The Economist Podcasts

The Economist

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

To a Lesser Degree: Trailer
Trailer 1 min 32 sec

All Episodes

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what the Omicron variant means for the world economy, what experiments with “free banking” in the 18th and 19th centuries reveal about the future of stablecoins (10:53) and how the legacy of Stalin’s gulag continues to shape Russian fortunes (18:16)  Please fill in our listener survey at www.economist.com/epsurvey  Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 6

25 min 23 sec

The Supreme Court looks poised to place dramatic limits on abortion rights. Liberals worry this signals a conservative takeover of the nation’s laws, but the justices deny that they are politicians in robes. How is the Supreme Court reshaping America?The Economist’s Steve Mazie explains what another case on the docket reveals about the court’s conservative wing. We go back to a surprising ruling on gay rights. And former Trump official Sarah Isgur tells us what the right thinks of the court.Jon Fasman presents with Charlotte Howard. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/USpodsurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 3

42 min 11 sec

The archipelago’s diplomatic pivot to China has added an international dimension to the latest flare-up of domestic tensions. We ask how this tiny state figures into far larger geopolitics. British law permits medical cannabis for children with epilepsy—so why are so few able to get it? And a Formula 1 race may mark the end of Saudi Arabia’s alcohol ban.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 3

20 min 44 sec

The former House majority leader and Virginia congressman assesses whether the Republican Party needs Donald Trump to win. The one-time rising star of the GOP talks to Anne McElvoy about the lessons learnt from losing his seat to a Tea-Party challenger. Is bipartisanship broken or can his old frenemy President Joe Biden fix it? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2

27 min 4 sec

The conservative supermajority on America’s Supreme Court looks likely to strip back rights enshrined since the Roe v Wade ruling in 1973. Beset by natural disasters, Puerto Rico did not seem ready for a pandemic—but our correspondent finds it has done better than the rest of America. And an intriguing new idea in the mystery of how Earth got its water. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2

24 min 2 sec

China’s economy is slowing while America’s overheats, prompting Jerome Powell to suggest this week that the Fed could act faster than planned. As the Omicron variant triggers a fresh wave of travel restrictions, is the world economy caught between a rock and a hard place? Host Patrick Lane and Henry Curr, our economics editor, assess the threats to global growth.With Carmen Reinhart, senior vice-president and chief economist of the World Bank group, and Wang Tao, chief China economist and head of Asia research for UBS, an investment bank.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 1

31 min 3 sec

Jack Dorsey’s departure from the social-media giant reflects the growing primacy of engineering talent, and the waning mythology of the big-tech founder. Ukraine’s military has become much better at battling Russian-backed separatists since the annexation of Crimea—but now a far graver kind of war looms. And the Economist Intelligence Unit’s latest list of the world’s most expensive cities.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 1

19 min 35 sec

Countries are scrambling to stop the Omicron variant of the coronavirus. We search for scientific clues to understand how it will shape the pandemic. Professor Sharon Peacock, one of the world’s top variant hunters, predicts Omicron will be more transmissible than previous strains. And, will Omicron supplant the Delta variant globally? Correspondent Hal Hodson looks to immunology for answers.Alok Jha hosts, with The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder and deputy editor, Edward Carr.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.  To keep up-to-date with our coverage of the Omicron variant, go to economist.com/omicron.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30

28 min 33 sec

Things were all smiles after negotiations resumed—but it is difficult to see how a middle ground can be reached in Iran’s nuclear ambitions. Apple’s surprise move to permit repairs to its hardware reflects the growing “right to repair” movement, and a shift in the notion of tech ownership. And the “grab lists” that museum curators prefer not to talk about. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30

22 min 51 sec

The rivalry between China and America will intensify in 2022 as each side strives to demonstrate the superiority of its system of government. As China uses its stage-managed Communist Party congress to cement Xi Jinping in power, Joe Biden and the Democratic Party are expected to face a drubbing in America’s mid-term elections. Editor-in-Chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, US editor John Prideaux and host Tom Standage assess the competition between the two superpowers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastofferAnd we would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/worldaheadsurvey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 29

22 min 54 sec

Governments’ rapid responses to a new coronavirus strain were wise. But much is still to be learned about the Omicron variant before longer-term policies can be prescribed. Vietnam’s government wants to create internationally competitive firms, and a growing new class of billionaires suggests the plan is working. And research suggests that social distancing comes naturally to bees under pathogenic threat.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 29

