lead to real measurable changes in the brain’s structure and functioning,” says Dr. Diane McIntosh, a psychiatrist  and author of the book This is Depression: A Comprehensive Compassionate Guide for Anyone who Wants to Understand Depression.

\n

“We can see in the brains of chronically, severely depressed patients that they have shrinkage of particular brain areas, one called the hippocampus. We can measure that in people who have severe and chronic depression and that’s related to an inflammatory cascade.”

\n
\"\"

Severe and chronic depression can cause changes in the brain. says author. (iStock)

\n
Treatment must be tailor-made, says psychiatrist
\n

McIntosh says there are no specific anti-inflammatory treatments for depression yet and there is much work being done to be more specific in the targeting of depression. However, many current treatments for depression do have an impact on the inflammatory system and neurotransmitters, and they help nourish the brain. Among the treatments are anti-depressants, electro compulsive therapy, and exercise to can have a beneficial effect.

\n

The difficulty is that everyone is different and every treatment needs to be tailor-made for each patient. Things like yoga and mindfulness can also help patients manage their symptoms. McIntosh says there is much trial and error involved in finding the right regimen for each patient.

\n
Dr. Diane McIntosh says depression is complex and involves inflammation.
\n

\"\"

","id":"1CROtjDeTBQZmQwbWdAbQp","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Depression link to inflammation explained in book","release_date":"2019-10-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1CROtjDeTBQZmQwbWdAbQp"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0613a994b4c9a9c789386cbe8dbf93853263a106","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"An international panel of experts in cancer and rehabilitation has devised new guidelines to help people prevent cancer or recover from it and improve their survival. “In terms of cancer treatment, we know that being active, in theory, has been safe. We’ve done a lot of research there and it’s beneficial,” says Kristin Campbell, associate professor of physical therapy at the University of British Columbia and the Canadian representative on the international panel. Exercise said to reduce fatigue, anxiety, depression “The research suggests that 30 minutes of aerobic activity, three days per week and two days a week of strength training can reduce cancer-related fatigue, improve feelings of anxiety and depression, improve your physical function and improve your overall quality of life.” The panel suggests doctors work out an exercise plan with cancer patients as part of their overall recovery regimen. (iStock) Exercise said to help prevent 7 cancers The panel also found that 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity like brisk walking or running can reduce the risk of getting seven common cancers. They are colon, breast, endometrial, kidney, bladder, esophagus and stomach cancer.  A new program has been devised to help health care providers ensure that people living with and beyond cancer are assessed and referred to appropriate exercise and rehabilitation as part of their overall care.  The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology was one of the 17 groups on the panel which also included American Cancer Society, German Union for Health Exercise, Exercise and sport Science Australia among others. Prof. Kristin Campbell explains what exercise can help prevent cancer or improve the lives of cancer survivors. (Martin Dee/University of British Columbia)EN_Interview_2-20191018-WIE20","duration_ms":264432,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5dph27cDJhSButnBVrMqqI"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5dph27cDJhSButnBVrMqqI","html_description":"

An international panel of experts in cancer and rehabilitation has devised new guidelines to help people prevent cancer or recover from it and improve their survival.

\n

“In terms of cancer treatment, we know that being active, in theory, has been safe. We’ve done a lot of research there and it’s beneficial,” says Kristin Campbell, associate professor of physical therapy at the University of British Columbia and the Canadian representative on the international panel.

\n
Exercise said to reduce fatigue, anxiety, depression
\n

“The research suggests that 30 minutes of aerobic activity, three days per week and two days a week of strength training can reduce cancer-related fatigue, improve feelings of anxiety and depression, improve your physical function and improve your overall quality of life.”

\n
\"\"

The panel suggests doctors work out an exercise plan with cancer patients as part of their overall recovery regimen. (iStock)

\n
Exercise said to help prevent 7 cancers
\n

The panel also found that 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity like brisk walking or running can reduce the risk of getting seven common cancers. They are colon, breast, endometrial, kidney, bladder, esophagus and stomach cancer. 

\n

A new program has been devised to help health care providers ensure that people living with and beyond cancer are assessed and referred to appropriate exercise and rehabilitation as part of their overall care. 

\n

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology was one of the 17 groups on the panel which also included American Cancer Society, German Union for Health Exercise, Exercise and sport Science Australia among others.

\n
Prof. Kristin Campbell explains what exercise can help prevent cancer or improve the lives of cancer survivors. (Martin Dee/University of British Columbia)
","id":"5dph27cDJhSButnBVrMqqI","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Exercise can help with cancer and help prevent it, says panel","release_date":"2019-10-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5dph27cDJhSButnBVrMqqI"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/833e0e924bdfd0546e98ad7621e7cd8a5e669e29","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Science shows that obesity is a chronic disease like diabetes or cancer, yet people living with it are being told “they did this to themselves, and that they don’t deserve to be supported,” says Dr. Arya Sharma, the scientific director for the non-profit Obesity Canada.  Misconceptions abound, says doctor He says a new survey shows there are many misconceptions among health care professionals, employers and people living with obesity.   The latter “shouldn’t look at this as being their own fault. This is something that happens to people in the same way that diabetes...or high blood pressure happens to people.  And when it happens...you need to get treatment that actually works,” says Sharma. While exercise is good for everyone, it and diet change alone are not enough to treat obesity, says doctor. (iStock) Better and long-term help is needed He adds, too many doctors simply recommend a change of diet and exercise, but that is not enough to treat obesity. People may need medication, cognitive behavioural therapy and, in some cases, bariatric surgery. And they need to understand there is no cure and the disease will require lifelong management. There are strong biological reasons that weight returns after weight loss and it is a long-term battle to fight them. Discrimination said to be 'deeply ingrained' Sharma says that weight bias and discrimination are “deeply ingrained among health care providers and employers and this is preventing people from accessing meaningful obesity care.” For example, employers often provide extended health benefits but don’t cover the cost of medications of psychological services to treat obesity.  In Canada, there are some seven million people living with obesity and the incidence is projected to reach 30 per cent of the population by 2030.  The Canadian Medical Association and the American Medical Association have recognized as a chronic disease, but not everyone has. Sharma says it’s time for people to understand that obesity is a complex problem and they should start removing the obstacles people face in getting the care they need. Dr. Arya Sharma describes obesity as a chronic disease which is misunderstood making it difficult for people to get treatment. (Obesity Canada)EN_Interview_2-20191017-WIE20 Survey involved over 2,500 respondents The Awareness, Care and Treatment in Obesity Management (ACTION) Study collected information from 2,000 individuals living with obesity,  395 doctors and allied health professionals who manage it, and 150 employers. Results were published in the journal Clinical Obesity in October 2019. ","duration_ms":498216,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/70QAWEcpqabfULiN1onRK8"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/70QAWEcpqabfULiN1onRK8","html_description":"

Science shows that obesity is a chronic disease like diabetes or cancer, yet people living with it are being told “they did this to themselves, and that they don’t deserve to be supported,” says Dr. Arya Sharma, the scientific director for the non-profit Obesity Canada

\n
Misconceptions abound, says doctor
\n

He says a new survey shows there are many misconceptions among health care professionals, employers and people living with obesity.   The latter “shouldn’t look at this as being their own fault. This is something that happens to people in the same way that diabetes…or high blood pressure happens to people.  And when it happens…you need to get treatment that actually works,” says Sharma.

\n
\"\"

While exercise is good for everyone, it and diet change alone are not enough to treat obesity, says doctor. (iStock)

\n
Better and long-term help is needed
\n

He adds, too many doctors simply recommend a change of diet and exercise, but that is not enough to treat obesity. People may need medication, cognitive behavioural therapy and, in some cases, bariatric surgery. And they need to understand there is no cure and the disease will require lifelong management. There are strong biological reasons that weight returns after weight loss and it is a long-term battle to fight them.

\n
Discrimination said to be ‘deeply ingrained’
\n

Sharma says that weight bias and discrimination are “deeply ingrained among health care providers and employers and this is preventing people from accessing meaningful obesity care.” For example, employers often provide extended health benefits but don’t cover the cost of medications of psychological services to treat obesity. 

\n

In Canada, there are some seven million people living with obesity and the incidence is projected to reach 30 per cent of the population by 2030.  The Canadian Medical Association and the American Medical Association have recognized as a chronic disease, but not everyone has. Sharma says it’s time for people to understand that obesity is a complex problem and they should start removing the obstacles people face in getting the care they need.

\n
Dr. Arya Sharma describes obesity as a chronic disease which is misunderstood making it difficult for people to get treatment. (Obesity Canada)
\n

Survey involved over 2,500 respondents

\n

The Awareness, Care and Treatment in Obesity Management (ACTION) Study collected information from 2,000 individuals living with obesity,  395 doctors and allied health professionals who manage it, and 150 employers. Results were published in the journal Clinical Obesity in October 2019. 

","id":"70QAWEcpqabfULiN1onRK8","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Bias, discrimination prevent people getting obesity care: study","release_date":"2019-10-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:70QAWEcpqabfULiN1onRK8"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/29ee37db07964c4a9928f5efbe9837a07739bbb1","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A recent study suggested there was not enough evidence to prove that people should avoid eating red meat and processed meats. This ran contrary to previous studies which have, for years, suggested that  consumption of these meats should be reduced to avoid cardiovascular disease.  The study caused much controversy particularly when it was revealed that one of the 13 scientists involved had five years earlier conducted a study on sugar which received some funding by an industry with a vested interest. The scientist was criticized for not reporting that in the current study on meat. However the journal publishing the study only requires a scientist report any conflict of interest that occurred within the last three years. Study not 'really meaningful,' says professor “It’s irrelevant, irrelevant when it comes to this paper,” says Prof. Joe Schwarcz, director of the McGill University Office for Science and Society. “What we should be looking at is whether the advice that they (the authors of the study) are now giving, that people … do not need to cut back on their meat consumption because there is just too little evidence that they will reap any benefit... that’s what we need to look at...Unfortunately I don’t think it’s very meaningful.” The safety of eating meat depends on many factors such as portion size, how the meat is prepared and one’s own health conditions. (iStock) Many factors to take into account Schwarcz says weak evidence is not the same as no evidence. This study did not look at portions, how the meat is cooked, how often it is consumed and what is being eaten with it. Nor does it take into account who is eating it and what their medical profile may be. Schwarcz is less concerned by who may have funded a study than he is by which studies may have not been published out of concern for the effect on funders. “That’s why, these days, what I push for is some sort of agency that would require that any study that is undertaken be registered with that agency before the study is started, so that you can’t hide the data and you’d be forced to publish even if it’s contrary to what you would like it to be.” The official Canada Food Guide consists of half fruit and vegetables, one-quarter whole grains and one-quarter various sources of protein. (Government of Canada) Canada Food Guide based on best science, says professor Schwarcz’s view is that the Canada Food Guide has the correct recommendations for what people should eat based on the current science. And that suggests that half a dinner plate should hold vegetables and fruit, one-quarter should hold whole grains and the last quarter should hold a protein that could be meat, fish, beans or lentils, or nuts. He is concerned that conflicting studies may shake people’s confidence in science, as may sensational media reports about them. But he urges people to look at studies and to assess their methods and accuracy. And he adds, people can always turn to his office which is neutral and dedicated to making science accessible to the public. Prof. Joe Schwarcz says scientific studies should be registered before they begin. (YouTube)EN_Interview_2-20191015-WIE20","duration_ms":399386,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6SBwRozNiaJrLlHjhuU9RP"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6SBwRozNiaJrLlHjhuU9RP","html_description":"

A recent study suggested there was not enough evidence to prove that people should avoid eating red meat and processed meats. This ran contrary to previous studies which have, for years, suggested that  consumption of these meats should be reduced to avoid cardiovascular disease. 

\n

The study caused much controversy particularly when it was revealed that one of the 13 scientists involved had five years earlier conducted a study on sugar which received some funding by an industry with a vested interest. The scientist was criticized for not reporting that in the current study on meat. However the journal publishing the study only requires a scientist report any conflict of interest that occurred within the last three years.

\n
Study not ‘really meaningful,’ says professor
\n

“It’s irrelevant, irrelevant when it comes to this paper,” says Prof. Joe Schwarcz, director of the McGill University Office for Science and Society. “What we should be looking at is whether the advice that they (the authors of the study) are now giving, that people … do not need to cut back on their meat consumption because there is just too little evidence that they will reap any benefit… that’s what we need to look at…Unfortunately I don’t think it’s very meaningful.”

\n
\"\"

The safety of eating meat depends on many factors such as portion size, how the meat is prepared and one’s own health conditions. (iStock)

\n
Many factors to take into account
\n

Schwarcz says weak evidence is not the same as no evidence. This study did not look at portions, how the meat is cooked, how often it is consumed and what is being eaten with it. Nor does it take into account who is eating it and what their medical profile may be.

\n

Schwarcz is less concerned by who may have funded a study than he is by which studies may have not been published out of concern for the effect on funders. “That’s why, these days, what I push for is some sort of agency that would require that any study that is undertaken be registered with that agency before the study is started, so that you can’t hide the data and you’d be forced to publish even if it’s contrary to what you would like it to be.”

\n
\"\"

The official Canada Food Guide consists of half fruit and vegetables, one-quarter whole grains and one-quarter various sources of protein. (Government of Canada)

\n
Canada Food Guide based on best science, says professor
\n

Schwarcz’s view is that the Canada Food Guide has the correct recommendations for what people should eat based on the current science. And that suggests that half a dinner plate should hold vegetables and fruit, one-quarter should hold whole grains and the last quarter should hold a protein that could be meat, fish, beans or lentils, or nuts.

\n

He is concerned that conflicting studies may shake people’s confidence in science, as may sensational media reports about them. But he urges people to look at studies and to assess their methods and accuracy. And he adds, people can always turn to his office which is neutral and dedicated to making science accessible to the public.

\n
Prof. Joe Schwarcz says scientific studies should be registered before they begin. (YouTube)
","id":"6SBwRozNiaJrLlHjhuU9RP","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Do we trust science? McGill professor weighs in","release_date":"2019-10-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6SBwRozNiaJrLlHjhuU9RP"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2d35a53586c1f21f8b78b419d20e4325dd1af45f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"On October 7, 2019, Extinction Rebellion activists blocked several bridges in Canada and succeeded in drawing attention to their message that climate change is an emergency already underway. The movement’s name refers to the belief that the world has entered the sixth global mass extinction event. It’s symbol is an hourglass that represents the view that time is running out. The group’s first protest in 2018 rallied 1,500 activists in London, England, and has since spread to more than 60 countries.  When compared with the large student marches led by Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, actions by Extinction Rebellion tactics are more intense.  Three protesters scaled a Montreal bridge on Oct. 8, 2019, forcing police to shut it down during rush hour. (Simon Marc Charron Radio-Canada) Dramatic acts sometimes break the law “Extinction Rebellion engages in non-violent, direct action, where they do dramatic acts. Sometimes they even break the law,” says Patricia Wood, a geography professor at York University and author of Citizenship, Activism and the City.  “They are trying to really draw attention and interrupt our daily lives.”  They occupy urban space in a way that disrupts commutes, they have glued themselves to government buildings and they sometimes wear colourful costumes and use creative signage.”  Some activists, like the one in the background on an Edmonton street, wear colourful costumes to draw attention to their demands. (Amber Bracken/The Canadian Press) Negative reaction can help, says author There has been some negative reaction to the tactics, notably from commuters who argue that sitting in their cars on blocked bridges emits more greenhouse gases contributing to climate change. But Wood says that can further the activists’ goals. “It certainly is annoying and that’s kind of the point, right, is to interrupt and annoy people as a way of really getting their attention around the urgency of this question because, while a lot of people may acknowledge the reality of climate change and the need to do something, there’s...an accurate sense that we’re not doing enough and we’re not doing it quickly enough.” More action coming next week Wood thinks the action has succeeded in drawing more attention to the urgency of climate change in that there has been extensive media coverage and efforts by journalists to delve more deeply into the subject, and politicians have been talking more about it, particularly in Canada’s current election campaign.  There will be another week of intense actions by Extinction Rebellion and Wood says she will be interested to see if they grow in size and drama, and whether governments respond. “If governments do not respond to them, I think it’s likely that we could expect to see an escalation in tactics because certainly, the science is on their side. They’re right and the urgency isn’t going away.” Prof. Patricia Wood discusses the tactics of climate activists with Extinction Rebellion. EN_Interview_2-20191011-WIE20","duration_ms":266580,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/03DuzCmmvLFQVuHkI3mLZe"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/03DuzCmmvLFQVuHkI3mLZe","html_description":"

On October 7, 2019, Extinction Rebellion activists blocked several bridges in Canada and succeeded in drawing attention to their message that climate change is an emergency already underway. The movement’s name refers to the belief that the world has entered the sixth global mass extinction event. It’s symbol is an hourglass that represents the view that time is running out.

\n

The group’s first protest in 2018 rallied 1,500 activists in London, England, and has since spread to more than 60 countries. 

\n

When compared with the large student marches led by Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, actions by Extinction Rebellion tactics are more intense. 

\n
\"\"

Three protesters scaled a Montreal bridge on Oct. 8, 2019, forcing police to shut it down during rush hour. (Simon Marc Charron Radio-Canada)

\n
Dramatic acts sometimes break the law
\n

“Extinction Rebellion engages in non-violent, direct action, where they do dramatic acts. Sometimes they even break the law,” says Patricia Wood, a geography professor at York University and author of Citizenship, Activism and the City.

\n

“They are trying to really draw attention and interrupt our daily lives.”  They occupy urban space in a way that disrupts commutes, they have glued themselves to government buildings and they sometimes wear colourful costumes and use creative signage.” 

\n
\"\"

Some activists, like the one in the background on an Edmonton street, wear colourful costumes to draw attention to their demands. (Amber Bracken/The Canadian Press)

\n
Negative reaction can help, says author
\n

There has been some negative reaction to the tactics, notably from commuters who argue that sitting in their cars on blocked bridges emits more greenhouse gases contributing to climate change. But Wood says that can further the activists’ goals.

\n

“It certainly is annoying and that’s kind of the point, right, is to interrupt and annoy people as a way of really getting their attention around the urgency of this question because, while a lot of people may acknowledge the reality of climate change and the need to do something, there’s…an accurate sense that we’re not doing enough and we’re not doing it quickly enough.”

\n
More action coming next week
\n

Wood thinks the action has succeeded in drawing more attention to the urgency of climate change in that there has been extensive media coverage and efforts by journalists to delve more deeply into the subject, and politicians have been talking more about it, particularly in Canada’s current election campaign.

\n

 There will be another week of intense actions by Extinction Rebellion and Wood says she will be interested to see if they grow in size and drama, and whether governments respond. “If governments do not respond to them, I think it’s likely that we could expect to see an escalation in tactics because certainly, the science is on their side. They’re right and the urgency isn’t going away.”

\n
Prof. Patricia Wood discusses the tactics of climate activists with Extinction Rebellion.
","id":"03DuzCmmvLFQVuHkI3mLZe","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Extinction rebellion action in Canada: measured success","release_date":"2019-10-11","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:03DuzCmmvLFQVuHkI3mLZe"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0c7769e1f8f1a56f0bb0dd8efcb3b26746f40e35","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canadian researchers are testing a new technology that could be widely used for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease which causes problems with memory, thinking and behaviour. Current tests involve PET scans or spinal taps. But a new technology has been developed involving a simple eye exam that could be done during routine eye checkups.  “The hyper spectral camera...is able to measure how light is reflected from the back of the eye--the retina,” says Dr. Sharon Cohen, medical director of the Toronto Memory Program. “The pattern of reflection translates into whether we have a signature of Alzheimer’s disease or not. It’s an ingenious biotechnology…(that would make) diagnosis pain free, inexpensive, accessible and scalable to the global population.” Incidence of Alzheimer's increasing worldwide There are over half a million Canadians living with Alzheimer’s now and that increases by 25,000 every year, notes Cohen. Globally, 50 million people have this form of dementia and there are expected to be 150 million by the year 2050. The scan of the eye can detect signs of amyloid, a toxic protein characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. (Cole Burston/RetiSpec) Early diagnosis helps research, helps people While there are no cures for Alzheimer’s, Cohen says it is still vital to have an easy way to diagnose it. “Most cases are either undiagnosed or diagnosed late at the point of crises when families are struggling to cope. So, putting a label on what’s wrong with somebody is not trivial. It allows people to get care, to get information and to join clinical trials that will move forward the treatments of the future. “It also helps research. If we properly identify and identify early who has or is developing the disease then we’re much more likely to hasten the treatment breakthroughs that we so badly need.” Researchers at the Toronto Memory Program are doing validation studies now comparing the results they get with a retinal scan of patients who have had a PET scan or examination of spinal fluid. If the results are the same, they hope to commercialize the eye scanning technique and have it available within one year. Dr. Sharon Cohen explains how the RetiSpec technology works and why it is so important. (Stephanie Cohen)EN_Interview_2-20191008-WIE20","duration_ms":325146,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3NCxAsFyiXT6zasOQ5W3hd"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3NCxAsFyiXT6zasOQ5W3hd","html_description":"

Canadian researchers are testing a new technology that could be widely used for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease which causes problems with memory, thinking and behaviour. Current tests involve PET scans or spinal taps. But a new technology has been developed involving a simple eye exam that could be done during routine eye checkups. 

\n

The hyper spectral camera...is able to measure how light is reflected from the back of the eye–the retina,” says Dr. Sharon Cohen, medical director of the Toronto Memory Program. “The pattern of reflection translates into whether we have a signature of Alzheimer’s disease or not. It’s an ingenious biotechnology…(that would make) diagnosis pain free, inexpensive, accessible and scalable to the global population.”

\n
Incidence of Alzheimer’s increasing worldwide
\n

There are over half a million Canadians living with Alzheimer’s now and that increases by 25,000 every year, notes Cohen. Globally, 50 million people have this form of dementia and there are expected to be 150 million by the year 2050.

\n
\"\"

The scan of the eye can detect signs of amyloid, a toxic protein characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. (Cole Burston/RetiSpec)

\n
Early diagnosis helps research, helps people
\n

While there are no cures for Alzheimer’s, Cohen says it is still vital to have an easy way to diagnose it.

\n

“Most cases are either undiagnosed or diagnosed late at the point of crises when families are struggling to cope. So, putting a label on what’s wrong with somebody is not trivial. It allows people to get care, to get information and to join clinical trials that will move forward the treatments of the future.

\n

“It also helps research. If we properly identify and identify early who has or is developing the disease then we’re much more likely to hasten the treatment breakthroughs that we so badly need.”

\n

Researchers at the Toronto Memory Program are doing validation studies now comparing the results they get with a retinal scan of patients who have had a PET scan or examination of spinal fluid. If the results are the same, they hope to commercialize the eye scanning technique and have it available within one year.

\n
Dr. Sharon Cohen explains how the RetiSpec technology works and why it is so important. (Stephanie Cohen)
","id":"3NCxAsFyiXT6zasOQ5W3hd","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Eye scan may soon permit early detection of Alzheimer’s","release_date":"2019-10-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3NCxAsFyiXT6zasOQ5W3hd"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3b4d98e7b0f8afda2d7ebc6ea080351f41d216b1","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada has produce a great many world class artists, but which have consistently been overlooked by critics. Only recently have some, such as Tom Thomson and the Group of 7 begun to be recognized internationally for their amazing talent. Still that leaves many who are clearly world class, but relatively unknown outside a few limited Canadian arts experts One such superb talent was that of Peter Clapham Sheppard. A stunning new book chronicles and highlights the life and work of this incredibly talented artist. Tom Smart is the award-winning author of this and several other critical biographies, catalogues and books on Canadian artists.. Having worked in art galleries and museums across the country, he is currently the Director and CEO of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton, New Brunswick. ListenEN_Interview_2-20190829-WIE20 This large coffee table style work published by Firefly Books is a celebration of rediscovery of an outstanding Canadian artist. Not only was Sheppard (1882-1965)  an amazingly talented painter, but even more surprising that he is so little known is that he played a leading role in the creation of Canada’s national school of art. A close-up portion of the full length portrait entitled \"In the Garden\" c-1912, oil on canvas. The painting showing his mastery of detailed portrait painting, although he also produced more figurative portraits. A leading commercial illustrator, draughtsman, and lithographer his ability with exacting detail in such work is remarkably contrasted with his ability for interpretation of scenes in his prolific artwork. Unlike many who developed a particular style, Sheppard’s work shows that he could master any style he chose, from portraits, to landscapes, to industrial subjects, oils, pencil, and watercolour. A contemporary of the now world famous Group of 7 who are known for powerful interpretations of Canada’s wilderness and nature, a subject he himself was also drawn to producing his own superb works. However,  he was also fascinated with inner cities,  run-down old buildings surrounded by the vast skyscrapers thrusting up in the new cities around them. Another example of his mastery of any style he chose, here somewhat in the style of the Group of 7, is \"Pines, Windy Day, Georgian Bay\" c-1029 oil on board, It is one of several of his nature and wilderness paintings He felt this was a rebirth amidst the destruction of the First World War, but tinged with the nostalgia for the past. He also was captivated by ships and the busy city harbours of Toronto, Montreal and New York, major cities where he produced much of his work, again as a modernist looking toward the future. Yet his work also touches on the lives of the working class. Sheppard was also intrigued by ships and the busy harbours, here showing one of several such themed works, this is \"Freighter\" 1922 oil on board Incredibly this talented artist ended his life in poverty and has been largely forgotten. Tom Smart hopes this over 200 page book with its multitude of wonderful colour reproductions of Sheppard’s artworks, and a detailed look into his life, will help restore the artist to his rightfully deserved place of recognition. Additional information Vaughan Citizen: D Al-Shibeeb: Nov 16/18: Curator wants Peter Sheppard to be part of Canada’s history Canadian Art: Dec 3/18:  Peter Clapham Sheppard and the Group of Seven Artnet: (images of over 200 of Sheppard paintings) pcsheppard.com","duration_ms":651546,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4SR96zQogQJjJS1G7sh5xf"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4SR96zQogQJjJS1G7sh5xf","html_description":"

Canada has produce a great many world class artists, but which have consistently been overlooked by critics. Only recently have some, such as Tom Thomson and the Group of 7 begun to be recognized internationally for their amazing talent.

\n

Still that leaves many who are clearly world class, but relatively unknown outside a few limited Canadian arts experts

\n

One such superb talent was that of Peter Clapham Sheppard.

\n

A stunning new book chronicles and highlights the life and work of this incredibly talented artist. Tom Smart is the award-winning author of this and several other critical biographies, catalogues and books on Canadian artists.. Having worked in art galleries and museums across the country, he is currently the Director and CEO of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton, New Brunswick.

\nListen\n

This large coffee table style work published by Firefly Books is a celebration of rediscovery of an outstanding Canadian artist.

\n

Not only was Sheppard (1882-1965)  an amazingly talented painter, but even more surprising that he is so little known is that he played a leading role in the creation of Canada’s national school of art.

\n
\"\"

A close-up portion of the full length portrait entitled “In the Garden” c-1912, oil on canvas. The painting showing his mastery of detailed portrait painting, although he also produced more figurative portraits.

\n

A leading commercial illustrator, draughtsman, and lithographer his ability with exacting detail in such work is remarkably contrasted with his ability for interpretation of scenes in his prolific artwork.

\n

Unlike many who developed a particular style, Sheppard’s work shows that he could master any style he chose, from portraits, to landscapes, to industrial subjects, oils, pencil, and watercolour.

\n

A contemporary of the now world famous Group of 7 who are known for powerful interpretations of Canada’s wilderness and nature, a subject he himself was also drawn to producing his own superb works. However,  he was also fascinated with inner cities,  run-down old buildings surrounded by the vast skyscrapers thrusting up in the new cities around them.

\n
\"\"

Another example of his mastery of any style he chose, here somewhat in the style of the Group of 7, is “Pines, Windy Day, Georgian Bay” c-1029 oil on board, It is one of several of his nature and wilderness paintings

\n

He felt this was a rebirth amidst the destruction of the First World War, but tinged with the nostalgia for the past.

\n

He also was captivated by ships and the busy city harbours of Toronto, Montreal and New York, major cities where he produced much of his work, again as a modernist looking toward the future. Yet his work also touches on the lives of the working class.

\n
\"\"

Sheppard was also intrigued by ships and the busy harbours, here showing one of several such themed works, this is “Freighter” 1922 oil on board

\n

Incredibly this talented artist ended his life in poverty and has been largely forgotten.

\n

Tom Smart hopes this over 200 page book with its multitude of wonderful colour reproductions of Sheppard’s artworks, and a detailed look into his life, will help restore the artist to his rightfully deserved place of recognition.

\n

Additional information

\n","id":"4SR96zQogQJjJS1G7sh5xf","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Art: the amazing Canadian artist you never heard of","release_date":"2019-08-31","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4SR96zQogQJjJS1G7sh5xf"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0e93bed9280c8db0024da22f9f0c69beea188745","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"It's possible to have fun without alcohol. That is the premise of a new space for gatherings and events in Montreal, the MindfulBar, which wants to be a sober, safe and inclusive space for everyone. The MindfulBar, conceived and founded by Isabel Tames and Diego Bayancela, will specialise in the creation of alcohol-free cocktails with local products and will offer thematic evenings, concerts and events with the approach of \"mindfulness\", which means enjoying life with conscience in the present moment, and with the acceptance and recognition of feelings, thoughts and sensations. We spoke with Isabel Tames who explained that the idea was born from a personal experience of harmful alcohol consumption, but quickly became more social as she realised that the subject concerned many more people. Isabel Tames how she got the idea of creating MindfulBar (Photo: Courtesy of ©MindfulBar)EN_Interview_6-20190621-WIE60 Unique cocktails on the menu As Isabel Tames explains, the concept of the alcohol-free bar is accompanied by a reflection on the products offered to the public. They will offer three kinds of drinks: Mindful drinks: a series of original and tasty non-alcoholic cocktails based on the five continents. Mocktails: a copy of classic alcoholic cocktails Various non-alcoholic drinks such as beer or wine as well as soft drinks The cocktails that will be offered are varied and created specifically within the framework of its local and unique concept. They themselves conceived the recipes for the flavor syrup preparations with the help of a mixologist, an expert in the art of mixing drinks to make cocktails, which are not juices. Isabel Tames explains the specificity of some of her cocktails : Isabel Tames presents some of her signature cocktails (Photo: Mindful Margarita Courtesy of ©MindfulBar))EN_Interview_3-20190621-WIE30 The concept of a bar, just without alcohol Without fear of being accused of discrimination, the administrators of Montreal's MindfulBar say that the concept is simple and clear. They want it to be like a normal bar with dj's and music but without the alcohol and the things that come with alcohol such as hangovers for example. They reserve the right of admission in case someone intoxicated wants to enter the establishment and children will not be allowed in the bar, except on Sundays. Beyond that, Isabel and Diego believe that people will understand that this is the only non-alcoholic bar in the city and that they will respect the idea. Non-drinkers are slowly starting to get better options at a lot of bars in major Canadian cities. But bars with no alcohol at all are much rarer. There are a few American ones, like Getaway Bar in Brooklyn, N.Y., or The Other Side in Crystal Lake, Ill. In the U.K., there’s Redemption Bar in London and The Brink in Liverpool. https://www.instagram.com/p/BvdFFf1AgRo/ The owners are confident on the fact that this bar will attract people who want to try new things and take care of their health. Heavy drinking rates are going up in nearly every age group, according to Statistics Canada. In Canada, average alcohol consumption per person has gradually increased over the past 10 years. In a household, the average annual consumption is 470 glasses of beer, wine, or spirits, or about nine drinks a week for every person aged 15 or older in the country. According to self-declared data, 20% of the most drinkers in Canada consumed approximately 70% of the alcohol sold annually. Approximately 20% of women and 30% of men who drink alcohol say they have risky drinking (excessively, accompanied by loss of consciousness or other dangerous behaviors) at least once a month. Some of the long-term effects of drinking can include memory loss, high blood pressure, and liver damage.  When asked about her what she wants to achieve with this bar, Tames hopes that it is the first of many. If they want to drink, they will go to one of the hundreds of other ba...","duration_ms":444500,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6IrNOXqVShTHg1qgsGzxW1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6IrNOXqVShTHg1qgsGzxW1","html_description":"

It’s possible to have fun without alcohol. That is the premise of a new space for gatherings and events in Montreal, the MindfulBar, which wants to be a sober, safe and inclusive space for everyone.

\n

The MindfulBar, conceived and founded by Isabel Tames and Diego Bayancela, will specialise in the creation of alcohol-free cocktails with local products and will offer thematic evenings, concerts and events with the approach of “mindfulness”, which means enjoying life with conscience in the present moment, and with the acceptance and recognition of feelings, thoughts and sensations.

\n

We spoke with Isabel Tames who explained that the idea was born from a personal experience of harmful alcohol consumption, but quickly became more social as she realised that the subject concerned many more people.

\n
Isabel Tames how she got the idea of creating MindfulBar (Photo: Courtesy of ©MindfulBar)
\n
Unique cocktails on the menu
\n

As Isabel Tames explains, the concept of the alcohol-free bar is accompanied by a reflection on the products offered to the public. They will offer three kinds of drinks:

\n\n

The cocktails that will be offered are varied and created specifically within the framework of its local and unique concept.

\n

They themselves conceived the recipes for the flavor syrup preparations with the help of a mixologist, an expert in the art of mixing drinks to make cocktails, which are not juices. Isabel Tames explains the specificity of some of her cocktails :

\n
Isabel Tames presents some of her signature cocktails (Photo: Mindful Margarita Courtesy of ©MindfulBar))
\n
The concept of a bar, just without alcohol
\n

Without fear of being accused of discrimination, the administrators of Montreal’s MindfulBar say that the concept is simple and clear. They want it to be like a normal bar with dj’s and music but without the alcohol and the things that come with alcohol such as hangovers for example.

\n

They reserve the right of admission in case someone intoxicated wants to enter the establishment and children will not be allowed in the bar, except on Sundays.

\n

Beyond that, Isabel and Diego believe that people will understand that this is the only non-alcoholic bar in the city and that they will respect the idea.

\n

Non-drinkers are slowly starting to get better options at a lot of bars in major Canadian cities. But bars with no alcohol at all are much rarer. There are a few American ones, like Getaway Bar in Brooklyn, N.Y., or The Other Side in Crystal Lake, Ill. In the U.K., there’s Redemption Bar in London and The Brink in Liverpool.

