RCI | English : The Link

By RCI | English

The Link podcast is a brief summary of just some of the many stories and interviews presented during the week with discussion on the stories along with occasional special guests, and features which are often about aspects of life in Canada.

  1. 1.
    The LINK Online, Mar. 13,14,15, 2020
    29:59
  2. 2.
    The LINK Online Feb 28,29; Mar 01, 2020
    30:00
  3. 3.
    The LINK Online, Feb. 20,21,22, 2020
    29:59
  4. 4.
    The LINK Online Feb 14.15.16, 2020
    29:57
  5. 5.
    The LINK Online, Feb. 7,8,9, 2020
    30:00
  6. 6.
    The Link Online, Jan. 29, 30, 31, 2020
    29:59
  7. 7.
    The LINK Online, Jan 24.25.26, 2020
    30:00
  8. 8.
    The LINK Online Jan. 17,18,19, 2020
    29:59
  1. 9.
    The LINK Online Jan 10,11,12, 2020
    30:00
  2. 10.
    The LINK Online, Dec 20,21,22, 2019
    30:01
  3. 11.
    The LINK Online, Dec. 13,14,15, 2019
    29:59
  4. 12.
    The LINK Online, Dec. 6,7,8, 2019
    29:57
  5. 13.
    The LINK Online, Nov 29, 30, Dec. 1, 2019
    30:00
  6. 14.
    The LINK Online, Nov 22, 23,24, 2019
    30:00
  7. 15.
    The LINK Online Nov 15.16.17, 2019
    30:00
  8. 16.
    The LINK Online, Nov. 8,9,10, 2019
    29:59
  9. 17.
    The LINK Online, Nov 1,2.3
    29:59
  10. 18.
    The LINK Online, Oct.25,26,27,
    30:00
  11. 19.
    The LINK Online, Oct 18.19.20, 2019
    29:57
  12. 20.
    The LINK Online, Oct.11,12,13, 2019
    29:56
  13. 21.
    The LINK Online, Sep 27.28.29, 2019
    30:01
  14. 22.
    The LINK Online, Sept. 20,21,22, 2019
    30:01
  15. 23.
    The LINK Online Sept. 13, 14, 15, 2019
    29:57
  16. 24.
    The LINK Online, Sept 6,7,8, 2019
    30:00
  17. 25.
    The LINK Online: Aug 29,30,31, 2019
    29:59
  18. 26.
    The LINK Online Aug. 23, 24, 26, 2019
    30:01
  19. 27.
    The LINK Online Aug, 9-10-11
    30:00
  20. 28.
    The LINK Online, Jul 5.6.7, 2019 : recycling, music, cost of living
    30:00
  21. 29.
    The LINK Online June 28, 29, 30, 2019
    30:03
  22. 30.
    The LINK Online, June 21,22,23, 2019
    30:01
  23. 31.
    The LINK Online, June 14, 15, 16, 2019
    29:59
  24. 32.
    The LINK Online, June 7, 8, 9, 2019
    30:00
  25. 33.
    The LINK Online -special- May 31, Jun 1,2, 2019
    29:59
  26. 34.
    The LINK Online, May 24,25,26, 2019
    29:58
  27. 35.
    The LINK Online, May 17, 18, 19, 2019
    30:01
  28. 36.
    The LINK Online, May 10,11,12, 2019
    30:01
  29. 37.
    The LINK Online, May 3, 4, 5, 2019
    30:00
  30. 38.
    The LINK Online Apr. 26,27,28, 2019
    30:00
  31. 39.
    The LINK Online April 19, 20, 21, 2019
    30:00
  32. 40.
    The LINK Online: April 12, 13, 14, 2019
    30:01
  33. 41.
    The LINK ONLINE Apr. 5, 6, 7, 2019
    30:00
  34. 42.
    The LINK Online, March 29, 30, 31, 2019
    29:33
  35. 43.
    The LINK Online, March 22, 23, 24, 2019
    28:52
  36. 44.
    The LINK Online, Mar. 15,16,17, 2019
    30:00
  37. 45.
    The LINK Online, Mar. 8-9-10, 2019
    30:00
  38. 46.
    The LINK Online, March 1,2,3, 2019
    30:00
  39. 47.
    The LINK Online, Feb 22,23,24 2019
    29:59
  40. 48.
    The LINK Online, Feb. 15,16,17
    30:02
  41. 49.
    The LINK Online, Feb. 8,9,10
    29:59
  42. 50.
    The LINK Online, Feb., 1,2,3, 2019.
    30:01

Listen to RCI | English : The Link now.

Listen to RCI | English : The Link in full in the Spotify app

\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"6NvbV6ONMUeHUJXOB58sLy","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Feb 28,29; Mar 01, 2020","release_date":"2020-02-28","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6NvbV6ONMUeHUJXOB58sLy"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b4fab66c10124fc50c6569c3531d4e05dbbcf0d7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Levon, Vincenzo, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20200221-WEE15 Trudeau asks for patience as rail blockades continue but offers no clear plan Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stands during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) As the rail blockades by Indigenous groups and supporters continue, business groups warn that the economy of the entire country is slowly grinding to a standstill. Farmers and the agriculture sector are extremely worried about perishable product standing idle in parked rail cars and about vital export contracts. Ports on both coasts, Vancouver and Halifax, are operating at only a fraction of capacity and a major container shipper has already diverted ships to U.S. ports. Manufacturers are also warning that they are running out of supplies, and their shipping contracts are compromised. Meanwhile, more protests and rail blockades in solidarity with the small group of Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, who oppose a natural gas pipeline through their claimed territory in northern British Columbia, have sprang up. The crisis also underlines internal divisions between Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and the majority of the band who are in favour of the contentious natural gas pipeline. The crisis was debated this week in the House of Commons in Ottawa with two very different views on how it should be handled. Levon has comments from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and reaction from Official Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer. full story here  *note also RCI has several stories on this ongoing issue Game studio in Ontario making audio-based video game The Vale is a medieval fantasy role-playing game, where players will take the role of as the second born and blind, daughter of the king. On her way to a castle, a horde of barbarians attack her caravan, and she’s left alone to fend for herself.  (Courtesy Falling Squirrel Games) A medieval fantasy role-playing video game is being developed with a new twist. Players are guided by sound and controller feedback. This means it's not only accessible to players with sight, but also those who are visually impaired. Vincenzo spoke with the creative director of Falling Squirrel Games in Ontario. full story here Survey: New office work space trends are actually counter-productive The ideas of \"open office\" work spaces were touted as a way to boost communication, transfer of ideas, and increase productivity. As it turns out, that idea isn't working so well at all. A new study says it leads to distractions and the loss of about two hours worth of productive time every day. Kane Wilmott is CEO and founder of iQ Offices co-working space who commissioned the study. full story here Video of show window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799976,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/40SFvE5UnQSHiTUyQI5trv"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/40SFvE5UnQSHiTUyQI5trv","html_description":"

Your hosts, Levon, Vincenzo, and Marc (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Trudeau asks for patience as rail blockades continue but offers no clear plan

\n
\"\"

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stands during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

\n

As the rail blockades by Indigenous groups and supporters continue, business groups warn that the economy of the entire country is slowly grinding to a standstill. Farmers and the agriculture sector are extremely worried about perishable product standing idle in parked rail cars and about vital export contracts.

\n

Ports on both coasts, Vancouver and Halifax, are operating at only a fraction of capacity and a major container shipper has already diverted ships to U.S. ports. Manufacturers are also warning that they are running out of supplies, and their shipping contracts are compromised.

\n

Meanwhile, more protests and rail blockades in solidarity with the small group of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, who oppose a natural gas pipeline through their claimed territory in northern British Columbia, have sprang up. The crisis also underlines internal divisions between Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs and the majority of the band who are in favour of the contentious natural gas pipeline.

\n

The crisis was debated this week in the House of Commons in Ottawa with two very different views on how it should be handled. Levon has comments from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and reaction from Official Opposition Leader Andrew Scheer.