21 min 2 sec

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the venture-capital industry is being turbocharged, what the fate of star tennis-player Peng Shuai reveals about one-party rule in China (10'52) and, when a museum is on fire, how do you decide what to save? (19'09) Tell us what you think at www.economist.com/epsurvey   Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 29

29 min 58 sec

At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey. Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. Could they cut back? The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.   John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/uspodsurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 26

39 min 37 sec

As President Recep Tayyip Erdogan keeps pushing his upside-down economic ideas, the currency plummets and an immiserated population grows restless. Sunday’s presidential election in Honduras will be a test of the country’s democracy; fears abound of the deadly protests that marred the last vote. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of Rossana Banti, a storied, lifelong anti-fascist campaigner.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 26

22 min 55 sec

In 1956 the Suez Crisis forced the Egyptian-born cookery writer and her Jewish family to flee Cairo for London. She tells Anne McElvoy why she collected the recipes of fellow refugees to keep the flavours of home alive and what food tells us about stories of migration. The octogenarian author of “A Book of Middle Eastern Food” and “Med” spills the secrets of her kitchen – from embracing mistakes to what to cook for the festive season. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/economistaskssurveyAnd please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 25

23 min 6 sec

A three-way coalition has struck a deal to govern. We ask who’s who among top ministers and what’s what on the newly centre-left agenda. A shortage of lorry drivers has sharpened Britain’s supply-chain woes; our correspondent hitches a ride with one, finding why it is such a hard job to fill. And what Maine’s new “right to food” actually means. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 25

23 min 36 sec

Venture capital is no longer embodied by Silicon Valley investing in its own backyard. A new wave of both capital and competition is powering new ideas across sectors and around the world. Our correspondent Arjun Ramani and host Rachana Shanbhogue speak to veteran VCs, newcomers and founders to find out whether the innovation being funded will be worth the risks.With Roelof Botha, partner at Sequoia Capital; Rana Yared, general partner at Balderton; Ali Partovi, chief executive of Neo; Dr Maria Chatzou Dunford, founder of Lifebit.ai and Rachel Delacour, co-founder of Sweep.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24

29 min 40 sec

Prices are up all over, especially in America. But whether the world’s largest economy is part of the problem or just suffering the same symptoms will determine how to fix it. Autocratic leaders of middling-sized countries are having a field day as America has relinquished its world-policeman role. And what makes some languages fail to develop a word for blue?For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24

22 min 51 sec

The coronavirus could be lurking in many species of animals, according to a new report. We analyse the implications for human health. Also, what is the relationship between an unbalanced gut microbiome and autism? And, the father of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy died this month. Aaron Beck’s daughter, the psychiatrist Judith Beck, tells us how her father turned the world of psychiatry upside down. Kenneth Cukier hosts.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.  For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Additional audio used with permission from the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 23

29 min 36 sec

A Delta wave is driving restrictions and restrictions are driving unrest. Vaccine mandates like that enacted by Austria may be the only way to end the cycle. We examine the dim prospects for Peng Shuai, a Chinese tennis star who accused a senior politician of sexual assault. And a broader view of modern art at the UAE’s new Guggenheim museum. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 23

22 min 36 sec

The presidential election will now go to a run-off—between candidates of political extremes. We ask how that polarisation will affect promised constitutional reform. Our correspondent visits Mali to witness the largest current Western push against jihadism, finding that governments and peacekeepers in the Sahel are losing the war. And women seek a more level playing field in competitive gaming.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 22

21 min 46 sec

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: a new era of big government, the revival of far-right ideas in France (10:34) and our Bartleby column on the business phrasebook (19:04)   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 22

24 min 48 sec

The bare facts of the Kyle Rittenhouse case are not disputed. In August 2020 he shot dead two people, and injured a third, during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin. But to the right the teenager is an American hero and to the left he’s a reckless vigilante. What does the case tell us about gun culture and race in America? We hear how the media on the left and right told the Rittenhouse story and go back to the origins of a notorious self-defence law. The Economist’s Daniel Knowles explains why guns divide America.John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 19

39 min 43 sec

Some factors that drive relentless growth in state spending are eternal; some are getting stronger. Our correspondent outlines a big-government future. We examine how MacKenzie Scott, an accidental billionaire, is revolutionising big-money philanthropy. And Moroccan hoteliers rail against a law that forbids beds for the unwed.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 19

