A Diary of a Curator's Podcast

Chaitya Dhanvi Shah

This Art Podcast is a platform for me, Chaitya Dhanvi Shah, to speak about what I think "serves the art ecosystem."

In a Minute | Season 2 - Introduction
Trailer 49 sec

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Experimental by nature, Kashyap Parikh is a multidimensional artist who has many styles and does not limit himself to working with one medium. There are Prakaar (variants) in shapes, colours, medium, size, genre, tones, lines, and the list goes on. Prakaar is endless. This series is all about one artist and diverse Prakaar. To compose it short, one can say his body of work is interlaced with spirituality and humanity. It is about energy, nature, growth and power being a vital extension. There are certain artworks, which ask for your time. Parikh’s works demand that time. Only then, it can reward you with a wonderful feeling of being with ‘Yourself’. To introspect and to act! Podcast © A Diary of a Curator ®BGM Courtesy: Bensound.com

Jan 27

6 min 52 sec

Can a city influence an artist and his art? Yes, it does. Sometimes, directly and many times indirectly. But, yes it does and that’s how Boys From Delhi came on the surface. In this case, apart from looking at the aesthetic value, the scale of artwork, visual beauty and investment opportunity, I was more interested in finding one common element in all the artworks that reflected the essence of Delhi. Just like there is diversity in people, the artist from Delhi offers diversity in style, subject and technique. But, that one quality that brings out true essence in their artworks is that of being Fearless. Starting from Faiyyaz Khan, he motivates us to be fearless and THINK. Artist Gurmeet Marwah inspires us to be fearless and LOVE. Works by Hukum Lal Verma encourages to EXPRESS oneself fearlessly and Sunil Yadav's works stimulates to UPGRADE in life. Vipin Singh Rajput's works energizes fearlessly EXPERIMENT whereas Vikash Kalra's works rouses the viewer to be BOLD in spirit. That leads us to the next question: How to look at art? What is so special about these artists and their works? Let’s find out.

Sep 2020

10 min 7 sec

Welcome to the show - In a minute with a diary of a curator. Thank you all for liking season 1. I hope you will find Season 2 exciting as well.

Jul 2020

49 sec

In season one my focus was on figurative artworks. In this series, I would like to talk about how execution is important in an artwork. In our day to day lives, every subject is seen before, every colour is used before, every emotion is felt before, forms, composition nothing is original in this world. There are millions of paintings in this world with the same animal as the subject, art related to music, abstraction in context to time and space, and sculptures portraying human figures and nature.Still, why do we find certain works very interesting even though we know they are seen before. It happens to many of us. In my opinion, the differentiator is the way an artist ‘executes’ his subject. It is their approach that makes their work stand out. Execution matters the most as it makes a simple subject powerful and a visual treat to the viewers.

Jul 2020

1 min 2 sec

What is that one thing which is common in this work? Considering the colour, medium, expression, and the object ie.the ‘Bull’, ‘Power’ is the keyword here. The use of black, free and rhythmic strokes, the depth of charcoal and the force of the bull symbolically gives a different ‘High’ to the viewer. The artist has wonderfully controlled the uncontrolled force of the bull. Another thing to be noticed here is how Avijit Roy has intelligently used the background with fast and bold strokes created with his own hand movement to show the 'bull in action' with ‘elan’. This work is the best example when you want to understand how justice to the subject can be given through colours, strokes, and medium.

Jul 2020

56 sec

There are few works that are abstract but have emotions in it. This work by Bhanu Shah is a fine blend cocktail of music and colours, harmony, and melody. I like to experiment by watching artworks in different ways. From my experience I can say, the most engrossing way to enjoy Shah’s this series is to view it while playing some Indian classical music in the background. This music gives an additional booster to ‘feel’ Shah's work. It gets you to that zone where a normal mind cannot go into the depth of such artworks. Here, Indian classical music is like what cheese is to wine. I wonder how neatly several colours and hues merge with each other maintaining the character of each tone from opaque to transparent.

Jul 2020

58 sec

Just like music can heal the soul, can paintings do the same? Yes, it can. The way artist Manoj Kachangal has composed the work definitely takes the viewer in his ‘Antar Yatra’. The shades of orange and yellow gives the viewer a positive energy and hope. The repetitive patches I would like to depict as one’s thoughts. In a fraction of seconds, we think of 100s of situations. Some are like red which may be of concern to us while some may be progressive and give hope. But, in the end, the ‘golden’ thoughts are the ones which we go ahead with, and that only happens when we talk to ourselves. No one can give us better advice than ourselves. In such works composition and textures play a very vital role.