\n

full story here*note also RCI has several stories on this ongoing issue

\n

Game studio in Ontario making audio-based video game

\n
\"Vale

The Vale is a medieval fantasy role-playing game, where players will take the role of as the second born and blind, daughter of the king. On her way to a castle, a horde of barbarians attack her caravan, and she’s left alone to fend for herself.  (Courtesy Falling Squirrel Games)

\n

A medieval fantasy role-playing video game is being developed with a new twist. Players are guided by sound and controller feedback. This means it’s not only accessible to players with sight, but also those who are visually impaired.

\n

Vincenzo spoke with the creative director of Falling Squirrel Games in Ontario.

\n

full story here

\n

Survey: New office work space trends are actually counter-productive

\n

\"\"

\n

The ideas of “open office” work spaces were touted as a way to boost communication, transfer of ideas, and increase productivity. As it turns out, that idea isn’t working so well at all. A new study says it leads to distractions and the loss of about two hours worth of productive time every day. Kane Wilmott is CEO and founder of iQ Offices co-working space who commissioned the study.

\n

full story here

\n

Video of show
\n

\n
\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"40SFvE5UnQSHiTUyQI5trv","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Feb. 20,21,22, 2020","release_date":"2020-02-21","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:40SFvE5UnQSHiTUyQI5trv"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2774f0cffd091494efc64ce4386ea26a2a21ba1c","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts today, Levon Sevunts, Vincenzo Morello,Marc Montgomery (video of show at bottom ListenEN_The_Link-20200214-WEE15 Canada plans to support ban on heavy fuel oil in Arctic shipping The community of Arctic Bay, Nvt., is seen on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. The federal government plans to support a proposed ban on the use of heavy fuel oil by ships plying Arctic waters. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Environmentalists have long been concerned about shipping in the Arctic using heavy fuel oil (HFO) also known as \"bunker oil\" to power the large vessels. HFO is a thick low quality fuel, used primarily because it is relatively inexpensive. However, environmental groups also say HFO use emits substantial amounts of black carbon soot along with the risk of extremely difficult if not impossible clean up should there be an accident or spill. Levon heard that Canada may announce a ban on HFO use in the Arctic next week, but he also gets reaction from a shipper who feels such a decision is wrong. Read the original story here Climate change, human activities, and increasing disease exposure The current fears and spread of a deadly strain of a coronavirus has many asking how do these new diseases appear? (via CBC) As the Covid-19 virus continues its deadly spread, the question arises as to where these viral and bacterial diseases come from, or how some known disease becomes even more virulent. The answer comes from a few situations but certainly climate change and other human activities are involved. Dr Courtney Howard spoke to Marc. She is president of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, and an emergency room doctor in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories original story here Tinder as a marketing tool: Exploring off brand uses of the dating app File Photo (Reuters/Mike Blake/Illustration) Tinder is a social media site designed originally only as a dating app. At least it was. Now it seems people are beginning to use it for other things as well. Vincenzo spoke to Stefanie Duguay, an assistant professor of communications studies at Concordia. She saw that some users on Tinder were using the app in “off-label” uses, different from its intended use as a dating app. original story here Video of show Feb 14,2020 (available also on facebook, and YouTube RCI channel  window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1797024,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4WTRacxE5uNDzrXTN2FC71"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4WTRacxE5uNDzrXTN2FC71","html_description":"

Your hosts today, Levon Sevunts, Vincenzo Morello,Marc Montgomery (video of show at bottom

\nListen\n

Canada plans to support ban on heavy fuel oil in Arctic shipping

\n
\"\"

The community of Arctic Bay, Nvt., is seen on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. The federal government plans to support a proposed ban on the use of heavy fuel oil by ships plying Arctic waters. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

\n

Environmentalists have long been concerned about shipping in the Arctic using heavy fuel oil (HFO) also known as “bunker oil” to power the large vessels. HFO is a thick low quality fuel, used primarily because it is relatively inexpensive. However, environmental groups also say HFO use emits substantial amounts of black carbon soot along with the risk of extremely difficult if not impossible clean up should there be an accident or spill.

\n

Levon heard that Canada may announce a ban on HFO use in the Arctic next week, but he also gets reaction from a shipper who feels such a decision is wrong.

\n

Read the original story here

\n

Climate change, human activities, and increasing disease exposure

\n
\"\"

The current fears and spread of a deadly strain of a coronavirus has many asking how do these new diseases appear? (via CBC)

\n

As the Covid-19 virus continues its deadly spread, the question arises as to where these viral and bacterial diseases come from, or how some known disease becomes even more virulent.

\n

The answer comes from a few situations but certainly climate change and other human activities are involved.

\n

Dr Courtney Howard spoke to Marc. She is president of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, and an emergency room doctor in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories

\n

original story here

\n

Tinder as a marketing tool: Exploring off brand uses of the dating app

\n
\"\"

File Photo (Reuters/Mike Blake/Illustration)

\n

Tinder is a social media site designed originally only as a dating app. At least it was. Now it seems people are beginning to use it for other things as well.

\n

Vincenzo spoke to Stefanie Duguay, an assistant professor of communications studies at Concordia. She saw that some users on Tinder were using the app in “off-label” uses, different from its intended use as a dating app.

\n

original story here

\n

Video of show Feb 14,2020 (available also on facebook, and YouTube RCI channel
\n

\n
\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"4WTRacxE5uNDzrXTN2FC71","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Feb 14.15.16, 2020","release_date":"2020-02-14","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4WTRacxE5uNDzrXTN2FC71"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0a0febb73f41e75208739bd7907b463866ce0569","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Levon, Vincenzo, and Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20200207-WEE15 Ottawa set to dispatch second plane to Wuhan ‘to bring every Canadian home’ Megan Millward, her husband Lie Zhang and their two children on board an evacuation flight from Wuhan, China. Two planes carrying Canadians out of the centre of the coronavirus region of China  have arrived in Canada. Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs Francois-Philippe Champagne said a third plane is being arranged for the remaining Canadians in China who want to leave. There are about 100 Canadians still in Wuhan. Levon has an update on the situation as of Friday with comments from Health Minister Patty Hajdu full story here 5G-In the rush to the internet of things, is human health at risk? More and more on the outskirts of towns or open spaces, and on almost all tall city buildings, cell towers are going up to ensure strong signals everywhere, almost inescapable signals.(Elise Amendola-The Associated Press)) Around the world, governments and technophiles are talking about the development of 5G networks. This will connect billions more devices from mobile phones to household appliances, autonomous vehicles and much more. But also around the world, groups of medical researchers and scientists are already concerned about the existing amount of radio frequency radiation from existing networks, and even more so about the vast increase in such signals with 5G. The say RF radiation should be classed as a human carcinogen in the same category as X-rays Marc spoke with Dr. Anthony Miller (MD, FRCP, FRCP (C), FFPH, FACE), a specialist in internal medicine and Professor Emeritus of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. full story here Research may link exercise to improved video game performance (iStock/EvgeniyShkolenko) It may at first seem like opposites, but exercise and video game may prove to go hand in hand. A study shows that a physical workout before playing a video game seems to improve the player's results. A neuroscientist at Montreal's McGill university tested the theory with some his students. Vincenzo spoke to Dr. Marc Roig. full story here Video of show (begins at 0;57)  window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800696,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3t0vSoLCC7Yt5XEIE6CC8I"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3t0vSoLCC7Yt5XEIE6CC8I","html_description":"

Your hosts, Levon, Vincenzo, and Marc  (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Ottawa set to dispatch second plane to Wuhan ‘to bring every Canadian home’

\n
\"\"

Megan Millward, her husband Lie Zhang and their two children on board an evacuation flight from Wuhan, China.

\n

Two planes carrying Canadians out of the centre of the coronavirus region of China  have arrived in Canada. Canada’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Francois-Philippe Champagne said a third plane is being arranged for the remaining Canadians in China who want to leave. There are about 100 Canadians still in Wuhan.

\n

Levon has an update on the situation as of Friday with comments from Health Minister Patty Hajdu

\n

full story here

\n

5G-In the rush to the internet of things, is human health at risk?

