Money Talks from The Economist

The Economist

Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Wednesday by Economist Podcasts.

All Episodes

Venture capital is no longer embodied by Silicon Valley investing in its own backyard. A new wave of both capital and competition is powering new ideas across sectors and around the world. Our correspondent Arjun Ramani and host Rachana Shanbhogue speak to veteran VCs, newcomers and founders to find out whether the innovation being funded will be worth the risks.With Roelof Botha, partner at Sequoia Capital; Rana Yared, general partner at Balderton; Ali Partovi, chief executive of Neo; Dr Maria Chatzou Dunford, founder of Lifebit.ai and Rachel Delacour, co-founder of Sweep.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24

29 min 40 sec

Until recently worrying about rising prices seemed like a relic of the 1970s. Now it borders on a global obsession. As new data on inflation from around the world exceed expectations, host Rachana Shanbhogue asks whether central bankers will be able to curb the trend. Plus, we crunch the numbers in our alternative inflation “Uluru” index.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17

30 min 57 sec

The debt-ridden Chinese property giant continues to teeter on the verge of collapse. But the rot in China’s financial system goes much deeper—and could pose a global risk. As COP26 in Glasgow nears a close, we explore the drawbacks of the debate over “degrowth” for tackling climate change. And the property website Zillow’s house-flipping flop reveals the limits of big data in real estate. Henry Tricks hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10

28 min 37 sec

With the prospects for inflation clouded in uncertainty, central banks are in a new staring contest with the bond market. Who will blink first? Also, host Henry Tricks explores how the private sector is influencing what might be the most corporate COP ever. And economist Claudia Goldin tracks five generations of American women to work out why the gender pay gap persists—and how to conquer it.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 3

30 min 26 sec

This week The Economist auctioned off an Alice in Wonderland-inspired NFT for charity. Host Rachana Shanbhogue finds out how the sale went and explores the promise and pitfalls of this dizzying new market. Plus, the financial landscape in Africa is changing fast: we ask why the unicorn population has more than doubled this year and speak to Sim Tshabalala, head of the continent’s largest lender, Standard Group Bank. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 27

31 min 18 sec

Higher inflation looks likely to last into 2022. The Bank of England could be the first big central bank to raise interest rates—why might it make the first move? Also, our team explores how real-time data are upending economics. And Michael Dell, boss of the eponymous tech firm, on why founders are leaving Silicon Valley for Texas and why PCs are still sexy. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 20

30 min 59 sec

This year's Nobel prize celebrates the "credibility revolution" that has transformed economics since the 1990s. Today most notable new work is not theoretical but based on analysis of real-world data. Host Rachana Shanbhogue speaks to two of the winners, David Card and Joshua Angrist, and our Free Exchange columnist Ryan Avent explains how their work has brought economics closer to real life.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 13

33 min 54 sec

Trade used to be about efficiency and growth. But those goals are being overtaken by others, from security to environmentalism. Our Britain economics editor Soumaya Keynes and host Rachana Shanbhogue investigate how the blurring of economic and political concerns is driving—and destabilising—trade relationships, with global consequences.We hear from Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, director-general of the World Trade Organisation, about the WTO’s complicated history and contested future. US Trade Representative Katherine Tai explains where she thinks the current rules-based system falls short, particularly when it comes to China. And Pamela Coke-Hamilton, head of the International Trade Centre, identifies the winners and losers of this new era.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 6

35 min 51 sec

China’s largest developer Evergrande is threatening to default—what does this reveal about the broader troubles in the country’s property market? And if you live in a big American or European city, there’s a good chance that a mighty financial institution could be your next landlord. Plus, historian Adam Tooze looks back at the economic impact of the pandemic. Patrick Lane hosts.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 29

29 min 3 sec

The price of natural gas is rocketing, with global consequences. Is volatility in this crucial fuel here to stay? We also ask why an investigation at the World Bank has put Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, in the spotlight. And, after our adventures in DeFi-land last week, economist Eswar Prasad assesses who should control the future of money and payments. Patrick Lane hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 22

29 min 23 sec

After a painstakingly slow start, the financial system is now digitising fast. Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s US finance correspondent, and host Rachana Shanbhogue explore the different emerging models shaping the future of money and payments. With David Marcus, head of Facebook Financial and Novi, its new digital wallet system; Benoît Cœuré, head of innovation at the Bank for International Settlements, a club of central banks (recorded at the 2021 Eurofi forum) and Lex Sokolin, head of decentralised finance at ConsenSys, a blockchain software firm.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 15

33 min 47 sec

The notoriously insular American chipmaker wants to throw open the doors. Succeed or fail, this reversal will shake up a $600bn industry at the heart of the global economy. Plus, Harvard economist Edward Glaeser explains how the pandemic is transforming the world’s cities. And, as high streets and malls open, can the direct-to-consumer boom last? Patrick Lane hosts.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 8