\n

https://www.instagram.com/p/BvdFFf1AgRo/

\n

The owners are confident on the fact that this bar will attract people who want to try new things and take care of their health.

\n

Heavy drinking rates are going up in nearly every age group, according to Statistics Canada.

\n

In Canada, average alcohol consumption per person has gradually increased over the past 10 years. In a household, the average annual consumption is 470 glasses of beer, wine, or spirits, or about nine drinks a week for every person aged 15 or older in the country.

\n

According to self-declared data, 20% of the most drinkers in Canada consumed approximately 70% of the alcohol sold annually.

\n

Approximately 20% of women and 30% of men who drink alcohol say they have risky drinking (excessively, accompanied by loss of consciousness or other dangerous behaviors) at least once a month.

\n

Some of the long-term effects of drinking can include memory loss, high blood pressure, and liver damage. 

\n

When asked about her what she wants to achieve with this bar, Tames hopes that it is the first of many.

\n

If they want to drink, they will go to one of the hundreds of other bars that exist in Montreal.

\n

The official opening is July 11, 2019.

\n
You can listen to the full interview with Isabel Tames here
\n

With files from Statistics Canada and Health Canada

","id":"6IrNOXqVShTHg1qgsGzxW1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Partying hard, drinking soft: revolutionising your nights out","release_date":"2019-06-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6IrNOXqVShTHg1qgsGzxW1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2fd12de303448ab4e0f006c77ca447b7e709762a","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North Full Inuit participation will be key to long-term sustainable development in the Arctic as well as helping the world confront the current climate crisis, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, a long-time Canadian Inuit rights activitst, told an audience at the International Economic Forum of the Americas this week. \"The Inuit right to be cold is connected to everyone's right to a healthy environment,\" Watt-Cloutier said on Wednesday. \"Because our home is a barometer of health for the planet, if we cannot save the Arctic, can we really hope to save the forests and the rivers and farm lands of other regions? We can develop our Arctic in a very socially conscious and very balanced way by tapping into the ingenuity of Inuit culture. \"My message to you is to look to, and support morally, respectfully, openly, and yes financially, the Indigenous world,\" said Watt-Cloutier, who received a standing ovation from the international audience at the end of her 37-minute speech. \"The urban setting of the world has lost its connection to each other, to its food source, to its environment and that's why we're debating this issue of climate change in the first place.\" Focus on 'anti-dependence' industries and business Watt said the trauma of colonialism, residential schools and dog slaughters in the Canadian Arctic have kept Inuit trapped in an ongoing cycle of dependency. \"What was created in place of the ingenuity of Inuit culture, of being so wise, of knowing what to do at every given moment, is institutions that made us dependent on them,\" said Watt-Cloutier, a former international chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council that represents the 160,000 Inuit in Canada, Russia, Alaska and Greenland. \"We lost the ability to think and act for ourselves. As a result of that we are facing the problems we are today.\" She says climate change is accelerating the rapid changes in Inuit society. Canada's Changing Climate Report, commissioned by Environment and Climate Change Canada and released earlier this year, found that snow and ice loss, and the resulting increased absorption of solar radiation, is a key factor contributing to Canada warming at twice the global rate. Meanwhile, the Canadian Arctic is warming at approximately three times the global rate, the report found. On June 7, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Canada's national Inuit organization, launched their National Inuit Climate Change Strategy (NICCS), describing global warming's effect on Arctic communities and the need for Inuit to be included in global conversations on climate policy. Feature Interview For more on climate change, Arctic economics and what the world can learn from Inuit culture, listen to Eye on the Arctic’s Feature Interview with Inuit rights activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/06/Watt_Cloutier.mp3 New businesses models that keep Inuit on the land, provide jobs for youth and maintain Inuit traditions of resiliency and independence, make social and economic sense, Watt-Cloutier told Eye on the Arctic in an interview after her speech.  This could include anything from promoting a conservation economy in the North to undoing the damage from the global anti-sealing campaign. \"These dependency producing institutions is something that needs to be removed and replaced by liberating institutions and businesses,\" she said. \"That's what we're trying to create here and bring back the foundations, the values and the principals of Inuit culture, which is not only good for us, it's good for the world that is looking for leadership on these issues. Keeping Inuit on the land as sentinels for climate change is also important for the rest of the world as the global community struggles to adapt to the changrining environment, she said. \"Climate change is often interpreted as only political, economics, science,","duration_ms":370051,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0OKUlssdhK9hRsWSphqbVP"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0OKUlssdhK9hRsWSphqbVP","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North\nFull Inuit participation will be key to long-term sustainable development in the Arctic as well as helping the world confront the current climate crisis, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, a long-time Canadian Inuit rights activitst, told an audience at the International Economic Forum of the Americas this week.\n\n\"The Inuit right to be cold is connected to everyone's right to a healthy environment,\" Watt-Cloutier said on Wednesday.\n\n\"Because our home is a barometer of health for the planet, if we cannot save the Arctic, can we really hope to save the forests and the rivers and farm lands of other regions? We can develop our Arctic in a very socially conscious and very balanced way by tapping into the ingenuity of Inuit culture.\n\n\"My message to you is to look to, and support morally, respectfully, openly, and yes financially, the Indigenous world,\" said Watt-Cloutier, who received a standing ovation from the international audience at the end of her 37-minute speech.\n\n\"The urban setting of the world has lost its connection to each other, to its food source, to its environment and that's why we're debating this issue of climate change in the first place.\"\nFocus on 'anti-dependence' industries and business\nWatt said the trauma of colonialism, residential schools and dog slaughters in the Canadian Arctic have kept Inuit trapped in an ongoing cycle of dependency.\n\n\"What was created in place of the ingenuity of Inuit culture, of being so wise, of knowing what to do at every given moment, is institutions that made us dependent on them,\" said Watt-Cloutier, a former international chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council that represents the 160,000 Inuit in Canada, Russia, Alaska and Greenland.\n\n\"We lost the ability to think and act for ourselves. As a result of that we are facing the problems we are today.\"\n\nShe says climate change is accelerating the rapid changes in Inuit society.\n\nCanada's Changing Climate Report, commissioned by Environment and Climate Change Canada and released earlier this year, found that snow and ice loss, and the resulting increased absorption of solar radiation, is a key factor contributing to Canada warming at twice the global rate.\n\nMeanwhile, the Canadian Arctic is warming at approximately three times the global rate, the report found.\n\nOn June 7, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Canada's national Inuit organization, launched their National Inuit Climate Change Strategy (NICCS), describing global warming's effect on Arctic communities and the need for Inuit to be included in global conversations on climate policy.\n\nFeature Interview\n\nFor more on climate change, Arctic economics and what the world can learn from Inuit culture, listen to Eye on the Arctic’s Feature Interview with Inuit rights activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier:\n\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/06/Watt_Cloutier.mp3\n\n\n\nNew businesses models that keep Inuit on the land, provide jobs for youth and maintain Inuit traditions of resiliency and independence, make social and economic sense, Watt-Cloutier told Eye on the Arctic in an interview after her speech.  This could include anything from promoting a conservation economy in the North to undoing the damage from the global anti-sealing campaign.\n\n\"These dependency producing institutions is something that needs to be removed and replaced by liberating institutions and businesses,\" she said. \"That's what we're trying to create here and bring back the foundations, the values and the principals of Inuit culture, which is not only good for us, it's good for the world that is looking for leadership on these issues.\n\nKeeping Inuit on the land as sentinels for climate change is also important for the rest of the world as the global community struggles to adapt to the changrining environment, she said.\n\n\"Climate change is often interpreted as only political, economics, science,","id":"0OKUlssdhK9hRsWSphqbVP","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Indigenous participation key to Arctic development, Inuit activist tells Economic Forum of the Americas","release_date":"2019-06-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0OKUlssdhK9hRsWSphqbVP"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b08da2866361ab5410c4175b633a514f68cb0971","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Better wildfire management and improved agricultural practices have been added to a list of black carbon and methane mitigation recommendations by a group of international experts. The Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane, which includes experts from all over the world including Canada, added the two new recommendations, along with previous recommendations in four other areas: diesel-powered sources, the oil and gas sector, residential combustion and solid waste disposal, in its 2019 report Summary of Progress and Recommendations. \"The expert group certainly concluded that's there's potential for making more ambitious targets ,\" said Mikael Hilden, the former chair of the Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane under Finland's 2017-2019 chairmanship. \"Black carbon can, of course, not be completely excluded,\" Hilden said in telephone interview from Helsinki.  \"As long as humans burn something, there will be some emissions of black carbon. But it can be contained, it can be reduced significantly. That's the important message.\" Gas flares, a producer of black carbon, go off at a an unnamed liquefied natural gas plant on Sakhalin island in Russia's Far East. (Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images) Recommendations around agricultural policies includes finding ways to reduce agricultural burning as well as recommendations to \"...promote food consumption patterns that utilize Arctic food chains sustainability and efficiently, support the preservation of carbon sinks, and minimize life-cycle emissions of methane,\" says the report. It also recommends that work be done to reduce emissions of enteric methane under Arctic conditions, in co-operation with relevant organizations. Enteric methane is caused when organic matter breaks down. Wildfire management Wildfires are becoming a increasing concern in the North because of how they contribute to black carbon emissions. In summer 2018, fires raged in circumpolar countries like Sweden, Finland, Russia and Norway, including in their respective Arctic regions. The report's recommendations stress the importance of collaboration between Arctic countries on wildfire management, suppression and monitoring, and call for the need to  \"... maintain international mutual aid and resource exchange arrangements\" and regionally specific public education programs on wildfire prevention and safety. A wildfire burning approximately 20km southwest of Fort St. James, in the Canadian province of British Columbia on Wednesday August 15, 2018. Northern nations should do more to share best practices on wildfire management and prevention, says a new report from an Arctic Council expert group. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press) \"Locally, there's lots of things to be learned across the arctic countries,\" Hilden said. The situation is of course vastly different in say, Canada, compared with Finland, where we have a dense network of forest roads, and therefore, extinguishing forest fires is easier and more manageable, but that doesn't mean of course that it would be a complete one off and that there couldn't' be things that the Arctic countries couldn't learn from each other. \"There should be more exchange on this including the prepardness, the information contained, in order to reduce unnecessary fires and doing the managment in such a way that the wildfires can be managed to the extent that they are manageable.\" Dangerous to health and environment Black carbon and methane emissions are a serious concern for the world’s circumpolar countries because of this form of pollution’s role in warming the atmosphere. When black carbon is deposited on ice and snow, it absorbs heat, instead of reflecting heat from these surfaces, contributing to global warming. After carbon dioxide, it’s the second biggest contributor to warming. Black carbon is made up of fine matter produced by incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels.","duration_ms":440555,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6NGTnAHlWFmBANrJr6DZoG"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6NGTnAHlWFmBANrJr6DZoG","html_description":"Better wildfire management and improved agricultural practices have been added to a list of black carbon and methane mitigation recommendations by a group of international experts.\nThe Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane, which includes experts from all over the world including Canada, added the two new recommendations, along with previous recommendations in four other areas: diesel-powered sources, the oil and gas sector, residential combustion and solid waste disposal, in its 2019 report Summary of Progress and Recommendations.\n\n\"The expert group certainly concluded that's there's potential for making more ambitious targets ,\" said Mikael Hilden, the former chair of the Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane under Finland's 2017-2019 chairmanship.\n\n\"Black carbon can, of course, not be completely excluded,\" Hilden said in telephone interview from Helsinki.  \"As long as humans burn something, there will be some emissions of black carbon. But it can be contained, it can be reduced significantly. That's the important message.\"\n\nGas flares, a producer of black carbon, go off at a an unnamed liquefied natural gas plant on Sakhalin island in Russia's Far East. (Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images)\n\nRecommendations around agricultural policies includes finding ways to reduce agricultural burning as well as recommendations to \"...promote food consumption patterns that utilize Arctic food chains sustainability and efficiently, support the preservation of carbon sinks, and minimize life-cycle emissions of methane,\" says the report.\n\nIt also recommends that work be done to reduce emissions of enteric methane under Arctic conditions, in co-operation with relevant organizations. Enteric methane is caused when organic matter breaks down.\nWildfire management\nWildfires are becoming a increasing concern in the North because of how they contribute to black carbon emissions.\n\nIn summer 2018, fires raged in circumpolar countries like Sweden, Finland, Russia and Norway, including in their respective Arctic regions.\n\nThe report's recommendations stress the importance of collaboration between Arctic countries on wildfire management, suppression and monitoring, and call for the need to  \"... maintain international mutual aid and resource exchange arrangements\" and regionally specific public education programs on wildfire prevention and safety.\n\nA wildfire burning approximately 20km southwest of Fort St. James, in the Canadian province of British Columbia on Wednesday August 15, 2018. Northern nations should do more to share best practices on wildfire management and prevention, says a new report from an Arctic Council expert group. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)\n\n\"Locally, there's lots of things to be learned across the arctic countries,\" Hilden said. The situation is of course vastly different in say, Canada, compared with Finland, where we have a dense network of forest roads, and therefore, extinguishing forest fires is easier and more manageable, but that doesn't mean of course that it would be a complete one off and that there couldn't' be things that the Arctic countries couldn't learn from each other.\n\n\"There should be more exchange on this including the prepardness, the information contained, in order to reduce unnecessary fires and doing the managment in such a way that the wildfires can be managed to the extent that they are manageable.\"\nDangerous to health and environment\nBlack carbon and methane emissions are a serious concern for the world’s circumpolar countries because of this form of pollution’s role in warming the atmosphere. When black carbon is deposited on ice and snow, it absorbs heat, instead of reflecting heat from these surfaces, contributing to global warming.\n\nAfter carbon dioxide, it’s the second biggest contributor to warming.\n\nBlack carbon is made up of fine matter produced by incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels.","id":"6NGTnAHlWFmBANrJr6DZoG","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Better wildfire management would help reduce black carbon pollution say Arctic experts","release_date":"2019-06-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6NGTnAHlWFmBANrJr6DZoG"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/358e1bceca4c089e1ec0f4ef7f89d9364be8f82b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada filed its Arctic continental shelf submission with the U.N. Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf on Wednesday, claiming approximately 1.2 million square kilometres of the Arctic Ocean seabed and subsoil in an area that includes the North Pole.  “Canada is committed to furthering its leadership in the Arctic,\" said Chrystia Freeland, Canada's minister of foreign affairs, in a news release on Wednesday.  \"Defining our continental shelf is vital to ensuring our sovereignty and to serving the interests of all people, including Indigenous peoples, in the Arctic.\"  The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) gives coastal states a 200 nautical mile continental shelf claim that allows countries the right to exploit resources in the seabed and subsoil of their respective areas.  The activities could be anything from deep seabed mining and fishing, to oil and gas exploration. Canada has been working on gathering data to support its claims in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans since 2003. \"We are proud to support Canada’s Arctic Ocean submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, supported by science and evidence, reaffirming our government’s commitment to furthering Canada’s leadership in the Arctic,”  Amarjeet Sohi, Canada's minister of Natural Resources, said in the news release. Overlapping claims But UNCLOS allows continental shelves to be extended if a state has scientific data to prove that particular underwater geological or geographical features are actually extensions of their continental shelves. The Lomonosov Ridge is a kind of underwater mountain chain that extends across the seafloor of the Arctic Ocean and is something that Canada, Russia and Denmark all claim is an extension of their respective continental shelves. A map from Canada's UNCLOS submission showing the Lomonosov Ridge. (Government of Canada) Russia was first to make a claim in the area, stopping just short of the North Pole, in 2001. Denmark submitted its submission concerning the Lomonosov Ridge in 2014. The commission rules on the validity of the science submitted by countries, which then becomes the basis for  subsequent political discussions over jurisdiction. Adam Lajeunesse, the Irving Chair at the Mulroney Institute of Government at St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada, and a Research Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, says Canada's claim contained few surprises.  \"There was (some conjecture) that we would sort of do a quid pro quo and stop our claim at about the pole as a means of facilitating a political settlement ultimately,\" Lajeunesse said in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic. \"But like the Danes, we’ve gone well over the North Pole and are claiming an enormous chunk of the Arctic continental shelf now.\" The commission has already ruled that the geology data put for forth in Russia's claim looks sound, but it could rule the same on Canada's and Denmark's data, says Lajeunesse. \"There's a very real chance that all three countries will have put forth claims based on good scientific evidence. Ultimately this will be a political resolution, not something resolved by the United Nations.\" Feature Interview “The claim Canada has put forward theoretically may have some resources, that may, theoretically, be of value in the future, but right now we certainly don’t know of any,” says Adam Lajeunesse. “But I think that’s the very longterm view that the countries are looking (at).” For more on UNCLOS, the Arctic and why the U.S. remains an outlier on this question, listen to more of Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Adam Lajeunesse, the Irving Chair at the Mulroney Institute of Government at St. Francis Xavier University and a Research Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/05/Lajeunesse.mp3 ","duration_ms":467853,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1vocs1ZkGoSOgjtsSgSCIL"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1vocs1ZkGoSOgjtsSgSCIL","html_description":"Canada filed its Arctic continental shelf submission with the U.N. Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf on Wednesday, claiming approximately 1.2 million square kilometres of the Arctic Ocean seabed and subsoil in an area that includes the North Pole. \n“Canada is committed to furthering its leadership in the Arctic,\" said Chrystia Freeland, Canada's minister of foreign affairs, in a news release on Wednesday.  \"Defining our continental shelf is vital to ensuring our sovereignty and to serving the interests of all people, including Indigenous peoples, in the Arctic.\" \n\nThe United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) gives coastal states a 200 nautical mile continental shelf claim that allows countries the right to exploit resources in the seabed and subsoil of their respective areas. \n\nThe activities could be anything from deep seabed mining and fishing, to oil and gas exploration.\n\nCanada has been working on gathering data to support its claims in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans since 2003.\n\n\"We are proud to support Canada’s Arctic Ocean submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, supported by science and evidence, reaffirming our government’s commitment to furthering Canada’s leadership in the Arctic,”  Amarjeet Sohi, Canada's minister of Natural Resources, said in the news release.\nOverlapping claims\nBut UNCLOS allows continental shelves to be extended if a state has scientific data to prove that particular underwater geological or geographical features are actually extensions of their continental shelves.\n\nThe Lomonosov Ridge is a kind of underwater mountain chain that extends across the seafloor of the Arctic Ocean and is something that Canada, Russia and Denmark all claim is an extension of their respective continental shelves.\n\nA map from Canada's UNCLOS submission showing the Lomonosov Ridge. (Government of Canada)\n\nRussia was first to make a claim in the area, stopping just short of the North Pole, in 2001. Denmark submitted its submission concerning the Lomonosov Ridge in 2014.\n\nThe commission rules on the validity of the science submitted by countries, which then becomes the basis for  subsequent political discussions over jurisdiction.\n\nAdam Lajeunesse, the Irving Chair at the Mulroney Institute of Government at St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada, and a Research Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, says Canada's claim contained few surprises. \n\n\"There was (some conjecture) that we would sort of do a quid pro quo and stop our claim at about the pole as a means of facilitating a political settlement ultimately,\" Lajeunesse said in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic. \"But like the Danes, we’ve gone well over the North Pole and are claiming an enormous chunk of the Arctic continental shelf now.\"\n\nThe commission has already ruled that the geology data put for forth in Russia's claim looks sound, but it could rule the same on Canada's and Denmark's data, says Lajeunesse.\n\n\"There's a very real chance that all three countries will have put forth claims based on good scientific evidence. Ultimately this will be a political resolution, not something resolved by the United Nations.\"\n\nFeature Interview\n\n“The claim Canada has put forward theoretically may have some resources, that may, theoretically, be of value in the future, but right now we certainly don’t know of any,” says Adam Lajeunesse. “But I think that’s the very longterm view that the countries are looking (at).”\n\nFor more on UNCLOS, the Arctic and why the U.S. remains an outlier on this question, listen to more of Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Adam Lajeunesse, the Irving Chair at the Mulroney Institute of Government at St. Francis Xavier University and a Research Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/05/Lajeunesse.mp3\n\n\n","id":"1vocs1ZkGoSOgjtsSgSCIL","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada files submission to establish continental shelf’s outer limits in Arctic Ocean","release_date":"2019-05-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1vocs1ZkGoSOgjtsSgSCIL"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a2d651f8a4f55e2ae8a0ba7fa0675f47f2a199d4","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Depression affects twice as many women as men and there needs to be more research on what makes men’s and women’s brains so different, say researchers at the University of Guelph. The researchers looked at studies on sex differences in brain wave activity. Then they examined what is known about how sex hormones and female cycling affect those brain waves, and they found a lack of scientific information. More study is needed on sex difference in brain wave activity, say researchers. (iStock) Researchers seek better treatment “It’s important because not only depression, but all neuropsychiatric disorders…(have) a lot of underlying causes,” says Melissa Perreault, professor and co-author of the review. “We want to be able to treat these disorders better than we’re doing. And to do so, we need to understand how these individuals (males and females) are different from one another.” Studies already show that depression has been linked to hormonal fluctuations that women experience during puberty, postpartum and menopause onset. But how female hormones affect the brain is not well understood. Fewer women studied Far too few studies include female subjects, according to Perreault, partly because it is easier to study males because they don’t have hormonal cycles and because it would be more expensive to double sample sized to include both sexes. Perreault says organizations which fund research are beginning to realize this and she hopes this review will help encourage future studies that include sex and gender. The review was published in the journal Biology of Sex Differences. (photo: University of Guelph) Prof. Melissa Perreault says understanding how women's and men's brains are different will help improve treatment for depression. ListenEN_Interview_2-20190405-WIE20","duration_ms":250410,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4UdtgkuenAldYGHM18LL90"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4UdtgkuenAldYGHM18LL90","html_description":"Depression affects twice as many women as men and there needs to be more research on what makes men’s and women’s brains so different, say researchers at the University of Guelph. \n\nThe researchers looked at studies on sex differences in brain wave activity. Then they examined what is known about how sex hormones and female cycling affect those brain waves, and they found a lack of scientific information.\n\nMore study is needed on sex difference in brain wave activity, say researchers. (iStock)\nResearchers seek better treatment\n“It’s important because not only depression, but all neuropsychiatric disorders…(have) a lot of underlying causes,” says Melissa Perreault, professor and co-author of the review. “We want to be able to treat these disorders better than we’re doing. And to do so, we need to understand how these individuals (males and females) are different from one another.”\n\nStudies already show that depression has been linked to hormonal fluctuations that women experience during puberty, postpartum and menopause onset. But how female hormones affect the brain is not well understood.\nFewer women studied\nFar too few studies include female subjects, according to Perreault, partly because it is easier to study males because they don’t have hormonal cycles and because it would be more expensive to double sample sized to include both sexes. \n\nPerreault says organizations which fund research are beginning to realize this and she hopes this review will help encourage future studies that include sex and gender. \n\nThe review was published in the journal Biology of Sex Differences.\n\n(photo: University of Guelph)\n\nProf. Melissa Perreault says understanding how women's and men's brains are different will help improve treatment for depression.\n\nListenEN_Interview_2-20190405-WIE20","id":"4UdtgkuenAldYGHM18LL90","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Science lacks evidence on depression in women, find researchers","release_date":"2019-04-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4UdtgkuenAldYGHM18LL90"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/92b851473eeb41d0bf21eb1db067699cc7082878","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Individual beluga whales make personalized sounds that let others know who they are, says Valeria Vergara, a research scientist with Ocean Wise, a conservation program of the Vancouver Aquarium. They may even share some calls with others in their group enabling others to identify not just individuals but groups of individuals that stay together. Valeria Vergara used a hydrophone to listen to belugas in Cunningham Inlet in the High Arctic. (Gretchen Freund) 'Belugas form long, strong relationships' “It really is not surprising, says Vergara.. Belugas are an incredibly socially complex species. They live for many years just like humans and they form very long-term, strong relationships and they need to keep track of one another.” Some of the belugas which Vergara studied are in the St. Lawrence River which is dark and murky, so the whales cannot see each other well but the sounds they emit travel well in water. However, the sound of vessels and other human activities travels well and interferes. “It can mask their communication sounds which means it can compromise the ability of social companions, or even mothers and calves to hear one another which can be a problem for animals that rely on each other for survival,” says Vergara. “It can affect the ability of these whales to find food, to echolocate properly. It can create some stress. There might be behavioural avoidance...avoidance of places that are really good for the whales to find food.” Several solutions available, says researcher There are solutions, says Vergara. There could be regulations to create quiet areas or sanctuaries. Vessels could be quieter, she says adding that technology has long existed to make submarines silent and could be used for boats and ships. And she says everyone should respect regulations that prohibit approaching whales at a distance of less than 400 metres. (Valeria Vergara) Researcher Valeria Vergara says noise pollution is harmful in many ways to belugas. (Valeria Bergara) ListenEN_Interview_2-20190205-WIE20 Beluga calves dying in record numbers There are only about 880 belugas left in the St. Lawrence River. The population is in steady decline and calves have been dying in record numbers since 2008. These belugas are listed as endangered under Canada's Species at Risk Act.   Vergara says that besides noise pollution, they face challenges around food availability, global warming, ecosystem shifts, contaminants in the environment and toxic algae blooms. “This population is really being bombarded with all sorts of factors that affect their ability to recover which is a real pity because they are the southern-most population. It’s a genetically isolated population, it’s a gem of a species which we stand to lose.”","duration_ms":308950,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0T9ZPG8jeGqS7pJckjaHXb"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0T9ZPG8jeGqS7pJckjaHXb","html_description":"Individual beluga whales make personalized sounds that let others know who they are, says Valeria Vergara, a research scientist with Ocean Wise, a conservation program of the Vancouver Aquarium. They may even share some calls with others in their group enabling others to identify not just individuals but groups of individuals that stay together.\n\nValeria Vergara used a hydrophone to listen to belugas in Cunningham Inlet in the High Arctic. (Gretchen Freund)\n'Belugas form long, strong relationships'\n“It really is not surprising, says Vergara.. Belugas are an incredibly socially complex species. They live for many years just like humans and they form very long-term, strong relationships and they need to keep track of one another.”\n\nSome of the belugas which Vergara studied are in the St. Lawrence River which is dark and murky, so the whales cannot see each other well but the sounds they emit travel well in water. However, the sound of vessels and other human activities travels well and interferes.\n\n“It can mask their communication sounds which means it can compromise the ability of social companions, or even mothers and calves to hear one another which can be a problem for animals that rely on each other for survival,” says Vergara. \n\n“It can affect the ability of these whales to find food, to echolocate properly. It can create some stress. There might be behavioural avoidance...avoidance of places that are really good for the whales to find food.”\nSeveral solutions available, says researcher\nThere are solutions, says Vergara. There could be regulations to create quiet areas or sanctuaries. Vessels could be quieter, she says adding that technology has long existed to make submarines silent and could be used for boats and ships. And she says everyone should respect regulations that prohibit approaching whales at a distance of less than 400 metres.\n\n(Valeria Vergara)\n\nResearcher Valeria Vergara says noise pollution is harmful in many ways to belugas. (Valeria Bergara)\n\nListenEN_Interview_2-20190205-WIE20\nBeluga calves dying in record numbers\nThere are only about 880 belugas left in the St. Lawrence River. The population is in steady decline and calves have been dying in record numbers since 2008. These belugas are listed as endangered under Canada's Species at Risk Act.  \n\nVergara says that besides noise pollution, they face challenges around food availability, global warming, ecosystem shifts, contaminants in the environment and toxic algae blooms.\n\n“This population is really being bombarded with all sorts of factors that affect their ability to recover which is a real pity because they are the southern-most population. It’s a genetically isolated population, it’s a gem of a species which we stand to lose.”","id":"0T9ZPG8jeGqS7pJckjaHXb","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Belugas use personalized sounds to identify themselves: researcher","release_date":"2019-02-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0T9ZPG8jeGqS7pJckjaHXb"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/c76bb3253570fe98b713f28b1d7125853caa392b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Forest fires, important sources of black carbon emissions, devastated Arctic regions around the world in 2018, and are an increasing concern for circumpolar nations, says the chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane. The fires raged this summer in circumpolar countries like Sweden, Finland, Russia and Norway, including in their respective Arctic regions. \"It's one of the reasons the Arctic Council has recognized (wildfires) more widely and it's a topic that will be dealt with more widely by the Arctic Council working group,\" said Mikael Hilden, chair of the expert group, in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic from Helsinki. \"Our part in particular has been to look into the policy side of it and see, what kind of policies should one pursue? One cannot remove wildfires completely, but one can address them so they are less dangerous than they might otherwise be.\" The Arctic Council is a forum made up of world’s eight circumpolar nations: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia and the United States; and six Arctic Indigenous groups; the Aleut International Association, the Arctic Athabaskan Council, the Gwich'in Council International, the Inuit Circumpolar Council, the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North and the Saami Council. The forum was established in 1996 to work on sustainable development and environmental protection in the North. Feature Interview “One should do small scale actions and scale up, and this way of progressing is what we hope this work will advance,” says Mikael Hilden, the chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane. (Kristina Baer/Arctic Council Secretariat) For more on climate change, Arctic collaboration and black carbon threat in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Mikael Hilden, chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/01/Hilden.mp3 The expert group  on black carbon was established by the forum in 2015 to help implement its goal of reducing black carbon and methane emissions.  The Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane met for a two-day meeting in Helsinki January 16 and 17 to discuss their progress summary and recommendations for reducing emissions, that will be submitted to the next Arctic Council ministerial meeting in May.  Dangerous to health and environment Black carbon and methane emissions are a serious concern for the world’s circumpolar countries because of this form of pollution’s role in warming the atmosphere. When black carbon is deposited on ice and snow, it absorbs heat, instead of reflecting heat from these surfaces, contributing to global warming. After carbon dioxide, it's the second biggest contributor to warming. Black carbon is made up of fine matter produced by incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. It can be emitted by everything from diesel engines to forest fires. Because black carbon particles are so small, they can be inhaled and have also been linked to respiratory and circulatory problems in humans. Most boreal wildfires occur between March and October and can be caused either naturally, by things like lightening, or by humans. Members of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane in Helsinki in January 2018. (Kristina Baer/Arctic Council Secretariat) The Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme described wildfire's impact on the North in their 2015 assessment \"Black carbon and ozone as Arctic climate forces.\" \"Not only are emissions from fires within the Arctic important, but the Arctic atmosphere can be impacted by fires far from the region,\" the assessment said. \"Wildfires can effectively inject emissions higher up into the atmosphere than other ground-based emission sources. Depending on the scale of the fire,","duration_ms":673515,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0YTL4CBmwZT64zdNKpHpcS"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0YTL4CBmwZT64zdNKpHpcS","html_description":"Forest fires, important sources of black carbon emissions, devastated Arctic regions around the world in 2018, and are an increasing concern for circumpolar nations, says the chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane.\nThe fires raged this summer in circumpolar countries like Sweden, Finland, Russia and Norway, including in their respective Arctic regions.\n\n\"It's one of the reasons the Arctic Council has recognized (wildfires) more widely and it's a topic that will be dealt with more widely by the Arctic Council working group,\" said Mikael Hilden, chair of the expert group, in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic from Helsinki.\n\n\"Our part in particular has been to look into the policy side of it and see, what kind of policies should one pursue? One cannot remove wildfires completely, but one can address them so they are less dangerous than they might otherwise be.\"\n\nThe Arctic Council is a forum made up of world’s eight circumpolar nations: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia and the United States; and six Arctic Indigenous groups; the Aleut International Association, the Arctic Athabaskan Council, the Gwich'in Council International, the Inuit Circumpolar Council, the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North and the Saami Council. \n\nThe forum was established in 1996 to work on sustainable development and environmental protection in the North.\n\nFeature Interview\n\n“One should do small scale actions and scale up, and this way of progressing is what we hope this work will advance,” says Mikael Hilden, the chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane. (Kristina Baer/Arctic Council Secretariat)\n\nFor more on climate change, Arctic collaboration and black carbon threat in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Mikael Hilden, chair of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2019/01/Hilden.mp3\n\n\n\nThe expert group  on black carbon was established by the forum in 2015 to help implement its goal of reducing black carbon and methane emissions. \n\nThe Arctic Council Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane met for a two-day meeting in Helsinki January 16 and 17 to discuss their progress summary and recommendations for reducing emissions, that will be submitted to the next Arctic Council ministerial meeting in May. \nDangerous to health and environment\nBlack carbon and methane emissions are a serious concern for the world’s circumpolar countries because of this form of pollution’s role in warming the atmosphere. When black carbon is deposited on ice and snow, it absorbs heat, instead of reflecting heat from these surfaces, contributing to global warming.