\n
\"\"

More and more on the outskirts of towns or open spaces, and on almost all tall city buildings, cell towers are going up to ensure strong signals everywhere, almost inescapable signals.(Elise Amendola-The Associated Press))

\n

Around the world, governments and technophiles are talking about the development of 5G networks. This will connect billions more devices from mobile phones to household appliances, autonomous vehicles and much more.

\n

But also around the world, groups of medical researchers and scientists are already concerned about the existing amount of radio frequency radiation from existing networks, and even more so about the vast increase in such signals with 5G. The say RF radiation should be classed as a human carcinogen in the same category as X-rays

\n

Marc spoke with Dr. Anthony Miller (MD, FRCP, FRCP (C), FFPH, FACE), a specialist in internal medicine and Professor Emeritus of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto.

\n

full story here

\n

Research may link exercise to improved video game performance

\n
\"computer

(iStock/EvgeniyShkolenko)

\n

It may at first seem like opposites, but exercise and video game may prove to go hand in hand.

\n

A study shows that a physical workout before playing a video game seems to improve the player’s results. A neuroscientist at Montreal’s McGill university tested the theory with some his students.

\n

Vincenzo spoke to Dr. Marc Roig.

\n

full story here

\n

Video of show (begins at 0;57)
\n

\n
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Your hosts Levon, Marc, and newcomer Vincenzo Morello (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Canada chartered passenger plane to repatriate Canadians from Wuhan

\n
\"\"

Emily Tjandra, left, and her son Wyatt Duplessis, 15, pose for a photo in their home in Wuhan, China in this handout photo. (Wayne Duplessis /THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO)

\n

Canada has arranged for a special charter plane to fly some 196 Canadians out of the Wuhan, China, a city at the epicentre of an epidemic of this new and deadly strain of a coronavirus.

\n

Canadian officials are now working with Chinese authorities to secure the necessary authorizations for the plane to land in Wuhan, as well as working out the logistical details of how the repatriation will proceed given the fact the city of nearly 11 million inhabitants has been under lockdown. Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne  and federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu spoke of the situation at a press conference on Thursday.

\n

Champagne and Hajdu said they are also still working out the details of what would happen to those Canadians and their family members who are repatriated to Canada.

\n

Levon has the story.

\n

full story here

\n

The issue of Huawei, national security and 5G

\n
\"\"

The concern over national security issues is back to the fore with Britain’s decision to allow Huawei partial access in developing the UK 5G network. Of the Five-Eyes international security group, The US, Australia, and New Zealand have banned Huawei, Britain has made its decision, Canada has yet to decide.(Andy Wong-AP)

\n

Huawei has long been accused of being an agent of the Chinese government. Many security agencies fear that Huawei could use its equipment to steal government and industry secrets, or be able to simply shut down key infrastructure in the event of a conflict, all through potential “back doors”. So far none of these allegations have been proven publicly. Nevertheless, the U.S., Australia and New Zealand have banned Huawei from participating in creating a 5G network in those countries.

\n

Stephanie Carvin (PhD) is an assistant professor at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University in Ottawa. In a conversation with Marc, she says China doesn’t need access to Huawei equipment for nefarious activities, and geo-economic actions of China related to Huawei may be of greater concern than theoretical security concerns.

\n

Full story here

\n

Survey: Top concern for Canadian employees is their mental well being

\n
\"\"

According to a survey by Morneau Shepell, 77 per cent of Canadians would take a lower salary in favour of better mental health support. (Photo iStock/SDI Productions)

\n

It seems in the current workplace environment, people are being tasked with more and more work. This has led to an increase in stress levels. Canadians are feeling this as well.

\n

A recent survey by a major technology oriented human resource service found that a clear majority, three out of four workers,would prioritize their mental well being over their salary

\n

Vincenzo spoke to Paula Allen. She is the senior vice president of research, analytics and innovation at Morneau Shepell

\n

full story here

\n

RCI Youtube channel: video of show
\n

\n
\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"600DN5J9BQICZN0iM4EbCg","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The Link Online, Jan. 29, 30, 31, 2020","release_date":"2020-01-31","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:600DN5J9BQICZN0iM4EbCg"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9d42c04222ba612c8f0346a30ad0b8ea65de95e7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Levon, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20200124-WEE15 According to Stephen Cornish who leads one of Canada's most recognized environmental and conservation NGO's, the root cause of many of the world's conflicts and migrations can be traced in some form back to a changing climate. In this episode he spoke to Levon about how climate concerns should factor in to Canada's foreign policy calling it a 'greening' of foreign and development policy. full story here     series link here Some millionaires ask World Economic Forum to tax them more It's estimated Canada's wealthiest and wealthy corporations avoid billions of taxes in Canada annually. A group of milionaires/billionaires in the U.S is calling on governments to tax them more as the class wage gap widens. (Chirs Watters-Reuters) Statistics show that a small number of the uber-rich control more money than the combined wealth of the vast majority of the entire rest of the world population. A small group of millionaires/billionaires mostly in the U.S. is now saying they should have to pay more tax. Calling themselves the 'patriotic millionaires', they've sent a letter to the World Economic former to that end. It's not altogether altruistic though as their campaign 'taxes or pitchforks' is in an indication of their concern for their own well-being. They know that historically when the gap between rich and poor becomes too great, social and political upheaval has followed. Author and economist Jeff Rubin spoke to Marc about the situation. full story here At long last love: Larry Walker’s going to the Baseball Hall of Fame Montreal Expos right fielder Larry Walker is seen in 1994. Less than a year later, he was off to Colorado. On Tuesday, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, just the second Canadian--after Ferguson Jenkins--to be elected. (The Canadian Press/AP) Larry Walker of Maple Ridge British Columbia has been voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He is only the second Canadian--after Ferguson Jenkins of Chatham, Ontario to get there.... Jenkins was a pitcher and Walker was an outfielder. It was a close call though as to whether Walker would make it. Terry spoke to  Richard Griffin, who is the director of baseball media for the Toronto Blue Jays, and the former Montreal Expos media relations director, a job that saw him spend a lot of hours with Walker. full story here Video of show  window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800720,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1u6GyMJAQAwof5ykzdP5ph"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1u6GyMJAQAwof5ykzdP5ph","html_description":"

Your hosts, Levon, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

According to Stephen Cornish who leads one of Canada’s most recognized environmental and conservation NGO’s, the root cause of many of the world’s conflicts and migrations can be traced in some form back to a changing climate.

\n

In this episode he spoke to Levon about how climate concerns should factor in to Canada’s foreign policy calling it a ‘greening’ of foreign and development policy.

\n

full story hereseries link here

\n

Some millionaires ask World Economic Forum to tax them more

\n
\"\"

It’s estimated Canada’s wealthiest and wealthy corporations avoid billions of taxes in Canada annually. A group of milionaires/billionaires in the U.S is calling on governments to tax them more as the class wage gap widens. (Chirs Watters-Reuters)

\n

Statistics show that a small number of the uber-rich control more money than the combined wealth of the vast majority of the entire rest of the world population.

\n

A small group of millionaires/billionaires mostly in the U.S. is now saying they should have to pay more tax. Calling themselves the ‘patriotic millionaires’, they’ve sent a letter to the World Economic former to that end.

\n

It’s not altogether altruistic though as their campaign ‘taxes or pitchforks’ is in an indication of their concern for their own well-being. They know that historically when the gap between rich and poor becomes too great, social and political upheaval has followed.

\n

Author and economist Jeff Rubin spoke to Marc about the situation.

\n

full story here

\n

At long last love: Larry Walker’s going to the Baseball Hall of Fame

\n
\"\"

Montreal Expos right fielder Larry Walker is seen in 1994. Less than a year later, he was off to Colorado. On Tuesday, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, just the second Canadian–after Ferguson Jenkins–to be elected. (The Canadian Press/AP)

\n

Larry Walker of Maple Ridge British Columbia has been voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.
\nHe is only the second Canadian–after Ferguson Jenkins of Chatham, Ontario to get there…. Jenkins was a pitcher and Walker was an outfielder. It was a close call though as to whether Walker would make it.