Jul 2020

57 sec

Who paints leaves? Isn't it a very easy job to paint leaves? In my opinion, only a person with deep philosophy can paint a minimal object. I think the more the simpler object, the greater the philosophy. Considering it, I think Shri Mirza, the artist, would have undergone a lot of philosophical difficulties and must have 'unlearned' what he has learned to reach here. The layers of colours in the background create a foundation for the leaves to create an impression on the viewer's mind. Though the real hero is the leaf but the actual work to enhance the hero is that of the supporting actor which here is the 'layered and tonal background'. The repetition of leaves gives me a sense of Japa, meditating with the artwork.

Jul 2020

56 sec

For me, the concept of ‘rural India’ plays a very important role in an artwork. It carries forward the rich legacy of our forefather's traditions and culture. Apart from being a great thinker, Ratilal Kansodaria is a very brave artist. The USP of the work is its 'subject' which we generally do not see these days. This work is a poetry of his love for the concept of coexistence between nature and men. In such concept-based works, execution ie. precision casting is the key. Right from the elements used to the anatomy of the figure is so real that it helps you to 'connect' with the emotion of the subject. Ony an experienced artist can create such subjects in lost wax casting techniques.

Jul 2020

55 sec

In this work, the first striking element is the use of ‘yellow’. You don't see many works that have such tones of yellow used in this proportion. The style of this work is a mix of conceptual and surrealism. Another interesting element to note here is the originality of the artist style. Everyone paints trees. But, what is important to note for an emerging artist is how to create your own ‘tree’. The same goes for faces. The value of this work is mainly because it is the ‘signature style’ of the artist. This work shows there is no need to fill in the canvas to convey your thoughts. By using only two elements ie. The face and tree, Shri Vasudev has conveyed his concept of ‘theatre of life’.

Jul 2020

57 sec

What is Shanta Samant, the creator of this sculpture capable of? The anatomy of the figure is not real, the shapes are exaggerated and there is hardly any expression on the face you can see still you 'connect' with this sculpture. That is what a champion sculptor is for me. Her execution of the subject is amazing. Sculptures like this are more of a pet. The more they stay around you the more they become part of your life. I am in love with this lady as it represents style, confidence, and class. The ‘attitude’ in her style and pose can seduce many men out there.

Jul 2020

52 sec

BTC is a show where the viewers/readers get to know about the functioning of the art market that takes place Behind The Canvas! When a collector buys an artwork he is not only buying someone’s extraordinaire skills but also emotions, ideology and or philosophy of someone who is deeply engrossed in a subject since a long time (in the case of senior artists) and a passionate person with a vision (in the case of emerging one’s). Let’s start with several questions which mostly all first-time buyers face: How are they priced? How would you know what the actual MRP is? How does the pricing of an artwork work in a primary market? How does one decide its pricing? On what basis will you know if we are buying at the right price? What is the process of valuation? How does an artwork is priced before it is exhibited on walls? Art like other products is seen as a commodity when it comes to the ‘market’. However, this commodity gives you soul experience and a visual delight. A commodity that enhances your life and adds a better living experience be it home or office!

Jun 2020

11 min 1 sec

A very close friend of mine kept saying ‘Chaitya, 2020 is the year!’ It will not only bring him a girlfriend and luck but happiness, parties, and tonnes of money in the stock exchange. Waiting for 2020 to come, we all were excited and wished what he said to come 'true'. By the time 2020 came, the world saw the worst of Australia fire bush and then the major pandemic Corona Virus which definitely did not bring my friend a girlfriend, but brought the risk of death over happiness, social distancing over parties and stock market crash alike 2008.

Apr 2020

12 min 28 sec

The overpowering cubist structure, strong rustic colours, and seamless bold lines prove that the artist Sunil Yadav is in complete command over his figure. The use of various shapes like circles, semi-circles, triangles, and cubes gives a character to this tribal-like looking figure. However, what makes it even more fascinating is how he has expressed himself and his figure through these intense lines using different tones. The structured face and body with overlapped layers of colours and strokes make you, the viewer understand how the artist can also convey his/her expressions and emotions in a different way. It is not always necessary to convey via facial expressions. The way he has placed the text in the background contributes to the narrative of the work.