\n\nAfter carbon dioxide, it's the second biggest contributor to warming.\n\nBlack carbon is made up of fine matter produced by incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. It can be emitted by everything from diesel engines to forest fires.\n\nBecause black carbon particles are so small, they can be inhaled and have also been linked to respiratory and circulatory problems in humans.\n\nMost boreal wildfires occur between March and October and can be caused either naturally, by things like lightening, or by humans.\n\nMembers of the Arctic Council expert group on black carbon and methane in Helsinki in January 2018. (Kristina Baer/Arctic Council Secretariat)\n\nThe Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme described wildfire's impact on the North in their 2015 assessment \"Black carbon and ozone as Arctic climate forces.\"\n\n\"Not only are emissions from fires within the Arctic important, but the Arctic atmosphere can be impacted by fires far from the region,\" the assessment said.\n\n\"Wildfires can effectively inject emissions higher up into the atmosphere than other ground-based emission sources. Depending on the scale of the fire,","id":"0YTL4CBmwZT64zdNKpHpcS","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Arctic experts tackle black carbon risk posed by wildfires","release_date":"2019-01-26","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0YTL4CBmwZT64zdNKpHpcS"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/1e93ef8b322dc52b8850535740db32e25662072c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North The United Nations has designated 2019 as the Year of Indigenous Languages. The goal is to to make people more aware of the languages and their role in cultural preservation. Throughout the year, Eye on the Arctic will be checking in with First Nations and Inuit communities across the North to talk policy, education and strategies for language preservation and promotion in their regions. In this instalment, we turn the spotlight on Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut in a conversation with Stephane Cloutier, the director of official languages at the Government of Nunavut's Department of Culture and Heritage.  With Cloutier, we talk about the state of Inuktut, the term used in Nunavut to refer to the Inuit language dialects of the region, and why 2019 is an important milestone for language legislation in the territory. Feature Interview Stephane Cloutier, Nunavut’s director of official languages, in an undated photo. (Nunavut Legislative Assembly) Eye on the Arctic: 2019 has been designated by the United Nations as the year of Indigenous Languages, is there anything planned in Nunavut to mark the occasion?  Stéphane Cloutier: Nunavut is planning a big event that coincides with the International Year of Indigenous Languages. The Government of Nunavut, with its partners, will be hosting a big conference to mark 10 years since adopting the Nunavut language legislation, and to look at where we’re at in terms of language vitality of Inuktut in the territory. That conference will be called Inuugatta Inuktuuqta “Because we are Inuit, we must speak the language.” What are some of the successes of the last 10 years in terms of the promotion and preservation of Inuktut? There’s been important steps taken by government in order to improve the delivery of government services in Inuktut. There’s support provided to businesses and to municipalities as well. In terms of promoting the use of the language, especially revitalisation, we’ve been collaborating with Kitikmeot Region, where the language is more in decline. We’ve been implementing different projects, even using drum dancing as a safe environment to practice the culture but also the language. We’ve also been promoting the language through music. Many people will know (Inuktut rock band) The Jerry Cans. But in the last three, four years, we’ve seen about 20 new albums recorded where artists from Nunavut are signing in Inuktut. This is something great that we did not see before. We’re also seeing more film productions or TV series using Inuktut. Education is also a key to really support the language. In the last few years we’ve seen increased support for guided reading books in Inuktut for early grades up to grade five, and there are also plans for the following  grades as well. This is a major initiative, we’re talking about close to 700 books that have been developed in the last few years just to support the learning of the language by youngsters. What challenges remain? We still see decline in language use either as a mother tongue, as a home language or knowledge of the language. We’re trying to do more research to better understand the reasons, the motivations and the barriers to language use or revitalization. There’s also a need for additional resources for the schools, especially more Inuit teachers and Inuit educators that can teach in the language. There are teacher training programs in place but we need to increase enrolment in some of those programs, so in Nunavut, we can one day teach all the way from kindergarten to grade 12 in the language. There’s been discussions over the last decades about standardizing the Inuit language across Canada, or even one day, standardizing the language across the Arctic so Inuit in Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland would be able to share books and education materials. Where are these discussions now,","duration_ms":623360,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4475y3PIGphaKK4dfm8dCk"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4475y3PIGphaKK4dfm8dCk","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North\nThe United Nations has designated 2019 as the Year of Indigenous Languages.\n\nThe goal is to to make people more aware of the languages and their role in cultural preservation.\n\nThroughout the year, Eye on the Arctic will be checking in with First Nations and Inuit communities across the North to talk policy, education and strategies for language preservation and promotion in their regions.\n\nIn this instalment, we turn the spotlight on Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut in a conversation with Stephane Cloutier, the director of official languages at the Government of Nunavut's Department of Culture and Heritage. \n\nWith Cloutier, we talk about the state of Inuktut, the term used in Nunavut to refer to the Inuit language dialects of the region, and why 2019 is an important milestone for language legislation in the territory.\n\nFeature Interview \n\nStephane Cloutier, Nunavut’s director of official languages, in an undated photo. (Nunavut Legislative Assembly)\n\nEye on the Arctic: 2019 has been designated by the United Nations as the year of Indigenous Languages, is there anything planned in Nunavut to mark the occasion? \n\nStéphane Cloutier: Nunavut is planning a big event that coincides with the International Year of Indigenous Languages. The Government of Nunavut, with its partners, will be hosting a big conference to mark 10 years since adopting the Nunavut language legislation, and to look at where we’re at in terms of language vitality of Inuktut in the territory. That conference will be called Inuugatta Inuktuuqta “Because we are Inuit, we must speak the language.”\n\nWhat are some of the successes of the last 10 years in terms of the promotion and preservation of Inuktut?\n\nThere’s been important steps taken by government in order to improve the delivery of government services in Inuktut. There’s support provided to businesses and to municipalities as well. In terms of promoting the use of the language, especially revitalisation, we’ve been collaborating with Kitikmeot Region, where the language is more in decline. We’ve been implementing different projects, even using drum dancing as a safe environment to practice the culture but also the language.\n\nWe’ve also been promoting the language through music. Many people will know (Inuktut rock band) The Jerry Cans. But in the last three, four years, we’ve seen about 20 new albums recorded where artists from Nunavut are signing in Inuktut. This is something great that we did not see before. We’re also seeing more film productions or TV series using Inuktut.\n\nEducation is also a key to really support the language. In the last few years we’ve seen increased support for guided reading books in Inuktut for early grades up to grade five, and there are also plans for the following  grades as well. This is a major initiative, we’re talking about close to 700 books that have been developed in the last few years just to support the learning of the language by youngsters.\n\nWhat challenges remain?\n\nWe still see decline in language use either as a mother tongue, as a home language or knowledge of the language. We’re trying to do more research to better understand the reasons, the motivations and the barriers to language use or revitalization. There’s also a need for additional resources for the schools, especially more Inuit teachers and Inuit educators that can teach in the language. There are teacher training programs in place but we need to increase enrolment in some of those programs, so in Nunavut, we can one day teach all the way from kindergarten to grade 12 in the language.\n\nThere’s been discussions over the last decades about standardizing the Inuit language across Canada, or even one day, standardizing the language across the Arctic so Inuit in Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland would be able to share books and education materials. Where are these discussions now,","id":"4475y3PIGphaKK4dfm8dCk","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"U.N. Year of Indigenous Languages: Spotlight Nunavut","release_date":"2019-01-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4475y3PIGphaKK4dfm8dCk"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/d7b4ca56c342ac048d0ac34b5eaa2d848ea330d7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"All year long, Eye on the Arctic brings you news, and newsmakers, from around the North. But as 2019 gets underway, we've taken a pause to check in with our Eye on the Arctic expert bloggers to get their take on the past year in Arctic news and what northern news junkies should be watching for in the months ahead. In this instalment, we spoke with Mia Bennett, who writes and runs the Cryopolitics Arctic news and analysis blog and is an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong. Feature Interview with Mia Bennett Mia Bennett, manager of the Cryopolitics Arctic news and analysis blog. (Courtesy Mia Bennett) Eye on the Arctic: How did Arctic news coverage change in 2018 compared to other years?  Mia Bennett: I think we’re staring to see more coverage of a range of issues than in the past. Stories are no longer just about climate change and oil and gas extraction. We’re starting to see more topics like the rise of China and insightful pieces on Indigenous communities. One story that comes to mind was in National Geographic (in November) on the diversity of Alaska native communities.  There were photos of people just hanging out in the sauna, playing around, chopping muktuk (whale blubber). I think stories like this help put a human face on the Arctic. And the story was also rather happy for a change instead of another depressing story of climate change adaptation or the kind of colonial trauma these communities have been going through. Those stories, of course, have to be told, but that these other (positive) stories are finally getting out is really nice to see. What were your two top Arctic stories this year? China’s Arctic policy: This attracted a lot of attention for good reason. It’s the first time China has finalized its policy up north. It talks about the government’s interest in arctic science, protecting the environment, developing arctic resources and getting involved in the governance of the Arctic. So it really shows that China’s here to stay in a very formal way. But I think this has provoked, in the media, a certain degree of unwarrented Sinophobia. One headline in the Wall Street Journal said New Cold War? China Declares Itself a ‘Near-Arctic State. So we’re seeing these tropes repeat themselves of ‘Cold War in the Arctic’ but only now it’s China that’s the bogeyman, not Russia. (The White Paper) was a big story but the reaction was a little over the top, and not just from the media. In another related story, there was the decision in Greenland to accept funding for the airports it wants to revamp and build up from the Danish government rather than potentially accept a loan from China. There’s rumours that the Greenlandic government did this under pressure from Copenhagen and also the U.S. So there’s a lot of worry about what China is going to do now in the future in the Arctic and we’re seeing that play out in different ways both in the media and politically. Open water north of Greenland: Some of the oldest, thickest sea ice, part of the so-called permanent ice pack north of Greenland melted this year, which is a phenomenon that hasn’t really been seen before. Now you’re having open water touching the north coast of Greenland, which for scientists is quite shocking and quite scary to see. The melting of the ice pack up there, and the Greenland ice sheet as well, is happening at rates we haven’t seen and every year it gets worse. Was there any Arctic issue or event that you felt was overlooked, underreported and that just didn’t get the attention it deserved in 2018? Arctic Indigenous cookbook wins international award: A cookbook project called EALLU funded by a working group within the Arctic Council won best cookbook of the year at this quite prestigious competition. It shows the Arctic Council is doing good work. That the cookbook could win such a prestigious award is really a testament to the efforts of the Arctic Council and the people living in the Arctic to...","duration_ms":624222,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0sNrux2yFUWqfytWyoXox5"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0sNrux2yFUWqfytWyoXox5","html_description":"All year long, Eye on the Arctic brings you news, and newsmakers, from around the North.\nBut as 2019 gets underway, we've taken a pause to check in with our Eye on the Arctic expert bloggers to get their take on the past year in Arctic news and what northern news junkies should be watching for in the months ahead.\n\nIn this instalment, we spoke with Mia Bennett, who writes and runs the Cryopolitics Arctic news and analysis blog and is an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong.\n\nFeature Interview with Mia Bennett\n\nMia Bennett, manager of the Cryopolitics Arctic news and analysis blog. (Courtesy Mia Bennett)\n\nEye on the Arctic: How did Arctic news coverage change in 2018 compared to other years? \n\nMia Bennett: I think we’re staring to see more coverage of a range of issues than in the past. Stories are no longer just about climate change and oil and gas extraction. We’re starting to see more topics like the rise of China and insightful pieces on Indigenous communities.\n\nOne story that comes to mind was in National Geographic (in November) on the diversity of Alaska native communities.  There were photos of people just hanging out in the sauna, playing around, chopping muktuk (whale blubber). I think stories like this help put a human face on the Arctic. And the story was also rather happy for a change instead of another depressing story of climate change adaptation or the kind of colonial trauma these communities have been going through. Those stories, of course, have to be told, but that these other (positive) stories are finally getting out is really nice to see.\n\nWhat were your two top Arctic stories this year?\n\nChina’s Arctic policy: This attracted a lot of attention for good reason. It’s the first time China has finalized its policy up north. It talks about the government’s interest in arctic science, protecting the environment, developing arctic resources and getting involved in the governance of the Arctic. So it really shows that China’s here to stay in a very formal way. But I think this has provoked, in the media, a certain degree of unwarrented Sinophobia.\n\nOne headline in the Wall Street Journal said New Cold War? China Declares Itself a ‘Near-Arctic State. So we’re seeing these tropes repeat themselves of ‘Cold War in the Arctic’ but only now it’s China that’s the bogeyman, not Russia.\n\n(The White Paper) was a big story but the reaction was a little over the top, and not just from the media. In another related story, there was the decision in Greenland to accept funding for the airports it wants to revamp and build up from the Danish government rather than potentially accept a loan from China. There’s rumours that the Greenlandic government did this under pressure from Copenhagen and also the U.S. So there’s a lot of worry about what China is going to do now in the future in the Arctic and we’re seeing that play out in different ways both in the media and politically.\n\nOpen water north of Greenland: Some of the oldest, thickest sea ice, part of the so-called permanent ice pack north of Greenland melted this year, which is a phenomenon that hasn’t really been seen before. Now you’re having open water touching the north coast of Greenland, which for scientists is quite shocking and quite scary to see. The melting of the ice pack up there, and the Greenland ice sheet as well, is happening at rates we haven’t seen and every year it gets worse.\n\nWas there any Arctic issue or event that you felt was overlooked, underreported and that just didn’t get the attention it deserved in 2018?\n\nArctic Indigenous cookbook wins international award: A cookbook project called EALLU funded by a working group within the Arctic Council won best cookbook of the year at this quite prestigious competition. It shows the Arctic Council is doing good work. That the cookbook could win such a prestigious award is really a testament to the efforts of the Arctic Council and the people living in the Arctic to...","id":"0sNrux2yFUWqfytWyoXox5","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Alaska drilling, China, and the Arctic Council handover to Iceland : Northern news to watch for in 2019","release_date":"2019-01-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0sNrux2yFUWqfytWyoXox5"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4e65d4fb903a59e418f92f3099b89cf8d5e4a1ac","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"All year long,  Eye on the Arctic brings you news, and newsmakers, from around the North. But as 2019 gets underway, we've taken a pause to check in with our Eye on the Arctic expert bloggers to get their take on the past year in Arctic news and what northern news junkies should be watching for in the months ahead. In this instalment, we spoke with Heather Exner-Pirot, a managing editor at the Arctic Yearbook, a peer-reviewed publication devoted to the North. Feature Interview with Heather Exner-Pirot Heather Exner-Pirot, a managing editor at the Arctic Yearbook. (Courtesy Heather Exner-Pirot) Eye on the Arctic: How did Arctic news coverage change in 2018 compared to other years?  Heather Exner-Pirot: For me, the coverage has been roughly the same for the last 10 years. That’s what’s fascinating is that the narrative about the Arctic, how southerners and urban dwellers perceive the Arctic, is so entrenched that we’re kind of reading the same story over and over again in the mainstream media. So just more of the same?  It is. I wrote a recent article about it “How to write an Arctic story in 5 easy steps.” There’s a formula. You see the same graphs, the same sea-ice extent from 1979, the same sea routes, the same map of Russia, the same map of the top of the world in every single article. Maybe if you’re not a keen Arctic observer you don’t notice that it’s the same article, over and over again.  But those of us who follow it closely have read it all before. What were your two top Arctic stories this year? It feels like everything’s in a bit of a holding pattern, not that much has changed. Even for the Arctic Yearbook, we do a timeline of events and there wasn’t really anything that moved the needle. Some of the bigger stories internationally: China had a White Paper on the Arctic, Trump and Putin met in Helsinki. Those were interesting stories but nothing really changed there. In Canada, I will say when Minister of Northern Affairs Dominic Leblanc came onto the scene in August, there was a little more action and a lot less talk, but still, everyone’s kind of waiting for that Arctic Policy Framework to come out. Has there been a difference in Arctic Council coverage since it moved back to Europe (Finland 2017-2019)  from back-to-back North American chairmanships (United States 2015-2017 & Canada 2013-2015)? I don’t think, for myself,  (Finland) has been a particularly exciting chairmanship. Everyone thinks it’s well run. The Finns are doing a great job managing it, but there isn’t anything transformative that I can see coming down the pipeline. Was there any Arctic issue or event that you felt was overlooked, underreported and that just didn’t get the attention it deserved in 2018? Canada’s national Inuit organization Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK): (Organization president) Natan Obed and ITK have been taking more and more power over issues that affect Inuit. For me as a political scientist, this is a fascinating move because the territorial governments that have more of a mandate or more authority on some of these issues, for example tuberculosis or mental health, are kind of standing by and letting ITK move into these areas where ITK hasn’t been before. I’m fascinating to see how this will all play out. Does ITK have the capacity to do this? Does it have the funding? What are the governance implications? Everyone’s kind of just stepping aside and letting Obed do his thing, and cetainly to his credit. But I’m very curious as to how this plays out. It seems like every week there’s a new announcement from them: environmental protection or economic development, education or new governance relations with Canada. There’s obviously a lot of momentum, I’m just wondering when, for example, (Canada’s eastern arctic territory of )Nunavut might have something to say about it. Looking ahead to Arctic news in 2019 – what are two or three of the big stories or issues you’ll be following or wat...","duration_ms":494524,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6ZoKQkBJbzN5kCi5JKKssN"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6ZoKQkBJbzN5kCi5JKKssN","html_description":"All year long,  Eye on the Arctic brings you news, and newsmakers, from around the North.\nBut as 2019 gets underway, we've taken a pause to check in with our Eye on the Arctic expert bloggers to get their take on the past year in Arctic news and what northern news junkies should be watching for in the months ahead.\n\nIn this instalment, we spoke with Heather Exner-Pirot, a managing editor at the Arctic Yearbook, a peer-reviewed publication devoted to the North.\n\nFeature Interview with Heather Exner-Pirot\n\nHeather Exner-Pirot, a managing editor at the Arctic Yearbook. (Courtesy Heather Exner-Pirot)\n\nEye on the Arctic: How did Arctic news coverage change in 2018 compared to other years? \n\nHeather Exner-Pirot: For me, the coverage has been roughly the same for the last 10 years. That’s what’s fascinating is that the narrative about the Arctic, how southerners and urban dwellers perceive the Arctic, is so entrenched that we’re kind of reading the same story over and over again in the mainstream media.\n\nSo just more of the same? \n\nIt is. I wrote a recent article about it “How to write an Arctic story in 5 easy steps.” There’s a formula. You see the same graphs, the same sea-ice extent from 1979, the same sea routes, the same map of Russia, the same map of the top of the world in every single article. Maybe if you’re not a keen Arctic observer you don’t notice that it’s the same article, over and over again.  But those of us who follow it closely have read it all before.\n\nWhat were your two top Arctic stories this year?\n\nIt feels like everything’s in a bit of a holding pattern, not that much has changed. Even for the Arctic Yearbook, we do a timeline of events and there wasn’t really anything that moved the needle. Some of the bigger stories internationally: China had a White Paper on the Arctic, Trump and Putin met in Helsinki. Those were interesting stories but nothing really changed there. In Canada, I will say when Minister of Northern Affairs Dominic Leblanc came onto the scene in August, there was a little more action and a lot less talk, but still, everyone’s kind of waiting for that Arctic Policy Framework to come out.\n\nHas there been a difference in Arctic Council coverage since it moved back to Europe (Finland 2017-2019)  from back-to-back North American chairmanships (United States 2015-2017 & Canada 2013-2015)?\n\nI don’t think, for myself,  (Finland) has been a particularly exciting chairmanship. Everyone thinks it’s well run. The Finns are doing a great job managing it, but there isn’t anything transformative that I can see coming down the pipeline.\n\nWas there any Arctic issue or event that you felt was overlooked, underreported and that just didn’t get the attention it deserved in 2018?\n\nCanada’s national Inuit organization Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK): (Organization president) Natan Obed and ITK have been taking more and more power over issues that affect Inuit. For me as a political scientist, this is a fascinating move because the territorial governments that have more of a mandate or more authority on some of these issues, for example tuberculosis or mental health, are kind of standing by and letting ITK move into these areas where ITK hasn’t been before. I’m fascinating to see how this will all play out. Does ITK have the capacity to do this? Does it have the funding? What are the governance implications? Everyone’s kind of just stepping aside and letting Obed do his thing, and cetainly to his credit. But I’m very curious as to how this plays out.\n\nIt seems like every week there’s a new announcement from them: environmental protection or economic development, education or new governance relations with Canada. There’s obviously a lot of momentum, I’m just wondering when, for example, (Canada’s eastern arctic territory of )Nunavut might have something to say about it.\n\nLooking ahead to Arctic news in 2019 – what are two or three of the big stories or issues you’ll be following or wat...","id":"6ZoKQkBJbzN5kCi5JKKssN","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"ITK, an Arctic Council rejig and the summit Finland won’t let die : Northern news to watch for in 2019","release_date":"2019-01-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6ZoKQkBJbzN5kCi5JKKssN"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/44f05fbe96bbdc7aac4473a08d9f8b0cbf6c1819","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Trade has been one of the dominant foreign affairs issues for Canada this year, and the situation has deteriorated significantly as we enter the new year. The arrest and detention of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei CFO, in Vancouver, at the request of the United States, has ignited Beijing's retaliation on Canada. The arrest took place on the same day U.S. President Trump was meeting with China's leader, Xi Jingpin, and it has rendered Canada in a complicated triangulated position as the two global powers vie for supremacy. This is my biggest fear for 2019, and that's this emerging trade war between China and the United States. Ian Lee, an assistant professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, says these most recent developments are not good news. In an interview with Professor Lee, last week, he said he's most concerned with the brewing trade war between the world's largest economies. ListenEN_Interview_6-20181220-WIE60 A trade war will be potentially devastating to the world economy, Lee says, as the United States and China battle it out. Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, right, is escorted by a member of her private security detail while arriving at a parole office, in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. As the international story about a Chinese tech executive wanted by the United States began unfolding from a Vancouver courtroom, the phone lines for a local Mandarin-language radio program began lighting up. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck \"I do not believe it's going to degenerate into a hot war of guns, bullets, bombs, that sort of thing, I don't believe that.\" Lee says. \"It's completely against the self-interest of China, or the self-interest of the United States\", he says. But the long predicted market \"correction\" may now be on its way to becoming the recession in 2019. \"The U.S. with 20 trillion in GDP, expressed in US dollars, China with 12 trillion, greater than 12 trillion, expressed in U.S. dollars, the two countries together are over 40 per cent of the world's GDP, two hundred countries in the world, two of them account for the lion's share, and a trade war would slow down trade, slow down business and possibly tip a number of countries into recession.\" There is room for negotiation by the U.S. imposed deadline of March 2019. Perhaps the Lunar New Year, February 5th, heralding the Year of the Pig will help. It is said to be a time of abundance and good fortune. Meanwhile, a third Canadian is now in detention in China. Sarah McIver, who taught English in China, was detained for routine work visa violations. Beijing arrested two Canadians, Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat and Michael Spavor, a China-based entrepreneur, on suspicion of “endangering national security”, just days after Meng's arrest.","duration_ms":596715,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7bggC3A2ktWifsBD2PIrBc"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7bggC3A2ktWifsBD2PIrBc","html_description":"Trade has been one of the dominant foreign affairs issues for Canada this year, and the situation has deteriorated significantly as we enter the new year.\n\nThe arrest and detention of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei CFO, in Vancouver, at the request of the United States, has ignited Beijing's retaliation on Canada.\n\nThe arrest took place on the same day U.S. President Trump was meeting with China's leader, Xi Jingpin, and it has rendered Canada in a complicated triangulated position as the two global powers vie for supremacy.\n\nThis is my biggest fear for 2019, and that's this emerging trade war between China and the United States.\n\nIan Lee, an assistant professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, says these most recent developments are not good news.\n\nIn an interview with Professor Lee, last week, he said he's most concerned with the brewing trade war between the world's largest economies.\n\nListenEN_Interview_6-20181220-WIE60\n\nA trade war will be potentially devastating to the world economy, Lee says, as the United States and China battle it out.\n\n\n\n \tHuawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, right, is escorted by a member of her private security detail while arriving at a parole office, in Vancouver, on Wednesday December 12, 2018. As the international story about a Chinese tech executive wanted by the United States began unfolding from a Vancouver courtroom, the phone lines for a local Mandarin-language radio program began lighting up. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck\n\n\"I do not believe it's going to degenerate into a hot war of guns, bullets, bombs, that sort of thing, I don't believe that.\" Lee says. \"It's completely against the self-interest of China, or the self-interest of the United States\", he says.\n\nBut the long predicted market \"correction\" may now be on its way to becoming the recession in 2019.\n\n\"The U.S. with 20 trillion in GDP, expressed in US dollars, China with 12 trillion, greater than 12 trillion, expressed in U.S. dollars, the two countries together are over 40 per cent of the world's GDP, two hundred countries in the world, two of them account for the lion's share, and a trade war would slow down trade, slow down business and possibly tip a number of countries into recession.\"\n\nThere is room for negotiation by the U.S. imposed deadline of March 2019. Perhaps the Lunar New Year, February 5th, heralding the Year of the Pig will help. It is said to be a time of abundance and good fortune.\n\nMeanwhile, a third Canadian is now in detention in China. Sarah McIver, who taught English in China, was detained for routine work visa violations.\n\nBeijing arrested two Canadians, Michael Kovrig, a former diplomat and Michael Spavor, a China-based entrepreneur, on suspicion of “endangering national security”, just days after Meng's arrest.","id":"7bggC3A2ktWifsBD2PIrBc","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Trade troubles dominate 2018 in Canada","release_date":"2018-12-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7bggC3A2ktWifsBD2PIrBc"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/26fb0794ae22775a21f67ce02bc7e81903ca95a3","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Updated on January 23rd 2019 | Canadian model Maye Musk, 70, attends the 2018 GQ Men Of The Year Party at Benedict Estate on December 6, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. Musk's modelling career has taken off since she let her hair grow in silver, and she's now the latest \"face\" of Covergirl. (Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images) HOW OLD? Canada, like all G7 countries, is an ageing society. With a population of almost 38 million people, the the median age here is now 40. Of the G7 countries, however, we’re still one of the youngest. But by 2031 we will be in the situation that Japan finds itself in now, with a quarter of the population over the age of 65. Headlines like these, from the 2016 Canadian Census, surprised many people, and present the challenges and opportunities we'll consider here. * If you'd like to view some of the charts, you'll find them at the end of this post. From the joys of embracing the process in good health as Maye Musk is doing, to the \"staggering ageism\" writer Sharon Butala has experienced, to the demands of the '100 million by 2100' group, to significantly increase immigration to support seniors, we'll look at how Canadians are evolving. Centenarians, people over 100, are the fastest growing demographic in Canada now. (Trevor Wilson/CBC) CENSUS AND CENTENARIANS The fact that there are now more people over the age of 65 in Canada, than under 14, came as a wake-up call, following the census. The demographic pyramids of the past have become demographic columns, and indeed now the columns are getting top heavy. David K. Foot, originally from Australia, is the economist and demographer, who recently retired from the University of Toronto. He first alerted Canadians to these developments over twenty years ago, with his \"Boom, Bust & Echo\" series of books, written with journalist Daniel Stoffman. David Foot, author of \"Boom, Bust & Echo,\"at his home in Toronto on May 29, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim In this new millennium, however, it is becoming evident this evolution is a global trend. It is not just the countries of the so-called developed world that have experienced a drop in fertility; it is increasingly the reality in what we know as the developing world now as well. Jonathan Chagnon is a demographer with Statistics Canada, the government agency that keeps track of the country’s facts and figures. He says it’s not all bad news, that we just have to be prepared for this evolution.  ListenEN_Clip_3-20181107-WME30 “Canada still has one of the youngest populations of the G7 countries. There’s only the United States who has a lower proportion of 65 and over, than Canada.” - Jonathan Chagnon From government budgets to provide the healthcare services, to buildings and residences designed to accommodate more walkers and wheel chairs, and more communal living options, profound changes in our society are underway. Many of the indoor shopping malls we frequent, particularly during the cold winter months, were redesigned in the last decade to provide more comfortable seating, allowing the elderly to rest as they make their way through retail spaces, and making seniors welcome to spend time there, or in the food courts, to break the isolation that is now recognized as so detrimental to the quality of life of an elderly person. Even death is undergoing a revision. There's a social transformation taking place as Canadians consider the right they now have, to an \"assisted death\". Funeral traditions and burial methods are also changing. In early November 2018, the first Salon de la Mort, at Montreal's Palais de Congres took place, featuring a wide variety of end of life options. CENTENARIANS ARE THE FASTEST GROWING DEMOGRAPHIC IN CANADA Photo: iStock Meanwhile, people are living longer, a lot more of them and a lot longer. Is it the good life here? “There was a real generational shift in Canada.","duration_ms":568947,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1nLq6TNzXmu7m7x4pjT167"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1nLq6TNzXmu7m7x4pjT167","html_description":"Updated on January 23rd 2019 |\n\n \t\n\nCanadian model Maye Musk, 70, attends the 2018 GQ Men Of The Year Party at Benedict Estate on December 6, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. Musk's modelling career has taken off since she let her hair grow in silver, and she's now the latest \"face\" of Covergirl. (Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images)\n \t\n\nHOW OLD?\nCanada, like all G7 countries, is an ageing society. With a population of almost 38 million people, the the median age here is now 40.\n\nOf the G7 countries, however, we’re still one of the youngest.\n\nBut by 2031 we will be in the situation that Japan finds itself in now, with a quarter of the population over the age of 65.\n\nHeadlines like these, from the 2016 Canadian Census, surprised many people, and present the challenges and opportunities we'll consider here. \n\n* If you'd like to view some of the charts, you'll find them at the end of this post.\n\nFrom the joys of embracing the process in good health as Maye Musk is doing, to the \"staggering ageism\" writer Sharon Butala has experienced, to the demands of the '100 million by 2100' group, to significantly increase immigration to support seniors, we'll look at how Canadians are evolving.\n\nCentenarians, people over 100, are the fastest growing demographic in Canada now. (Trevor Wilson/CBC)\nCENSUS AND CENTENARIANS\nThe fact that there are now more people over the age of 65 in Canada, than under 14, came as a wake-up call, following the census.\n\nThe demographic pyramids of the past have become demographic columns, and indeed now the columns are getting top heavy.\n\nDavid K. Foot, originally from Australia, is the economist and demographer, who recently retired from the University of Toronto.\n\nHe first alerted Canadians to these developments over twenty years ago, with his \"Boom, Bust & Echo\" series of books, written with journalist Daniel Stoffman.\n\nDavid Foot, author of \"Boom, Bust & Echo,\"at his home in Toronto on May 29, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim\n\nIn this new millennium, however, it is becoming evident this evolution is a global trend. \n\nIt is not just the countries of the so-called developed world that have experienced a drop in fertility; it is increasingly the reality in what we know as the developing world now as well.\n\nJonathan Chagnon is a demographer with Statistics Canada, the government agency that keeps track of the country’s facts and figures.\n\nHe says it’s not all bad news, that we just have to be prepared for this evolution. \n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20181107-WME30\n“Canada still has one of the youngest populations of the G7 countries. There’s only the United States who has a lower proportion of 65 and over, than Canada.” - Jonathan Chagnon\nFrom government budgets to provide the healthcare services, to buildings and residences designed to accommodate more walkers and wheel chairs, and more communal living options, profound changes in our society are underway.\n\nMany of the indoor shopping malls we frequent, particularly during the cold winter months, were redesigned in the last decade to provide more comfortable seating, allowing the elderly to rest as they make their way through retail spaces, and making seniors welcome to spend time there, or in the food courts, to break the isolation that is now recognized as so detrimental to the quality of life of an elderly person.\n\nEven death is undergoing a revision. There's a social transformation taking place as Canadians consider the right they now have, to an \"assisted death\".\n\nFuneral traditions and burial methods are also changing. In early November 2018, the first Salon de la Mort, at Montreal's Palais de Congres took place, featuring a wide variety of end of life options.\nCENTENARIANS ARE THE FASTEST GROWING DEMOGRAPHIC IN CANADA\n\n\nPhoto: iStock\n\nMeanwhile, people are living longer, a lot more of them and a lot longer. Is it the good life here?\n\n“There was a real generational shift in Canada.","id":"1nLq6TNzXmu7m7x4pjT167","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada: Becoming a Senior Society","release_date":"2018-12-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1nLq6TNzXmu7m7x4pjT167"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/c6b82a3cedfb75e530c4dfe23dd7b232a98bf6f8","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North An interactive ebook focused on research in Canada's Hudson Bay area, and its wider connection to the Arctic, has been released in an effort to make climate science more accessible to the general population. \"Scientific information is quite often not accessible to the public or the policy makers  because none of them read peer-reviewed journals,\" said David Barber,  Canada Research Chair in Arctic-System Science at the University of Manitoba and one of the people behind the project. \"So we took it upon ourselves to translate these very jargon-filled peer-reviewed publications and put it into an accessible format so that people could have the up-to-date knowledge [that] the scientific world has about the realities of climate change,\" Barber told Eye on the Arctic in a phone interview. Feature InterviewFor more on the challenges of communicating climate science, Eye on the Arctic talks with the University of Manitoba’s David Barber: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/12/FinalBarber.mp3 Interactive experience The Expedition Churchill: A Gateway to Arctic Research ebook  is part of  Expedition Churchill, an outreach program from the University of Manitoba's Centre for Earth Observation and Science. Churchill is a town of around 900 people in north-eastern Manitoba on the Hudson Bay coast and is well known for its polar bear tourism. Project partners include VIA Rail, The Town of Churchill, the Churchill Northern Studies Centre (CNSC), Assiniboine Park Zoo and Travel Manitoba. Special tables on the VIA Rail service will allow passengers on the resumed Churchill passenger rail service to explore the book's interactive features, says David Barber. (Michael Woelcke/VIA Rail) The book includes 10 chapters on everything from sea ice to the Arctic food chain and includes video, interactive graphics and audio of researchers explaining their science in plain language. Besides the ebook, the Expedition Churchill project includes interactive kiosks across Manitoba and interactive tabletops in the VIA Rail passenger train between Winnipeg and Churchill. \"People from all over the wold travel [to Churchill] to see the belugas, the northern lights, to go birding on the Hudon Bay lowlands and, or course, to see the polar bears,\" Barber said. \"These tourists are a valuable component  of our  society in terms of their engagement and involvement with the whole climate change arena. We wanted to make sure that tourists understood what it was they were  seeing and what the scientific realities of climate change are in the North.