\n

Terry spoke to  Richard Griffin, who is the director of baseball media for the Toronto Blue Jays, and the former Montreal Expos media relations director, a job that saw him spend a lot of hours with Walker.

\n

full story here

\n

Video of show
\n

\n
\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"1u6GyMJAQAwof5ykzdP5ph","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Jan 24.25.26, 2020","release_date":"2020-01-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1u6GyMJAQAwof5ykzdP5ph"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5d5984601748e9a317824432bf04dcdc0065a594","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20200117-WEE15 Diplomatic Dispatch series Canadian flags and the Parliament building's Victory and Peace Tower (iSTock) A new podcast series is being created with several episodes already online. Through one-on-one interviews with current and former politicians and diplomats, academics, and leaders of NGO's Levon brings insight into Canada's foreign policy, defence policy and international aid and development policies. In this excerpt Levon presents a comment from former Liberal cabinet minister and former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations, Allan Rock. PS752: How could Iran have made such a terrible, tragic mistake? This photo from Ukrainian investigators looking into the Flight PS752 crash shows part of the plane's cockpit. Initial thoughts are that at lease one missile blew up near the front of the plane sending shrapnel tearing through the cockpit and killing the crew immediately. (Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via Reuters) After initial denials, Iran admitted it had shot down the passenger jet, but claimed it was a mistake. This was a big passenger jet on a known flight path, leaving Tehran, climbing and travelling relatively speaking, slowly. How could it be mistaken for a small fast incoming hostile fighter jet or missile? Marc spoke with James McKay, political science professor at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston Ontario. Canada and Canadian's reaction to the downing of Ukrainian Airlines flight PS 752 A worker is seen last week searching the scene where Flight PS752 crashed just outside of Tehran, killing all 176 people on board. (Ebrahim Noroozi/Associated Press) Terry this week has covered several aspects of the official and unofficial reaction in Canada to the tragedy of the missile attack on the Ukrainian passenger jet leaving Tehran. Some 176 people were killed, the largest number were Canadian citizens, while others were Iranian students studying in Canada, and residents not yet citizens. Terry talks about some of his stories The Link- (show starts at 0;40) window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799496,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0GSjy7droO899dLGdyDOYh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0GSjy7droO899dLGdyDOYh","html_description":"

Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Diplomatic Dispatch series

\n
\"\"

Canadian flags and the Parliament building’s Victory and Peace Tower (iSTock)

\n

A new podcast series is being created with several episodes already online. Through one-on-one interviews with current and former politicians and diplomats, academics, and leaders of NGO’s Levon brings insight into Canada’s foreign policy, defence policy and international aid and development policies.

\n

In this excerpt Levon presents a comment from former Liberal cabinet minister and former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations, Allan Rock.

\n

PS752: How could Iran have made such a terrible, tragic mistake?

\n
\"\"

This photo from Ukrainian investigators looking into the Flight PS752 crash shows part of the plane’s cockpit. Initial thoughts are that at lease one missile blew up near the front of the plane sending shrapnel tearing through the cockpit and killing the crew immediately. (Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via Reuters)

\n

After initial denials, Iran admitted it had shot down the passenger jet, but claimed it was a mistake. This was a big passenger jet on a known flight path, leaving Tehran, climbing and travelling relatively speaking, slowly. How could it be mistaken for a small fast incoming hostile fighter jet or missile?

\n

Marc spoke with James McKay, political science professor at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston Ontario.

\n

Canada and Canadian’s reaction to the downing of Ukrainian Airlines flight PS 752

\n
\"\"

A worker is seen last week searching the scene where Flight PS752 crashed just outside of Tehran, killing all 176 people on board. (Ebrahim Noroozi/Associated Press)

\n

Terry this week has covered several aspects of the official and unofficial reaction in Canada to the tragedy of the missile attack on the Ukrainian passenger jet leaving Tehran. Some 176 people were killed, the largest number were Canadian citizens, while others were Iranian students studying in Canada, and residents not yet citizens.

\n

Terry talks about some of his stories

\n

The Link- (show starts at 0;40)

\n

\n
\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t","id":"0GSjy7droO899dLGdyDOYh","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Jan. 17,18,19, 2020","release_date":"2020-01-17","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0GSjy7droO899dLGdyDOYh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/4decae39833f2c566646260e976003c6a3afc2ff","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20200110-WEE15 Intelligence suggests Ukrainian airliner shot down by Iran, says Trudeau Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The tragic crash of the Ukrainian jetliner this week in Iran was not caused by some technical problem but was most likely the result of a missile attack, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed Thursday. It apparently was the first official mention of an Iranian missile. If it was a missile, was it deliberate or a tragic mistake? Levon looked into the Prime Minister's revelation and this larger question of a missile attack. The situation in Iran Iranian mourners gather during the final stage of the funeral procession for slain top Gen. Qassem Soleimani in his hometown of Kerman, Iran. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images) The American drone strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soliemani, has led to retaliation missile strikes against military bases in Iraq where NATO forces are based. It is possible that the tragic downing of a civilian jetliner with the loss of everyone on board including 63 Canadians, is related to the tensions. But what about the domestic social and political situation in Iran itself. Was Soleilmani allowed to be killed because he was becoming too powerful? Marc spoke with Ali Dizboni (Ph.D.), Director of Military and Strategic Studies-MSS and professor in the Department of Political Science and Economics at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario. Animal rights activists looking for more victories in 2020 Camille Labchuk, the executive director of Animal Justice, is looking forward to more victories in 2020. (Animal Justice) This past year marked some significant legal gains in terms of animal rights in Canada.  There were now laws including the ones making the most news–-a new law to ban keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity, new federal legislation cracking down on animal cruelty that will list those convicted of bestiality on Canada’s national sex offenders registry. and new legislation in Ontario strengthening that province’s animal cruelty laws. Terry spoke to the executive director of Animal Justice, Camille Labchuk Full story here (video of show starts at 0;40) window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800240,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1uDhVaI5DK2hue0e0v6A7o"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1uDhVaI5DK2hue0e0v6A7o","html_description":"

Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Intelligence suggests Ukrainian airliner shot down by Iran, says Trudeau

\n
\"\"

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

\n

The tragic crash of the Ukrainian jetliner this week in Iran was not caused by some technical problem but was most likely the result of a missile attack, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed Thursday. It apparently was the first official mention of an Iranian missile. If it was a missile, was it deliberate or a tragic mistake?

\n

Levon looked into the Prime Minister’s revelation and this larger question of a missile attack.

\n

The situation in Iran

\n
\"\"

Iranian mourners gather during the final stage of the funeral procession for slain top Gen. Qassem Soleimani in his hometown of Kerman, Iran. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

\n

The American drone strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soliemani, has led to retaliation missile strikes against military bases in Iraq where NATO forces are based. It is possible that the tragic downing of a civilian jetliner with the loss of everyone on board including 63 Canadians, is related to the tensions.

\n

But what about the domestic social and political situation in Iran itself. Was Soleilmani allowed to be killed because he was becoming too powerful? Marc spoke with Ali Dizboni (Ph.D.), Director of Military and Strategic Studies-MSS and professor in the Department of Political Science and Economics at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario.

\n

Animal rights activists looking for more victories in 2020

\n
\"\"

Camille Labchuk, the executive director of Animal Justice, is looking forward to more victories in 2020. (Animal Justice)

\n

This past year marked some significant legal gains in terms of animal rights in Canada.  There were now laws including the ones making the most news–-a new law to ban keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity, new federal legislation cracking down on animal cruelty that will listthose convicted of bestiality on Canada’s national sex offenders registry. and new legislation in Ontario strengthening that province’s animal cruelty laws.