Apr 2020

48 sec

Colours, composition and facial expressions are some of the key elements of figurative painting. But, here the artist Dipendra Pal has defined the figurative or portrait work with the use of fine, strong, sharp, thick, thin, straight, curvy, blur, wavy lines which holds its own character and depth. The minimal use of colours goes well with the subject. I liked the fact that he has played with two colours. It lets the viewer focus on the lines, the character of the portrait rather then get lost in the colours. The tones of black, dark and light, thick and thin substance create magic for the viewer. With these works, you do not feel to go in detailed about colours, composition and other technical aspects. You are like to relax, just ‘let me see it’. What a satisfying experience to just observe this kind of works at the end of the day.

Apr 2020

55 sec

When I see this painting, my mind starts reading things fast. Probably, because of its speedy lines, the overpowering black and carefree strokes. However, having so many thoughts in a few seconds it does not affect my mind to go crazy. The calm and soothing expressions of this figure handle the chaos in a viewer’s mind. This is what I like the most in this work whereby the artist Gurmeet Marwah has control over his figure and subject. He creates the controlled chaos in the viewer's mind directly conveying his subject of ‘Hear no evil’, one of the famous Gandhi thought. The heart in red tells you to be calm, hear good things, and make love and peace.

Apr 2020

44 sec

What is the first word that comes to your mind while looking at this work? Delicacy? From the use of colours, subject, figure to expression everything is cute. Not many paintings look cute. This work proves that not every painting needs to be bold or have strong colours to attract the viewer. What is important is how you portray your subject in order to convey your message. The tones of blue in the background and tones of red makes perfect harmony with the balanced use of watercolour technique. The emotion of this little innocent girl makes you feel for her. I would collect this work simply by going in for her facial expression. The figure does not look like a cartoonish character or a caricature and that is the strong point of the artist Neema Vaghela that she is able to retain its value of contemporary artwork.

Apr 2020

56 sec

A portrait is very difficult because of an artist as to hold you, the viewer only by the face of his/her subject. With a major portion of the work covering this one element. Again the contemporary portraits or figurative becomes more difficult to hold the attention of the viewer where the focus is on technique and colours and not only merely on the expressions. This painting is a fine example of how the colours can define the expression and story in a painting. The brush strokes and colour blocks here makes this African lady more beautiful. The aqua blue in the right side is very well balanced with the blues and purples in forehead and face respectively. However, what draws my attention is the left side of the work in white and layered colourful background. It has hidden layers interesting to think and enjoy, creating stories with your friends and family about what this hidden layered story would be. Why the lady is smiling like this? Do you see a different smirk in her smile? Such questions make me interested in this kind of work where it leaves things up to the viewer to think, engage and enjoy.

Apr 2020

44 sec

Not every time a message is conveyed through facial expression. At times, the viewer has to observe other elements too in an artwork. Looking at the colours, the tones of blue and white symbolizes calmness, serenity and peace. The yellow and tonal values of red only enrich the subject and the composition. The music instrument ‘Veena’ symbolizes complete knowledge. The Gyan Mudra, which the figure is posing with, is to improve one’s concentration and boost up memory. Again, related to knowledge. The facial expression of the figure is calm and sober. Combining all the elements from colours to composition the artist Anand Panchal has wonderfully scored in every element of this artwork to convey the message that knowledge is the ultimate truth of life and it leads a person to peace and moksha. This artwork is a fine example of how to read a painting for a person who has just started understanding art.

Apr 2020

56 sec

When a story or a concept is conveyed through correct expressions and right emotions with the help of apt composition and colours is what a successful figurative artwork is. An artist who is successful in bringing out the same can be awarded the title of a Master Figurative Artist.

Apr 2020

1 min 4 sec

I will start this show by talking about different types of figurative artworks. Before, that let us understand more about figurative artwork in a minute. In simple words, an artwork that has human figures and related objects around us can be defined as figurative art.

Mar 2020

38 sec

In a minute with a dairy of a curator, I Chaitya Dhanvi Shah share with you what I find exciting in an artwork. The objective of this show is to introduce people on how to appreciate, read and enjoy art. I wish more and more people to join in, engage and discuss art that in a way it will not only enrich their lives and mind but also help build a strong world #fortheartecosystem.

Mar 2020

1 min 53 sec

On 26th January 2020, Bharat Ganarajya (Republic of India) and 130+ million Bhartiya will celebrate their 71st Republic Day. On this day, the Constitution of India came into effect in 1950.The question to millions of Indians every Republic Day is how do we celebrate? For what? and Why? In my opinion, to truly celebrate Republic Day we should start introspecting. By going back in history. Understanding our past. And by acting on the future. From Mukesh Ambani to Jeff Bezoz – one is the richest Indian and another is the richest in the world, both of them think the 21st century belongs to India. Really? I don’t think so? Why?