\" Hudson Bay, a model for High Arctic The cover of the Expedition Churchill ebook. Understanding climate change in this region, can help people better understand how a warming climate will affect the Arctic Ocean, say researchers. (Courtesy University of Manitoba) The research done in Canada's Hudson Bay area is especially important as a model for how climate change may affect the Far North, says Barber. As an inland sea surrounded by a continent, researchers say Hudson Bay provides an important model for what might happen in the Arctic Ocean as the climate warms. \"Hudson Bay is actually a very good analogue of what the near future of what the High Arctic system looks like,\" said Barber. \"And this ebook explores this concept providing details about how Hudson Bay functions. \"We learn from this sub-Arctic sea about what's happening in the High Arctic.\" Passenger rail service resumes An aerial view of Churchill, Manitoba, is shown on Wednesday, July 4, 2018.  (John Woods/The Canadian Press) The ebook was launched on Friday to coincide with the resumption of passenger service to northern Manitoba, with the first train leaving on Sunday. The service was suspended in May 2017 after severe flooding damaged rail tracks. ","duration_ms":615001,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5mD8RD3is0TPGIYy0MJsGj"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5mD8RD3is0TPGIYy0MJsGj","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North\nAn interactive ebook focused on research in Canada's Hudson Bay area, and its wider connection to the Arctic, has been released in an effort to make climate science more accessible to the general population.\n\n\"Scientific information is quite often not accessible to the public or the policy makers  because none of them read peer-reviewed journals,\" said David Barber,  Canada Research Chair in Arctic-System Science at the University of Manitoba and one of the people behind the project.\n\n\"So we took it upon ourselves to translate these very jargon-filled peer-reviewed publications and put it into an accessible format so that people could have the up-to-date knowledge [that] the scientific world has about the realities of climate change,\" Barber told Eye on the Arctic in a phone interview.\n\nFeature InterviewFor more on the challenges of communicating climate science, Eye on the Arctic talks with the University of Manitoba’s David Barber:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/12/FinalBarber.mp3\n\n\nInteractive experience\nThe Expedition Churchill: A Gateway to Arctic Research ebook  is part of  Expedition Churchill, an outreach program from the University of Manitoba's Centre for Earth Observation and Science.\n\nChurchill is a town of around 900 people in north-eastern Manitoba on the Hudson Bay coast and is well known for its polar bear tourism.\n\nProject partners include VIA Rail, The Town of Churchill, the Churchill Northern Studies Centre (CNSC), Assiniboine Park Zoo and Travel Manitoba.\n\nSpecial tables on the VIA Rail service will allow passengers on the resumed Churchill passenger rail service to explore the book's interactive features, says David Barber. (Michael Woelcke/VIA Rail)\n\nThe book includes 10 chapters on everything from sea ice to the Arctic food chain and includes video, interactive graphics and audio of researchers explaining their science in plain language.\n\nBesides the ebook, the Expedition Churchill project includes interactive kiosks across Manitoba and interactive tabletops in the VIA Rail passenger train between Winnipeg and Churchill.\n\n\"People from all over the wold travel [to Churchill] to see the belugas, the northern lights, to go birding on the Hudon Bay lowlands and, or course, to see the polar bears,\" Barber said.\n\n\"These tourists are a valuable component  of our  society in terms of their engagement and involvement with the whole climate change arena. We wanted to make sure that tourists understood what it was they were  seeing and what the scientific realities of climate change are in the North.\"\nHudson Bay, a model for High Arctic\nThe cover of the Expedition Churchill ebook. Understanding climate change in this region, can help people better understand how a warming climate will affect the Arctic Ocean, say researchers. (Courtesy University of Manitoba)\n\nThe research done in Canada's Hudson Bay area is especially important as a model for how climate change may affect the Far North, says Barber.\n\nAs an inland sea surrounded by a continent, researchers say Hudson Bay provides an important model for what might happen in the Arctic Ocean as the climate warms.\n\n\"Hudson Bay is actually a very good analogue of what the near future of what the High Arctic system looks like,\" said Barber. \"And this ebook explores this concept providing details about how Hudson Bay functions.\n\n\"We learn from this sub-Arctic sea about what's happening in the High Arctic.\"\nPassenger rail service resumes\nAn aerial view of Churchill, Manitoba, is shown on Wednesday, July 4, 2018.  (John Woods/The Canadian Press)\n\nThe ebook was launched on Friday to coincide with the resumption of passenger service to northern Manitoba, with the first train leaving on Sunday.\n\nThe service was suspended in May 2017 after severe flooding damaged rail tracks.\n\n","id":"5mD8RD3is0TPGIYy0MJsGj","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Interactive Canadian ebook seeks to make Arctic climate science accessible","release_date":"2018-12-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5mD8RD3is0TPGIYy0MJsGj"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5f38f76550ca09dcbfb282dbb5c71bc12031162e","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  The First Nations Book Fair (Kwahiatonhk: Salon du livre des Premières Nations) gets underway in the Canadian province of Quebec November 22-25 to promote Indigenous books and authors. Eye on the Arctic participated in Espaces autochtones, a show from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's French-language service Radio-Canada,  to talk about the popular books and reading recommendations from independent bookstores and publishers based in Canada's northern territories. Here's the roundup: Finding our Faces. (Courtesy Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle) Finding our Faces   Publisher: Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle Books about the residential school experience continue to sell well and dominate Indigenous literature says Lise Schonewille, the buyer at Mac's Fireweed Books in Whitehorse, the capital of Canada's northwestern Yukon territory. Sugar Falls by David Alexander Robertson, They Called Me Number One by Bev Sellars and Speaking Our Truth by Monique Gray Smith are three books by southern Indigenous authors that the store recommends. For those interested in Yukon, Schonewille recommends Finding our Faces from the Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle, a book featuring photos and stories from former students of the Whitehorse Baptist Mission School. Adeline Webber, a member of the Teslin Tlingit First Nation, and a student at the school from 1952-1960, initiated the search for photos and stories to create a  book for former students and their decedents. It launched in 2015 but was so popular that demand exceeded their initial run. As more people found out about the project, more people got in contact to offer their photos to the project. A second edition was published in October. \"This has been a difficult book for some but it's also treasured by survivors and their children and grandchildren, because this is the history. It’s important for all of us,” says Adeline Webber, the woman behind the Finding our Faces project. (Courtesy Whitehorse Aboriginal Women’s Circle) Webber told Eye on the Arctic she hopes the book can also eventually be used in school programs. \"Many people here in Yukon told me after the book was published  that they hadn't even known that there had ever been a residential school in downtown Whitehorse. But that's the way it was. This has been a difficult book for some but it's also treasured by survivors and their children and grandchildren, because this is the history. It's important for all of us.\" Tilly and the Crazy Eights  Author: Monique Gray Smith Publisher:  Second Story Press Indigenous literature is more diverse than most Canadians realize and there are more writers and books to recommend than she has time to list, says Judith Drinnan, owner of the Yellowknife Book Cellar in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT). She says authors like Richard Van Camp, a Tłı̨chǫ writer from the NWT  town of Fort Smith, does everything from short stories and children's books to graphic novels and poetry. She also recommends work by Monique Gray Smith, a Victoria-based Indigenous writer of Cree, Lakota and Scottish ancestry, saying Gray Smith's most recent book Tilly and the Crazy Eights, a novel about of a group of elders from the Canadian province of British Columbia who take a road trip to the Gathering of Nations powwow in the American state of New Mexico, as a story \"full of humour and life.\" Feature Interview with Monique Gray Smith‏ “The marking team, they didn’t think  there would be enough interest (in Tilly and the Crazy Eights) because there wasn’t enough trauma in the book,” says Gray Smith of one publisher that rejected her manuscript. “That really said a lot to me about what people are thinking is still needed in regards to literature that focuses on Indigenous characters.” (Centric Photography/Courtesy Second Story Press) ","duration_ms":388336,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5ZGRmFPA33SnTFXTZ4evpl"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5ZGRmFPA33SnTFXTZ4evpl","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nThe First Nations Book Fair (Kwahiatonhk: Salon du livre des Premières Nations) gets underway in the Canadian province of Quebec November 22-25 to promote Indigenous books and authors.\n\nEye on the Arctic participated in Espaces autochtones, a show from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's French-language service Radio-Canada,  to talk about the popular books and reading recommendations from independent bookstores and publishers based in Canada's northern territories.\n\nHere's the roundup:\n\nFinding our Faces. (Courtesy Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle)\n\nFinding our Faces  \nPublisher: Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle\n\nBooks about the residential school experience continue to sell well and dominate Indigenous literature says Lise Schonewille, the buyer at Mac's Fireweed Books in Whitehorse, the capital of Canada's northwestern Yukon territory. Sugar Falls by David Alexander Robertson, They Called Me Number One by Bev Sellars and Speaking Our Truth by Monique Gray Smith are three books by southern Indigenous authors that the store recommends.\n\nFor those interested in Yukon, Schonewille recommends Finding our Faces from the Whitehorse Aboriginal Women's Circle, a book featuring photos and stories from former students of the Whitehorse Baptist Mission School.\n\nAdeline Webber, a member of the Teslin Tlingit First Nation, and a student at the school from 1952-1960, initiated the search for photos and stories to create a  book for former students and their decedents. It launched in 2015 but was so popular that demand exceeded their initial run. As more people found out about the project, more people got in contact to offer their photos to the project. A second edition was published in October.\n\n\"This has been a difficult book for some but it's also treasured by survivors and their children and grandchildren, because this is the history. It’s important for all of us,” says Adeline Webber, the woman behind the Finding our Faces project. (Courtesy Whitehorse Aboriginal Women’s Circle)\n\nWebber told Eye on the Arctic she hopes the book can also eventually be used in school programs.\n\n\"Many people here in Yukon told me after the book was published  that they hadn't even known that there had ever been a residential school in downtown Whitehorse. But that's the way it was. This has been a difficult book for some but it's also treasured by survivors and their children and grandchildren, because this is the history. It's important for all of us.\"\n\nTilly and the Crazy Eights \nAuthor: Monique Gray Smith\nPublisher:  Second Story Press\n\nIndigenous literature is more diverse than most Canadians realize and there are more writers and books to recommend than she has time to list, says Judith Drinnan, owner of the Yellowknife Book Cellar in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT).\n\nShe says authors like Richard Van Camp, a Tłı̨chǫ writer from the NWT  town of Fort Smith, does everything from short stories and children's books to graphic novels and poetry. She also recommends work by Monique Gray Smith, a Victoria-based Indigenous writer of Cree, Lakota and Scottish ancestry, saying Gray Smith's most recent book Tilly and the Crazy Eights, a novel about of a group of elders from the Canadian province of British Columbia who take a road trip to the Gathering of Nations powwow in the American state of New Mexico, as a story \"full of humour and life.\"\n\nFeature Interview with Monique Gray Smith‏ \n\n“The marking team, they didn’t think  there would be enough interest (in Tilly and the Crazy Eights) because there wasn’t enough trauma in the book,” says Gray Smith of one publisher that rejected her manuscript. “That really said a lot to me about what people are thinking is still needed in regards to literature that focuses on Indigenous characters.” (Centric Photography/Courtesy Second Story Press)\n\n","id":"5ZGRmFPA33SnTFXTZ4evpl","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Notable book recommendations from across northern Canada","release_date":"2018-11-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5ZGRmFPA33SnTFXTZ4evpl"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/120bf8ec1acffbe0346b42b22896c9f8da8b137f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"People who are seriously injured are at greater risk of being hospitalized for a mental health disorder or of dying by suicide within the following five years, according to a new study. The research involved over 19,000 people who were seriously injured in car accidents, falls or violence in the province of Ontario between 2005 and 2010.  They were 40 per cent more likely to be hospitalized with problems like depression, anxiety or substance abuse. Their rate of suicide was about six times higher than average. Findings important for the injured and their doctors The lead author of the study, Dr. Christopher Evans of the Kingston Health Sciences Centre says it is important for people who suffer major injuries, their friends and families to be aware of potential mental health issues so patients can get the support they may need. “From the health care providers’ side...I think we need to be cognizant of these issues and look to develop our systems to have more vigorous approaches to identifying patients who are at risk and standardized processes for allowing access to mental health services,” says Evans. He adds that, now that the health care system has become good at treating people for the physical aspects of severe trauma, it needs to ensure their mental health is treated as well. The study was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Dr. Christopher Evans explains the results of his study on major trauma and mental illness. ListenEN_Interview_7-20181115-WIE70","duration_ms":290691,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7GdZ4gZvRIlynW0qRS24gp"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7GdZ4gZvRIlynW0qRS24gp","html_description":"People who are seriously injured are at greater risk of being hospitalized for a mental health disorder or of dying by suicide within the following five years, according to a new study.\n\nThe research involved over 19,000 people who were seriously injured in car accidents, falls or violence in the province of Ontario between 2005 and 2010.  They were 40 per cent more likely to be hospitalized with problems like depression, anxiety or substance abuse. Their rate of suicide was about six times higher than average.\nFindings important for the injured and their doctors\nThe lead author of the study, Dr. Christopher Evans of the Kingston Health Sciences Centre says it is important for people who suffer major injuries, their friends and families to be aware of potential mental health issues so patients can get the support they may need. \n\n“From the health care providers’ side...I think we need to be cognizant of these issues and look to develop our systems to have more vigorous approaches to identifying patients who are at risk and standardized processes for allowing access to mental health services,” says Evans.\n\nHe adds that, now that the health care system has become good at treating people for the physical aspects of severe trauma, it needs to ensure their mental health is treated as well.\n\nThe study was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.\n\n\n\nDr. Christopher Evans explains the results of his study on major trauma and mental illness.\n\nListenEN_Interview_7-20181115-WIE70","id":"7GdZ4gZvRIlynW0qRS24gp","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Major trauma linked to higher risk of mental illness, suicide","release_date":"2018-11-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7GdZ4gZvRIlynW0qRS24gp"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7f659cf5ade25c80af5563a1edc739b604b65747","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  If left unchecked, acidification levels in the Arctic Ocean will have significant consequences for northern communities as well as the rest of the globe says a report released this week. The report, 2018 Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment, was put together by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), a working group of the Arctic Council,  and was released at the  2018 Arctic Biodiversity Congress in Rovaniemi, Finland on Wednesday. The assessment was based on a series of case studies from different regions of the Arctic including Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and the Barents Sea. In all cases, they projected unchecked acidification levels would have grave impacts on all areas in coming years. \"Overall, the case studies show that effects of acidification, in combination with other  stressors, are highly uncertain,\" said AMAP in a news release. \"This uncertainty underscores the urgent need for  increased monitoring in the region, and for research that looks at the effects on species  of a number of environmental stressors acting in combination.\" Areas studied for AMAP assessment Alaska: Impacts of acidification on fisheries in different regions of the state Barents Sea: Effects of fishing, climate warming and acidification on cod Canada: Potential effects of climate change and ocean acidification on polar cod and the Indigenous communities that rely on the fish for country food Greenland: Effect of acidification on shrimp fishing and socio‐economic implications of those changes Norway:  How ocean acidification and  warming might impact sea urchin yields Acidification impacts Rising ocean acidification is primarily driven by rising greenhouse gas emissions. Changing ocean chemistry has a suite of cascading impacts: it can interrupt the food chain, alter predator-prey relationships and can even impact how marine life develops. The impacts of this in fragile environments like North, are particularly worrying, AMAP says. \"Falling ocean pH levels – which are  changing most quickly in the Arctic – are acting in tandem with other environmental  stressors, such as rising air and sea temperatures, to drive significant changes in marine  ecosystems, with impacts on the communities that depend upon them,\" they said. Assessing environmental threats AMAP, like other Arctic Council working groups, are made of up experts that come together to examine particular areas of concern in the North. AMAP's mandate is to assess polltion threats and their affects on Arctic peoples and the environment and to give advice to Arctic ministers on actions needed to respond and mitigate some of these threats. The report released this week is an update to a previous 2013 AMAP assessment. Around four-hundred and fifty experts are attending the Arctic Biodiveristy Congress in Rovaniemi. The conference ends October 12. Feature Interview Finland’s Environment Minister Kimmo Tiilikainen (pictured right in 2016 with Dutch State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment Sharon Dijksma in Brussels) hosted a two-day Arctic Environment Ministers’ meeting in Rovaniemi, Finland this week.(Emmanuel Dunand /AFP/Getty Images) Listen here for Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Finland’s Environment Minister Kimmo Tiilikainen for more about the conferences that took place in Finnish Lapland this week and the environmental issues facing the Arctic: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/10/Finland_AC_ministers.mp3 Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca First published on www.rcinet.ca on October 13th 2018 Related stories from around the North: Canada:  Thawing permafrost in Canada’s Northwest Territories releasing acid that’s breaking down minerals: study, CBC News Finland: Arctic environment ministers gather in Finland to tackle climate change,","duration_ms":374361,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4fPn3W2upTpGN4zYVzPCtU"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4fPn3W2upTpGN4zYVzPCtU","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nIf left unchecked, acidification levels in the Arctic Ocean will have significant consequences for northern communities as well as the rest of the globe says a report released this week.\n\nThe report, 2018 Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment, was put together by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), a working group of the Arctic Council,  and was released at the  2018 Arctic Biodiversity Congress in Rovaniemi, Finland on Wednesday.\n\nThe assessment was based on a series of case studies from different regions of the Arctic including Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Norway and the Barents Sea. In all cases, they projected unchecked acidification levels would have grave impacts on all areas in coming years.\n\n\"Overall, the case studies show that effects of acidification, in combination with other  stressors, are highly uncertain,\" said AMAP in a news release. \"This uncertainty underscores the urgent need for  increased monitoring in the region, and for research that looks at the effects on species  of a number of environmental stressors acting in combination.\"\n\nAreas studied for AMAP assessment \n\nAlaska: Impacts of acidification on fisheries in different regions of the state\n\nBarents Sea: Effects of fishing, climate warming and acidification on cod\n\nCanada: Potential effects of climate change and ocean acidification on polar cod and the Indigenous communities that rely on the fish for country food\n\nGreenland: Effect of acidification on shrimp fishing and socio‐economic implications of those changes\n\nNorway:  How ocean acidification and  warming might impact sea urchin yields\n\n\nAcidification impacts\nRising ocean acidification is primarily driven by rising greenhouse gas emissions.\n\nChanging ocean chemistry has a suite of cascading impacts: it can interrupt the food chain, alter predator-prey relationships and can even impact how marine life develops. The impacts of this in fragile environments like North, are particularly worrying, AMAP says.\n\n\"Falling ocean pH levels – which are  changing most quickly in the Arctic – are acting in tandem with other environmental  stressors, such as rising air and sea temperatures, to drive significant changes in marine  ecosystems, with impacts on the communities that depend upon them,\" they said.\nAssessing environmental threats\nAMAP, like other Arctic Council working groups, are made of up experts that come together to examine particular areas of concern in the North. AMAP's mandate is to assess polltion threats and their affects on Arctic peoples and the environment and to give advice to Arctic ministers on actions needed to respond and mitigate some of these threats.\n\nThe report released this week is an update to a previous 2013 AMAP assessment.\n\nAround four-hundred and fifty experts are attending the Arctic Biodiveristy Congress in Rovaniemi.\n\nThe conference ends October 12.\n\nFeature Interview \n\nFinland’s Environment Minister Kimmo Tiilikainen (pictured right in 2016 with Dutch State Secretary for Infrastructure and the Environment Sharon Dijksma in Brussels) hosted a two-day Arctic Environment Ministers’ meeting in Rovaniemi, Finland this week.(Emmanuel Dunand /AFP/Getty Images)\n\nListen here for Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Finland’s Environment Minister Kimmo Tiilikainen for more about the conferences that took place in Finnish Lapland this week and the environmental issues facing the Arctic:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/10/Finland_AC_ministers.mp3\n\n\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca\nFirst published on www.rcinet.ca on October 13th 2018\n\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada:  Thawing permafrost in Canada’s Northwest Territories releasing acid that’s breaking down minerals: study, CBC News\n\nFinland: Arctic environment ministers gather in Finland to tackle climate change,","id":"4fPn3W2upTpGN4zYVzPCtU","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Increasing ocean acidification ushering in an era of uncertainty for Arctic, says report","release_date":"2018-11-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4fPn3W2upTpGN4zYVzPCtU"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8283a0df3604488e6881a80fd32a88cd94f7c4cd","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Iconic Canadian landscapes found If you love art, and if you love detective stories, and especially if you love the artworks of Canada’s iconic Group of Seven. Then you’ll want this book. Back in 1977, Jim and Sue Waddington began a journey that has taken them year after year to some of the most majestic and awe-inspiring sites in Canada. ListenEN_Interview_2-20200203-WIE20 That was when they began their travels to locate the exact and often remote spots where some of Canada’s most iconic paintings were created. View from the spot where FH Varley painted \"Squally Weather, Georgian Bay-1920- the painting shown on the front cover, photographed by the Waddingtons (back cover-Goose Lane Editions) These are the works of the various artists who made up the famous Canadian “Group of Seven”. By hiking, canoeing, and as the artists themselves sometimes did - camping in the wilderness, the Waddingtons have located a great many of those views that inspired the artists. While many of the works were inspired by the vast regions of central and northern Ontario, others were much farther afield on both coasts and up into the Arctic. Jim and Sue Waddington, have spent decades travelling across Canada to find the exact spots where the artists of the Group of Seven sketched and created their works (supplied) Guided by their research into the painters own travel writings, and those of others who knew tham, and aided by local residents own stories of the artists stays in their area, the couple have managed to locate many of thes difficult to find spots . \"The little falls\" J.E.H. MacDonald 1918 \"The little falls\" located in the Algoma region of northern Ontario, photo by Jeff McColl 2011. The book features the paintings, and a photos of the actual scene taken as much as possible from the exact vantage point of the artist himself often more than a century earlier. In capturing on film those places, one can also see how the artist then interpreted the scene before him. Adding to the most marvelous book is the text describing the story behind the painting and the Waddington’s efforts to find the location additional information Facebook- Waddington- Footsteps Goose Lane Editions: Following the Footsteps of Group of 7","duration_ms":558968,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0cGAYjzp1zhAi9mmf51R0p"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0cGAYjzp1zhAi9mmf51R0p","html_description":"Iconic Canadian landscapes found\nIf you love art, and if you love detective stories, and especially if you love the artworks of Canada’s iconic Group of Seven. Then you’ll want this book.\n\nBack in 1977, Jim and Sue Waddington began a journey that has taken them year after year to some of the most majestic and awe-inspiring sites in Canada.\n\n\nListenEN_Interview_2-20200203-WIE20\n\nThat was when they began their travels to locate the exact and often remote spots where some of Canada’s most iconic paintings were created.\n\nView from the spot where FH Varley painted \"Squally Weather, Georgian Bay-1920- the painting shown on the front cover, photographed by the Waddingtons (back cover-Goose Lane Editions)\n\nThese are the works of the various artists who made up the famous Canadian “Group of Seven”.\n\nBy hiking, canoeing, and as the artists themselves sometimes did - camping in the wilderness, the Waddingtons have located a great many of those views that inspired the artists.\n\nWhile many of the works were inspired by the vast regions of central and northern Ontario, others were much farther afield on both coasts and up into the Arctic.\n\nJim and Sue Waddington, have spent decades travelling across Canada to find the exact spots where the artists of the Group of Seven sketched and created their works (supplied)\n\nGuided by their research into the painters own travel writings, and those of others who knew tham, and aided by local residents own stories of the artists stays in their area, the couple have managed to locate many of thes difficult to find spots\n\n.\n\n \t\"The little falls\" J.E.H. MacDonald 1918\n\n\"The little falls\" located in the Algoma region of northern Ontario, photo by Jeff McColl 2011.\n\nThe book features the paintings, and a photos of the actual scene taken as much as possible from the exact vantage point of the artist himself often more than a century earlier.\n\nIn capturing on film those places, one can also see how the artist then interpreted the scene before him.\n\nAdding to the most marvelous book is the text describing the story behind the painting and the Waddington’s efforts to find the location\n\nadditional information\n\n \tFacebook- Waddington- Footsteps\n \tGoose Lane Editions: Following the Footsteps of Group of 7","id":"0cGAYjzp1zhAi9mmf51R0p","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Book: Waddington-tracing the Group of Seven","release_date":"2018-11-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0cGAYjzp1zhAi9mmf51R0p"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/97cd1ce93c0371de9880808295065ac5fb5525e4","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Environmentalists are urging Canadians to avoid single-use plastic, to recycle more and they want the government to take strong action to reduce plastic waste. A survey found that in 2017, 71 per cent of Canadians order takeout food more than a few times a month and almost half buy cups of coffee daily. This generates huge amounts of plastic waste. Canadians take out a lot of food and coffee generating tons of plastic waste. (iStock) ‘In landfills...for hundreds of years’ “We know that single-use plastics overall make up around 40 per cent of Canada’s plastic waste. And a lot of that is...delivery food containers, plastic bottles, coffee cups and that sort of thing,” says Ashley Wallis, plastics program manager at the advocacy group, Environmental Defence. “So that’s a lot of plastic that’s being used for maybe only a few seconds but will sit in landfills or the environment for potentially hundreds of years.” Consumers can help Many of the plastics and styrofoam in particular are not recyclable. Wallis says when Canadians order out, they can refuse items like plastic cutler and small packaged condiments. Sometimes, when ordering out or buying food in bulk, they might bring their own containers and some stores encourage this by offering small discounts. Calls for a national strategy Wallis says restaurants and other businesses can help by using plastic products that contain no toxic substances and can be recycled. She notes that Canada has a patchwork of recycling protocols, with each municipality having its own rules. It’s estimated that only 11 per cent of plastics are recycled. Wallis says the Federal government should develop a national strategy to limit the use of plastics and increase recycling. (photo Environmental Defence) Ashley Wallis says Canada must use less plastic and recycle more. ListenEN_Clip_3-20181026-WME30","duration_ms":301322,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5nP1obaNTNrrWPB6pPFfeb"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5nP1obaNTNrrWPB6pPFfeb","html_description":"Environmentalists are urging Canadians to avoid single-use plastic, to recycle more and they want the government to take strong action to reduce plastic waste. \n\nA survey found that in 2017, 71 per cent of Canadians order takeout food more than a few times a month and almost half buy cups of coffee daily. This generates huge amounts of plastic waste.\n\nCanadians take out a lot of food and coffee generating tons of plastic waste. (iStock)\n‘In landfills...for hundreds of years’\n“We know that single-use plastics overall make up around 40 per cent of Canada’s plastic waste. And a lot of that is...delivery food containers, plastic bottles, coffee cups and that sort of thing,” says Ashley Wallis, plastics program manager at the advocacy group, Environmental Defence. “So that’s a lot of plastic that’s being used for maybe only a few seconds but will sit in landfills or the environment for potentially hundreds of years.”\nConsumers can help\nMany of the plastics and styrofoam in particular are not recyclable. Wallis says when Canadians order out, they can refuse items like plastic cutler and small packaged condiments. Sometimes, when ordering out or buying food in bulk, they might bring their own containers and some stores encourage this by offering small discounts.\nCalls for a national strategy\nWallis says restaurants and other businesses can help by using plastic products that contain no toxic substances and can be recycled. She notes that Canada has a patchwork of recycling protocols, with each municipality having its own rules. It’s estimated that only 11 per cent of plastics are recycled. Wallis says the Federal government should develop a national strategy to limit the use of plastics and increase recycling.\n\n(photo Environmental Defence)\n\nAshley Wallis says Canada must use less plastic and recycle more.\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20181026-WME30","id":"5nP1obaNTNrrWPB6pPFfeb","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada only recycles 11 per cent of plastic waste","release_date":"2018-10-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5nP1obaNTNrrWPB6pPFfeb"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7e21e3e6f192e9a3020f8b1380705456d0270847","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  The successes of cultural tourism in Canada's southern Aboriginal communities are providing an important roadmap for development of Indigenous cultural tourism in the North, a sector expected to grow significantly in coming years, say northern communities and tourism organizations. The Government of Northwest Territories’ Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment, the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada (ITAC), and Northwest Territories Tourism (NWTT), recently signed a memorandum of understanding to develop Indigenous cultural tourism in the territory and includes new annual investments of up to $257,000. The majority of the 2018-2019 funding will be directed towards workshops and marketing, many geared towards growing local businesses to be able to better handle visitors from southern Canada and international visitors, as well creating greater awareness about what's NWT has to offer. Many of the approaches are inspired by successful tourism initiatives of southern Aboriginal communities like Wendake, a Huron-Wendat community in Quebec, Klemtu, a Kitasoo/Xai'xai community in British Columbia (B.C.) and Haida Gwaii, formally known as the Queen Charlotte Islands, now home to several successful tourism businesses owned and run by members of the Haida Nation, also in B.C. A muskox in the Northwest Territories' proposed Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve. (Courtesy Lutselke Dene First Nation) The NWT Dene community of Lutselkʼe, home to around 300 people,  is one of the communities to receive part of the recently announced funding. It will go to the development and testing of visitor day packages. Several communities members have already travelled south to Klemtu to learn from their example. \"What Klemtu has accomplished is incredible,\" Andreina Cambronero, Lutselkʼe's Tourism Development Officer told Eye on the Arctic over the phone. \"Their unemployment rate is 5 to 10 per cent. Everything they do is sustainable from land use planning, to monitoring visitor impacts. They're a great model of how eco-tourism can work in small communities like [Lutselkʼe].\" Klemtu is located on the pacific coast of British Columbia. Like Lutselkʼe, it's also a fly-in community. But since the revamping of its community-owned Spirit Bear Lodge around 2010, eco-cultural tourism in the community has taken off. Community by-in, community ownership John Czornobaj, the general manager, says Klemtu's success is an example that could be replicated, even in the North. \"We have a lot to share with each other,\"  Dzorbobaj said in phone interview. \"Even though we're in B.C., we have the same infrastructure challenges as the North. We're a fly-in community, we have a small population. But the most important thing is community by-in, that's the key to success.  It has to be community-owned.\" Keith Henry, the president & CEO of the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada, says these kinds of exchanges are key to growing Indigenous cultural tourism in Canada \"The reason we signed the agreement last week in the Northwest Territories is based on some of that ongoing mentorship,\"  Henry told Eye on the Arctic over the phone from Vancouver. \"We've been doing best-practice missions, (like) to Wendake, with (northern) communities or entrepreneurs. We have our upcoming Indigenous tourism conference in Saskatoon on October 30 & 31. \"People are coming from around the world to see what we're doing in Canada.\" Feature Interview “We’re in a time of reconciliation, and tourism is one of the best ways to get people face to face and getting to know each other,” says Keith Henry, the president & CEO Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada. (Courtesy Keith Henry) For more on the Northwest Territories and the future of Indigenous cultural tourism in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Keith Henry,","duration_ms":504842,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6jFbpU7FPQIeg7NrPfT68l"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6jFbpU7FPQIeg7NrPfT68l","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nThe successes of cultural tourism in Canada's southern Aboriginal communities are providing an important roadmap for development of Indigenous cultural tourism in the North, a sector expected to grow significantly in coming years, say northern communities and tourism organizations.\nThe Government of Northwest Territories’ Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment, the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada (ITAC), and Northwest Territories Tourism (NWTT), recently signed a memorandum of understanding to develop Indigenous cultural tourism in the territory and includes new annual investments of up to $257,000.\n\nThe majority of the 2018-2019 funding will be directed towards workshops and marketing, many geared towards growing local businesses to be able to better handle visitors from southern Canada and international visitors, as well creating greater awareness about what's NWT has to offer.\n\nMany of the approaches are inspired by successful tourism initiatives of southern Aboriginal communities like Wendake, a Huron-Wendat community in Quebec, Klemtu, a Kitasoo/Xai'xai community in British Columbia (B.C.) and Haida Gwaii, formally known as the Queen Charlotte Islands, now home to several successful tourism businesses owned and run by members of the Haida Nation, also in B.C.\n\nA muskox in the Northwest Territories' proposed Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve. (Courtesy Lutselke Dene First Nation)\n\nThe NWT Dene community of Lutselkʼe, home to around 300 people,  is one of the communities to receive part of the recently announced funding. It will go to the development and testing of visitor day packages. Several communities members have already travelled south to Klemtu to learn from their example.\n\n\"What Klemtu has accomplished is incredible,\" Andreina Cambronero, Lutselkʼe's Tourism Development Officer told Eye on the Arctic over the phone. \"Their unemployment rate is 5 to 10 per cent. Everything they do is sustainable from land use planning, to monitoring visitor impacts. They're a great model of how eco-tourism can work in small communities like [Lutselkʼe].\"\n\nKlemtu is located on the pacific coast of British Columbia. Like Lutselkʼe, it's also a fly-in community. But since the revamping of its community-owned Spirit Bear Lodge around 2010, eco-cultural tourism in the community has taken off.\nCommunity by-in, community ownership\nJohn Czornobaj, the general manager, says Klemtu's success is an example that could be replicated, even in the North.\n\n\"We have a lot to share with each other,\"  Dzorbobaj said in phone interview. \"Even though we're in B.C., we have the same infrastructure challenges as the North. We're a fly-in community, we have a small population. But the most important thing is community by-in, that's the key to success.  It has to be community-owned.\"\n\nKeith Henry, the president & CEO of the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada, says these kinds of exchanges are key to growing Indigenous cultural tourism in Canada\n\n\"The reason we signed the agreement last week in the Northwest Territories is based on some of that ongoing mentorship,\"  Henry told Eye on the Arctic over the phone from Vancouver. \"We've been doing best-practice missions, (like) to Wendake, with (northern) communities or entrepreneurs. We have our upcoming Indigenous tourism conference in Saskatoon on October 30 & 31.\n\n\"People are coming from around the world to see what we're doing in Canada.