\n

Terry spoke to the executive director of Animal Justice, Camille Labchuk

\n

Full story here

\n

(video of show starts at 0;40)

\n

\n

\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t

","id":"1uDhVaI5DK2hue0e0v6A7o","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Jan 10,11,12, 2020","release_date":"2020-01-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1uDhVaI5DK2hue0e0v6A7o"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/325e31e7da5ffb568109ad54d53850cb24a19561","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts  Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191220-WEE15 Refugee advocacy group sounds the alarm on crisis in Mali Malian Armed Forces (FAMa) soldiers drive along women and children during the Operation Barkhane in Ndaki, Mali, July 29, 2019. (Benoit Tessier/REUTERS) A Canadian humanitarian aid worker says the situation in Mali is deteriorating even further. Alexandra Lamarche authored a report called Mali’s Humanitarian Crisis: Overmilitarized and Overshadowed. She says international efforts have been focussed on the military and stabilisation effort while the growing humanitarian aid need has bee woefully underfunded. Levon had a chance to speak with Lamarche for a podcast episode discussing her report and its recommendations for improving the humanitarian situation in Mali, addressing root causes of the conflict, which has now spilled to neighbouring Niger and Burkina Faso, and implementing the terms of the country’s peace agreement. (full story/interview here) Think tank backs PM on massive tree planting possibilities A new study by a leading Canadian think tank says a government promise to plant over two billion trees before 2030 to combat climate change is very feasible. (Fred Tanneau/Getty Images) A new study by the Smart Prosperity Institute at the University of Ottawa says planting the trees could reduce emissions between two and four million tonnes a year by 2030, and up to eight million tons a year by 2050 as the trees mature and absorb more carbon dioxide. In the recent election campaign, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to spend $3 billion on land and water conservation projects--including planting two billion additional trees–before 2030. Terry spoke with Dave Sawyer–an environmental economist at the institute who  co-wrote the study. (full story/interview here) Smart speakers and privacy: helpful devices, but gathering data on you as well Smart speakers with their voice assistants are hugely popular, but they also gather vast information about you for corporate and other interests (Shannon Stapleton-Reuters) They is yet another high-tech device claiming to make your life easier. But as with most such devices, there are privacy issues. So -called 'smart speakers' are also microphones and while helping you find information you've requested, are also recording that data about your private habits, likes, wants, destinations etc.  Also they have the potential to accidentally record conversations you had thought were confidential. Jordan Pearson talks about the concerns. He is a Senior Editor at Motherboard, a tech news site from VICE Media. (full story/interview here) THE  LINK video (Youtube RCI channel- RCI Facebook) ","duration_ms":1801248,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4WYeH80J5076TAD3SuWqh1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4WYeH80J5076TAD3SuWqh1","html_description":"

Your hosts  Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)

\nListen\n

Refugee advocacy group sounds the alarm on crisis in Mali

\n
\"\"

Malian Armed Forces (FAMa) soldiers drive along women and children during the Operation Barkhane in Ndaki, Mali, July 29, 2019. (Benoit Tessier/REUTERS)

\n

A Canadian humanitarian aid worker says the situation in Mali is deteriorating even further.

\n

Alexandra Lamarche authored a report called Mali’s Humanitarian Crisis: Overmilitarized and Overshadowed.

\n

She says international efforts have been focussed on the military and stabilisation effort while the growing humanitarian aid need has bee woefully underfunded.

\n

Levon had a chance to speak with Lamarche for a podcast episode discussing her report and its recommendations for improving the humanitarian situation in Mali, addressing root causes of the conflict, which has now spilled to neighbouring Niger and Burkina Faso, and implementing the terms of the country’s peace agreement.

\n

(full story/interview here)

\n

Think tank backs PM on massive tree planting possibilities

\n
\"\"

A new study by a leading Canadian think tank says a government promise to plant over two billion trees before 2030 to combat climate change is very feasible. (Fred Tanneau/Getty Images)

\n

A new study by the Smart Prosperity Institute at the University of Ottawa says planting the trees could reduce emissions between two and four million tonnes a year by 2030, and up to eight million tons a year by 2050 as the trees mature and absorb more carbon dioxide.

\n

In the recent election campaign, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to spend $3 billion on land and water conservation projects--including planting two billion additional trees–before 2030.

\n

Terry spoke with Dave Sawyeran environmental economist at the institute who  co-wrote the study.

\n

(full story/interview here)

\n

Smart speakers and privacy: helpful devices, but gathering data on you as well

\n
\"\"

Smart speakers with their voice assistants are hugely popular, but they also gather vast information about you for corporate and other interests (Shannon Stapleton-Reuters)

\n

They is yet another high-tech device claiming to make your life easier. But as with most such devices, there are privacy issues.

\n

So -called ‘smart speakers’ are also microphones and while helping you find information you’ve requested, are also recording that data about your private habits, likes, wants, destinations etc.  Also they have the potential to accidentally record conversations you had thought were confidential.

\n

Jordan Pearson talks about the concerns. He is a Senior Editor at Motherboard, a tech news site from VICE Media.

\n

(full story/interview here)

\n

THE  LINK video (Youtube RCI channel- RCI Facebook)