Jan 2020

8 min 20 sec

It was a hectic Saturday afternoon in 2011 at Prabhadevi, Mumbai in Shri Akbar Padamsee’s Studio. We were tired working from early morning getting serigraphs signed and looking at Padamsee’s new collection. There were certain abstract works that he was working on. I had this privilege to understand the process behind his abstraction. How he mixes colours, what brushes he uses, what amount of oil is to be mixed and how the monochromatic colours can be applied. To be there in an artist’s studio is amazing but to be in a legend’s studio is only possible when you are ‘The Lucky One’.

Jan 2020

5 min 37 sec

As kids, we were taught about Amdavad as the city founded by Ahmedshah Badshah. True, but not exactly. Let us rewind back in history a little. A Bhil king named the current city of ‘Amdavad’ after Ashapura Ma, as Ashaval long before Ahmedshah Badshah had found ‘the already established city’. The temple of Ashapura Ma and the Bhil Tekra are only a few steps away from the walled city built by Ahmedshah Badshah.

Aug 2019

5 min 3 sec

Who will tell us that the sky can be yellow? Who can make a face in a cube form? Who can paint Radha and Krishna together in a romantic set yet represent their love as a symbol of purity? It is a power that resides within the artist, painter, fine artist and visual painter; to create something extraordinary with his absolute Freedom to Think.

Aug 2019

5 min 10 sec

Walls are our life. We are surrounded by walls. Be it our home or office. We are surrounded by walls these days. With the growing length and gray of the walls, do you not feel suffocated? Your escape is either heading to the woods (very costly and also for a particular time) or to hang a beautiful painting. It gives you an escape, it only refreshes your brain after it is overloaded by files and work and an 8 GB ram which is almost full. With the boss yelling at you and your peers busy, how about a little zoning out through the painting?

Jun 2019

6 min 3 sec

Today, Facebook is removing fake pages from its platform, WhatsApp is requesting it users to help them stop spreading fake news, and Instagram and YouTube remove videos if copyrighted music is found in any content. I wish as a curator, we had the power to check the circulation of fake Indian artworks and remove them before entering the art ecosystem or may be burn them whenever found.

Jun 2019

2 min 20 sec

The first time buyers should understand that ‘Art Market’ is like a mutual funds or share market. The major difference here is that you get to enjoy and connect with its emotions. The statutory warning, ‘Mutual Fund investments are subject to market risks, read all scheme related documents carefully’ also applies to the Art Market.

Jun 2019

5 min 9 sec

We cannot blame young students or unemployed artists for creating the fake art. They do not have many options than doing this. The greed, illiteracy of art and aesthetics of the rich interior designers, architects, individual curators, art dealers and framers is to blame.

Jun 2019

2 min 19 sec

In the Western Art Market, the artworks copied are generally of a high price and are years old works. In addition, it is a developed market. The prices are exorbitant even for the upper middle class to collect them. However, what I cannot comprehend is why it happens in India. We do not match to any of the above criteria. Our HNIs and upper middle class can afford any top Indian artist.

Jun 2019

3 min 42 sec

80,000 – earned by the architect/ interiors / middle men / agent / art dealer and curator. So what does the artist, who has actually invested years of hard work in thought process and skill development, get?

Jun 2019

4 min 29 sec

For me, fake art means illegal reproduction of the intellectual work in any form without the permission of the creator i.e. the artist (dead or alive, famous or emerging). It is a clear exploitation of moral, financial and legal rights of the artist.

Jun 2019

3 min 14 sec

In the series, ‘The Poison called “Fake Art” ‘, I shall share my views from what, why and how the ‘Poison called Fake Art’ damages the Indian Art Ecosystem.

Jun 2019

1 min 36 sec

Kamal Rana owns the qualities of being a complete painter. The fact thathe can work in multiple mediums like wood, canvas, paper, board, with help of acrylic, ink pen, mix media, nail, watercolour, and of course FIRE is remarkable.He can create works in sizes from 1 feet to 60 feet.Rana’s works include major styles like figurative, abstract, religious, animals;which offerflashes and slivers of Indian folk, miniature, modern and contemporary;makingeach of his workvisually unique, technically brilliant and aesthetically beautiful.

Mar 2019

5 min 59 sec

As a curator, I observed over the years that it is due to the lack of understanding of the concept that most people refrain from enjoying abstracts, especially in our country.

Aug 2018

6 min 56 sec