\"\n\nFeature Interview\n\n“We’re in a time of reconciliation, and tourism is one of the best ways to get people face to face and getting to know each other,” says Keith Henry, the president & CEO Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada. (Courtesy Keith Henry)\n\nFor more on the Northwest Territories and the future of Indigenous cultural tourism in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Keith Henry,","id":"6jFbpU7FPQIeg7NrPfT68l","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Indigenous Cultural Tourism: How the North is learning from community success in southern Canada","release_date":"2018-10-06","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6jFbpU7FPQIeg7NrPfT68l"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ade2334470425206e3b7cde53595d4e57a5d70d9","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Besides infrastructure updates, the Royal Canadian Police will also initiate new regional operational models in five Yukon communities: Faro, Ross River, Haines Junction, Burwash Landing and the Destruction Bay area. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press) Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Government of Yukon announced new plans this week for policing infrastructure in the territory. Besides renovations to police buildings in the communities of Faro and Ross River, a new detachment building is planned for the community of Carcross in consultation with the Carcross Tagish First Nation and Yukon's departments of justice and highways and public works. Costs are expected to run around $11-million. \"It's important for us to address ageing infrastructure with respect to how we deliver police services here in the territory,\" Tracy-Anne McPhee, Yukon's justice minister, told Eye on the Arctic in a phone interview on Friday. \"(The government and RCMP) have really tried to put our heads together to make sure that we are coming up with creative ideas to address policing issues here in the territory.\" 'We need creative ideas': Yukon justice minister Yukon Justice Minister Tracy-Anne McPhee and Scott Sheppard, the Yukon RCMP commanding officer chief superintendent, at the Yukon policing announcement this week. (Courtesy Government of Yukon) For more on Yukon’s policing plans and the importance of keeping the community policing model in Yukon, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Yukon Justice Minister Tracy-Anne McPhee: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/09/Yukon_McPhee.mp3 New operational models Besides building rejigs, new regional operational models will be put in place in five Yukon communities: Faro, Ross River, Haines Junction, Burwash Landing and the Destruction Bay area. \"Policing in Yukon continues to evolve,\" said Scott Sheppard, the Yukon RCMP commanding officer chief superintendent, in a news release on Tuesday. \"It’s important that we remain flexible to new service delivery models, so we can maintain our ability to respond to Yukon’s unique policing requirements. This can only be achieved through ongoing and honest discussions with our policing partners. Providing proper facilities for our employees will have a positive impact on the work we carry out in these communities.\" RCMP in the North The RCMP (earlier called the North West Mounted Police) has been policing Yukon since the 1800s. In this undated photo, the North West Mounted Police are shown in Tagish Post, Yukon. (National Archives of Canada/The Canadian Press) The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are Canada’s national police force. The also provide policing in the majority of rural Canada and places without municipal law enforcement. The RCMP also provides policing in Canada’s three northern territories: Yukon, the neighbouring Northwest Territories and the eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut. Sources: Government of Yukon, Royal Canadian Mounted Police The RCMP provides  policing to Yukon under contract. The policing infrastructure investments announced this week are governed under the 20-year Territorial Police Service Agreement between Canada and Yukon. There are around 36,000 people living in the territory. Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn@cbc.ca Related stories from around the North: Canada: Former Canadian Mountie sues after developing PTSD while policing in the North, CBC News Denmark: Nordics report high abuse levels against women, Radio Sweden Finland: Finnish-Swedish police launch cross-border cooperation, Barents Observer Russia:  Service reindeer for police in Russia’s Arctic, The Independent Barents Observer Sweden:  Cross-border Nordic policing would better serve Arctic: politician, Radio Sweden United States: New police unit to fight violent c...","duration_ms":278570,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4Q77x1gJdtCwL4ctbn50l6"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4Q77x1gJdtCwL4ctbn50l6","html_description":"Besides infrastructure updates, the Royal Canadian Police will also initiate new regional operational models in five Yukon communities: Faro, Ross River, Haines Junction, Burwash Landing and the Destruction Bay area. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)\nEye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nThe Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Government of Yukon announced new plans this week for policing infrastructure in the territory.\n\nBesides renovations to police buildings in the communities of Faro and Ross River, a new detachment building is planned for the community of Carcross in consultation with the Carcross Tagish First Nation and Yukon's departments of justice and highways and public works.\n\nCosts are expected to run around $11-million.\n\n\"It's important for us to address ageing infrastructure with respect to how we deliver police services here in the territory,\" Tracy-Anne McPhee, Yukon's justice minister, told Eye on the Arctic in a phone interview on Friday.\n\n\"(The government and RCMP) have really tried to put our heads together to make sure that we are coming up with creative ideas to address policing issues here in the territory.\"\n\n'We need creative ideas': Yukon justice minister\n\nYukon Justice Minister Tracy-Anne McPhee and Scott Sheppard, the Yukon RCMP commanding officer chief superintendent, at the Yukon policing announcement this week. (Courtesy Government of Yukon)\n\nFor more on Yukon’s policing plans and the importance of keeping the community policing model in Yukon, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Yukon Justice Minister Tracy-Anne McPhee:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/09/Yukon_McPhee.mp3\n\n\nNew operational models\nBesides building rejigs, new regional operational models will be put in place in five Yukon communities: Faro, Ross River, Haines Junction, Burwash Landing and the Destruction Bay area.\n\n\"Policing in Yukon continues to evolve,\" said Scott Sheppard, the Yukon RCMP commanding officer chief superintendent, in a news release on Tuesday.\n\n\"It’s important that we remain flexible to new service delivery models, so we can maintain our ability to respond to Yukon’s unique policing requirements. This can only be achieved through ongoing and honest discussions with our policing partners. Providing proper facilities for our employees will have a positive impact on the work we carry out in these communities.\"\n\nRCMP in the North\n\nThe RCMP (earlier called the North West Mounted Police) has been policing Yukon since the 1800s. In this undated photo, the North West Mounted Police are shown in Tagish Post, Yukon. (National Archives of Canada/The Canadian Press)\n\nThe Royal Canadian Mounted Police are Canada’s national police force. The also provide policing in the majority of rural Canada and places without municipal law enforcement. The RCMP also provides policing in Canada’s three northern territories: Yukon, the neighbouring Northwest Territories and the eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut.\nSources: Government of Yukon, Royal Canadian Mounted Police\n\n\nThe RCMP provides  policing to Yukon under contract.\n\nThe policing infrastructure investments announced this week are governed under the 20-year Territorial Police Service Agreement between Canada and Yukon.\n\nThere are around 36,000 people living in the territory.\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn@cbc.ca\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada: Former Canadian Mountie sues after developing PTSD while policing in the North, CBC News\n\nDenmark: Nordics report high abuse levels against women, Radio Sweden\n\nFinland: Finnish-Swedish police launch cross-border cooperation, Barents Observer\n\nRussia:  Service reindeer for police in Russia’s Arctic, The Independent Barents Observer\n\nSweden:  Cross-border Nordic policing would better serve Arctic: politician, Radio Sweden\n\nUnited States: New police unit to fight violent c...","id":"4Q77x1gJdtCwL4ctbn50l6","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Policing infrastructure rejig in Canada’s northwestern Yukon territory","release_date":"2018-09-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4Q77x1gJdtCwL4ctbn50l6"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5eae9565de58f673c60a6bbfb710b539f3645d62","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  This week, we bring you another instalment of our occasional series looking at how climate change is affecting different parts of the circumpolar world. Arctic climate change is one of the most important stories of our time, but limited field work means we may not getting the full picture, says the author of a study published this summer in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. The study, Patchy field sampling biases understanding of climate change impacts across the Arctic, was done by consulting data bases and pulling out thousands of papers that examined either the Arctic or sub-Arctic. The researchers isolated where in the Arctic the research was done for each paper and plotted it on a map. \"What we found, was, in a way, of course obvious, that the research performed across the Arctic is heavily, heavily, heavily clustered around a very few number of locations,\" said lead author Dan Metcalfe in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic. Important knowledge gaps in Arctic Russia, Canada Metcalfe, a senior lecturer at the Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science at Sweden's Lund University,  said the idea for the research came from his own experiences working in Abisko Scientific Research Station in Arctic Sweden and seeing so many of the world's heavyweight Arctic researchers at exactly the same place. \"It's so weird, its seems like half of the European science community working on Arctic issues basically comes to this station, it felt like,\" Metcalfe said. The Canadian High Arctic Research Station in the community of Cambridge Bay in Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut. Arctic research stations are important to science but more data needs to be gathered from isolated, hard-to-get regions of the North, says a recent paper. (Jimmy Thomson/CBC) And while it makes sense that much of Arctic research be based around the few northern research stations, Metcalfe said this could be skewing what we think we know about the warming North. \"We think it's a problem because we assume that if there's clustering in space that also means that there's physical factors that are also biased. So we're likely also only sampling a small range of the full spectrum of variation in physical variables, in biological variables and chemical variables that exist out there in the whole Arctic.\" Arctic Russia and Canada's Arctic archipelago are two of the areas least studied the research found. What now?  Metcalfe stresses that the research is not meant to point the finger at or criticize the important research being done at the world's polar research stations, but rather to indicate the areas of the North the scientific community needs to better understand. Reindeer antlers on a landscape near the Swedish village of Abisko, a prominent Arctic research site. Better partnerships between Arctic Indigenous communities and researchers could help fill in scientific knowledge gaps, said Lund University's Dan Metcalfe. (Tyler Logan/Courtesy Dan Metcalfe) Partnering with Indigenous communities could help address some of the missing knowledge, he says. \"Some of the areas not researched are areas that are very remote and hard to get to,\" Metcalfe said. \"But in many of the areas there are people, the Indigenous people of the Arctic, people like the Saami for instance. Their knowledge could help fill in a lot of gaps that the scientific community has, if we did a better job of partnering with them.\" Feature Interview “We just don’t know what’s going on at these unsampled locations” says Metcalfe. “They may have a whole set of properties and processes which are rather special and that we’re completely missing out on.” (Courtesy Dan Metcalfe) Listen here for more of Eye on the Arctic‘s interview with Lund University’s Dan Metcalfe: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/08/Dan_Metcal...","duration_ms":393456,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3jRG5OpeTiXMsM6pFmPhsI"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3jRG5OpeTiXMsM6pFmPhsI","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nThis week, we bring you another instalment of our occasional series looking at how climate change is affecting different parts of the circumpolar world.\nArctic climate change is one of the most important stories of our time, but limited field work means we may not getting the full picture, says the author of a study published this summer in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.\n\nThe study, Patchy field sampling biases understanding of climate change impacts across the Arctic, was done by consulting data bases and pulling out thousands of papers that examined either the Arctic or sub-Arctic.\n\nThe researchers isolated where in the Arctic the research was done for each paper and plotted it on a map.\n\n\"What we found, was, in a way, of course obvious, that the research performed across the Arctic is heavily, heavily, heavily clustered around a very few number of locations,\" said lead author Dan Metcalfe in a phone interview with Eye on the Arctic.\nImportant knowledge gaps in Arctic Russia, Canada\nMetcalfe, a senior lecturer at the Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science at Sweden's Lund University,  said the idea for the research came from his own experiences working in Abisko Scientific Research Station in Arctic Sweden and seeing so many of the world's heavyweight Arctic researchers at exactly the same place.\n\n\"It's so weird, its seems like half of the European science community working on Arctic issues basically comes to this station, it felt like,\" Metcalfe said.\n\nThe Canadian High Arctic Research Station in the community of Cambridge Bay in Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut. Arctic research stations are important to science but more data needs to be gathered from isolated, hard-to-get regions of the North, says a recent paper. (Jimmy Thomson/CBC)\n\nAnd while it makes sense that much of Arctic research be based around the few northern research stations, Metcalfe said this could be skewing what we think we know about the warming North.\n\n\"We think it's a problem because we assume that if there's clustering in space that also means that there's physical factors that are also biased. So we're likely also only sampling a small range of the full spectrum of variation in physical variables, in biological variables and chemical variables that exist out there in the whole Arctic.\"\n\nArctic Russia and Canada's Arctic archipelago are two of the areas least studied the research found.\nWhat now? \nMetcalfe stresses that the research is not meant to point the finger at or criticize the important research being done at the world's polar research stations, but rather to indicate the areas of the North the scientific community needs to better understand.\n\nReindeer antlers on a landscape near the Swedish village of Abisko, a prominent Arctic research site. Better partnerships between Arctic Indigenous communities and researchers could help fill in scientific knowledge gaps, said Lund University's Dan Metcalfe. (Tyler Logan/Courtesy Dan Metcalfe)\n\nPartnering with Indigenous communities could help address some of the missing knowledge, he says.\n\n\"Some of the areas not researched are areas that are very remote and hard to get to,\" Metcalfe said. \"But in many of the areas there are people, the Indigenous people of the Arctic, people like the Saami for instance. Their knowledge could help fill in a lot of gaps that the scientific community has, if we did a better job of partnering with them.\"\n\nFeature Interview \n\n“We just don’t know what’s going on at these unsampled locations” says Metcalfe. “They may have a whole set of properties and processes which are rather special and that we’re completely missing out on.” (Courtesy Dan Metcalfe)\n\nListen here for more of Eye on the Arctic‘s interview with Lund University’s Dan Metcalfe:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/08/Dan_Metcal...","id":"3jRG5OpeTiXMsM6pFmPhsI","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Feature Interview: Is Arctic climate research missing the big picture?","release_date":"2018-09-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3jRG5OpeTiXMsM6pFmPhsI"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9ccac1e5d1f13a13de30cbae119eaca63a755bbb","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  As global players ramp up interest in the Arctic, the organization representing the world’s Inuit wrapped up their general assembly in Alaska in July with a pledge to amplify their voice on the international stage. The Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) represents the approximately 160,000 Inuit from Canada, Greenland, Russia and the United States. The Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) represents the approximately 160,000 Inuit from Canada, Greenland, Russia and the United States. The ICC meets every four years to elect a new chair and executive council and to establish the organization’s focus for the next four years. The theme of the 2018 Utqiaġvik Declaration is \"Inuit – The Arctic We Want.\" In it, the document outlines human rights, education, health and wellness, and food security as among the top priorities. Dalee Sambo Dorough, an associate professor at the University of Alaska Anchorage's department of political science, who specializes in international law and human rights, was also elected ICC chair for the next four years. Feature Interview with ICC Chair Dalee Sambo Dorough To better understand the ICC’s vision for the next four years, Eye on the Arctic reached Dalee Sambo Dorough, in Anchorage, Alaska. Q: Tell us about ICC’s priorities for the next four years. The overall message from Inuit, to the rest of the global community, is the need to honour, respect and recognize the rights of Inuit as distinct peoples within this distinct region of the world.  It’s important that the rest of the world recognize our responsibilities as landholders and as rights holders. Our homelands mean everything to us, both the land and the coastal seas in the Arctic Ocean. I want to stress how important honour, respect, human rights, and our homeland, are to Inuit. The new ICC executive council (l-r): ICC Canada President Monica Ell-Kanayuk; ICC Chukotka President Lobov Talian; ICC Greenland President Hjalmar Dahl; ICC Russia Vice President Elena Kaminskaya; ICC Chair Dalee Sambo Dorough; ICC Greenland Vice President Nuka Kleemann; ICC Canada Vice President Lisa Koperqualuk; ICC Alaska Vice President Vera Metcalf; ICC Alaska President James Stotts. (Kelly Eningowuk/Courtesy ICC Alaska) Q: The ICC is forty years old now, how effective do you think it’s been at amplifying Inuit concerns on the international stage? We’ve been able to infuse international intergovernmental organizations with the views and perspectives of Inuit. We’ve been active within the United Nations and for the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We’ve been very active in the Arctic Council, participating in a wide range of working groups but also with the senior Arctic officials from each of the Arctic states. Now, one of the objectives will be to infuse other intergovernmental fora with our views and perspectives, especially as they become more active in our homeland.  I think it’s important to state that Inuit are experts on the Arctic. Our profound relationship has been highly developed over centuries and our distinct knowledge about the region is quite significant. Q: The ICC was also created to build greater links between the world’s Inuit regions on matters like economy and education. Are there still challenges to moving forward on those issues, or has that changed? Challenges remain. Just on language alone, we know that we are in a state of crisis as far as preservation of language. Just the practical side of establishing and controlling our own education institutions is a huge challenge and a major hurdle that has to be overcome. Though we’ve made extraordinary progress in a wide range of areas, challenges do remain. For us to overcome them will take some careful strategic planning and establishing of priorities in order to systematically remove all those challenges and to arrive at a place where Inuit,","duration_ms":695327,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2hpzKeR7NKxWmVqxaCkxoh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2hpzKeR7NKxWmVqxaCkxoh","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nAs global players ramp up interest in the Arctic, the organization representing the world’s Inuit wrapped up their general assembly in Alaska in July with a pledge to amplify their voice on the international stage.\nThe Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) represents the approximately 160,000 Inuit from Canada, Greenland, Russia and the United States.\n\nThe Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) represents the approximately 160,000 Inuit from Canada, Greenland, Russia and the United States.\n\nThe ICC meets every four years to elect a new chair and executive council and to establish the organization’s focus for the next four years. The theme of the 2018 Utqiaġvik Declaration is \"Inuit – The Arctic We Want.\" In it, the document outlines human rights, education, health and wellness, and food security as among the top priorities.\n\nDalee Sambo Dorough, an associate professor at the University of Alaska Anchorage's department of political science, who specializes in international law and human rights, was also elected ICC chair for the next four years.\n\nFeature Interview with ICC Chair Dalee Sambo Dorough \n\nTo better understand the ICC’s vision for the next four years, Eye on the Arctic reached Dalee Sambo Dorough, in Anchorage, Alaska.\n\nQ: Tell us about ICC’s priorities for the next four years.\n\nThe overall message from Inuit, to the rest of the global community, is the need to honour, respect and recognize the rights of Inuit as distinct peoples within this distinct region of the world.  It’s important that the rest of the world recognize our responsibilities as landholders and as rights holders. Our homelands mean everything to us, both the land and the coastal seas in the Arctic Ocean. I want to stress how important honour, respect, human rights, and our homeland, are to Inuit.\n\nThe new ICC executive council (l-r): ICC Canada President Monica Ell-Kanayuk; ICC Chukotka President Lobov Talian; ICC Greenland President Hjalmar Dahl; ICC Russia Vice President Elena Kaminskaya; ICC Chair Dalee Sambo Dorough; ICC Greenland Vice President Nuka Kleemann; ICC Canada Vice President Lisa Koperqualuk; ICC Alaska Vice President Vera Metcalf; ICC Alaska President James Stotts. (Kelly Eningowuk/Courtesy ICC Alaska)\n\nQ: The ICC is forty years old now, how effective do you think it’s been at amplifying Inuit concerns on the international stage?\n\nWe’ve been able to infuse international intergovernmental organizations with the views and perspectives of Inuit. We’ve been active within the United Nations and for the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We’ve been very active in the Arctic Council, participating in a wide range of working groups but also with the senior Arctic officials from each of the Arctic states.\n\nNow, one of the objectives will be to infuse other intergovernmental fora with our views and perspectives, especially as they become more active in our homeland.  I think it’s important to state that Inuit are experts on the Arctic. Our profound relationship has been highly developed over centuries and our distinct knowledge about the region is quite significant.\n\nQ: The ICC was also created to build greater links between the world’s Inuit regions on matters like economy and education. Are there still challenges to moving forward on those issues, or has that changed?\n\nChallenges remain. Just on language alone, we know that we are in a state of crisis as far as preservation of language. Just the practical side of establishing and controlling our own education institutions is a huge challenge and a major hurdle that has to be overcome.\n\nThough we’ve made extraordinary progress in a wide range of areas, challenges do remain. For us to overcome them will take some careful strategic planning and establishing of priorities in order to systematically remove all those challenges and to arrive at a place where Inuit,","id":"2hpzKeR7NKxWmVqxaCkxoh","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Feature Interview: International Inuit leader stresses importance of Indigenous voices on world stage","release_date":"2018-08-04","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2hpzKeR7NKxWmVqxaCkxoh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0a964b0538eb4175e571a9fada004188218375fe","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  Sometimes it's seals with amputated flippers. Or even a sea lion snatched seemingly out of thin air. But for at least 10 years, subsistence harvesters in Alaska's coastal communities have occasionally encountered mysterious injuries on the marine mammals they rely on for food. The wound patterns suggest shark attacks. And community members, researchers, biologists and veterinarians are monitoring the situation to find out what's going on, how it's happening, and most importantly, why now. Researchers examine a seal with an amputated flipper and puncture wound. (Courtesy Gay Sheffield) Brandon Ahmasuk, the subsistence resources program director at Kawerak, a non-profit corporation in Alaska's Bering Strait region, says hunters contact him and even send  pictures, when they encounter the strange injuries. In most cases, it's unclear where the original attacks took place. But the reports have come in from subsistence hunters everywhere from the city of Nome to the Arctic Alaskan city of Utqiaġvik. \"A seal harvested with an amputated flipper isn't normal,\" said Ahmasuk in a telephone interview from Nome with Eye on the Arctic. \"Some of the amputations were clear up to the hip area of the seals. And again, not normal. \"There were one of two seals with their heads completely bit off (that) washed up on the beach. There were one or two that had bite marks out of their sides in the rib cage area, and again, clean cut, semi-circle bite marks.\" Feature Interview Listen here for Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Brandon Ahmasuk  for more on climate change, how it’s affecting Alaska’s subsistence hunters, and the details reported by St. Lawrence Island hunters after witnessing a shark attack on a 600-kilogram sea lion: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/Brandon_Final.mp3 “I don’t want cause region-wide, state-wide panic, just awareness that climate change is here, we’re seeing it,” says Kawerak’s Brandon Ahmasuk. (Courtesy Kawerak Subsistence Program) Mystery cause Subsistence harvesters and researchers can't say for sure that sharks are the culprit, but the injury patterns strongly suggest these ocean predators from further south, not sharks native to the region, are responsible for the injuries, probably moving North as the climate warms. “We do have sharks in the North but they are primarily thought to be scavengers, not active predators,\" Gay Sheffield, the Bering Strait agent for Alaska Sea Grant, a research, education, and outreach program headquartered at University of Alaska Fairbanks, said in a phone interview. \"There are not many marine animals that we have here that would want to cause these injuries, so, it seems as if we have new players. For example, we're getting more of the typical prey of the central Bering Sea in our region, like steller sea lion activity. We wonder whether they're bringing some of their predators, like the white shark, up with them as the climate warms.\" Killer whale attacks have also all but been ruled out. “We're talking about amputated back flippers of large, up to 280-pound seals,\" Sheffield said. \" The bones are sheared.  We see triangular shaped avulsions and the penetration marks aren’t the round peg of an orca whale tooth, but more as if a knife blade was stabbed in the seal.\" Looking for clues Could great white sharks be responsible for the mysterious injuries on marine mammals near coastal Alaska? (Ryan Pierse/Getty Images) No research project is currently underway to get to the bottom of what the coastal communities are seeing, or give precise injury numbers, but Ahmasuk estimates there's been a few dozen reports of such injuries to date. Gay Sheffield says that the environmental knowledge of Alaska's subsistence harvesters goes back for generations, so when they see something and are concerned enough to report...","duration_ms":347037,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2ziNf4xy5gwYMSuPpohYWv"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2ziNf4xy5gwYMSuPpohYWv","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nSometimes it's seals with amputated flippers.\n\nOr even a sea lion snatched seemingly out of thin air.\n\nBut for at least 10 years, subsistence harvesters in Alaska's coastal communities have occasionally encountered mysterious injuries on the marine mammals they rely on for food.\n\nThe wound patterns suggest shark attacks. And community members, researchers, biologists and veterinarians are monitoring the situation to find out what's going on, how it's happening, and most importantly, why now.\n\nResearchers examine a seal with an amputated flipper and puncture wound. (Courtesy Gay Sheffield)\n\nBrandon Ahmasuk, the subsistence resources program director at Kawerak, a non-profit corporation in Alaska's Bering Strait region, says hunters contact him and even send  pictures, when they encounter the strange injuries.\n\nIn most cases, it's unclear where the original attacks took place. But the reports have come in from subsistence hunters everywhere from the city of Nome to the Arctic Alaskan city of Utqiaġvik.\n\n\"A seal harvested with an amputated flipper isn't normal,\" said Ahmasuk in a telephone interview from Nome with Eye on the Arctic. \"Some of the amputations were clear up to the hip area of the seals. And again, not normal.\n\n\"There were one of two seals with their heads completely bit off (that) washed up on the beach. There were one or two that had bite marks out of their sides in the rib cage area, and again, clean cut, semi-circle bite marks.\"\n\nFeature Interview Listen here for Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Brandon Ahmasuk  for more on climate change, how it’s affecting Alaska’s subsistence hunters, and the details reported by St. Lawrence Island hunters after witnessing a shark attack on a 600-kilogram sea lion:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/Brandon_Final.mp3\n\n“I don’t want cause region-wide, state-wide panic, just awareness that climate change is here, we’re seeing it,” says Kawerak’s Brandon Ahmasuk. (Courtesy Kawerak Subsistence Program)\n\n\nMystery cause\nSubsistence harvesters and researchers can't say for sure that sharks are the culprit, but the injury patterns strongly suggest these ocean predators from further south, not sharks native to the region, are responsible for the injuries, probably moving North as the climate warms.\n\n“We do have sharks in the North but they are primarily thought to be scavengers, not active predators,\" Gay Sheffield, the Bering Strait agent for Alaska Sea Grant, a research, education, and outreach program headquartered at University of Alaska Fairbanks, said in a phone interview.\n\n\"There are not many marine animals that we have here that would want to cause these injuries, so, it seems as if we have new players. For example, we're getting more of the typical prey of the central Bering Sea in our region, like steller sea lion activity. We wonder whether they're bringing some of their predators, like the white shark, up with them as the climate warms.\"\n\nKiller whale attacks have also all but been ruled out.\n\n“We're talking about amputated back flippers of large, up to 280-pound seals,\" Sheffield said. \" The bones are sheared.  We see triangular shaped avulsions and the penetration marks aren’t the round peg of an orca whale tooth, but more as if a knife blade was stabbed in the seal.\"\nLooking for clues\nCould great white sharks be responsible for the mysterious injuries on marine mammals near coastal Alaska? (Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)\n\nNo research project is currently underway to get to the bottom of what the coastal communities are seeing, or give precise injury numbers, but Ahmasuk estimates there's been a few dozen reports of such injuries to date.\n\nGay Sheffield says that the environmental knowledge of Alaska's subsistence harvesters goes back for generations, so when they see something and are concerned enough to report...","id":"2ziNf4xy5gwYMSuPpohYWv","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Is climate change luring sharks north? Communities wrestle with bite mystery off Arctic coast","release_date":"2018-07-28","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2ziNf4xy5gwYMSuPpohYWv"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9b6f21dd5610bed6acbcebb763add0ac4dd7ca62","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  Arctic glaciers are shrinking at an alarming rate and show no signs of regeneration, says a recent study conducted in Canada. The research looked at glaciers between 1999 and 2015 and focused on Ellesmere Island, the most northern region of the country. During that sixteen-year period, researchers noted over 1700 square kilometres of ice  lost - a change in area of six per cent. \"That shows that over 75 per cent of glaciers have lost area and no glaciers are increasing as far as we can see,\" said University of Ottawa Phd student Adrienne White, who authored the paper Area change of glaciers across Northern Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, between ~1999 and ~2015 with Luke Copland which was published in the Journal of Glaciology in June. 'Big shock' for researchers The disappearance of several smaller ice caps and the amount of open water were things that surprised even experienced researchers like White. \"We have three small ice caps - their areas were less than 1.5 square kilometres - but they completely vanished which is something I've never really seen before,\" White said. \"Another big shock was to see how much open water we now have along the northern coast of Ellesmere Island. In an area where we used to have glaciers flowing into the ocean and having a floating terminus - anywhere where we have that - much of that ice has actually broken off and become icebergs. So in an area that used to be completely covered in sea ice and glacier ice we're now seeing open water each summer.\" Feature Interview For more  on how climate change is transforming Canada’s Arctic, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s feature interview with Adrienne White, a Phd student from the University of Ottawa’s Laboratory for Cryospheric Research: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/A_White_Final.mp3 “We’re in a feedback cycle, where because of the loss of sea ice we are now absorbing a lot more warmth into the Arctic region. It’s going to be very difficult to reverse,” says Adrienne White, pictured here on Ellesmere Island with the Milne Glacier in the background. (Dorota Medrzycka/Courtesy Adrienne White) Dangerous feedback loop Although Ellesmere Island may seem remote to many Canadians, what's happening to its glaciers is already having implications on the environment. There's been significant increases in sea levels in the Canadian Arctic since 2005 says White, nothing that what's going on with the Ellesmere glaciers is a contributor. Researchers say they saw no evidence of glaciers regenerating and that that is unlikely given the island's sensitive environment. \"For things to reverse, we would need dramatic climate cooling,\" says White. \"At this point, we're in a feedback cycle, where because of the loss of sea ice we are now absorbing a lot more warmth into the Arctic region. \"It's going to be very difficult to reverse.\" A glacier in Yelverton Inlet in the Canadian Arctic. Researchers there did ground penetrating radar measurements via helicopter. (Luke Copland/Courtesy Adrienne White) Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca Related stories from around the North: Canada: Feds announce funding to tackle climate change in Inuit region of Atlantic Canada, Eye on the Arctic Greenland: Glacier half the size of Manhattan breaks off Greenland, CBC News Norway: Northern Barents Sea warming at alarming speed, The Independent Barents Observer Russia: Densely-packed ice makes navigation difficult in Russian Arctic, The Independent Barents Observer Sweden: Swedish icebreaker heading for North Pole to study melting sea ice, Radio Sweden United States: Rapid Arctic warming is increasing the frequency of blizzards in U.S. Northeast: study, Radio Canada International","duration_ms":444003,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2V6D9d8TqTQX2OeN0aloG2"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2V6D9d8TqTQX2OeN0aloG2","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. \nArctic glaciers are shrinking at an alarming rate and show no signs of regeneration, says a recent study conducted in Canada.\n\nThe research looked at glaciers between 1999 and 2015 and focused on Ellesmere Island, the most northern region of the country.\n\nDuring that sixteen-year period, researchers noted over 1700 square kilometres of ice  lost - a change in area of six per cent.\n\n\"That shows that over 75 per cent of glaciers have lost area and no glaciers are increasing as far as we can see,\" said University of Ottawa Phd student Adrienne White, who authored the paper Area change of glaciers across Northern Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, between ~1999 and ~2015 with Luke Copland which was published in the Journal of Glaciology in June.\n'Big shock' for researchers\nThe disappearance of several smaller ice caps and the amount of open water were things that surprised even experienced researchers like White.\n\n\"We have three small ice caps - their areas were less than 1.5 square kilometres - but they completely vanished which is something I've never really seen before,\" White said.\n\n\"Another big shock was to see how much open water we now have along the northern coast of Ellesmere Island. In an area where we used to have glaciers flowing into the ocean and having a floating terminus - anywhere where we have that - much of that ice has actually broken off and become icebergs. So in an area that used to be completely covered in sea ice and glacier ice we're now seeing open water each summer.\"\n\nFeature Interview \n\nFor more  on how climate change is transforming Canada’s Arctic, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s feature interview with Adrienne White, a Phd student from the University of Ottawa’s Laboratory for Cryospheric Research:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/07/A_White_Final.mp3\n\n“We’re in a feedback cycle, where because of the loss of sea ice we are now absorbing a lot more warmth into the Arctic region. It’s going to be very difficult to reverse,” says Adrienne White, pictured here on Ellesmere Island with the Milne Glacier in the background. (Dorota Medrzycka/Courtesy Adrienne White)\n\n\n\nDangerous feedback loop\n\nAlthough Ellesmere Island may seem remote to many Canadians, what's happening to its glaciers is already having implications on the environment. There's been significant increases in sea levels in the Canadian Arctic since 2005 says White, nothing that what's going on with the Ellesmere glaciers is a contributor.\n\nResearchers say they saw no evidence of glaciers regenerating and that that is unlikely given the island's sensitive environment.\n\n\"For things to reverse, we would need dramatic climate cooling,\" says White. \"At this point, we're in a feedback cycle, where because of the loss of sea ice we are now absorbing a lot more warmth into the Arctic region.\n\n\"It's going to be very difficult to reverse.\"\n\nA glacier in Yelverton Inlet in the Canadian Arctic. Researchers there did ground penetrating radar measurements via helicopter. (Luke Copland/Courtesy Adrienne White)\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada: Feds announce funding to tackle climate change in Inuit region of Atlantic Canada, Eye on the Arctic\n\nGreenland: Glacier half the size of Manhattan breaks off Greenland, CBC News\n\nNorway: Northern Barents Sea warming at alarming speed, The Independent Barents Observer\n\nRussia: Densely-packed ice makes navigation difficult in Russian Arctic, The Independent Barents Observer\n\nSweden: Swedish icebreaker heading for North Pole to study melting sea ice, Radio Sweden\n\nUnited States: Rapid Arctic warming is increasing the frequency of blizzards in U.S. Northeast: study, Radio Canada International","id":"2V6D9d8TqTQX2OeN0aloG2","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Climate destruction on Ellesmere Island – Canada’s shrinking glaciers","release_date":"2018-07-21","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2V6D9d8TqTQX2OeN0aloG2"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/c3ed3d4d0d29e0394294c7c83e0eff0ca11e2984","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"A photographer renowned for his images documenting the human face of seal hunting in Quebec and Newfoundland will spend at least another two years chronicling the Inuit seal hunt in Arctic Canada. \"I've been hunting there and became passionate about the North,\" said Yoanas Menge. Since 2012, Menge's photography project Hakapik took him to chronicle the life of commercial sealers in the Atlantic Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec's Magdalen Islands; and to Nunavik in northern Quebec, and Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut, where he chronicled the Inuit subsistence hunt. Menge, whose mother is from the Magadalen Islands, says he grew up hearing stories about the seal hunt. \"The seal is not an endangered species,\" he said in a telephone interview from his home. \"Since there has been people on the island, there has been seal hunting, because it was the only fresh meat they could get in the winter. It's still a big part of the tradition and a way to feed us and get nice pelts to make mittens and hats and boots.\" Menge says understanding the human story behind seal hunting is a key part of his work. (Courtesy Yoanis Menge) He got the idea for Hakapik,  after seeing anti-sealing posters in the Paris metro in 2009 depicting an adult seal trying to crush the head of a human baby on the sea ice. \"I was really shocked about that image,\" he said. \"I was (also) a little bit bored of all those  pictures of propaganda against the seal hunt and wanted to see what it really was.