25 min 16 sec

The Delta variant has altered the direction of the pandemic and the threats the world economy faces—economic policy must adapt. Also, what can America's ‘gilded age’ reveal about China's future? And, the world’s strictest limits on video games could be a ‘critical hit’ to the industry. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 1

23 min 57 sec

The Federal Reserve under Jerome Powell has taken an extraordinarily bold gamble. But will the central bank chairman still be in office to see if it pays off? Plus why construction firms cannot build fast enough to keep up with the rich world’s housing boom. And the race for territory as, one by one, American states legalise betting on sports.Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Featuring Peter Jackson, CEO of Flutter Entertainment.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 25

28 min 12 sec

Hundreds of billions of dollars are pouring into the business of decarbonisation. Can this green boom flourish where the last one wilted? Plus, why the branchless neobanks finally conquering America face new challenges beyond the pandemic. And the cybersecurity industry is thriving—but do those shelling out for protection get what they pay for? The Economist’s finance editor Rachana Shanbhogue hosts, with Ciaran Martin, former head of the National Cyber Security Centre.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 18

26 min

The contours of Xi Jinping’s grand plan for the Chinese technology industry are emerging. But with so much damage done to the country’s star firms, host Henry Tricks asks what is driving the crackdown. Can the Communist Party pull off an ambitious overhaul of the data economy without crippling it? And what could the West learn from watching the fallout?With Don Weinland, The Economist’s China business and finance correspondent; Simon Cox, our China economics editor; Kendra Schaefer, head of tech at Trivium China; and Dr Keyu Jin of the London School of Economics.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 11

32 min 46 sec

At the start of the 21st century, developing economies were a source of unbounded optimism and fierce ambition. But the pandemic has revealed a very different picture: many poor and middle-income countries seem to be losing the knack of catching up with rich ones. Is the golden age of emerging markets over? And how can countries now battered by the pandemic get back on that path to rapid growth?Rachana Shanbhogue hosts with Jim O’Neill, former chief economist at Goldman Sachs who 20 years ago coined the term “BRICs”; Makhtar Diop, head of the International Finance Corporation; our trade and international economics editor, Ryan Avent; China economics editor, Simon Cox, and Africa correspondent, Kinley Salmon.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 4

32 min 3 sec

The trading app brought retail investing to the public—now it is going public via its retail investors. Our Wall Street correspondent reports from inside its unusual IPO. Plus, as food prices soar, big agriculture is having a bumper year. How long can it last? And lessons from the history books for a new age of central banking. Patrick Lane hosts Subscribers to The Economist can join John O’Sullivan, Buttonwood columnist, and Alice Fulwood, Wall Street correspondent, on July 29th for a live event unpicking the inner workings of financial markets and how to make sense of them. Register and submit your questions at economist.com/marketseventFor full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 28

29 min 30 sec

Financial markets are rattled by fears about the rapidly spreading Delta variant of covid-19. But another threat also looms: can the economic recovery survive the end of emergency stimulus? Plus, why America’s shale-oil tycoons are now fracking as little as possible. And, our correspondent meets bitcoin miners in rural China to find out why they are packing up and shipping out. Simon Long hosts Subscribers to The Economist can join our finance reporters John O’Sullivan, Buttonwood columnist, and Alice Fulwood, Wall Street correspondent, on July 29th for a live event unpicking the inner workings of financial markets and how to make sense of them. Register and submit your questions at economist.com/marketseventFor full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 21

28 min 27 sec

Can a new generation of Chinese multinational companies learn to adapt and even thrive in a hostile environment at home and abroad? Also, how Europe’s latest green plan aims to plug the leaks in the world’s biggest carbon market. And, why online shopping is about to become a whole lot more chatty. Simon Long hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 14

28 min 47 sec

The economic recovery is outpacing expectations—but so is inflation. Can central banks wind back their support without sending markets into freefall? And, the Olympics used to be a bonanza for corporate sponsors, but this years’ games are turning into a reputational minefield. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 7

26 min 42 sec

Lockdowns have become a default tool for governments trying to control covid-19. But are the benefits worth the costs? The return to the office is proving much more difficult than last year’s abrupt exodus. And as he prepares to move to a new beat, our China economics editor reflects on a decade of spectacular growth—and what lies ahead. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 30

28 min 14 sec

How has the world's biggest technology investor Softbank ridden the wave of the pandemic?And, the surging threat of cyber-heists—the methods and menace of the new bank robbers. Also, survival of the fittest in economic theory.Simon Long hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 23