23 min 11 sec

When covid-19 lockdowns shuttered his productions, the renowned satirist vented his frustrations in a new form – a mock-epic poem called “Pandemonium”. He talks to Anne McElvoy about seeking inspiration in the works of John Milton and how to find humour in difficult days. Is any joke out of bounds for the creator of the television shows “The Thick of It” and “Veep” and what’s on his pick-me-up reading list?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 18

25 min 47 sec

Mikheil Saakashvili, a former president, is seven weeks into a hunger strike and protests supporting him are proliferating. We ask where the country is headed. China’s state-sponsored industrial espionage is growing more overt and more organised—and little can be done to stop it. And how to figure out the past tense of verbs like “green-light” and “gaslight”.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 18

22 min 24 sec

Until recently worrying about rising prices seemed like a relic of the 1970s. Now it borders on a global obsession. As new data on inflation from around the world exceed expectations, host Rachana Shanbhogue asks whether central bankers will be able to curb the trend. Plus, we crunch the numbers in our alternative inflation “Uluru” index.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17

32 min 5 sec

The meeting between superpower presidents was cordial and careful, but it will take far more than a video call to smooth such frosty relations. Europe once had an enviable international rail network—one it must revive if the bloc is to meet its climate targets. And the costly and sometimes dangerous lengths South Koreans are going to for flattering photographs.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17

19 min 53 sec

An estimated 55 million people around the world live with dementia, yet only a quarter have been formally diagnosed. How will technology improve diagnostic devices for the condition? Also, with better testing in place but few treatments available, we explore if healthcare systems can cope with this silent epidemic. And, author and professor, Nina Kraus explores how brains build a sound world. Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 16

26 min 58 sec

White roses, white sheets hung from homes, even white t-shirts: a movement’s symbolic colour was not much in evidence after officials quashed national protests. Part of Saudi Arabia’s plan to wean its economy off oil is to entice lots of tourists; we ask how likely that is to work. And gut bugs beget a bigger bounty of blackcurrant berries.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 16

19 min 32 sec

COP26 has come to a close. What does the outcome mean for the future of the planet? We measure it against earlier landmarks of environmental summitry. Gro Harlem Brundtland, a former Norwegian prime minister and pioneer of environmental dealmaking, tells us the process is yielding results. And science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson makes the case for optimism.Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 15

38 min 21 sec

The ruling party got a pasting at the polls, owing in part to a reeling economy. We ask what the opposition’s gains mean for the country. The practice of assisted dying is being enshrined in law the world over; we examine the ethical dimensions of its spread. And why electric vehicles failed to keep their market dominance a century ago.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 15

21 min 2 sec

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the consequences of Russia’s new era of repression, why too many are still denied the right to die assisted dying (09:19) and why Turkey is deporting refugees for eating bananas (17:09) Watch The Economist’s new documentary film, “Fearless: the women fighting Putin” Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 15

19 min 15 sec

America has reopened its borders to vaccinated travellers, 20 months after they were shut. In that time attempts to cross illegally into the US from the south have soared. Joe Biden promised to undo his predecessor’s immigration policies, but on the ground it appears nothing much has changed. What is happening at America’s border with Mexico?  The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass reports from Arizona. We go back to when a Democratic president talked tough on immigration. And migrant rights activist Gia Del Pino tells us about the families stuck in limbo.   John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 12

41 min 22 sec

The climate summit in Glasgow is in its last official day, but looks sure to overrun as negotiators thrash out an agreement. When the talking’s over, what will count as success? The rise of film franchises and streaming is taking the shine off Hollywood’s top stars. And we hatch a tale of unusual births among North America’s biggest birds.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 12

20 min 56 sec

Host Anne McElvoy asks the founder of Multiverse why he thinks apprenticeships are the best route into the workplace and whether the education policies of former British prime minister Tony Blair, his father, mean too many young people go to university. He reflects on growing up in the spotlight and what proximity to power has taught him. And is there the tech entrepreneur’s dress code?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 11

27 min 29 sec

As the economy has deteriorated and the internet has bypassed television, persecution of opponents has become the president’s main tool of political control. Even the pandemic has been harnessed to silence dissent. An Economist film reports on the young women standing up to Vladimir Putin. And in China, there’s a more subdued background to the Singles’ Day online shopping splurge. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 11