\" Menge moved back to the Magdalen Islands, learning how to seal hunt himself, and began working on Hakapik, named after wooden club used to kill seals,  in 2012. A new colonialism? In Inuit communities, the anti-sealing campaigns were economically and psychologically disastrous. Although Greenpeace issued an apology in 2014 for failing to consider the impacts their anti-sealing campaign would have on Indigenous communities, many Inuit leaders say it is not enough to compensate for the repercussions still felt in their communities. Menge says anti-sealing campaigns have distorted the role of both the subsistence hunt in the northern Canada and the commercial hunt in the southern Canada, without engaging with the communities or cultures. \"I what to know what seal hunting means to those people,\" he said. \"That's what anti-sealing groups never did. They look at the seal hunt from helicopters, really far away, but never go to meet those people and to talk with them. There's something wrong with that.\" \"It's a colonialist attitude about those cultures and those peoples,\" he said. \"It's moral decisions on the cultures of other people.\" Feature Interview: The human story behind seal hunting in Canada “It’s a colonialist attitude about those cultures and those peoples,” says Menge, pictured above, of the anti-sealing campaign. “It’s moral decisions on the cultures of other people.” (Courtesy Yoanis Menge) For more from Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with photographer Yoanis Menge, listen here: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Hakapik_Menge.mp3 Going beyond cliché But despite the controversial subject, Menge says he has yet to receive negative feedback on Hakapik, named after wooden club used to kill seals, and plans to spend another two years travelling to the North to chronicle the lives of hunters. He says the reaction of sealers or Inuit hunters to his photographs is one of the most satisfying parts of his job. \"For the first time they see the real seal hunt not the propaganda images that they always saw before... That's the power of the work. It's close to the people.\" Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca Related stories from around the North: Canada: Angry Inuk - Canadian filmmaker takes on anti-sealing groups, Radio Canada International Finland:  Sami group occupies island in northern Finland to protest fishing rules...","duration_ms":405499,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5bApHTULf1soxZS5s0WmdL"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5bApHTULf1soxZS5s0WmdL","html_description":"A photographer renowned for his images documenting the human face of seal hunting in Quebec and Newfoundland will spend at least another two years chronicling the Inuit seal hunt in Arctic Canada.\n\"I've been hunting there and became passionate about the North,\" said Yoanas Menge.\n\nSince 2012, Menge's photography project Hakapik took him to chronicle the life of commercial sealers in the Atlantic Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec's Magdalen Islands; and to Nunavik in northern Quebec, and Canada's eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut, where he chronicled the Inuit subsistence hunt.\n\nMenge, whose mother is from the Magadalen Islands, says he grew up hearing stories about the seal hunt.\n\n\"The seal is not an endangered species,\" he said in a telephone interview from his home. \"Since there has been people on the island, there has been seal hunting, because it was the only fresh meat they could get in the winter. It's still a big part of the tradition and a way to feed us and get nice pelts to make mittens and hats and boots.\"\n\nMenge says understanding the human story behind seal hunting is a key part of his work. (Courtesy Yoanis Menge)\n\nHe got the idea for Hakapik,  after seeing anti-sealing posters in the Paris metro in 2009 depicting an adult seal trying to crush the head of a human baby on the sea ice.\n\n\"I was really shocked about that image,\" he said. \"I was (also) a little bit bored of all those  pictures of propaganda against the seal hunt and wanted to see what it really was.\"\n\nMenge moved back to the Magdalen Islands, learning how to seal hunt himself, and began working on Hakapik, named after wooden club used to kill seals,  in 2012.\nA new colonialism?\nIn Inuit communities, the anti-sealing campaigns were economically and psychologically disastrous.\n\nAlthough Greenpeace issued an apology in 2014 for failing to consider the impacts their anti-sealing campaign would have on Indigenous communities, many Inuit leaders say it is not enough to compensate for the repercussions still felt in their communities.\n\nMenge says anti-sealing campaigns have distorted the role of both the subsistence hunt in the northern Canada and the commercial hunt in the southern Canada, without engaging with the communities or cultures.\n\n\"I what to know what seal hunting means to those people,\" he said. \"That's what anti-sealing groups never did. They look at the seal hunt from helicopters, really far away, but never go to meet those people and to talk with them. There's something wrong with that.\"\n\n\"It's a colonialist attitude about those cultures and those peoples,\" he said. \"It's moral decisions on the cultures of other people.\"\n\nFeature Interview: The human story behind seal hunting in Canada\n\n“It’s a colonialist attitude about those cultures and those peoples,” says Menge, pictured above, of the anti-sealing campaign. “It’s moral decisions on the cultures of other people.” (Courtesy Yoanis Menge)\n\nFor more from Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with photographer Yoanis Menge, listen here:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Hakapik_Menge.mp3\n\n\nGoing beyond cliché\nBut despite the controversial subject, Menge says he has yet to receive negative feedback on Hakapik, named after wooden club used to kill seals, and plans to spend another two years travelling to the North to chronicle the lives of hunters.\n\nHe says the reaction of sealers or Inuit hunters to his photographs is one of the most satisfying parts of his job.\n\n\"For the first time they see the real seal hunt not the propaganda images that they always saw before... That's the power of the work. It's close to the people.\"\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada: Angry Inuk - Canadian filmmaker takes on anti-sealing groups, Radio Canada International\n\nFinland:  Sami group occupies island in northern Finland to protest fishing rules...","id":"5bApHTULf1soxZS5s0WmdL","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"From the Arctic to Atlantic, a photographer documents seal hunting in Canada","release_date":"2018-06-09","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5bApHTULf1soxZS5s0WmdL"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3b4e8dd6e18b2f453028e30ea21ae8ac987d3ce0","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Each week, Eye on the Arctic brings you news and views from around the North A book showcasing the recipes of  Indigenous peoples from across the Arctic took the day at the Gourmand International Cookbook Awards in Yantai, China. EALLU –Food, Knowledge and How We Have Thrived on the Margins won in the Best Food Book of the Year category, beating out 15 other finalists from places like Canada, the U.S., Japan, Germany, Colombia, China and South Africa. \"I got tears in my eyes,\"  Maret Ravdna Buljo, a Sami reindeer herder and one of the book's contributors, told  Eye on the Arctic in a telephone interview from her home in Norway's Lofoten Islands this week. \"When we made this I never thought we'd be going to the Gourmand awards with it. I am very happy and grateful also for that.\" Entries for this year's awards came from 215 regions around the world. Over 50 authors from the Arctic and sub-Arctic contributed to the winning cookbook. The award was given out on May 26 in Yantai, China. (Courtesy International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry) “To receive such an award from the mainstream food publishing industry is a powerful recognition of the richness and depth of a focal point of our cultures, our relationship to food,\" said Mikhail Pogodaev from the Association of World Reindeer Herders in Yakutsk, Russia and one of the book's project leaders. “This is much more than just a book of recipes,\" he said in a news release.  \"This is about Arctic Indigenous peoples´ deep knowledge about food, raw materials, processing and conservation, food security, health and wellbeing – It’s about our food traditions, our traditional nomadic lifestyles, our local economies, our philosophy and our worldviews.\" Feature Interview: The Sami Family Meal Listen to our Eye on the Arctic conversation with reindeer herder and cookbook contributor Maret Ravdna Buljo, for more on Sami cooking and Indigenous food culture can serve as a bulwark against climate change and industrial development in the Arctic: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Buljo.mp3 From stomach soup and reindeer yoghurt, to caribou stew and bearded seal The book is split into sections examining the plants, animals and recipes that different Arctic Indigenous peoples rely on. It includes maps,  photos and notes from the recipe authors, as well as sections on food culture, customs and beliefs. The recipes include everything from ones found in Arctic Canada, like nilii gaih (dry meat), made by the Gwich'in,  and caribou meat gravy made by Inuit, to Saami techniques for smoking reindeer and a detailed explanations of the seaweed and plants used by the Yup'ik and Chukchi people of Siberian Russia. Sea squirts pictured in the Russian Arctic. The Chukchi eat them raw, boiled and frozen. The sea squirt, also known as upa, is also used for medicinal purposes. (Elena Kaminskaya/EALLU –Food, Knowledge and How We Have Thrived on the Margins) Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara, a Sami reindeer herder, PhD student and cookbook contributor, said she hopes the award shows Arctic Indigenous youth that their knowledge is important and valued. \"It gives us more  motivation to work on this topic,\" Sara told Eye on the Arctic from her home in Norway. \"It's a very big part of our daily lives and we really see it's important to document and maintain the way our ancestors have been living for generations. \"It's of great value and importance for us, and also of the rest of the world.\" Feature Interview: “I grew up in this livelihood , says Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara. “Reindeer herding is still a big, big part of my life. (Courtesy Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara) For more on Indigenous food culture and what reindeer can teach the world about sustainability in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018...","duration_ms":294113,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6I92w9PBLSKKWAOfFj11AU"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6I92w9PBLSKKWAOfFj11AU","html_description":"Each week, Eye on the Arctic brings you news and views from around the North\nA book showcasing the recipes of  Indigenous peoples from across the Arctic took the day at the Gourmand International Cookbook Awards in Yantai, China.\n\nEALLU –Food, Knowledge and How We Have Thrived on the Margins won in the Best Food Book of the Year category, beating out 15 other finalists from places like Canada, the U.S., Japan, Germany, Colombia, China and South Africa.\n\n\"I got tears in my eyes,\"  Maret Ravdna Buljo, a Sami reindeer herder and one of the book's contributors, told  Eye on the Arctic in a telephone interview from her home in Norway's Lofoten Islands this week. \"When we made this I never thought we'd be going to the Gourmand awards with it. I am very happy and grateful also for that.\"\n\nEntries for this year's awards came from 215 regions around the world.\n\nOver 50 authors from the Arctic and sub-Arctic contributed to the winning cookbook. The award was given out on May 26 in Yantai, China. (Courtesy International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry)\n\n“To receive such an award from the mainstream food publishing industry is a powerful recognition of the richness and depth of a focal point of our cultures, our relationship to food,\" said Mikhail Pogodaev from the Association of World Reindeer Herders in Yakutsk, Russia and one of the book's project leaders.\n\n“This is much more than just a book of recipes,\" he said in a news release.  \"This is about Arctic Indigenous peoples´ deep knowledge about food, raw materials, processing and conservation, food security, health and wellbeing – It’s about our food traditions, our traditional nomadic lifestyles, our local economies, our philosophy and our worldviews.\"\n\nFeature Interview: The Sami Family Meal\n\nListen to our Eye on the Arctic conversation with reindeer herder and cookbook contributor Maret Ravdna Buljo, for more on Sami cooking and Indigenous food culture can serve as a bulwark against climate change and industrial development in the Arctic:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Buljo.mp3\n\n\nFrom stomach soup and reindeer yoghurt, to caribou stew and bearded seal\nThe book is split into sections examining the plants, animals and recipes that different Arctic Indigenous peoples rely on. It includes maps,  photos and notes from the recipe authors, as well as sections on food culture, customs and beliefs.\n\nThe recipes include everything from ones found in Arctic Canada, like nilii gaih (dry meat), made by the Gwich'in,  and caribou meat gravy made by Inuit, to Saami techniques for smoking reindeer and a detailed explanations of the seaweed and plants used by the Yup'ik and Chukchi people of Siberian Russia.\n\nSea squirts pictured in the Russian Arctic. The Chukchi eat them raw, boiled and frozen. The sea squirt, also known as upa, is also used for medicinal purposes. (Elena Kaminskaya/EALLU –Food, Knowledge and How We Have Thrived on the Margins)\n\nRavdna Biret Marja Eira Sara, a Sami reindeer herder, PhD student and cookbook contributor, said she hopes the award shows Arctic Indigenous youth that their knowledge is important and valued.\n\n\"It gives us more  motivation to work on this topic,\" Sara told Eye on the Arctic from her home in Norway. \"It's a very big part of our daily lives and we really see it's important to document and maintain the way our ancestors have been living for generations.\n\n\"It's of great value and importance for us, and also of the rest of the world.\"\n\nFeature Interview: \n\n“I grew up in this livelihood , says Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara. “Reindeer herding is still a big, big part of my life. (Courtesy Ravdna Biret Marja Eira Sara)\n\nFor more on Indigenous food culture and what reindeer can teach the world about sustainability in the North, listen to Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with Ravdna Biret\nMarja Eira Sara:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018...","id":"6I92w9PBLSKKWAOfFj11AU","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Arctic Indigenous food culture takes the day at international cookbook awards","release_date":"2018-06-02","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6I92w9PBLSKKWAOfFj11AU"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/37fc456625ef8a32cb5ad8baa16e8f62d75bf4df","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Canada's department of Fisheries and Oceans has announced it will give $1,261,890 over 5 years to help solve the mystery of dwindling char numbers near the Arctic Canadian community of Kugluktuk. The money will go to a University of Waterloo research project created after hearing the community's concerns about the changes they were seeing in fish species in their area. The Kugluktuk Hunters and Trappers Organization said chair Larry Adjun wasn't available for an interview when reached by Eye on the Arctic this week. But University of Waterloo researcher Heidi Swanson said better understanding char in the region is important from both a scientific and food security perspective. \" What folks have been telling us is that there's been major declines in the numbers of char in the past few years ,\" Swanson said in a telephone interview. \"And nobody really knows why. It could be water temperature. Maybe it's increased shipping traffic. Maybe some of their stream habitat is drying out.\" The research project will focus on better understanding the migratory patterns and overwintering habitats of char. This summer and next summer, fish will be tagged to track where they go in the winter. The results will then be used to see what obstacles may be impeding migration and causing fish to get stuck or stranded and what restoration work can be done to remove any obstructions. Feature Interview: What's happening to the char? “We should always ground our science in what the community’s concerns and questions are,” says University of Waterloo researcher Heidi Swanson of working in the Arctic. (Courtesy Heidi Swanson) Listen here for more of Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with researcher Heidi Swanson: https://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Swanson_Interview.mp3 Indigenous knowledge and science working together Swanson said working with Inuit hunters in Kugluktuk is key to better understanding the pressures Arctic fish species are under because of environmental change. \"Across the Arctic, char numbers will go up and down in cycles,\" she said. \"But the thing is, the people that have been living up there know what those cycles usually  look like and (what they're seeing now) is a change from the normal cycle. \"Food security, as many people know, is really tough in the Canadian Arctic and fish is a major source of food. People are really worried about Arctic char. \"We really want to get a handle on what these char are doing so that we can better manage them as we go into future scenarios of climate change and resource development.\" Oceans protection plan The government's investment in the research is part of the $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund, established to finance multiyear projects that look to protect the coastline and marine species. The fund favours projects that also include Indigenous participation. The fund was put in place as part of Canada's  $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan, launched in 2016. Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca Related stories from around the North: Canada: Which fish live in Arctic Canada? Thanks to new book, we finally know, Radio Canada International Finland:  Endangered Finnish seal population slowly recovering, Yle News Norway: Fishing rights: Norway takes tough line against EU in Svalbard waters, the Independent Barents Observer Russia: Russian salmon farmers buy Norwegian smolt company, The Independent Barents Observer Sweden:  Record numbers for Swedish wild salmon, Radio Sweden United States:  America’s most toxic site is in the Alaskan Arctic, Cryopolitics blog","duration_ms":363703,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5U0F9T67PpEgVbtZQy9ili"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5U0F9T67PpEgVbtZQy9ili","html_description":"Canada's department of Fisheries and Oceans has announced it will give $1,261,890 over 5 years to help solve the mystery of dwindling char numbers near the Arctic Canadian community of Kugluktuk.\nThe money will go to a University of Waterloo research project created after hearing the community's concerns about the changes they were seeing in fish species in their area.\n\nThe Kugluktuk Hunters and Trappers Organization said chair Larry Adjun wasn't available for an interview when reached by Eye on the Arctic this week.\n\nBut University of Waterloo researcher Heidi Swanson said better understanding char in the region is important from both a scientific and food security perspective.\n\n\" What folks have been telling us is that there's been major declines in the numbers of char in the past few years ,\" Swanson said in a telephone interview. \"And nobody really knows why. It could be water temperature. Maybe it's increased shipping traffic. Maybe some of their stream habitat is drying out.\"\n\nThe research project will focus on better understanding the migratory patterns and overwintering habitats of char. This summer and next summer, fish will be tagged to track where they go in the winter. The results will then be used to see what obstacles may be impeding migration and causing fish to get stuck or stranded and what restoration work can be done to remove any obstructions.\n\nFeature Interview: What's happening to the char? \n\n“We should always ground our science in what the community’s concerns and questions are,” says University of Waterloo researcher Heidi Swanson of working in the Arctic. (Courtesy Heidi Swanson)\n\nListen here for more of Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with researcher Heidi Swanson:\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2018/05/Swanson_Interview.mp3\n\n\nIndigenous knowledge and science working together\nSwanson said working with Inuit hunters in Kugluktuk is key to better understanding the pressures Arctic fish species are under because of environmental change.\n\n\"Across the Arctic, char numbers will go up and down in cycles,\" she said. \"But the thing is, the people that have been living up there know what those cycles usually  look like and (what they're seeing now) is a change from the normal cycle.\n\n\"Food security, as many people know, is really tough in the Canadian Arctic and fish is a major source of food. People are really worried about Arctic char.\n\n\"We really want to get a handle on what these char are doing so that we can better manage them as we go into future scenarios of climate change and resource development.\"\nOceans protection plan\nThe government's investment in the research is part of the $75-million Coastal Restoration Fund, established to finance multiyear projects that look to protect the coastline and marine species. The fund favours projects that also include Indigenous participation.\n\nThe fund was put in place as part of Canada's  $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan, launched in 2016.\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada: Which fish live in Arctic Canada? Thanks to new book, we finally know, Radio Canada International\n\nFinland:  Endangered Finnish seal population slowly recovering, Yle News\n\nNorway: Fishing rights: Norway takes tough line against EU in Svalbard waters, the Independent Barents Observer\n\nRussia: Russian salmon farmers buy Norwegian smolt company, The Independent Barents Observer\n\nSweden:  Record numbers for Swedish wild salmon, Radio Sweden\n\nUnited States:  America’s most toxic site is in the Alaskan Arctic, Cryopolitics blog","id":"5U0F9T67PpEgVbtZQy9ili","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada invests $1.2 million to help solve mystery of dwindling char numbers in Arctic","release_date":"2018-05-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5U0F9T67PpEgVbtZQy9ili"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7546b55153caaf5db2416c4985aa1eb88b2baea4","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"(commenting open on all RCI stories - scroll to bottom) Hockey is just, well, so Canadian. Sure the Russians, Czechs, Swedes, Germans, even Americans are pretty darn good internationally, and many do end up in the National Hockey League, but the NHL is still considered rightly or wrongly as Canada’s league. (Though now headquartered in the U.S the “national” in NHL originally meant Canada, as the NHL grew out of the National Hockey Association- a Canadian league prior to 1917). Canadian Senator David Richards recently gave a speech in the Senate denouncing Americanisms in hockey language and a general lack of understanding in play by play and analysis by American announcers. ListenEN_Saturday_Columns_2-20180505-WCE26 Canadian Senator and award winning author David Richards of New Brunswick- Photo: Senator Richards website Senator Richards, himself an author and so quite aware of the significance of language laments –admittedly slightly tongue-in- cheek, the use of words like “jersey” to describe a hockey “sweater”. It’s a hockey sweater he says, every Canadian knows that, there was even a famous Canadian short story written about “the hockey sweater”. As for “half wall”, you get hit hard into the “boards”, or get a penalty for “boarding”, there’s no “half wall”. He  grates his teeth at American descriptions of a shot as a “wrister” or a “slapper”. The famous Canadian short story by Roch Carrier about \"The Hockey Sweater\" Photo-Tundra Books-Penguin Random House But not only the use of American words, he says that most American announcers just don’t know or understand the game. He says Canadian announcers do, mainly because they grew up watching and playing hockey. While Canadian teams haven’t won the Stanley Cup (championship) since 1993, he points out that almost three-quarters of players on American teams are in fact Canadian. He wonders what happened to the \"deke\" or the \"spin-o-rama\" (Doug Harvey, Serge Savard, Bobby Orr)  or the dipsy doodle (Max Bentley ‘the dipsy doodle dandy’, and others). In any case, he'll be watching to Stanley Cup playoff broadcasts, even if he has to tune in to Canadian radio announcers at the same time. additional information PostMedia: MD Smith: May 2/18 odious American sports commentators","duration_ms":414824,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7eYygQUGHlyUcP46iNPJ7o"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7eYygQUGHlyUcP46iNPJ7o","html_description":"(commenting open on all RCI stories - scroll to bottom)\n\nHockey is just, well, so Canadian.\n\nSure the Russians, Czechs, Swedes, Germans, even Americans are pretty darn good internationally, and many do end up in the National Hockey League, but the NHL is still considered rightly or wrongly as Canada’s league. (Though now headquartered in the U.S the “national” in NHL originally meant Canada, as the NHL grew out of the National Hockey Association- a Canadian league prior to 1917).\n\nCanadian Senator David Richards recently gave a speech in the Senate denouncing Americanisms in hockey language and a general lack of understanding in play by play and analysis by American announcers.\n\nListenEN_Saturday_Columns_2-20180505-WCE26\n\nCanadian Senator and award winning author David Richards of New Brunswick- Photo: Senator Richards website\n\nSenator Richards, himself an author and so quite aware of the significance of language laments –admittedly slightly tongue-in- cheek, the use of words like “jersey” to describe a hockey “sweater”. It’s a hockey sweater he says, every Canadian knows that, there was even a famous Canadian short story written about “the hockey sweater”.\n\nAs for “half wall”, you get hit hard into the “boards”, or get a penalty for “boarding”, there’s no “half wall”. He  grates his teeth at American descriptions of a shot as a “wrister” or a “slapper”.\n\nThe famous Canadian short story by Roch Carrier about \"The Hockey Sweater\" Photo-Tundra Books-Penguin Random House\n\nBut not only the use of American words, he says that most American announcers just don’t know or understand the game. He says Canadian announcers do, mainly because they grew up watching and playing hockey.\n\nWhile Canadian teams haven’t won the Stanley Cup (championship) since 1993, he points out that almost three-quarters of players on American teams are in fact Canadian.\n\nHe wonders what happened to the \"deke\" or the \"spin-o-rama\" (Doug Harvey, Serge Savard, Bobby Orr)  or the dipsy doodle (Max Bentley ‘the dipsy doodle dandy’, and others).\n\nIn any case, he'll be watching to Stanley Cup playoff broadcasts, even if he has to tune in to Canadian radio announcers at the same time.\n\nadditional information\n\n \tPostMedia: MD Smith: May 2/18 odious American sports commentators","id":"7eYygQUGHlyUcP46iNPJ7o","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Hockey- use the right words eh?","release_date":"2018-05-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7eYygQUGHlyUcP46iNPJ7o"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/90c9b727765d1404067e50880e68431a134bc48f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"One out of ten children fleeing a vicious flare up of fighting in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) say they were raped during their journey to Uganda, according to a new assessment by Save the Children. More 73,000 refugees have fled the gruesome and escalating conflict in DRC to Uganda, including nearly 2,800 unaccompanied or separated children since the beginning of this year, according to the charity. An overwhelming majority - some 77.5 per cent - are women and children. “The conflict in DRC is one of the world’s forgotten crises,” said in a statement Johnson Byamukama, Save the Children’s Emergency Response Director in Uganda. “We see child refugees arriving in Uganda every day in desperate need. Every one of them has a horrific story to tell, including of rape, of parents being killed, of witnessing extreme violence.” The assessment by Save the Children, based on interviews of 132 refugee children aged 10 to 17, found that hunger was the biggest issue, affecting eight in 10 children fleeing the eastern Ituri region of DRC, said Rachel Logel Carmichael, the charity’ head of humanitarian affairs in Canada. (click to listen to the full interview with Rachel Logel Carmichael) ListenEN_Interview_3-20180420-WIE30 Surviving sickness and violence Mave Grace, 11, who had part of her arm chopped off by militiamen when they attacked the village of Tchee, stands in an Internally Displaced Camp in Bunia, Ituri province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, April 12, 2018. According to witnesses, militiamen killed her pregnant mother, her three brothers and injured her sister, Racahele-Ngabausi. (Goran Tomasevic/REUTERS) More than half of children said they were affected by sickness along the way, and a quarter of children interviewed said they were assaulted by armed groups as they fled, Logel Carmichael said. Having walked for days, refugees are primarily entering Uganda via Lake Albert on makeshift boats, a dangerous crossing that has already proved fatal for \"several\" people, according to the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR. “As you can imagine those who have arrived on the Uganda side there is quite a bit of stress and trauma from that journey,” Logel Carmichael said. Fighting in Ituri has involved the Hema cattle herders and the Lendu farmers who have a long history of violence over access to land. UNHCR Babar Baloch said at a briefing in Geneva in March that armed men are reported to be attacking villages, looting and burning down houses, indiscriminately killing civilian populations and kidnapping young men and boys. Separated from families Rachele-Ngabausi, aged two, injured by militiamen when they attacked the village of Tchee, sits in an Internally Displaced Camp in Bunia, Ituri province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, April 12, 2018. According to witnesses, militiamen killed her pregnant mother, her three brothers and chopped off part of her sister's arm. (Goran Tomasevic/REUTERS) “One of the concerns for Save the Children is cases of the children who have been separated from their families or who are crossing the border on their own,” Logel Carmichael said. “So we ensure that in our programming on the Uganda side of the border that we’re addressing the specific needs of unaccompanied and separated children.” These children are put in foster care provided by other refugees, but ultimately the goal is to reunite the children with their families, she said. Another concern is the lack of services available to victims of sexual violence, Logel Carmichael said. “We certainly must commend the government of Uganda for opening its doors to refugees in this area and across the country, but this is an area that whilst there were refugee camps they’re not a lot of services to host this many people,” Logel Carmichael said. In addition, even after arriving in Uganda, children remain at risk of sexual violence, with numerous incidents reported around the settlements i...","duration_ms":869303,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4gdlplVth7lEjc9CIrk9UO"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4gdlplVth7lEjc9CIrk9UO","html_description":"One out of ten children fleeing a vicious flare up of fighting in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) say they were raped during their journey to Uganda, according to a new assessment by Save the Children.\n\nMore 73,000 refugees have fled the gruesome and escalating conflict in DRC to Uganda, including nearly 2,800 unaccompanied or separated children since the beginning of this year, according to the charity.\n\nAn overwhelming majority - some 77.5 per cent - are women and children.\n\n“The conflict in DRC is one of the world’s forgotten crises,” said in a statement Johnson Byamukama, Save the Children’s Emergency Response Director in Uganda. “We see child refugees arriving in Uganda every day in desperate need. Every one of them has a horrific story to tell, including of rape, of parents being killed, of witnessing extreme violence.”\n\nThe assessment by Save the Children, based on interviews of 132 refugee children aged 10 to 17, found that hunger was the biggest issue, affecting eight in 10 children fleeing the eastern Ituri region of DRC, said Rachel Logel Carmichael, the charity’ head of humanitarian affairs in Canada.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Rachel Logel Carmichael)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20180420-WIE30\nSurviving sickness and violence\nMave Grace, 11, who had part of her arm chopped off by militiamen when they attacked the village of Tchee, stands in an Internally Displaced Camp in Bunia, Ituri province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, April 12, 2018. According to witnesses, militiamen killed her pregnant mother, her three brothers and injured her sister, Racahele-Ngabausi. (Goran Tomasevic/REUTERS)\n\nMore than half of children said they were affected by sickness along the way, and a quarter of children interviewed said they were assaulted by armed groups as they fled, Logel Carmichael said.\n\nHaving walked for days, refugees are primarily entering Uganda via Lake Albert on makeshift boats, a dangerous crossing that has already proved fatal for \"several\" people, according to the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR.\n\n“As you can imagine those who have arrived on the Uganda side there is quite a bit of stress and trauma from that journey,” Logel Carmichael said.\n\nFighting in Ituri has involved the Hema cattle herders and the Lendu farmers who have a long history of violence over access to land.\n\nUNHCR Babar Baloch said at a briefing in Geneva in March that armed men are reported to be attacking villages, looting and burning down houses, indiscriminately killing civilian populations and kidnapping young men and boys.\nSeparated from families\nRachele-Ngabausi, aged two, injured by militiamen when they attacked the village of Tchee, sits in an Internally Displaced Camp in Bunia, Ituri province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, April 12, 2018. According to witnesses, militiamen killed her pregnant mother, her three brothers and chopped off part of her sister's arm. (Goran Tomasevic/REUTERS)\n\n“One of the concerns for Save the Children is cases of the children who have been separated from their families or who are crossing the border on their own,” Logel Carmichael said. “So we ensure that in our programming on the Uganda side of the border that we’re addressing the specific needs of unaccompanied and separated children.”\n\nThese children are put in foster care provided by other refugees, but ultimately the goal is to reunite the children with their families, she said.\n\nAnother concern is the lack of services available to victims of sexual violence, Logel Carmichael said.\n\n“We certainly must commend the government of Uganda for opening its doors to refugees in this area and across the country, but this is an area that whilst there were refugee camps they’re not a lot of services to host this many people,” Logel Carmichael said.\n\nIn addition, even after arriving in Uganda, children remain at risk of sexual violence, with numerous incidents reported around the settlements i...","id":"4gdlplVth7lEjc9CIrk9UO","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Children fleeing DR Congo conflict to Uganda report widespread rape","release_date":"2018-04-20","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4gdlplVth7lEjc9CIrk9UO"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/fb968ffabb084a04cceafbad161a5faa5128a666","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Their exact location is a jealously guarded secret but a set of mysterious petroglyphs in the Eastern Canadian Arctic feature among Ottawa’s latest submission to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration as a new World Heritage Site. The so-called Qajartalik petroglyphs, highly stylized human faces carved into soapstone, are unique manifestations of Dorset Era artistic expression, said Louis Gagnon, a curator with the Avataq Cultural Institute, a non-profit group dedicated to protecting and promoting Indigenous language and culture in the Eastern Arctic. (click to listen to the interview with Louis Gagnon) ListenEN_Clip_4-20180316-WME40 Qajartalik appears to be the only place where Dorset Era peoples transposed onto soapstone, on a huge scale, the distinctive figures usually found on much smaller artifacts made of bone, ivory or horn, Gagnon said. The Dorset people lived along the coasts of Nunavik from 2,000 to 1,000 years ago and disappeared before the arrival of the Thule Inuit, the ancestors of the modern Inuit inhabiting the area, approximately 800 years ago, Gagnon said. Qajartalik, which means “the place where a kayak can be seen” in Inuktitut, is officially part of Canadian Arctic territory of Nunavut, but because it lies off the coast of the Inuit region of Nunavik in northern Quebec it is used by the Nunavik Inuit, said Gagnon. While the Inuit – and the Dorset people before them – have used the island for centuries to quarry soapstone for their oil lamps and cooking pots, Bernard Saladin d’Anglure became the first Westerner to document 95 carvings at Qajartalik in the early 1960s. During later expeditions to Qajartalik from 1996 to 1998 he discovered and documented an additional 70 petroglyphs, bringing the site’s total to 165. More carvings have been found since. 'Unique Arctic rock-art' For the last decade, the Avataq Cultural Institute has been working with the federal government to have Qajartalik recognized as a world heritage site. (Louis Gagnon /Avataq) The carvings, which have baffled archaeologists since their discovery in the early 1960s, range from a few centimetres in height to more than 30 centimetres, Gagnon said. Qajartalik is not only the most northerly rock-art site on the continent; it is also one of a kind because it depicts only these stylized faces and nothing else, he said. The faces are highly anthropomorphic and come in various forms: rounded, oval, square or triangular. Many have horn-like features on top of their heads. “It’s probably why some people were talking about, ‘Oh, they are devil representations,’” Gagnon said. “Maybe, but this is a modern interpretation.” However, the pointy features on the top of the carved heads could also represent a particular Dorset Era article of clothing, Gagnon said. Dorset people wore parkas with very high collars, almost reaching the top of the head of a person, instead of the hoods preferred by the Inuit, Gagnon said. “So maybe it’s just a representation of those two points coming from the collar,” Gagnon said. “We did some experiments and it looks pretty much the same.” Scientists have been unable to date the site very precisely but experts believe the extinct Dorset culture created the carvings about 1,000 years ago, . Scientists speculate that the decline of the Dorset people was triggered by a sudden warming of the climate in the Arctic around the 10th century. The Dorset people had a hard time coping with dramatic changes in their environment and that precipitated an increase in magical beliefs and shamanism, as well as artistic expression related to these spiritual practices, Gagnon said. “It’s an indication maybe that that site, which is quite unique with all those faces, could be a sort of an attempt to make some sort of a ritual or something linked to shamanism,” Gagnon said.","duration_ms":895242,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7nqHfDCeNc0BJsFpkF18EL"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7nqHfDCeNc0BJsFpkF18EL","html_description":"Their exact location is a jealously guarded secret but a set of mysterious petroglyphs in the Eastern Canadian Arctic feature among Ottawa’s latest submission to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration as a new World Heritage Site.\n\nThe so-called Qajartalik petroglyphs, highly stylized human faces carved into soapstone, are unique manifestations of Dorset Era artistic expression, said Louis Gagnon, a curator with the Avataq Cultural Institute, a non-profit group dedicated to protecting and promoting Indigenous language and culture in the Eastern Arctic.\n\n(click to listen to the interview with Louis Gagnon)\n\nListenEN_Clip_4-20180316-WME40\n\nQajartalik appears to be the only place where Dorset Era peoples transposed onto soapstone, on a huge scale, the distinctive figures usually found on much smaller artifacts made of bone, ivory or horn, Gagnon said.\n\nThe Dorset people lived along the coasts of Nunavik from 2,000 to 1,000 years ago and disappeared before the arrival of the Thule Inuit, the ancestors of the modern Inuit inhabiting the area, approximately 800 years ago, Gagnon said.\n\nQajartalik, which means “the place where a kayak can be seen” in Inuktitut, is officially part of Canadian Arctic territory of Nunavut, but because it lies off the coast of the Inuit region of Nunavik in northern Quebec it is used by the Nunavik Inuit, said Gagnon.\n\nWhile the Inuit – and the Dorset people before them – have used the island for centuries to quarry soapstone for their oil lamps and cooking pots, Bernard Saladin d’Anglure became the first Westerner to document 95 carvings at Qajartalik in the early 1960s.\n\nDuring later expeditions to Qajartalik from 1996 to 1998 he discovered and documented an additional 70 petroglyphs, bringing the site’s total to 165. More carvings have been found since.\n'Unique Arctic rock-art'\nFor the last decade, the Avataq Cultural Institute has been working with the federal government to have Qajartalik recognized as a world heritage site. (Louis Gagnon /Avataq)\n\nThe carvings, which have baffled archaeologists since their discovery in the early 1960s, range from a few centimetres in height to more than 30 centimetres, Gagnon said.\n\nQajartalik is not only the most northerly rock-art site on the continent; it is also one of a kind because it depicts only these stylized faces and nothing else, he said.\n\nThe faces are highly anthropomorphic and come in various forms: rounded, oval, square or triangular. Many have horn-like features on top of their heads.\n\n“It’s probably why some people were talking about, ‘Oh, they are devil representations,’” Gagnon said. “Maybe, but this is a modern interpretation.”\n\nHowever, the pointy features on the top of the carved heads could also represent a particular Dorset Era article of clothing, Gagnon said.\n\nDorset people wore parkas with very high collars, almost reaching the top of the head of a person, instead of the hoods preferred by the Inuit, Gagnon said.