29 min 45 sec

The company that owns China’s leading ride-sharing app is expected to float on the stockmarket in New York next month, in what could be the biggest IPO in the world this year. We examine its ambitions and its plans to beat the competition. And, what about the inflation in the room? Host Patrick Lane asks how American businesses are coping with a spring surge of prices. Also, we talk to the CEO of Twitch, a streaming service that made watching people play video games big business. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 16

26 min 7 sec

The clean-energy business is thriving. Theories of decarbonisation are finally being put into practice. But how can the green boom avoid getting bogged down? Plus, the new geopolitics of business: American and Chinese big companies dominate. How did Europe become an also-ran and can it recover its footing? And, why the ghost storefronts of Fifth Avenue could stay empty. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsFor full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 9

28 min 34 sec

President Joe Biden wants to Europeanise the American welfare state. How will the biggest social-policy experiment since the 1960s work—and who will pay for it? Also, the work from home revolution promises a financial reckoning for commercial property. And, as LGBT+ Pride month begins, how can companies avoid “rainbow-washing”? Host Simon Long explores the pitfalls of woke advertising.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 2

25 min 31 sec

The French are back in cafes and Italians can stay out past 10pm—relief at reopening is widespread but European economic recovery risks being starkly unequal. Plus, Arnold Donald, CEO of Carnival, the world’s biggest cruise company, shares lessons from a year in the doldrums as ships prepare to set sail again. And, are cryptocurrencies a financial world unto themselves? Patrick Lane hosts.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 26

27 min 52 sec

Businesses are struggling to fill vacancies at the same time as millions of people are out of work. Host Patrick Lane investigates this conundrum. Also, each year almost 10% of global tax revenue is lost through companies shifting their income to tax havens. How can governments get the world’s most profitable companies to cough up? And, Patrick Collison, co-founder and CEO of Stripe, on the rise of America’s biggest ever unlisted firm.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 19

29 min 38 sec

Technological change is upending finance as the clout of payment platforms and tech firms grows and central banks begin to issue their own digital currencies. But can you imagine a world without banks? Rachana Shanbhogue explores the future of banking with Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s Wall Street correspondent, Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase, Patrick Collison, cofounder and CEO of Stripe, Kahina van Dyke, head of digital and data at Standard Chartered, and Jean-Pierre Landau, former deputy-governor of the Banque de France.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 12

31 min 17 sec

Now that the world’s most celebrated investor has named a successor, the conglomerate he created must face some hard truths. Also, as companies wrestle with thorny issues from climate change to voting rights, economist Dambisa Moyo argues corporate boards need a makeover. And, the pandemic has coaxed millions of older people online—now companies are racing to keep up with the silver surfers. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 5

27 min 5 sec

As economies recover, central bankers will need to decide what to do with their asset-purchase schemes and their enormous balance-sheets. We look at how quantitative easing was pioneered in Japan 20 years ago and why it is still a black box. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 27

23 min 52 sec

As America and its allies threaten more penalties against Russia over the treatment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, does the West’s overdependence on economic sanctions risk making them ineffective? Also, why India is proving an attractive—and clever—investor in poor countries concerned about Chinese influence. And, do plans for a football Super League risk an own goal? Patrick Lane hosts A note for our listeners: from May 5th 2021 Money Talks will be published every Wednesday.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 20

28 min 28 sec

From voting rights to climate change, companies are under pressure to speak out—is it wise to mix business and politics? Also, China’s state control over tech giants like Ant Group is growing. Trillions of dollars in market value are at stake. And, as crypto-marketplace Coinbase prepares to list and bitcoin’s value surges, we take a look at the currency’s hidden costs. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsFor full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 13

28 min 36 sec

The pandemic has fuelled an explosion of unemployment and a transformation in how many people work, especially in richer countries. We consider the many reasons for optimism about the labour market and the prospects for working from home. And, we talk to David Autor, a labour economist at MIT, about the effect of covid-19 on automation. Simon Long hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 6

22 min 50 sec

The EU’s €750bn recovery fund aims to rejuvenate the old continent, but ten months in it faces legal challenges and is yet to pay out a cent. Sustainable investing has been accused of “greenwashing”: we crunch the numbers to find out the real impact. And, ahead of Deliveroo’s IPO, our correspondents take to two wheels to investigate the economics of food delivery. Patrick Lane hosts.With Paolo Gentiloni, European commissioner for economy and former prime minister of Italy, and Tariq Fancy, former chief investment officer for sustainable investing at BlackRock.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 30

29 min 17 sec

Against the backdrop of sanctions and retaliations, China's capital markets are increasingly interwoven with global finance—what will this mean for foreign investors? Plus, will President Joe Biden’s fiscal stimulus trigger a dreaded return to high inflation—with global consequences? And, a new generation of workers' unions takes on the tech giants. Simon Long hosts.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 23