20 min 30 sec

The debt-ridden Chinese property giant continues to teeter on the verge of collapse. But the rot in China’s financial system goes much deeper—and could pose a global risk. As COP26 in Glasgow nears a close, we explore the drawbacks of the debate over “degrowth” for tackling climate change. And the property website Zillow’s house-flipping flop reveals the limits of big data in real estate. Henry Tricks hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10

30 min 16 sec

Around 2,000 people from the Middle East are at the European Union’s eastern frontier. Alexander Lukashenko, the autocratic Belarusian president, promised them passage to the EU. They are pawns in a long dispute and their plight is bleak. Tension is mounting in north Africa, between Algeria and Morocco. And who said words were cheap? The cost of newsprint is soaring. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10

23 min 2 sec

As covid-19 threatens Europe once again, effective oral antiviral treatments for covid-19 are finally being approved by regulators. Is this the next step towards beating the virus? Also, author Azeem Azhar on what the accelerating growth of technology means for business, the economy and society. And we reveal the winners of our latest book giveaway. Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 9

26 min 17 sec

Americans born at the bottom of the economic ladder find it harder than past generations—or their peers abroad—to climb to the top. The president has plans to change that. But he’s already having to scale them back. Concrete may be a super-spouter of carbon dioxide, but it can go green. And a new style of book review is flourishing on TikTok  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 9

22 min 25 sec

The COP26 conference is taking place amid an energy crisis. How will political pressures on the negotiators from activists, public opinion, and a troubled energy market influence the outcome?UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed tells us why the negotiations are so important to the poor world. We go to The Netherlands, where green activists have turned to the courts and we look at America’s tricky energy politics. Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 8

42 min 9 sec

Who first thought of putting wheels on suitcases and why did this seemingly obvious idea not take off until the 1990s? In the final episode of our series on how innovation works, we explore how the adoption of an idea can be hampered by social attitudes and prejudices. In the case of the wheeled suitcase, it wasn’t a change in technology that made the difference—instead, the crucial change took place inside people’s heads. Tom Standage hosts.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 8

31 min 30 sec

Over four days in Beijing, the political and military elite are meeting to recast the past. The revised version will depict Xi Jinping as a giant of the stature of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping—and justify his continued rule. More Africans are migrating, mostly within their own continent. And Hollywood is examining its navel. It doesn’t like what it finds.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 8

21 min 40 sec

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the calamity facing Joe Biden and the democrats, the uses and abuses of green finance (10:19) And Orwellian and proud (16:07) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 8

25 min 26 sec

Normally a political party goes through a reckoning after a defeat. But, a year later, there’s been no post-mortem of the 2020 election for Republicans. Instead the GOP remains loyal to the man who many refuse to accept lost the presidency. What does the Republican party stand for beyond Trumpism?Jon Fasman reports from a gathering of social conservatives. We find out how a radical anti-capitalist philosopher is inspiring the modern GOP. And pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson explains what drives rank and file Republicans to the polls.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 5

41 min 52 sec

Few imagined when Ethiopia’s civil war began a year ago that the capital, Addis Ababa, would come under threat from Tigrayan rebels. We explain why the tide has turned. At this time of year, India’s deadliest environmental problem—its toxic air—is at its worst. And the Chinese Comminust Party is cracking down on burning gifts for the dead.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 5

24 min 5 sec

The leading man who made his name playing the baddie talks to Anne McElvoy about what makes the best villains and his recent memoir “Putting the Rabbit in the Hat”. The star of HBO’s “Succession” says why the series struck a chord during the Trump presidency and what links the two powerful patriarchs Logan Roy and Shakespeare’s King Lear. Also, have young actors lost the craft of theatre?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 4

25 min 9 sec

At the global climate summit, more than 100 countries have promised to end deforestation by 2030. Similar promises have been made before, but might this time be different? America’s Supreme Court dives into the thorny topics of abortion and gun rights. And we report on the peculiar economics of African cities where the UN has set up shop. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 4

22 min 54 sec

With the prospects for inflation clouded in uncertainty, central banks are in a new staring contest with the bond market. Who will blink first? Also, host Henry Tricks explores how the private sector is influencing what might be the most corporate COP ever. And economist Claudia Goldin tracks five generations of American women to work out why the gender pay gap persists—and how to conquer it.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 3

30 min 59 sec