\n\n“So maybe it’s just a representation of those two points coming from the collar,” Gagnon said. “We did some experiments and it looks pretty much the same.”\n\nScientists have been unable to date the site very precisely but experts believe the extinct Dorset culture created the carvings about 1,000 years ago, .\n\nScientists speculate that the decline of the Dorset people was triggered by a sudden warming of the climate in the Arctic around the 10th century. The Dorset people had a hard time coping with dramatic changes in their environment and that precipitated an increase in magical beliefs and shamanism, as well as artistic expression related to these spiritual practices, Gagnon said.\n\n“It’s an indication maybe that that site, which is quite unique with all those faces, could be a sort of an attempt to make some sort of a ritual or something linked to shamanism,” Gagnon said.","id":"7nqHfDCeNc0BJsFpkF18EL","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada wants to list mysterious Arctic petroglyphs as UNESCO World Heritage Site","release_date":"2018-03-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7nqHfDCeNc0BJsFpkF18EL"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7543c9aafc0e8fc4c6781221415128a6efde2d9f","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Nearly a year after a concerted humanitarian effort staved off a famine in South Sudan, the country is once again teetering on the brink of another catastrophic food crisis, the United Nations warns. Almost two-thirds of the population will need food aid this year to stave off starvation and malnutrition as aid groups prepare for the “toughest year on record”, according to the estimates of a working group that includes South Sudanese and UN officials. “The situation is extremely fragile, and we are close to seeing another famine. The projections are stark,” Serge Tissot, the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Representative in South Sudan, warned reporters last week. FAO, the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the UN World Food Programme (WFP) warn that any progress in preventing hunger-related deaths made so far could be undone, and more people than ever could be pushed into severe hunger and famine-like conditions during May-July unless assistance and access are maintained. People of South Sudan still need our help: UNICEF South Sudan famine averted but millions still face hunger Particularly at risk are 155,000 people, including 29,000 children, who could suffer from the most extreme levels of hunger. Legacy of war Children sit on the floor inside a classroom in Konyokonyo camp for the internally displaced people in Juba, South Sudan January 31, 2018. (Samir Bol/REUTERS) Ross Smith, 41, head of programs for the WFP in South Sudan, said the country’s ongoing civil war is chiefly to blame. “Over the past more than three years we had conflict spread throughout the country, affecting virtually all parts of the country,” said Smith, a Canadian who has been in South Sudan for nearly two years. (click to listen to the interview with Smith Ross) ListenEN_Clip_3-20180302-WME30 The conflict has forced 2 million people to flee South Sudan to neighbouring countries, while at least another 2 million have been displaced inside the country. The civil war has also caused widespread food insecurity in South Sudan. Over 5.3 million people, almost half of the country’s population, are already facing severe food insecurity according to the WFP estimates. “Food insecurity means that they don’t have enough to eat on the daily basis for a household, especially for kids in a household,” Smith said in a phone interview from Juba. “People end up skipping meals or reducing the size of meals, they change the foods that they eat, often simplifying the diet to they’ll often eat one type of cereal, for example, like sorghum or maize.” This kind of a diet is especially harmful for children, he said. “A well-balanced diet and frequent meals are very important for growth and development in children,” Smith said. “And here you have kids eating sometimes once a day, sometimes once every two days.” This can severely impair the growth and development of children and it causes both short-term and chronic malnutrition in children, Smith said. The most dangerous country to be an aid worker Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Marie Bibeau visited WFP’s Rapid Response food distribution sites in Jonglei State, in South Sudan June, 2017 accompanied by WFP’s Head of Programme, Ross Smith. (Sabine Starke/WFP) South Sudan is considered the world's most dangerous place to be an aid worker, with at least 95 killed since the conflict began. The United Nations says violence against aid workers in South Sudan reached a new high in 2017, with 28 killed. Nearly half of the 1,159 humanitarian access incidents reported last year by aid agencies involved violence including killing, looting and threats. “For myself, I live in the capital city, in Juba, and we have a range of security precautions, we have curfews and various things, but it is really our staff and partner staff that are out on the front lines in the bush that face the most danger,” Smith said. ","duration_ms":734354,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2X3FjaNPz97fmvCL0nSMah"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2X3FjaNPz97fmvCL0nSMah","html_description":"Nearly a year after a concerted humanitarian effort staved off a famine in South Sudan, the country is once again teetering on the brink of another catastrophic food crisis, the United Nations warns.\n\nAlmost two-thirds of the population will need food aid this year to stave off starvation and malnutrition as aid groups prepare for the “toughest year on record”, according to the estimates of a working group that includes South Sudanese and UN officials.\n\n“The situation is extremely fragile, and we are close to seeing another famine. The projections are stark,” Serge Tissot, the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Representative in South Sudan, warned reporters last week.\n\nFAO, the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the UN World Food Programme (WFP) warn that any progress in preventing hunger-related deaths made so far could be undone, and more people than ever could be pushed into severe hunger and famine-like conditions during May-July unless assistance and access are maintained.\n\n \tPeople of South Sudan still need our help: UNICEF\n \tSouth Sudan famine averted but millions still face hunger\n\nParticularly at risk are 155,000 people, including 29,000 children, who could suffer from the most extreme levels of hunger.\nLegacy of war\nChildren sit on the floor inside a classroom in Konyokonyo camp for the internally displaced people in Juba, South Sudan January 31, 2018. (Samir Bol/REUTERS)\n\nRoss Smith, 41, head of programs for the WFP in South Sudan, said the country’s ongoing civil war is chiefly to blame.\n\n“Over the past more than three years we had conflict spread throughout the country, affecting virtually all parts of the country,” said Smith, a Canadian who has been in South Sudan for nearly two years.\n\n(click to listen to the interview with Smith Ross)\n\nListenEN_Clip_3-20180302-WME30\n\nThe conflict has forced 2 million people to flee South Sudan to neighbouring countries, while at least another 2 million have been displaced inside the country.\n\nThe civil war has also caused widespread food insecurity in South Sudan. Over 5.3 million people, almost half of the country’s population, are already facing severe food insecurity according to the WFP estimates.\n\n“Food insecurity means that they don’t have enough to eat on the daily basis for a household, especially for kids in a household,” Smith said in a phone interview from Juba. “People end up skipping meals or reducing the size of meals, they change the foods that they eat, often simplifying the diet to they’ll often eat one type of cereal, for example, like sorghum or maize.”\n\nThis kind of a diet is especially harmful for children, he said.\n\n“A well-balanced diet and frequent meals are very important for growth and development in children,” Smith said. “And here you have kids eating sometimes once a day, sometimes once every two days.”\n\nThis can severely impair the growth and development of children and it causes both short-term and chronic malnutrition in children, Smith said.\nThe most dangerous country to be an aid worker\nMinister of International Development and La Francophonie, Marie Bibeau visited WFP’s Rapid Response food distribution sites in Jonglei State, in South Sudan June, 2017 accompanied by WFP’s Head of Programme, Ross Smith. (Sabine Starke/WFP)\n\nSouth Sudan is considered the world's most dangerous place to be an aid worker, with at least 95 killed since the conflict began.\n\nThe United Nations says violence against aid workers in South Sudan reached a new high in 2017, with 28 killed.\n\nNearly half of the 1,159 humanitarian access incidents reported last year by aid agencies involved violence including killing, looting and threats.\n\n“For myself, I live in the capital city, in Juba, and we have a range of security precautions, we have curfews and various things, but it is really our staff and partner staff that are out on the front lines in the bush that face the most danger,” Smith said.\n","id":"2X3FjaNPz97fmvCL0nSMah","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"South Sudan faces another famine, aid groups warn","release_date":"2018-03-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2X3FjaNPz97fmvCL0nSMah"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8debce7dd8613bb916b80eeceaafd136a3a95225","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from across the North The Canadian province of Ontario may be a southern province, but this week it pledged $96,844 towards the Inuit Art Foundation's update to the Igloo Tag Trademark. The money was part of a series of funding announcements made on Thursday by David Zimmer, Ontario's Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation. “These grants are part of Ontario’s commitment to work closely with Indigenous partners so they can fully develop the talent and economic opportunities in their communities,\" Zimmer said in a news release. \"From supporting education and employment opportunities for single mothers to protecting Inuit art and culture and beyond these are important steps in Ontario’s journey of reconciliation.” Although, none of Canada's traditional Inuit territory is found in Ontario,  many of the country's most important Inuit art galleries and organizations are located in the province. Feature Interview The Inuit Art Foundation’s Alysa Procida tells Eye on the Arctic why the igloo tag still matters and its role in the modern day art market: ListenEN_Interview_5-20180216-WIE50 Art trademark gets a rethink A carving by the late Mathewsie Tunnillie (1984-2009) with its igloo tag listing the artist's name, community and description of the work. (Eilís Quinn/Eye on the Arctic) The igloo tag was created in 1958. It was developed by the government of Canada after counterfeit, mass-market works began hitting the market to take advantage of Inuit art’s popularity in the South. The goal was to create a trademark that would protect both Inuit artists and buyers from fake works and ensure the robustness of the Inuit art economy. Each tag includes an igloo trademark, along with things like the artist’s name and home community, allowing the work’s provenance to be easily authenticated. The Canadian government handed over control of the tag to the Inuit Art Foundation, which promotes Inuit artists and publishes the magazine Inuit Art Quarterly, in 2017. The updated igloo tag trademark that will be issued by the Inuit Art Foundation. (Inuit Art Foundation) Role in modern-day art market Alysa Procida, executive director of the Inuit Art Foundation , said the grant will help the organization make the trademark more relevant to the modern-day art market. \"That includes everything from updating the actual trademark itself, which now says \"Inuit art,\" rather than a more outdated terminology, to conducting consultations with artists who have never really been asked before what else they would like the trademark to do or how else it might be used,\" Procida said in a phone interview from Toronto. Possibilities include expanding the types of art it could be applied to, licensing, and making the trademark available to Inuit artists no matter which region of Canada they belong to or work in. (Currently, Inuit artists in Nunatsiavut, the Inuit self-governing region of Newfoundland and Labrador in Atlantic Canada, and Inuit artists in southern Canada, do not have access to the tag.) Economic heft A study released in 2017 found that Inuit art contributed $87.2 million to Canada’s GDP and that the igloo tag trademark contributed $3.5 million annually to the Inuit arts economy. It also found that the presence of the igloo tag increased the perceived value of a particular work by approximately $117 CDN. Video Section To view Eye on the Arctic’s in-studio interviews with Inuit artists from across Canada, visit our special video section: The art and artists of Canada’s Arctic Artist Jolly Atagooyuk working in studio in Pangnirtung, a community in Canada’s eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut. (Eye on the Arctic) Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca Related stories from around the North: Canada: Inuit art featured on new Canadian banknote, Eye on the Arctic Finland:  London gallery offers multimedia Sámi art,","duration_ms":353123,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6IEd4HM93pLaCXhPNVou1H"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6IEd4HM93pLaCXhPNVou1H","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from across the North\nThe Canadian province of Ontario may be a southern province, but this week it pledged $96,844 towards the Inuit Art Foundation's update to the Igloo Tag Trademark.\n\nThe money was part of a series of funding announcements made on Thursday by David Zimmer, Ontario's Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.\n\n“These grants are part of Ontario’s commitment to work closely with Indigenous partners so they can fully develop the talent and economic opportunities in their communities,\" Zimmer said in a news release. \"From supporting education and employment opportunities for single mothers to protecting Inuit art and culture and beyond these are important steps in Ontario’s journey of reconciliation.”\n\nAlthough, none of Canada's traditional Inuit territory is found in Ontario,  many of the country's most important Inuit art galleries and organizations are located in the province.\n\nFeature Interview The Inuit Art Foundation’s Alysa Procida tells Eye on the Arctic why the igloo tag still matters and its role in the modern day art market:\n\nListenEN_Interview_5-20180216-WIE50\n\n\nArt trademark gets a rethink\nA carving by the late Mathewsie Tunnillie (1984-2009) with its igloo tag listing the artist's name, community and description of the work. (Eilís Quinn/Eye on the Arctic)\n\nThe igloo tag was created in 1958.\n\nIt was developed by the government of Canada after counterfeit, mass-market works began hitting the market to take advantage of Inuit art’s popularity in the South.\n\nThe goal was to create a trademark that would protect both Inuit artists and buyers from fake works and ensure the robustness of the Inuit art economy.\n\nEach tag includes an igloo trademark, along with things like the artist’s name and home community, allowing the work’s provenance to be easily authenticated.\n\nThe Canadian government handed over control of the tag to the Inuit Art Foundation, which promotes Inuit artists and publishes the magazine Inuit Art Quarterly, in 2017.\n\nThe updated igloo tag trademark that will be issued by the Inuit Art Foundation. (Inuit Art Foundation)\nRole in modern-day art market\nAlysa Procida, executive director of the Inuit Art Foundation , said the grant will help the organization make the trademark more relevant to the modern-day art market.\n\n\"That includes everything from updating the actual trademark itself, which now says \"Inuit art,\" rather than a more outdated terminology, to conducting consultations with artists who have never really been asked before what else they would like the trademark to do or how else it might be used,\" Procida said in a phone interview from Toronto.\n\nPossibilities include expanding the types of art it could be applied to, licensing, and making the trademark available to Inuit artists no matter which region of Canada they belong to or work in. (Currently, Inuit artists in Nunatsiavut, the Inuit self-governing region of Newfoundland and Labrador in Atlantic Canada, and Inuit artists in southern Canada, do not have access to the tag.)\nEconomic heft\nA study released in 2017 found that Inuit art contributed $87.2 million to Canada’s GDP and that the igloo tag trademark contributed $3.5 million annually to the Inuit arts economy.\n\nIt also found that the presence of the igloo tag increased the perceived value of a particular work by approximately $117 CDN.\nVideo Section\nTo view Eye on the Arctic’s in-studio interviews with Inuit artists from across Canada, visit our special video section:\nThe art and artists of Canada’s Arctic\n\n\nArtist Jolly Atagooyuk working in studio in Pangnirtung, a community in Canada’s eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut. (Eye on the Arctic)\n\nWrite to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca\nRelated stories from around the North:\nCanada: Inuit art featured on new Canadian banknote, Eye on the Arctic\n\nFinland:  London gallery offers multimedia Sámi art,","id":"6IEd4HM93pLaCXhPNVou1H","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian province of Ontario contributes $96,000 towards update of Inuit art trademark","release_date":"2018-02-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6IEd4HM93pLaCXhPNVou1H"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7dab108c164914a6156259c0f51015eebdcbc3de","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"New research suggests that people who are obese or severely obese may be fit and, if they are, they have the same or possibly better health benefits from their fitness than do other people. Many studies link obesity with diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and other health problems. But the recent study from York University suggests that people who are obese or very obese get the same or better reduction in health risk by doing as little as 150 minutes per week of an activity like walking. You cannot judge a person’s fitness by what they look like, says study co-author. (CBC) ‘High fitness was very protective’ Of the general population, 80 per cent are fit. In this study, 41per cent of the mildly obese subjects were found to be fit and among the severely obese, 11 per cent were. “When we’re talking about severe obesity, certainly…being in that high fitness group was very protective,” says Prof. Jennifer Kuk, a co-author of the study. “In fact, there was no difference in the risk of high blood pressure or high glucose or high lipids between the groups even though there is about a 120 or 100-pound (54 or 45-kg) difference between the…groups.” Prof. Jennifer Kuk says people who are obese get the same or better health benefits from good fitness. (York University) ListenEN_Saturday_Columns_1-20180217-WCE16 This result was based on data gathered from 853 Canadians of all ages, sizes and ethnic origins attending weight management clinics in the province of Ontario. ‘Take the focus off body weight’ “The most important message is that you really can’t judge people based on what they look like and know what their health level is,” says Kuk. “If you are struggling with obesity or if you’re not struggling with obesity, it’s really important for you to exercise regardless of whether or not the scale goes down. “I think that we need to take that focus off your body weight and realize there is a lot more to health than just the scale.” About 150 minutes of moderate activity are enough to confer health benefits no matter what a person weighs, according to the study. ‘Fitness more challenging the higher the BMI’ Canadian obesity expert Dr. Arya Sharma posted a blog drawing attention to this study. He wrote that we already know that “it is quite possible to mitigate the metabolic risks commonly associated with excess body fat by improving cardiorespiratory fitness. Now, a study….shows this relationship also holds for people with quite severe obesity.” However he goes on to say that “it is also apparent based on the rather low number of ‘fit’ individuals in the severe obesity category (only about 1 in 10), that maintaining a high level of fitness proves to be more challenging the higher the BMI (body mass index).” Studies of this kind are important as obesity is increasing in Canada. Now, one in four adults and one in 10 children have clinical obesity. That equals about six million people.","duration_ms":268069,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5wuiyquQZhB93y3zVXlLPk"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5wuiyquQZhB93y3zVXlLPk","html_description":"New research suggests that people who are obese or severely obese may be fit and, if they are, they have the same or possibly better health benefits from their fitness than do other people. Many studies link obesity with diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and other health problems.\n\nBut the recent study from York University suggests that people who are obese or very obese get the same or better reduction in health risk by doing as little as 150 minutes per week of an activity like walking.\n\nYou cannot judge a person’s fitness by what they look like, says study co-author. (CBC)\n\n‘High fitness was very protective’\n\nOf the general population, 80 per cent are fit. In this study, 41per cent of the mildly obese subjects were found to be fit and among the severely obese, 11 per cent were.\n\n“When we’re talking about severe obesity, certainly…being in that high fitness group was very protective,” says Prof. Jennifer Kuk, a co-author of the study. “In fact, there was no difference in the risk of high blood pressure or high glucose or high lipids between the groups even though there is about a 120 or 100-pound (54 or 45-kg) difference between the…groups.”\n\nProf. Jennifer Kuk says people who are obese get the same or better health benefits from good fitness. (York University)\n\nListenEN_Saturday_Columns_1-20180217-WCE16\n\nThis result was based on data gathered from 853 Canadians of all ages, sizes and ethnic origins attending weight management clinics in the province of Ontario.\n\n‘Take the focus off body weight’\n\n“The most important message is that you really can’t judge people based on what they look like and know what their health level is,” says Kuk. “If you are struggling with obesity or if you’re not struggling with obesity, it’s really important for you to exercise regardless of whether or not the scale goes down.\n\n“I think that we need to take that focus off your body weight and realize there is a lot more to health than just the scale.”\n\nAbout 150 minutes of moderate activity are enough to confer health benefits no matter what a person weighs, according to the study.\n\n‘Fitness more challenging the higher the BMI’\n\nCanadian obesity expert Dr. Arya Sharma posted a blog drawing attention to this study. He wrote that we already know that “it is quite possible to mitigate the metabolic risks commonly associated with excess body fat by improving cardiorespiratory fitness. Now, a study….shows this relationship also holds for people with quite severe obesity.”\n\nHowever he goes on to say that “it is also apparent based on the rather low number of ‘fit’ individuals in the severe obesity category (only about 1 in 10), that maintaining a high level of fitness proves to be more challenging the higher the BMI (body mass index).”\n\nStudies of this kind are important as obesity is increasing in Canada. Now, one in four adults and one in 10 children have clinical obesity. That equals about six million people.","id":"5wuiyquQZhB93y3zVXlLPk","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Fat people who are fit have the related health benefits: study","release_date":"2018-02-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5wuiyquQZhB93y3zVXlLPk"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3b284d788d5295eb9ac152c9954cf4579992a7a6","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The federal government has found no “conclusive” evidence Canadian-made armoured vehicles were used to commit human-rights violations in Saudi Arabia’s restive Eastern Province last summer, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told a parliamentary committee Thursday. That was the result of a “full and thorough” investigation by Global Affairs officials after videos and photos surfaced last July of Saudi special police and security forces using Canadian-made armoured vehicles in a crackdown against Shia Muslim minority militants in the town of Awamiyah, Freeland said. “That was the independent, objective opinion of our public service and the advice given to me as minister,” Freeland told MPs on the Commons foreign affairs committee. Ottawa scrambles to investigate reported use of Canadian arms in Saudi crackdown Canadian armour on display as Saudi troops celebrate victory in Shia town A still image taken from a video posted on Twitter appears to show a Terradyne Gurkha APC on the streets of Awamiyah in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. (Anthony Fenton/Twitter) This experience did, however, cause her to pause and led her to re-examine Canada’s export permit system, Freeland said. “Canada is not alone in the world in taking stock of how we allow and monitor the export of arms, and of the considerations that go into those decisions,” Freeland said. “I have spoken with my counterparts in Germany, Sweden and The Netherlands, for example, whose countries have all recently—in one way or another—questioned how arms are exported.” To toughen Canada’s arms exports laws, Freeland said the Liberals plan to introduce a new clause in Bill C-47, a proposed legislation which would amend the Export and Import Permits Act to allow Canada to accede to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). Government presents legislation to join Arms Trade Treaty The Liberal government supports the inclusion of a “substantial risk” clause in the law, which would require the Global Affairs officials who issue export permits for military equipment to ensure that there was no substantial risk such equipment could be used to commit human rights violations, she said. “Such a clause would mean that our government, and indeed future governments, would not allow the export of a controlled good if there were a substantial risk that it could be used to commit human rights violations,” Freeland said. But there is one caveat, she said. “As a matter of broad principle, Canada will honour, to the greatest extent possible, pre-existing contracts,” Freeland said. Freeland said Canada's word as a “trusted partner” in international negotiations has to be protected. A Canadian LAV (light armoured vehicle) arrives to escort a convoy at a forward operating base near Panjwaii, Afghanistan at sunrise on Nov.26, 2006. (Bill Graveland/THE CANADIAN PRESS) This would mean that the $15-billion deal brokered by Ottawa to sell advanced Light Armoured Vehicles (LAV 6.0) to Saudi Arabia would still go ahead. That’s a very troubling development, said Cesar Jaramillo, executive director of Project Ploughshares, a disarmament group. “The main reason why it’s troubling has to do with the very standard that the government is using,” Jaramillo said in a phone interview from Waterloo, Ontario. “They keep referring – and this is a recurring problem – to evidence,” Jaramillo said. “But this emphasis on the word evidence is misleading because from an arms-control perspective internationally the gold standard, the recognized threshold that should guide decisions is not evidence but reasonable risk.” (click to listen to the full interview with Cesar Jaramillo) ListenEN_Interview_3-20180209-WIE30 The restrictions on arms exports called for under the ATT are based on a risk assessment, not evidence, which could be hard to get, Jaramillo said. “We feel that the government uses the wrong standard,” he said. ","duration_ms":734563,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1qZMn4JzQR1byhRTqgMLmO"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1qZMn4JzQR1byhRTqgMLmO","html_description":"The federal government has found no “conclusive” evidence Canadian-made armoured vehicles were used to commit human-rights violations in Saudi Arabia’s restive Eastern Province last summer, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told a parliamentary committee Thursday.\n\nThat was the result of a “full and thorough” investigation by Global Affairs officials after videos and photos surfaced last July of Saudi special police and security forces using Canadian-made armoured vehicles in a crackdown against Shia Muslim minority militants in the town of Awamiyah, Freeland said.\n\n“That was the independent, objective opinion of our public service and the advice given to me as minister,” Freeland told MPs on the Commons foreign affairs committee.\n\n \tOttawa scrambles to investigate reported use of Canadian arms in Saudi crackdown\n \tCanadian armour on display as Saudi troops celebrate victory in Shia town\n\nA still image taken from a video posted on Twitter appears to show a Terradyne Gurkha APC on the streets of Awamiyah in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. (Anthony Fenton/Twitter)\n\nThis experience did, however, cause her to pause and led her to re-examine Canada’s export permit system, Freeland said.\n\n“Canada is not alone in the world in taking stock of how we allow and monitor the export of arms, and of the considerations that go into those decisions,” Freeland said. “I have spoken with my counterparts in Germany, Sweden and The Netherlands, for example, whose countries have all recently—in one way or another—questioned how arms are exported.”\n\nTo toughen Canada’s arms exports laws, Freeland said the Liberals plan to introduce a new clause in Bill C-47, a proposed legislation which would amend the Export and Import Permits Act to allow Canada to accede to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT).\n\n \tGovernment presents legislation to join Arms Trade Treaty\n\nThe Liberal government supports the inclusion of a “substantial risk” clause in the law, which would require the Global Affairs officials who issue export permits for military equipment to ensure that there was no substantial risk such equipment could be used to commit human rights violations, she said.\n\n“Such a clause would mean that our government, and indeed future governments, would not allow the export of a controlled good if there were a substantial risk that it could be used to commit human rights violations,” Freeland said.\n\nBut there is one caveat, she said.\n\n“As a matter of broad principle, Canada will honour, to the greatest extent possible, pre-existing contracts,” Freeland said.\n\nFreeland said Canada's word as a “trusted partner” in international negotiations has to be protected.\n\nA Canadian LAV (light armoured vehicle) arrives to escort a convoy at a forward operating base near Panjwaii, Afghanistan at sunrise on Nov.26, 2006. (Bill Graveland/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThis would mean that the $15-billion deal brokered by Ottawa to sell advanced Light Armoured Vehicles (LAV 6.0) to Saudi Arabia would still go ahead.\n\nThat’s a very troubling development, said Cesar Jaramillo, executive director of Project Ploughshares, a disarmament group.\n\n“The main reason why it’s troubling has to do with the very standard that the government is using,” Jaramillo said in a phone interview from Waterloo, Ontario.\n\n“They keep referring – and this is a recurring problem – to evidence,” Jaramillo said. “But this emphasis on the word evidence is misleading because from an arms-control perspective internationally the gold standard, the recognized threshold that should guide decisions is not evidence but reasonable risk.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Cesar Jaramillo)\n\nListenEN_Interview_3-20180209-WIE30\n\nThe restrictions on arms exports called for under the ATT are based on a risk assessment, not evidence, which could be hard to get, Jaramillo said.\n\n“We feel that the government uses the wrong standard,” he said.\n\n","id":"1qZMn4JzQR1byhRTqgMLmO","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canada plans to toughen arms-export rules but will honour Saudi arms deal: Freeland","release_date":"2018-02-09","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1qZMn4JzQR1byhRTqgMLmO"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a3c2cba692d08998ea70b412cac8b2f7ab288247","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from across the North. Weak national leadership in the North American Arctic is hindering northern development compared to the thriving polar regions of Russia and the Nordics, says a Canadian think tank in a new report. \"Canada has a romantic, folkloric ideal of the Arctic which is not in close accord with reality,\" John Higginbotham, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), told Eye on the Arctic in a telephone conversation this week. \"We're attached to a vision of polar bears and Inuit in kayaks. But what is lacking in this country is a broad understanding of how challenging the environment is going to be because of climate change.\" Feature Interview Listen here for more from Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with John Higginbotham from the Centre for International Governance Innovation: ListenEN_Interview_5-20180202-WIE50 Other countries, both Arctic and non-Arctic, are increasing investment and interest in the North while Canada, and other areas of the North American Arctic like Alaska and Greenland continue to fall behind, said Higginbotham, co-author of the report The North American Arctic: Energizing Regional Collaboration and Governance, along with Jennifer Spence. \"Russia is decades ahead of Canada when it comes to oil and gas development and the development of the Northern Sea Route,\" he said.  \"The Nordics have found a good balance between environmental responsibility and economic development.   Canada is paying, frankly more attention to governance and identity issues than to the fundamental development of economic infrastructure on which any long term solution to the social and economic problems of the Canadian Arctic (will be made).\" Climate's creeping impact Cars on the Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk Highway in Arctic Canada on November 15, 2017. A new report argues more infrastructure projects like this are needed in the North. (Melinda Trochu/AFP/Getty Images) Russia has made significant investments in Arctic oil and gas exploration, including the Yamal LNG plant, located on the Yamal Peninsula in Russia's Far North.  It's also invested heavily in the Northern Sea Route, a waterway bridging Asia and Europe that passes through the country's Arctic. Norway has also invested heavily in offshore Arctic drilling. Major commercial shipping powers like China also continue to develop significant icebreaker capacity and signal increasing interest in the North as climate change makes the region more accessible. \"These are dynamic factors that contain both challenges and opportunities for Canada, but we aren't having a discussion about how to respond to any of these outside forces or how to make our own Arctic a better place,\" Higginbotham said. \"Roads, energy projects, deep waters ports require long-term political and economic commitment and though the Canadian government has made reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples a priority, there's been little talk about concrete measures that could lead to sustainable economic reconciliation.\" East-West cooperation A 2012 community meeting in Deline in Canada's Northwest Territories. Are better links with other northern regions the key to success for communities like this one? (Eilís Quinn/Eye on the Arctic) With only three federal Members of Parliament in Canada's Arctic territories compared to the hundreds of federal, provincial and municipal representatives in the South, Higginbotham says creating stronger  ties between Arctic regions and sub-national governments would be a first step to strengthening northern voices on the national stage. \"East - West cooperation could go a long way to helping, instead of the North-South relations where people worry about Washington, D.C. , Ottawa or Copenhagen,\" he said. \"But I think it's time that the North American Arctic spoke up, and with a more united voice, to the South about what is needed. \" ","duration_ms":445336,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/01HMil1ibihkJRbko9Eldy"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/01HMil1ibihkJRbko9Eldy","html_description":"Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from across the North.\nWeak national leadership in the North American Arctic is hindering northern development compared to the thriving polar regions of Russia and the Nordics, says a Canadian think tank in a new report.\n\n\"Canada has a romantic, folkloric ideal of the Arctic which is not in close accord with reality,\" John Higginbotham, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), told Eye on the Arctic in a telephone conversation this week.\n\n\"We're attached to a vision of polar bears and Inuit in kayaks. But what is lacking in this country is a broad understanding of how challenging the environment is going to be because of climate change.\"\n\nFeature Interview\n\nListen here for more from Eye on the Arctic‘s conversation with John Higginbotham from the Centre for International Governance Innovation:\n\nListenEN_Interview_5-20180202-WIE50\n\n\n\nOther countries, both Arctic and non-Arctic, are increasing investment and interest in the North while Canada, and other areas of the North American Arctic like Alaska and Greenland continue to fall behind, said Higginbotham, co-author of the report The North American Arctic: Energizing Regional Collaboration and Governance, along with Jennifer Spence.\n\n\"Russia is decades ahead of Canada when it comes to oil and gas development and the development of the Northern Sea Route,\" he said.  \"The Nordics have found a good balance between environmental responsibility and economic development.   Canada is paying, frankly more attention to governance and identity issues than to the fundamental development of economic infrastructure on which any long term solution to the social and economic problems of the Canadian Arctic (will be made).\"\nClimate's creeping impact\nCars on the Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk Highway in Arctic Canada on November 15, 2017. A new report argues more infrastructure projects like this are needed in the North. (Melinda Trochu/AFP/Getty Images)\n\nRussia has made significant investments in Arctic oil and gas exploration, including the Yamal LNG plant, located on the Yamal Peninsula in Russia's Far North.  It's also invested heavily in the Northern Sea Route, a waterway bridging Asia and Europe that passes through the country's Arctic.\n\nNorway has also invested heavily in offshore Arctic drilling.\n\nMajor commercial shipping powers like China also continue to develop significant icebreaker capacity and signal increasing interest in the North as climate change makes the region more accessible.\n\n\"These are dynamic factors that contain both challenges and opportunities for Canada, but we aren't having a discussion about how to respond to any of these outside forces or how to make our own Arctic a better place,\" Higginbotham said.\n\n\"Roads, energy projects, deep waters ports require long-term political and economic commitment and though the Canadian government has made reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples a priority, there's been little talk about concrete measures that could lead to sustainable economic reconciliation.\"\nEast-West cooperation\nA 2012 community meeting in Deline in Canada's Northwest Territories. Are better links with other northern regions the key to success for communities like this one? (Eilís Quinn/Eye on the Arctic)\n\nWith only three federal Members of Parliament in Canada's Arctic territories compared to the hundreds of federal, provincial and municipal representatives in the South, Higginbotham says creating stronger  ties between Arctic regions and sub-national governments would be a first step to strengthening northern voices on the national stage.\n\n\"East - West cooperation could go a long way to helping, instead of the North-South relations where people worry about Washington, D.C. , Ottawa or Copenhagen,\" he said.\n\n\"But I think it's time that the North American Arctic spoke up, and with a more united voice, to the South about what is needed. \"\n\n","id":"01HMil1ibihkJRbko9Eldy","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"North American Arctic is failing compared to Russia, Nordics, warns think tank","release_date":"2018-02-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:01HMil1ibihkJRbko9Eldy"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9bda743d959a9f0197c99cf03439da0feda91b82","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Levon, Marc   **. (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_2-20180119-WIE20 Myanmar’s brutal campaign against Rohingya’s refugees is one example of how violence escalates when no one speaks out against it, says Human Rights Watch. Photo credit Manish Swarup/AP Photo. Human Rights Watch has issued their annual report. It looks at the human and civil rights situation in some 90 countries. This year the report notes the rise of authoritarian and populist regimes in Europe, and a divisive, and anti-immigrant stance in the U.S. The report expresses hope however. The title of the report is \"Fighting for Rights Succeeds\". Lynn spoke with Emma Daly, communications director at Human Rights Watch. photo montage of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. Photo CBC Canada's national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls continues its travels across the country, followed by controversy.  There have been many calls from Indigenous groups for the head commissioner, Marion Buller to step down. This has been due to a variety of issues including a very slow start to the $54 million inquiry, mishandling and missteps involving grieving family giving testimony, lack of funds for those wishing to travel to testify, and not least of all an abnormally high turnover of top staff. The recent leaving of the second executive director after only four months has further highlighted apparent problems behind the scenes. Marc spoke with Lori Campbell, about her thoughts. She is the director of Indigenous Initiatives at St. Paul's University College, affiliated with the University of Waterloo, Ontario. Minister of International Trade Francois-Philippe Champagne speaks to the media on the first day of the Liberal government’s cabinet retreat in London, Ontario on Thursday, January 11, 2018. The Liberal government is planning to make good on a campaign promise to create an ombudsman with teeth to oversee the conduct of Canadian companies operating abroad.Photo Credit: PC / Geoff Robins The federal government is trying to do something about a long time international complaint against Canada. The government is creating an independent watchdog to investigate the conduct of Canadian companies operating abroad. Some Canadian companies, notably mining companies and affiliates operating in developing countries have often raised concerns especially concerning human rights abuses. The government has now created the post of ombudsman to investigate complaints. Levon spoke to Karyn Keenan, director of the NGO \"Above Ground\" Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1802632,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2hGYDFz0DhenirE8CpEAJs"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2hGYDFz0DhenirE8CpEAJs","html_description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Levon, Marc   **. (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_2-20180119-WIE20\n\nMyanmar’s brutal campaign against Rohingya’s refugees is one example of how violence escalates when no one speaks out against it, says Human Rights Watch. Photo credit Manish Swarup/AP Photo.