26 min 45 sec

The shopping industry is in a state of flux. Smartphones and social media are enabling a data-driven transformation that is only just getting started. Host Henry Tricks investigates whether the future of shopping will be ruled by giants and how personal data will increasingly shape not just what gets bought, and where, but even what gets made. Could a new generation of consumers change capitalism for the better?With David Liu, vice president of strategy at Pinduoduo, Harley Finkelstein, president of Shopify, Nilam Ganenthiran, president of Instacart, and Katie Hunt, cofounder of Showfields.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 16

30 min 13 sec

Special-purpose acquisition companies are Wall Street’s latest craze, attracting everyone from celebrities to retail investors. An alternative to the traditional IPO, SPACs could transform tech investing and supercharge innovation. They are even shaping the post-Brexit battle to be Europe’s financial capital. But are these “blank-cheque firms” a mania, a useful innovation, or both? Simon Long hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 9

26 min 17 sec

Last week’s turmoil in the bond market has calmed for now, but fears of inflation mean more turbulence ahead. Plus, how poor countries trying to secure debt relief are caught in a minefield of lenders’ competing priorities and egos. And, host Simon Long takes a lesson from a former hostage negotiator in the secrets of successful listening.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 2

25 min 25 sec

Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, cofounder of Nubank, a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 23

26 min 10 sec

Globetrotting had never been easier—then the pandemic brought it to a standstill. The Economist’s industry editor Simon Wright investigates how mass travel has changed the world and what it will take to get people moving again. Could this shock to the system be an opportunity to make the future of tourism greener, safer and more enjoyable?With Michael O’Leary, CEO of Ryanair, James Liang, chairman of CTrip and Trip.com, Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, and Brian Pearce, chief economist of the International Air Transport Association.Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 16

24 min 31 sec

As the price of oil rises, so too does the value of the battery metals that could replace it. Host Patrick Lane asks what’s driving these competing bets on the fuels of the future. Plus, the rise of the hairy zombies: why some of the most pandemic-battered shares in USA Inc are confident of an afterlife. And, how remote work is playing havoc with American taxes. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 9

24 min 28 sec

The GameStop saga continues—does it reveal a cheat code to how to beat the stockmarket, or is it a sign of a deeper transformation at work in the financial system? Plus, property is the biggest asset market in the world and nowhere bigger than in China. Host Simon Long asks how long China’s property boom can hold. And, our Buttonwood columnist shares some hard truths about investing in bricks and mortar. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 2

27 min 50 sec

The vast semiconductor industry is booming but faces new stresses that recently stalled production lines worldwide and could threaten the stability of the global economy. President Biden’s “Buy American” executive order aims to create jobs and boost resilience—but will Americans actually benefit? And, economist Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a modern “moonshot”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 26

26 min 49 sec

What will the new president’s plans mean for the American economy—and for its partners and rivals around the world? Sabine Weyand, of the European Commission’s department for international trade, explains how the EU hopes to rebalance the global trading order in the post-Trump era. And host Simon Long asks why, despite a return to growth, the Communist Party is busy reining in China Inc.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 19

24 min 36 sec

Despite the economic catastrophe of the pandemic, prices of goods such as copper, iron ore and soya beans are surging; just how far can commodities climb? Also, how the Brexit trade agreement will reshape business on both sides of the Channel. And, the economic cost of covid-19 is impossible to calculate—but host Patrick Lane has a go anyway.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 12

25 min 52 sec

Having tripled in value in the past quarter, the cryptocurrency continues its rollercoaster ride, as the financial establishment begins to jump aboard. Also, why a new EU-China investment deal fails to balance competition, cooperation and confrontation. And, what can companies do to bridge the gap between the workforce of today and the jobs of tomorrow? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 5

23 min 38 sec

A hundred years ago, Sadie Alexander became the first African American to receive a PhD in economics and then spent a career fighting racial discrimination. In this episode, The Economist’s trade and globalisation editor Soumaya Keynes speaks to Nina Banks of Bucknell University about rediscovering Alexander's economics and why her insights are still relevant today.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2020

24 min 28 sec

Tins of tuna and bedroom slippers, triple-digit growth and IPO implosion—what could it all mean? Host Henry Tricks leads an international band of “Money Talks” regulars on a whistlestop tour through a year like no other. The team choose their stories of the year, face baffling clues to mystery items, and share their predictions—and their hopes—for 2021.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2020

30 min 50 sec

A volatile world begets volatile financial markets. Does this explain investor enthusiasm for tech stocks and IPOs—or is something else afoot? Also, Michael O’Leary, the boss of Europe’s largest airline Ryanair, reads the skies ahead. And, the little-known history of working from home: even in the 18th and 19th centuries it had its advantages. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 2020

28 min 27 sec