\n\nHuman Rights Watch has issued their annual report. It looks at the human and civil rights situation in some 90 countries.\n\nThis year the report notes the rise of authoritarian and populist regimes in Europe, and a divisive, and anti-immigrant stance in the U.S.\n\nThe report expresses hope however. The title of the report is \"Fighting for Rights Succeeds\".\n\nLynn spoke with Emma Daly, communications director at Human Rights Watch.\n\nphoto montage of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. Photo CBC\n\nCanada's national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls continues its travels across the country, followed by controversy.  There have been many calls from Indigenous groups for the head commissioner, Marion Buller to step down.\n\nThis has been due to a variety of issues including a very slow start to the $54 million inquiry, mishandling and missteps involving grieving family giving testimony, lack of funds for those wishing to travel to testify, and not least of all an abnormally high turnover of top staff.\n\nThe recent leaving of the second executive director after only four months has further highlighted apparent problems behind the scenes.\n\nMarc spoke with Lori Campbell, about her thoughts. She is the director of Indigenous Initiatives at St. Paul's University College, affiliated with the University of Waterloo, Ontario.\n\nMinister of International Trade Francois-Philippe Champagne speaks to the media on the first day of the Liberal government’s cabinet retreat in London, Ontario on Thursday, January 11, 2018. The Liberal government is planning to make good on a campaign promise to create an ombudsman with teeth to oversee the conduct of Canadian companies operating abroad.Photo Credit: PC / Geoff Robins\n\nThe federal government is trying to do something about a long time international complaint against Canada. The government is creating an independent watchdog to investigate the conduct of Canadian companies operating abroad.\n\nSome Canadian companies, notably mining companies and affiliates operating in developing countries have often raised concerns especially concerning human rights abuses.\n\nThe government has now created the post of ombudsman to investigate complaints. Levon spoke to Karyn Keenan, director of the NGO \"Above Ground\"\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"2hGYDFz0DhenirE8CpEAJs","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, 20-21 Jan. 2018","release_date":"2018-01-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2hGYDFz0DhenirE8CpEAJs"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5a21365592fbeca35b9f99f86548dfa146567a19","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"\"Down Inside\": A career in Canada’s federal prisons Suicides, violent beatings, horrific murders,  guards who cared, guards who didn’t, bureaucratic indifference, political meddling, Robert Clark saw all of that and much more. Robet Clarks intimate look at his long career in the Correctional Service Canada, working with some of the country’s most horrific and violent criminals, and in a sometimes contradictory system. © Goose Lane Editions Now retired, Robert Clark's new book \"Down Inside\" ( Goose Lane Editions),  reveals a lifetime of experience as a member of the Correctional Service Canada, working in very very difficult environments in a variety of Canada's toughest penal institutions, ListenEN_Interview_2-20180112-WIE20 Now author, former CSC employee Robert Clark from student volunteer to deputy warden, 30 years working in Canada’s toughest prisons. © CBC “Down Inside”- not in the office, but inside the prison itself, in the ranges, the yard, the workshops, gym, and so on. Robert Clark in his career has seen everything that can and did go on in what is to most of us, a mysterious, potentially frightening, unknown world of federal prisons and penitentiaries. He spent 30 years inside Canada’s toughest federal prison system rising from a volunteer university student, to parole officer, to deputy warden The Kingston Penitentiary, opened in 1835 and closed in 2013. It housed many of Canada’s worst criminals, and it’s where Rob Clark spent some of his career © iStock via CBC Along the way he saw how things didn’t work in the federal prison system and were harmful, such as extended solitary confinement, (just now being modified). how the wrong move or word could turn a peaceful situation into something explosive, and how showing a minimum of respect towards the prisoners could turn an potential explosive situation into calm. Cellblock or *range* in Kingston Pen (now decommissioned) This Victorian era institution was one of the toughest prisons in Canada, and where Robert Clark spent some of his career. © Boardhead-wiki commons He also tells of how the stressful environment took a toll on the guards personal lives, including his own. He also points out that the idea of punishing inmates as in the “tough on crime” attitude really only makes a bad situation worse. From quelling riots, to taking prisoners on sight seeing trips in the city. it’s a fascinating look into this world and suggests along the way how those in decision-making positions could make changes to improve the prison system so that both prisoners and society benefit.","duration_ms":424751,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4LiwggvZ0WY62zyiRWbPc4"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4LiwggvZ0WY62zyiRWbPc4","html_description":"\"Down Inside\": A career in Canada’s federal prisons\nSuicides, violent beatings, horrific murders,  guards who cared, guards who didn’t, bureaucratic indifference, political meddling, Robert Clark saw all of that and much more.\nRobet Clarks intimate look at his long career in the Correctional Service Canada, working with some of the country’s most horrific and violent criminals, and in a sometimes contradictory system. © Goose Lane Editions\nNow retired, Robert Clark's new book \"Down Inside\" ( Goose Lane Editions),  reveals a lifetime of experience as a member of the Correctional Service Canada, working in very very difficult environments in a variety of Canada's toughest penal institutions,\n\nListenEN_Interview_2-20180112-WIE20\nNow author, former CSC employee Robert Clark from student volunteer to deputy warden, 30 years working in Canada’s toughest prisons. © CBC\n“Down Inside”- not in the office, but inside the prison itself, in the ranges, the yard, the workshops, gym, and so on.\n\nRobert Clark in his career has seen everything that can and did go on in what is to most of us, a mysterious, potentially frightening, unknown world of federal prisons and penitentiaries.\n\nHe spent 30 years inside Canada’s toughest federal prison system rising from a volunteer university student, to parole officer, to deputy warden\nThe Kingston Penitentiary, opened in 1835 and closed in 2013. It housed many of Canada’s worst criminals, and it’s where Rob Clark spent some of his career © iStock via CBC\nAlong the way he saw how things didn’t work in the federal prison system and were harmful, such as extended solitary confinement, (just now being modified). how the wrong move or word could turn a peaceful situation into something explosive, and how showing a minimum of respect towards the prisoners could turn an potential explosive situation into calm.\nCellblock or *range* in Kingston Pen (now decommissioned) This Victorian era institution was one of the toughest prisons in Canada, and where Robert Clark spent some of his career. © Boardhead-wiki commons\nHe also tells of how the stressful environment took a toll on the guards personal lives, including his own.\n\nHe also points out that the idea of punishing inmates as in the “tough on crime” attitude really only makes a bad situation worse.\n\nFrom quelling riots, to taking prisoners on sight seeing trips in the city.\n\nit’s a fascinating look into this world and suggests along the way how those in decision-making positions could make changes to improve the prison system so that both prisoners and society benefit.","id":"4LiwggvZ0WY62zyiRWbPc4","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Non-fiction: 30 years as a prison guard","release_date":"2018-01-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4LiwggvZ0WY62zyiRWbPc4"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ae6f5b1f7666f20728fc1a32b2c55ce997318643","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The United Nations and humanitarian agencies working in war-torn Yemen are sounding the alarm over the continuing blockade of much of the country's air, sea and land entry points by the Western-supported coalition of Gulf states, calling on them to allow lifesaving humanitarian supplies to pass to alleviate “the worst humanitarian crisis in the world.” “While the Saudi-led military coalition has partially lifted the recent blockade of Yemen, closure of much of the country's air, sea and land ports is making an already catastrophic situation far worse,” said a joint statement issued by World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director David Beasley, UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director Anthony Lake, and World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “The space and access we need to deliver humanitarian assistance is being choked off, threatening the lives of millions of vulnerable children and families,” the statement added. The United Nations relief wing added its voice on Friday, warning of famine-like conditions unfolding in Yemen, as a blockade on aid and other essential goods by a Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels entered its 12th day. Over a dozen humanitarian agencies operating in Yemen said Thursday they were “outraged” by the continued blockade by the Saudi-led coalition of humanitarian and commercial supplies desperately needed for the survival of the Yemeni population. “Ongoing obstruction by the Saudi-led coalition to the delivery of critical supplies is a measure which may amount to collective punishment of millions of Yemeni people,” said a statement signed by sixteen humanitarian agencies. Children rest on a bed at their family hut at a poor neighbourhood on the outskirts of the Red Sea port city of Hodeida, Yemen November 12, 2017. © ABDULJABBAR ZEYAD More than 20 million people, including over 11 million children in Yemen, are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance, at least 14.8 million are without basic healthcare and an outbreak of cholera has resulted in more than 900,000 suspected cases, according to the UN agencies working there. “Some 17 million people do not know where their next meal is coming from and 7 million are totally dependent on food assistance,” the statement by UN agencies said. “Severe acute malnutrition is threatening the lives of almost 400,000 children. As supplies run low, food prices rise dramatically, putting thousands more at risk.” Since 2015, Yemen has been in a conflict between forces loyal to President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi supported by Saudi Arabia and most Western governments and those allied to the Houthi rebel movement, supported by Iran. The Houthis control much of the country, including the capital Sana’a and the biggest port terminal in Hodeida. The Saudi-led coalition has accused the Houthis of smuggling weapons through Yemen’s sea, air and land entry ports and has imposed a blockade on the ports controlled by the rebels. Yemen imports nearly 80 per cent of its food, said Kevin Dunbar, director of global programs at CARE Canada. “Now that food aid hasn’t been able to come through these major ports, which have been blocked by the Saudis and people depend on that regular supply,” Dunbar told Radio Canada International. “So there is not enough food, fuel is not coming through as well so major cities and people are not able to use that fuel to pump clean water, and also medical supplies are running out.” (click to listen to the full interview with Kevin Dunbar) https://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/11/Kevin-Dunbar-Yemen-blockade-ed1_7352879_2017-11-17T17-32-02.000.mp3 Cars crowd at a gas station amid fuel supply shortage in Sanaa, Yemen November 10, 2017. © Mohamed Al-Sayaghi CARE employees in the capital tell him that the usually bustling Sana’a has turned into a quiet ghost town, Dunbar said. Reserves of fuel are in such short supply that the cities of Hodeida,","duration_ms":347037,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0upEtRAWtRtRlUZuzIxmu8"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0upEtRAWtRtRlUZuzIxmu8","html_description":"The United Nations and humanitarian agencies working in war-torn Yemen are sounding the alarm over the continuing blockade of much of the country's air, sea and land entry points by the Western-supported coalition of Gulf states, calling on them to allow lifesaving humanitarian supplies to pass to alleviate “the worst humanitarian crisis in the world.”\n\n“While the Saudi-led military coalition has partially lifted the recent blockade of Yemen, closure of much of the country's air, sea and land ports is making an already catastrophic situation far worse,” said a joint statement issued by World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director David Beasley, UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) Executive Director Anthony Lake, and World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.\n\n“The space and access we need to deliver humanitarian assistance is being choked off, threatening the lives of millions of vulnerable children and families,” the statement added.\n\nThe United Nations relief wing added its voice on Friday, warning of famine-like conditions unfolding in Yemen, as a blockade on aid and other essential goods by a Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels entered its 12th day.\n\nOver a dozen humanitarian agencies operating in Yemen said Thursday they were “outraged” by the continued blockade by the Saudi-led coalition of humanitarian and commercial supplies desperately needed for the survival of the Yemeni population.\n\n“Ongoing obstruction by the Saudi-led coalition to the delivery of critical supplies is a measure which may amount to collective punishment of millions of Yemeni people,” said a statement signed by sixteen humanitarian agencies.\nChildren rest on a bed at their family hut at a poor neighbourhood on the outskirts of the Red Sea port city of Hodeida, Yemen November 12, 2017. © ABDULJABBAR ZEYAD\nMore than 20 million people, including over 11 million children in Yemen, are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance, at least 14.8 million are without basic healthcare and an outbreak of cholera has resulted in more than 900,000 suspected cases, according to the UN agencies working there.\n\n“Some 17 million people do not know where their next meal is coming from and 7 million are totally dependent on food assistance,” the statement by UN agencies said. “Severe acute malnutrition is threatening the lives of almost 400,000 children. As supplies run low, food prices rise dramatically, putting thousands more at risk.”\n\nSince 2015, Yemen has been in a conflict between forces loyal to President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi supported by Saudi Arabia and most Western governments and those allied to the Houthi rebel movement, supported by Iran.\n\nThe Houthis control much of the country, including the capital Sana’a and the biggest port terminal in Hodeida. The Saudi-led coalition has accused the Houthis of smuggling weapons through Yemen’s sea, air and land entry ports and has imposed a blockade on the ports controlled by the rebels.\n\nYemen imports nearly 80 per cent of its food, said Kevin Dunbar, director of global programs at CARE Canada.\n\n“Now that food aid hasn’t been able to come through these major ports, which have been blocked by the Saudis and people depend on that regular supply,” Dunbar told Radio Canada International. “So there is not enough food, fuel is not coming through as well so major cities and people are not able to use that fuel to pump clean water, and also medical supplies are running out.”\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Kevin Dunbar)\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/11/Kevin-Dunbar-Yemen-blockade-ed1_7352879_2017-11-17T17-32-02.000.mp3\nCars crowd at a gas station amid fuel supply shortage in Sanaa, Yemen November 10, 2017. © Mohamed Al-Sayaghi\nCARE employees in the capital tell him that the usually bustling Sana’a has turned into a quiet ghost town, Dunbar said.\n\nReserves of fuel are in such short supply that the cities of Hodeida,","id":"0upEtRAWtRtRlUZuzIxmu8","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"UN and humanitarian agencies sound alarm on Saudi-led blockade of Yemen","release_date":"2017-11-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0upEtRAWtRtRlUZuzIxmu8"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/30b057cc98868db5e7918f8e0dcee1d52a631c54","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"South Sudanese refugees in northern parts of the country are in desperate need of humanitarian assistance before the rainy season sets in, making it even harder to reach the already isolated areas, says a Canadian photographer who just returned from Unity State near the border with Sudan. Speaking to Radio Canada International from capital Juba, Renaud Philippe said nothing in his career of covering strife and humanitarian disasters compares to the desperate situation he witnessed in South Sudan. (click to listen to the interview with Renaud Philippe) https://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/05/Renaud-Philippe-South-Sudan-ed1_6952356_2017-05-12T19-56-18.000.mp3 The Quebec City native is in South Sudan on an assignment for the Humanitarian Coalition, an umbrella group of seven Canadian aid groups: Canadian Lutheran World Relief, CARE Canada, Islamic Relief Canada, Oxfam Canada, Oxfam-Québec, Plan Canada and Save the Children Canada. A boy eats out of a ladle at his home in Ngop in South Sudan’s Unity State on March 10, 2017. © ALBERT GONZALEZ FARRAN A deadly combination of civil war and a devastated subsistence economy already under stress from climate change have left more than 100,000 people facing starvation in parts of South Sudan, according to three UN agencies and their partner NGOs. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) warned earlier this year that an additional one million people are classified as being on the brink of famine, with that number expected to rise to 5.5 million by mid-summer if nothing is done to resolve the food crisis. The escalating conflict in South Sudan had driven more than one million children out of the country, according to the latest statistics released by the United Nations. “The horrifying fact that nearly one in five children in South Sudan has been forced to flee their home illustrates how devastating this conflict has been for the country’s most vulnerable,” said Leila Pakkala, the Regional Director for Eastern and Southern Africa of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), in a press release issued jointly with the UN refugee agency. “Add this to the more than one million children who are also displaced within South Sudan, and the future of a generation is truly on the brink,” she warned. Aid groups have slammed a ’man-made’ famine caused by ongoing fighting in South Sudan where civil war has forced people to flee, disrupted agriculture, sent prices soaring, and seen aid agencies blocked from accessing some of the worst-hit areas. © Renaud Philippe Philippe said he visited a remote area in Unity State where thousands of internally displaced people fleeing the violence have sought refuge on remote islands scattered in huge marshes along the White Nile. “They found some peace on these islands but the problem is, because it’s hard to access they have no food, no proper healthcare,” Philippe said. The local communities are trying to help the refugees but their resources are strained to the limit Philippe said. People subsist on fishing with spears and harvesting water lilies, he said. “That’s the only thing they can have at this time,” Philippe said. But the situation will get even more desperate with the approaching rainy season. “Because of the rainy season no more planes will be able to land in this area, only choppers, which is a lot more expensive than planes,” Philippe said. “So all the international aid provided in this area will be compromised.” All the NGOs in the area are in a race against the clock to establish their programs and bring in supplies before the rainy season starts, he said. “It’s now that we need to do something because the rainy season is coming and it will only become worse and worse,” Philippe said. Canadians can help by donating money to the international aid groups that work in the area,","duration_ms":476317,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1VBKYUi3mEcMLda8zpMIwf"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1VBKYUi3mEcMLda8zpMIwf","html_description":"South Sudanese refugees in northern parts of the country are in desperate need of humanitarian assistance before the rainy season sets in, making it even harder to reach the already isolated areas, says a Canadian photographer who just returned from Unity State near the border with Sudan.\n\nSpeaking to Radio Canada International from capital Juba, Renaud Philippe said nothing in his career of covering strife and humanitarian disasters compares to the desperate situation he witnessed in South Sudan.\n\n(click to listen to the interview with Renaud Philippe)\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/05/Renaud-Philippe-South-Sudan-ed1_6952356_2017-05-12T19-56-18.000.mp3\n\nThe Quebec City native is in South Sudan on an assignment for the Humanitarian Coalition, an umbrella group of seven Canadian aid groups: Canadian Lutheran World Relief, CARE Canada, Islamic Relief Canada, Oxfam Canada, Oxfam-Québec, Plan Canada and Save the Children Canada.\nA boy eats out of a ladle at his home in Ngop in South Sudan’s Unity State on March 10, 2017. © ALBERT GONZALEZ FARRAN\nA deadly combination of civil war and a devastated subsistence economy already under stress from climate change have left more than 100,000 people facing starvation in parts of South Sudan, according to three UN agencies and their partner NGOs.\n\nThe Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) warned earlier this year that an additional one million people are classified as being on the brink of famine, with that number expected to rise to 5.5 million by mid-summer if nothing is done to resolve the food crisis.\n\nThe escalating conflict in South Sudan had driven more than one million children out of the country, according to the latest statistics released by the United Nations.\n\n“The horrifying fact that nearly one in five children in South Sudan has been forced to flee their home illustrates how devastating this conflict has been for the country’s most vulnerable,” said Leila Pakkala, the Regional Director for Eastern and Southern Africa of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), in a press release issued jointly with the UN refugee agency.\n\n“Add this to the more than one million children who are also displaced within South Sudan, and the future of a generation is truly on the brink,” she warned.\nAid groups have slammed a ’man-made’ famine caused by ongoing fighting in South Sudan where civil war has forced people to flee, disrupted agriculture, sent prices soaring, and seen aid agencies blocked from accessing some of the worst-hit areas. © Renaud Philippe \nPhilippe said he visited a remote area in Unity State where thousands of internally displaced people fleeing the violence have sought refuge on remote islands scattered in huge marshes along the White Nile.\n\n“They found some peace on these islands but the problem is, because it’s hard to access they have no food, no proper healthcare,” Philippe said.\n\nThe local communities are trying to help the refugees but their resources are strained to the limit Philippe said.\n\nPeople subsist on fishing with spears and harvesting water lilies, he said.\n\n“That’s the only thing they can have at this time,” Philippe said.\n\nBut the situation will get even more desperate with the approaching rainy season.\n\n“Because of the rainy season no more planes will be able to land in this area, only choppers, which is a lot more expensive than planes,” Philippe said. “So all the international aid provided in this area will be compromised.”\n\nAll the NGOs in the area are in a race against the clock to establish their programs and bring in supplies before the rainy season starts, he said.\n\n“It’s now that we need to do something because the rainy season is coming and it will only become worse and worse,” Philippe said.\n\nCanadians can help by donating money to the international aid groups that work in the area,","id":"1VBKYUi3mEcMLda8zpMIwf","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Canadian photographer sounds alarm on crisis in South Sudan","release_date":"2017-05-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1VBKYUi3mEcMLda8zpMIwf"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9f41cf6a38747f43055ff9b20944ed0498ce2ec5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"U.S. cruise missile attacks against Syrian military targets believed to have been behind a deadly chemical weapons attack in northern Syria mark a new and unpredictable phase in the six-year-old war, says a Canadian expert. The U.S. Navy launched 59 cruise missiles on Thursday in response to the attack in the northern Idlib province that killed at least 80 civilians, including 20 children in what President Donald Trump had called \"a disgrace to humanity.\" Kyle Matthews, Senior Deputy Director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies at Concordia University and a Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, says while the U.S. strike against President Bashar al-Assad's air force degrades its capacity to carry out any other attacks against civilians and using chemical weapons, it also puts the trajectory of the wider conflict onto a path of possible confrontation with Russia. (click to listen to the full interview with Kyle Matthews) Listen https://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/04/Kyle-Matthews-Syria-chemicals-ed1_6877464_2017-04-07T17-43-38.000.mp3 U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) conducts strike operations while in the Mediterranean Sea which U.S. Defense Department said was a part of cruise missile strike against Syria on April 7, 2017. © Handout . / Reuters Russia warned on Friday that U.S. cruise missile strikes on a Syrian air base could have \"extremely serious\" consequences.  \"We strongly condemn the illegitimate actions by the U.S. The consequences of this for regional and international stability could be extremely serious,” Russia's deputy U.N. envoy, Vladimir Safronkov, told a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Friday. Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev charged that the U.S. strikes were one step away from clashing with Russia's military. Russian Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations Vladimir Safronkov listens during a meeting of the United Nations Security Council at U.N. headquarters, April 5, 2017 in New York City. © GI/Drew Angerer \"Clearly Syria is strategically very important to Russia and Russia will do whatever it can to defend the Assad regime, because its interests are supported by keeping Assad in power,\" Matthews said. Russia has already promised to boost Syria's air defence system and is moving more equipment and a part of its navy closer to Syria, he said. Russian defence officials also announced that Russia is suspending an agreement with the U.S. designed to avoid collisions between their air forces over Syria. \"We don't know where this is going, I hope cool heads will prevail and we can focus on actually trying to stop this conflict,\" said Matthews. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley holds up photos of victims of the Syrian chemical attack during a meeting of the United Nations Security Council at U.N. headquarters, April 5, 2017 in New York City. © GI/Drew Angerer U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said on Friday the Trump administration was ready to take further steps if needed. \"We are prepared to do more, but we hope that will not be necessary,\" she told the U.N. Security Council. \"The United States will not stand by when chemical weapons are used. It is in our vital national security interest to prevent the spread and use of chemical weapons.\" However, the confrontation with Russia and the Syrian regime could derail Trump's plans to work with Russian President Vladimir Putin in fighting ISIS. The U.S. is already involved in the conflict in Syria and has a number of special forces soldiers working with Kurdish groups fighting Islamic State militants in the east of the country, trying to retake the terror group's stronghold of Raqqa, Matthews said. \"They really needed the support of support of the Syrian government at least in some manner but also Russia and now it appears that's going to become a major challenge,","duration_ms":763716,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0kAxWdZnD1ehZmk2DyqxpM"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0kAxWdZnD1ehZmk2DyqxpM","html_description":"U.S. cruise missile attacks against Syrian military targets believed to have been behind a deadly chemical weapons attack in northern Syria mark a new and unpredictable phase in the six-year-old war, says a Canadian expert.\n\nThe U.S. Navy launched 59 cruise missiles on Thursday in response to the attack in the northern Idlib province that killed at least 80 civilians, including 20 children in what President Donald Trump had called \"a disgrace to humanity.\"\n\nKyle Matthews, Senior Deputy Director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies at Concordia University and a Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, says while the U.S. strike against President Bashar al-Assad's air force degrades its capacity to carry out any other attacks against civilians and using chemical weapons, it also puts the trajectory of the wider conflict onto a path of possible confrontation with Russia.\n\n(click to listen to the full interview with Kyle Matthews)\n\nListen\n\nhttps://www.rcinet.ca/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/04/Kyle-Matthews-Syria-chemicals-ed1_6877464_2017-04-07T17-43-38.000.mp3\nU.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) conducts strike operations while in the Mediterranean Sea which U.S. Defense Department said was a part of cruise missile strike against Syria on April 7, 2017. © Handout . / Reuters\nRussia warned on Friday that U.S. cruise missile strikes on a Syrian air base could have \"extremely serious\" consequences. \n\n\"We strongly condemn the illegitimate actions by the U.S. The consequences of this for regional and international stability could be extremely serious,” Russia's deputy U.N. envoy, Vladimir Safronkov, told a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Friday.\n\nRussian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev charged that the U.S. strikes were one step away from clashing with Russia's military.\nRussian Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations Vladimir Safronkov listens during a meeting of the United Nations Security Council at U.N. headquarters, April 5, 2017 in New York City. © GI/Drew Angerer\n\"Clearly Syria is strategically very important to Russia and Russia will do whatever it can to defend the Assad regime, because its interests are supported by keeping Assad in power,\" Matthews said.\n\nRussia has already promised to boost Syria's air defence system and is moving more equipment and a part of its navy closer to Syria, he said. Russian defence officials also announced that Russia is suspending an agreement with the U.S. designed to avoid collisions between their air forces over Syria.\n\n\"We don't know where this is going, I hope cool heads will prevail and we can focus on actually trying to stop this conflict,\" said Matthews.\nU.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley holds up photos of victims of the Syrian chemical attack during a meeting of the United Nations Security Council at U.N. headquarters, April 5, 2017 in New York City. © GI/Drew Angerer\nU.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said on Friday the Trump administration was ready to take further steps if needed.\n\n\"We are prepared to do more, but we hope that will not be necessary,\" she told the U.N. Security Council. \"The United States will not stand by when chemical weapons are used. It is in our vital national security interest to prevent the spread and use of chemical weapons.\"\n\nHowever, the confrontation with Russia and the Syrian regime could derail Trump's plans to work with Russian President Vladimir Putin in fighting ISIS. The U.S. is already involved in the conflict in Syria and has a number of special forces soldiers working with Kurdish groups fighting Islamic State militants in the east of the country, trying to retake the terror group's stronghold of Raqqa, Matthews said.\n\n\"They really needed the support of support of the Syrian government at least in some manner but also Russia and now it appears that's going to become a major challenge,","id":"0kAxWdZnD1ehZmk2DyqxpM","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"Chemical attack in Syria upends prospects of Russia-U.S. detente","release_date":"2017-04-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0kAxWdZnD1ehZmk2DyqxpM"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/162d320d448e14d00418387e383f54962e29c87c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"The last thing I remember before my German colleague Volker Handloik died in a hail of bullets was a feverish but a very methodical mental calculation: should I stay or should I follow him and jump? Muzzle flashes from at least half-a-dozen AK-47 assault rifles and a heavier PK machine gun, spewing hundreds of rounds at us, illuminated the velvet Afghan night barely 25 meters to our right. Several of the Northern Alliance soldiers accompanying us also jumped or fell as the infantry fighting vehicle we were on, an old Russian-made BMP-1, lurched down the hill slope like a wounded animal, trying to evade the Taliban ambush. In the split second it took me to decide to stay on top of the BMP, Volker rolled on the ground like a stuntman and disappeared from my view. I never saw him again. But that image of Volker, a writer for the German Stern magazine, wearing his quilted Afghan overcoat, his long ginger curls tied in a knot in the back, rolling on the ground to break the jump from the fast-moving troop carrier, remains seared in my memory 15 years later. Johanne Sutton (left), Volker Handloik (top right) and Pierre Billaud (bottom right) were killed in a Taliban ambush in northeastern Afghanistan on Nov. 11, 2001. Two other European journalists - Radio France International reporter Johanne Sutton and her friend Pierre Billaud of Radio-Television Luxembourg (RTL) - were also killed in that incident on Nov. 11, 2001 near the village of Dasht-e-qala in Afghanistan's northeastern province of Takhar. And I can still feel Johanne Sutton’s smooth and tender hand as warmth left her lifeless body with every drop of the blood that oozed out of a gaping wound in her back as I held her for one last ride bumpy ride on Afghan roads. 'A wake-up call' Their deaths, first in a line of many others to come after 2001, became a catalyst in a major shift in how media organizations in the developed countries approached covering wars and conflicts, said Michel Cormier, a veteran foreign correspondent. Since 2001, 215 journalists have been killed while covering war and conflict, according to statistics compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists. The total number of journalists killed from 2001 to date (as of Nov. 19, 2016) is 866. “Before we were just babes in the woods,” said Cormier, head of news and current affairs at Radio-Canada, the French-language service of Canada's public broadcaster. (Watch an illustrated excerpt of the interview with Michel Cormier, executive director News and Current Affairs of CBC/Radio-Canada French Services) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xQHmHU0wMU Many journalists weren’t aware of the dangers, had no equipment to protect themselves from bullets or shrapnel, or even from disease or car accidents. And most reporters had no training whatsoever in first aid, said Cormier who has covered several conflicts, including the war in Afghanistan, for Radio-Canada and CBC. “I think Afghanistan changed the way we covered wars,” Cormier said. “For one thing we were not in conventional wars, now we were perceived as part of the enemy.” New realities of war News organizations and reporters had to adapt to the new realities of this guerrilla warfare where there are no clear frontlines, Cormier said. “And secondly we’ve learned that we need to know how the war works: what kind of weapons we’re up against, what’s the trajectory of bullets, how far they travel, through what they actually move, whether it’s a brick wall or a car tire,” Cormier said. “I think that was a wakeup call for most of the journalists at the time.” Many media organizations now have experts on staff whose main job is to take care of the security of journalists and make sure that they are equipped and trained to go into war situations, or even domestic disturbances such as protests and riots, Cormier said. News editors, reporters and security experts are now constantly working to assess the potentia...","duration_ms":1080921,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7f1ZC6yHpvP9TfVvDyuJmL"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7f1ZC6yHpvP9TfVvDyuJmL","html_description":"The last thing I remember before my German colleague Volker Handloik died in a hail of bullets was a feverish but a very methodical mental calculation: should I stay or should I follow him and jump?\n\nMuzzle flashes from at least half-a-dozen AK-47 assault rifles and a heavier PK machine gun, spewing hundreds of rounds at us, illuminated the velvet Afghan night barely 25 meters to our right.\n\nSeveral of the Northern Alliance soldiers accompanying us also jumped or fell as the infantry fighting vehicle we were on, an old Russian-made BMP-1, lurched down the hill slope like a wounded animal, trying to evade the Taliban ambush.\n\nIn the split second it took me to decide to stay on top of the BMP, Volker rolled on the ground like a stuntman and disappeared from my view.\n\nI never saw him again.\n\nBut that image of Volker, a writer for the German Stern magazine, wearing his quilted Afghan overcoat, his long ginger curls tied in a knot in the back, rolling on the ground to break the jump from the fast-moving troop carrier, remains seared in my memory 15 years later.\n\n\n\n \tJohanne Sutton (left), Volker Handloik (top right) and Pierre Billaud (bottom right) were killed in a Taliban ambush in northeastern Afghanistan on Nov. 11, 2001.\n\nTwo other European journalists - Radio France International reporter Johanne Sutton and her friend Pierre Billaud of Radio-Television Luxembourg (RTL) - were also killed in that incident on Nov. 11, 2001 near the village of Dasht-e-qala in Afghanistan's northeastern province of Takhar.\n\nAnd I can still feel Johanne Sutton’s smooth and tender hand as warmth left her lifeless body with every drop of the blood that oozed out of a gaping wound in her back as I held her for one last ride bumpy ride on Afghan roads.\n'A wake-up call'\nTheir deaths, first in a line of many others to come after 2001, became a catalyst in a major shift in how media organizations in the developed countries approached covering wars and conflicts, said Michel Cormier, a veteran foreign correspondent.\n\nSince 2001, 215 journalists have been killed while covering war and conflict, according to statistics compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists. The total number of journalists killed from 2001 to date (as of Nov. 19, 2016) is 866.\n\n“Before we were just babes in the woods,” said Cormier, head of news and current affairs at Radio-Canada, the French-language service of Canada's public broadcaster.\n\n(Watch an illustrated excerpt of the interview with Michel Cormier, executive director News and Current Affairs of CBC/Radio-Canada French Services)\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xQHmHU0wMU\n\nMany journalists weren’t aware of the dangers, had no equipment to protect themselves from bullets or shrapnel, or even from disease or car accidents. And most reporters had no training whatsoever in first aid, said Cormier who has covered several conflicts, including the war in Afghanistan, for Radio-Canada and CBC.\n\n“I think Afghanistan changed the way we covered wars,” Cormier said. “For one thing we were not in conventional wars, now we were perceived as part of the enemy.”\nNew realities of war\nNews organizations and reporters had to adapt to the new realities of this guerrilla warfare where there are no clear frontlines, Cormier said.\n\n“And secondly we’ve learned that we need to know how the war works: what kind of weapons we’re up against, what’s the trajectory of bullets, how far they travel, through what they actually move, whether it’s a brick wall or a car tire,” Cormier said. “I think that was a wakeup call for most of the journalists at the time.”\n\nMany media organizations now have experts on staff whose main job is to take care of the security of journalists and make sure that they are equipped and trained to go into war situations, or even domestic disturbances such as protests and riots, Cormier said.\n\nNews editors, reporters and security experts are now constantly working to assess the potentia...","id":"7f1ZC6yHpvP9TfVvDyuJmL","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"15 years after deadly Afghan ambush reporters face new threats","release_date":"2016-11-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7f1ZC6yHpvP9TfVvDyuJmL"}],"limit":50,"next":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/2aBV2t7VOloIwnkRCKjSmg/episodes?offset=50&limit=50&market=US","offset":0,"previous":null,"total":52},"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/show/2aBV2t7VOloIwnkRCKjSmg"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/2aBV2t7VOloIwnkRCKjSmg","id":"2aBV2t7VOloIwnkRCKjSmg","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/38c050a5d55928821234f255dde325a52a20a7b2","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/5c9b5ad5a89c378f0510b700e0a5cb71e53251b5","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/f37d9b2e0933fdde959d5c60ffb05dc205312d95","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"languages":["en"],"media_type":"audio","name":"RCI | English : Columns","publisher":"RCI | English","total_episodes":52,"type":"show","uri":"spotify:show:2aBV2t7VOloIwnkRCKjSmg"};