\n

","id":"4WYeH80J5076TAD3SuWqh1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Dec 20,21,22, 2019","release_date":"2019-12-20","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4WYeH80J5076TAD3SuWqh1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b3ea0e5ad0651efba5781aeeb9f882597f6607b5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts are Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191213-WEE15 Is it time for Canada to rethink policy regarding China? Chinese President Xi Jinping is seen during the closing session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing in May 2018. Many say that under his leadership China has become an international bully and shown little respect for international law. A longtime China watcher agrees with many other analysts saying its time for Canada to get tough with China (Mark Schiefelbein/Associated Press) Working for the Canadian government, Margaret McCuaig Johnston had for decades worked to develop closer ties between Canada and China. She says, however, that China under the current leadership has changed, becoming far more aggressive. She told Marc that she has changed her view of that country and suggests Canada should take a tougher stance against China on one hand, and start developing new markets other than China. (full story here) UN food assistance agency warns of escalating crisis in Burkina Faso A displaced woman looks on while she waits for help at a village in Dablo area, Burkina Faso March 1, 2019. (Luc Gnago/REUTERS) The UN is giving warning of a dire humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso, along with its neighbours in the Central Sahel region. Just 59 years into its independence, Burkina Faso is wracked with internal violence combined with the damaging effects of climate change. The UN estimates almost 500,000 internally displaced people with almost 900,000 throughout the region, with some 2.4 million needing food assistance. Levon has a report. (full story here) A whole different kind of musical tour: the film In a scene from 'Chaakapesh,' MSO Maestro Kent Nagano watches two Inuit artists perform a throat-singing duet. (Fragments Distribution) One of the world's great orchestra leaders, Kent Nagano, combined his talent, that of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, composer Matthew Ricketts, Cree playwright Thomson Highway, director and producer Roger Frappier, and several communities of the far north of Quebec. The result is a unique collaboration in a chamber opera, and a film. Performed in five languages, Cree, Innu, Inuit, English and French. It tells of the folk legend of a 'trickster' swallowed by a whale. It's called 'Chaakapesh: The Trickster’s Quest,\" Terry Haig spoke to co-writer and co-director Jason Kingsley. (full story here) LINK VIDEO window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799184,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/64aFlsUl1ZgL1vMrZeei8a"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/64aFlsUl1ZgL1vMrZeei8a","html_description":"Your hosts are Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191213-WEE15\nIs it time for Canada to rethink policy regarding China?\nChinese President Xi Jinping is seen during the closing session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing in May 2018. Many say that under his leadership China has become an international bully and shown little respect for international law. A longtime China watcher agrees with many other analysts saying its time for Canada to get tough with China (Mark Schiefelbein/Associated Press)\n\nWorking for the Canadian government, Margaret McCuaig Johnston had for decades worked to develop closer ties between Canada and China.\n\nShe says, however, that China under the current leadership has changed, becoming far more aggressive. She told Marc that she has changed her view of that country and suggests Canada should take a tougher stance against China on one hand, and start developing new markets other than China.\n\n(full story here)\nUN food assistance agency warns of escalating crisis in Burkina Faso\nA displaced woman looks on while she waits for help at a village in Dablo area, Burkina Faso March 1, 2019. (Luc Gnago/REUTERS)\n\nThe UN is giving warning of a dire humanitarian crisis in Burkina Faso, along with its neighbours in the Central Sahel region. Just 59 years into its independence, Burkina Faso is wracked with internal violence combined with the damaging effects of climate change.\n\nThe UN estimates almost 500,000 internally displaced people with almost 900,000 throughout the region, with some 2.4 million needing food assistance.\n\nLevon has a report.\n\n(full story here)\nA whole different kind of musical tour: the film\nIn a scene from 'Chaakapesh,' MSO Maestro Kent Nagano watches two Inuit artists perform a throat-singing duet. (Fragments Distribution)\n\nOne of the world's great orchestra leaders, Kent Nagano, combined his talent, that of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, composer Matthew Ricketts, Cree playwright Thomson Highway, director and producer Roger Frappier, and several communities of the far north of Quebec.\n\nThe result is a unique collaboration in a chamber opera, and a film. Performed in five languages, Cree, Innu, Inuit, English and French. It tells of the folk legend of a 'trickster' swallowed by a whale. It's called 'Chaakapesh: The Trickster’s Quest,\"\n\nTerry Haig spoke to co-writer and co-director Jason Kingsley.\n\n(full story here)\n\nLINK VIDEO\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"64aFlsUl1ZgL1vMrZeei8a","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Dec. 13,14,15, 2019","release_date":"2019-12-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:64aFlsUl1ZgL1vMrZeei8a"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/2407486cf4af00d92c4a2dadf8e549ecece861d9","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191206-WEE15 GTA immigrants have trouble climbing corporate ladder: report Paulette Senior, the president and CEO of the Canadian Women's Foundation, poses for a photograph in Toronto on Monday, Apr. 29, 2019. A new study conducted by the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) shows that only about 4.2 per cent of executives in the GTA are from racial minorities, and only two per cent of executives are immigrant women of colour. (Tijana Martin/THE CANADIAN PRESS) An examination of statistics from major corporations and businesses located in the Greater Toronto Area showed a very low percentage of immigrants rising to upper management levels. The study was done by the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council. Levon spoke with Yimaz Ergun Dinc, policy analyst with the TRIEC. (full story here) Study finds traumatic brain injuries dramatically affect the homeless Vancouver Oppenheimer Park advocate Chrissy Brett holds Taco last month as both were bundled in warm sweaters in an attempt to keep out the chill. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC) An international study of the homeless found that one out of every two people who are homeless may have experienced traumatic brain injury. The study was an analysis of data from 38 other studies published between 1995 and 2018 from six high income countries: Australia, Canada, Japan, South Korea, the UK and the USA. Terry spoke to William Panenka, physician and researcher with the B.C. Neuropsychiatry Program and the Provincial Health Services Agency in Vancouver (full story here) Study suggests Canadian food prices to surpass inflation in 2020 An annual report on food prices in Canada says costs will rise above the inflation rate (Nathan Denette-CP) In its tenth annual report, researchers say food prices in Canada are expected to rise up to four per cent next year and possibly higher. One of the main reasons is because climate change has caused unpredictable and poor conditions for crops and harvests. Marc spoke with Sylvain Charlebois, the Director of the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University, and lead author of the report. (full story here) The Link show online (starts at 0:40)  window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1797144,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1Ndh9xocLrGqmp2aawjDVh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1Ndh9xocLrGqmp2aawjDVh","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191206-WEE15\nGTA immigrants have trouble climbing corporate ladder: report\nPaulette Senior, the president and CEO of the Canadian Women's Foundation, poses for a photograph in Toronto on Monday, Apr. 29, 2019. A new study conducted by the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) shows that only about 4.2 per cent of executives in the GTA are from racial minorities, and only two per cent of executives are immigrant women of colour. (Tijana Martin/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nAn examination of statistics from major corporations and businesses located in the Greater Toronto Area showed a very low percentage of immigrants rising to upper management levels.\n\nThe study was done by the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council.\n\nLevon spoke with Yimaz Ergun Dinc, policy analyst with the TRIEC.\n\n(full story here)\nStudy finds traumatic brain injuries dramatically affect the homeless\nVancouver Oppenheimer Park advocate Chrissy Brett holds Taco last month as both were bundled in warm sweaters in an attempt to keep out the chill. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)\n\nAn international study of the homeless found that one out of every two people who are homeless may have experienced traumatic brain injury.\n\nThe study was an analysis of data from 38 other studies published between 1995 and 2018 from six high income countries: Australia, Canada, Japan, South Korea, the UK and the USA.\n\nTerry spoke to William Panenka, physician and researcher with the B.C. Neuropsychiatry Program and the Provincial Health Services Agency in Vancouver\n\n(full story here)\nStudy suggests Canadian food prices to surpass inflation in 2020\nAn annual report on food prices in Canada says costs will rise above the inflation rate (Nathan Denette-CP)\n\nIn its tenth annual report, researchers say food prices in Canada are expected to rise up to four per cent next year and possibly higher.\n\nOne of the main reasons is because climate change has caused unpredictable and poor conditions for crops and harvests.\n\nMarc spoke with Sylvain Charlebois, the Director of the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University, and lead author of the report.\n\n(full story here)\n\nThe Link show online (starts at 0:40)\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1Ndh9xocLrGqmp2aawjDVh","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Dec. 6,7,8, 2019","release_date":"2019-12-06","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1Ndh9xocLrGqmp2aawjDVh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f9fcba5c1ba85a02d43a8634f1be41d2c5e1b129","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191129-WEE15 Former Canadian spy chief calls for ‘clear eyed’ national security discussion Richard Fadden, National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister, appears at Senate national security and defence committee in Ottawa on April 27, 2015. Fadden, a former head of Canada's spy agency, says Canada needs to take a hard look at itself to ensure it is ready to face new threats. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) A major international conference held in Ottawa this week, saw political leaders past and present, along with top level security and NGO officials discuss a variety of topics from climate, foreign aid, to security. As for Canada, the feeling was Canada needs a ‘root and branch’ review of its foreign policy according to the experts in attendance. Levon was there and spoke to a number of the officials about the rapidly changing international and domestic scene, and policies and strategies to cope. (full story here) Study shows more and more plastics are polluting the Great Lakes A fog drifts in from Lake Superior in 2011. Gail Krantzberg, an engineering and public policy professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, has published a new study that finds the microplastic problem in the Great Lakes mirrors that of the oceans: small organisms mistake microplastics for plankton, and from there they work their way up the food chain. (Canadian Press) Plastic garbage is filling up the world's oceans as we've been warned many times now.  A new study says the same tragedy is happening in the five enormous lakes known as the \"Great Lakes\" shared by Canada and the U.S. Gail Krantzberg carried out the study. She's an engineering and public policy professor at the Booth School of Engineering Practice and Technology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and spoke to Terry about the situation (full story here) U.N. Climate warning:Move quickly before it’s too late The United Nations has just released two environmental reports showing a gap in where emissions reductions should be, and where they are. (UNEP) Two recent U. N. reports look at where the world is in terms of meeting it's carbon emissions reductions, and the apparent path we're on heading towards a 3.2 degree Celsius increase in global average temperature by the end of the century. (full story here) Show starts at 0:42 window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800384,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7njwR2IEWN6Cza6o1BPdIe"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7njwR2IEWN6Cza6o1BPdIe","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191129-WEE15\nFormer Canadian spy chief calls for ‘clear eyed’ national security discussion\nRichard Fadden, National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister, appears at Senate national security and defence committee in Ottawa on April 27, 2015. Fadden, a former head of Canada's spy agency, says Canada needs to take a hard look at itself to ensure it is ready to face new threats. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nA major international conference held in Ottawa this week, saw political leaders past and present, along with top level security and NGO officials discuss a variety of topics from climate, foreign aid, to security.\n\nAs for Canada, the feeling was Canada needs a ‘root and branch’ review of its foreign policy according to the experts in attendance.\n\nLevon was there and spoke to a number of the officials about the rapidly changing international and domestic scene, and policies and strategies to cope.\n\n(full story here)\nStudy shows more and more plastics are polluting the Great Lakes\nA fog drifts in from Lake Superior in 2011. Gail Krantzberg, an engineering and public policy professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, has published a new study that finds the microplastic problem in the Great Lakes mirrors that of the oceans: small organisms mistake microplastics for plankton, and from there they work their way up the food chain. (Canadian Press)\n\nPlastic garbage is filling up the world's oceans as we've been warned many times now.  A new study says the same tragedy is happening in the five enormous lakes known as the \"Great Lakes\" shared by Canada and the U.S.\n\nGail Krantzberg carried out the study. She's an engineering and public policy professor at the Booth School of Engineering Practice and Technology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and spoke to Terry about the situation\n\n(full story here)\nU.N. Climate warning:Move quickly before it’s too late\nThe United Nations has just released two environmental reports showing a gap in where emissions reductions should be, and where they are. (UNEP)\n\nTwo recent U. N. reports look at where the world is in terms of meeting it's carbon emissions reductions, and the apparent path we're on heading towards a 3.2 degree Celsius increase in global average temperature by the end of the century.\n\n(full story here)\n\nShow starts at 0:42\n\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"7njwR2IEWN6Cza6o1BPdIe","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Nov 29, 30, Dec. 1, 2019","release_date":"2019-11-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7njwR2IEWN6Cza6o1BPdIe"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b378095468edab95bd00bed43fb9003d8e9d8277","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc   (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191122-WEE15 Trudeau taps former top diplomat to deal with discontent in Western Canada Newly named Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Chrystia Freeland speaks following the swearing-in of the new cabinet at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS) In the October general election in Canada, the Liberals under Justin Trudeau were re-elected, but this time in a minority government situation and one in which they were virtually eliminated in the four provinces west of Ontario. Very few Liberals were elected in Manitoba and British Columbia, and none at all in Saskatchewan and Alberta. With a resurrection of the separatist Bloc Quebecois in Quebec, this has left the country deeply divided. Levon discussed the nomination of former Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland to the posts of deputy Prime Minister and Intergovernmental Affairs Minister. Originally from Alberta her job will be to try to restore some unity to the country (original story here) Hong Kong protests: a former Canadian diplomat's viewpoint Police and student protesters clash at Hong Kong University this week (via CBC) The protests in Hong Kong have quieted somewhat and at last report, only a few students remain barricaded in Hong Kong university after a tense week of violent clashes with police once again.  While the situation has calmed somewhat it is doubtful they will remain that way, or that the protests are anywhere close to ending. Colin Robertson is a former Canadian Consul in Hong Kong and he says there seems to be a standoff as protesters are making demands that the Hong Kong government, and certainly China, are unwilling to compromise on. In a conversation with Marc, he expresses concern that this will not end well for anybody. Haley Wickenheiser goes to the Hockey Hall of Fame in familiar company Hayley Wickenheiser celebrates after Canada's gold medal victory at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, one of four she won in her 23-year career. Wickenheiser was to enter the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday night. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press) She has been a hockey player since her early teens, but more than that, became one of the best female hockey players in the world. She also played on men's teams for awhile has played on gold medal winning Canadian Olympic teams and world championships. Terry Haig looks at the career of this amazing player who now joins the very rare elite women inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame (original story here) VIDEO of this week's show  (starts at 0;50) window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800240,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2j4NVQGxeGZ3C473QhKgcb"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2j4NVQGxeGZ3C473QhKgcb","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc   (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191122-WEE15\nTrudeau taps former top diplomat to deal with discontent in Western Canada\nNewly named Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Chrystia Freeland speaks following the swearing-in of the new cabinet at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nIn the October general election in Canada, the Liberals under Justin Trudeau were re-elected, but this time in a minority government situation and one in which they were virtually eliminated in the four provinces west of Ontario. Very few Liberals were elected in Manitoba and British Columbia, and none at all in Saskatchewan and Alberta.\n\nWith a resurrection of the separatist Bloc Quebecois in Quebec, this has left the country deeply divided. Levon discussed the nomination of former Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland to the posts of deputy Prime Minister and Intergovernmental Affairs Minister. Originally from Alberta her job will be to try to restore some unity to the country\n\n(original story here)\nHong Kong protests: a former Canadian diplomat's viewpoint\nPolice and student protesters clash at Hong Kong University this week (via CBC)\n\nThe protests in Hong Kong have quieted somewhat and at last report, only a few students remain barricaded in Hong Kong university after a tense week of violent clashes with police once again.  While the situation has calmed somewhat it is doubtful they will remain that way, or that the protests are anywhere close to ending.\n\nColin Robertson is a former Canadian Consul in Hong Kong and he says there seems to be a standoff as protesters are making demands that the Hong Kong government, and certainly China, are unwilling to compromise on.\n\nIn a conversation with Marc, he expresses concern that this will not end well for anybody.\nHaley Wickenheiser goes to the Hockey Hall of Fame in familiar company\nHayley Wickenheiser celebrates after Canada's gold medal victory at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, one of four she won in her 23-year career. Wickenheiser was to enter the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday night. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)\n\nShe has been a hockey player since her early teens, but more than that, became one of the best female hockey players in the world. She also played on men's teams for awhile has played on gold medal winning Canadian Olympic teams and world championships.\n\nTerry Haig looks at the career of this amazing player who now joins the very rare elite women inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame\n\n(original story here)\n\nVIDEO of this week's show  (starts at 0;50)\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"2j4NVQGxeGZ3C473QhKgcb","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Nov 22, 23,24, 2019","release_date":"2019-11-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2j4NVQGxeGZ3C473QhKgcb"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/d0d1b54a61d062563869a6b41236d6a44a9e1f75","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry and Marc ListenEN_The_Link-20191115-WEE15 Canada welcomes genocide lawsuit against Myanmar, says Freeland Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, arrive at the National Press Theatre to make an announcement and hold a media availability on Canada's response to the Rohingya crisis in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 23, 2018. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Gambia has launched a lawsuit against Myanmar (formerly Burma) claiming that state has committed genocide against their Rohingya minority. In Canada, a unanimous vote in the House of Commons recognized the crimes against the Rohingya as genocide in 2018 Levon spoke with Canadian legal expert Payam Akkhavan, a former U.N. prosecutor and professor of International Law at McGill University in Montreal. Levon reached him on his mobile phone in The Hague (full story here) Superbugs could kill hundreds of thousands, cost billions in just 30 years A computer-generated image shows a group of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteria. This increase in antibiotic-resistant infections is expected to cost Canada 396,000 lives, $120 billion in hospital expenses and $388 billion in gross domestic product over the next three decades. The expert CCA panel calculated that resistant infections contributed to over 14,000 deaths in Canada in 2018, and of those, 5,400 were directly attributable to the infections(Centers for Disease Control/Associated Press) A shocking new report by a variety of medical experts in a variety of fields, along with social and economic experts, has said the incidence of anti-biotic resistant bacteria will increase to 40% by 2030. Currently some 26 percent of infections are already resistant. They calculate between now and 2050, the so-called \"superbugs\" will result in almost 400,000 deaths in Canada as infections will no longer be able to be treated. They say medical and hospital costs combined with lost productivity will cost the economy over 500 Billion dollars in that time Marc spoke with Gerry Wright, director of the Michael DeGroote Centre of Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University in Hamilton Ontario. (full story here) Remembering the horror that led to \"In Flanders Fields\" The remains of a German observation position on April 22, 1915. By this time, the countryside was devastated by millions of artillery shells fired by both sides near Ypres since 1914. Human losses were also staggering on both sides. Canadian John McCrae wrote \"In Flanders Fields\" on May 3. (Photo Credit: Archives Canada MIKAN no. 3397986) It is arguable one of the most famous poems of war. \"In Flanders Fields\" was written by a Canadian medical officer, Col John McCrae on the back of an ambulance during a brief respite from his work trying to save the many wounded and maimed. At the time he had just learned of the death of a close personal friend during a battle. He himself would die just three years later of pneumonia partly due to his working himself to exhaustion. Terry spoke to actor David Calderisi who talks about the poem, and reads it aloud. (full story here) Video of show window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800696,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0oTmi3kwcirqH9MQDCQ5FR"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0oTmi3kwcirqH9MQDCQ5FR","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry and Marc\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191115-WEE15\nCanada welcomes genocide lawsuit against Myanmar, says Freeland\nForeign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, arrive at the National Press Theatre to make an announcement and hold a media availability on Canada's response to the Rohingya crisis in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 23, 2018. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nGambia has launched a lawsuit against Myanmar (formerly Burma) claiming that state has committed genocide against their Rohingya minority.\n\nIn Canada, a unanimous vote in the House of Commons recognized the crimes against the Rohingya as genocide in 2018\n\nLevon spoke with Canadian legal expert Payam Akkhavan, a former U.N. prosecutor and professor of International Law at McGill University in Montreal. Levon reached him on his mobile phone in The Hague\n\n(full story here)\nSuperbugs could kill hundreds of thousands, cost billions in just 30 years\nA computer-generated image shows a group of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae bacteria. This increase in antibiotic-resistant infections is expected to cost Canada 396,000 lives, $120 billion in hospital expenses and $388 billion in gross domestic product over the next three decades. The expert CCA panel calculated that resistant infections contributed to over 14,000 deaths in Canada in 2018, and of those, 5,400 were directly attributable to the infections(Centers for Disease Control/Associated Press)\n\nA shocking new report by a variety of medical experts in a variety of fields, along with social and economic experts, has said the incidence of anti-biotic resistant bacteria will increase to 40% by 2030. Currently some 26 percent of infections are already resistant.\n\nThey calculate between now and 2050, the so-called \"superbugs\" will result in almost 400,000 deaths in Canada as infections will no longer be able to be treated. They say medical and hospital costs combined with lost productivity will cost the economy over 500 Billion dollars in that time\n\nMarc spoke with Gerry Wright, director of the Michael DeGroote Centre of Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University in Hamilton Ontario.\n\n(full story here)\n\nRemembering the horror that led to \"In Flanders Fields\"\n\nThe remains of a German observation position on April 22, 1915. By this time, the countryside was devastated by millions of artillery shells fired by both sides near Ypres since 1914. Human losses were also staggering on both sides. Canadian John McCrae wrote \"In Flanders Fields\" on May 3. (Photo Credit: Archives Canada MIKAN no. 3397986)\n\nIt is arguable one of the most famous poems of war. \"In Flanders Fields\" was written by a Canadian medical officer, Col John McCrae on the back of an ambulance during a brief respite from his work trying to save the many wounded and maimed. At the time he had just learned of the death of a close personal friend during a battle. He himself would die just three years later of pneumonia partly due to his working himself to exhaustion. Terry spoke to actor David Calderisi who talks about the poem, and reads it aloud.\n\n(full story here)\n\nVideo of show\n\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0oTmi3kwcirqH9MQDCQ5FR","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Nov 15.16.17, 2019","release_date":"2019-11-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0oTmi3kwcirqH9MQDCQ5FR"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/18893d2b8cf2ffb5472005f0b9b3e88b3bafde41","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc  (video of show at bottom) The Link: World scientists on climate emergency, Canadian aid orphans in Africa, new book on a tragically deadly victory in WWIIEN_The_Link-20191108-WEE15 Scientists around the world issue climate emergency warning Thousands of people joined a climate strike in Vancouver on Oct. 23. Scientists around the world are echoing their concerns about a the state of the planet. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC) Inspired in part by young activist Greta Thunberg, over 11,000 scientists from around the world have signed an open letter called \"World Scientists Warning of a Climate Emergency\". Terry spoke to Lonnie Aarssen, a Queen's University biologist in Kingston Ontario. Professor Aarssen was one of the over 400 Canadian scientists and researchers who signed the international document. Canadian charity teams with egg farmers to care for African orphans SaskEgg supports the Heart for Africa's Project Canaan project and recently got together to purchase an egg delivery truck that allows eggs and meal packs to be delivered to thousands of children and families across Eswatini (formerly Swaziland) every week. (Egg Farmers of Canada) Two successful Canadian business people married to each other happened to be in the United States on the day of tragic 9/11 attacks. One of those Canadians were aboard a jet at the time, and the other was conducting business in New York City, and both were worried sick that the other may have died in the deadly attacks. Both were safe but the ordeal caused them to completely rethink their lives. It resulted in a move to Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland) in Southern Africa where they established an orphanage for babies. Levon spoke to Ian and Janine Maxwell about their humanitarian operation and their partnership with Egg Farmers of Canada. Remembrance WWII: Canada's Black Watch in the tragic victory at Verrieres Ridge A Black Watch sniper from C Co. in a ruined building in Gennep, Holland, Feb 14, 1946 (IWM B-14626) It was a pivotal battle during the Second World War. Canada's storied Black Watch regiment was sent to take the Germans position at Verrieres Ridge in France. The Germans had decided to hold this high ground and the resulting bitter fight almost wiped out the Royal Highland Regiment, but though other battles raged on for months afterwards, it has also been seen as the beginning of the end for the Germans in Normandy Marc spoke to Montreal historian, author, and teacher David O'Keefe about his new book for this short period describing in personalised detail and narrative style this terribly costly battle. It's called \"Seven Days in Hell: Canada's battle for Normandy and the rise of the Black Watch snipers\" Video of this week's show (starts at 0;42)","duration_ms":1799616,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7FfmWt783rGDLC1LLbEHXS"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7FfmWt783rGDLC1LLbEHXS","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nThe Link: World scientists on climate emergency, Canadian aid orphans in Africa, new book on a tragically deadly victory in WWIIEN_The_Link-20191108-WEE15\nScientists around the world issue climate emergency warning\nThousands of people joined a climate strike in Vancouver on Oct. 23. Scientists around the world are echoing their concerns about a the state of the planet. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)\n\nInspired in part by young activist Greta Thunberg, over 11,000 scientists from around the world have signed an open letter called \"World Scientists Warning of a Climate Emergency\".\n\nTerry spoke to Lonnie Aarssen, a Queen's University biologist in Kingston Ontario. Professor Aarssen was one of the over 400 Canadian scientists and researchers who signed the international document.\nCanadian charity teams with egg farmers to care for African orphans\nSaskEgg supports the Heart for Africa's Project Canaan project and recently got together to purchase an egg delivery truck that allows eggs and meal packs to be delivered to thousands of children and families across Eswatini (formerly Swaziland) every week. (Egg Farmers of Canada)\n\nTwo successful Canadian business people married to each other happened to be in the United States on the day of tragic 9/11 attacks. One of those Canadians were aboard a jet at the time, and the other was conducting business in New York City, and both were worried sick that the other may have died in the deadly attacks. Both were safe but the ordeal caused them to completely rethink their lives.\n\nIt resulted in a move to Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland) in Southern Africa where they established an orphanage for babies. Levon spoke to Ian and Janine Maxwell about their humanitarian operation and their partnership with Egg Farmers of Canada.\nRemembrance WWII: Canada's Black Watch in the tragic victory at Verrieres Ridge\nA Black Watch sniper from C Co. in a ruined building in Gennep, Holland, Feb 14, 1946 (IWM B-14626)\n\nIt was a pivotal battle during the Second World War. Canada's storied Black Watch regiment was sent to take the Germans position at Verrieres Ridge in France. The Germans had decided to hold this high ground and the resulting bitter fight almost wiped out the Royal Highland Regiment, but though other battles raged on for months afterwards, it has also been seen as the beginning of the end for the Germans in Normandy\n\nMarc spoke to Montreal historian, author, and teacher David O'Keefe about his new book for this short period describing in personalised detail and narrative style this terribly costly battle. It's called \"Seven Days in Hell: Canada's battle for Normandy and the rise of the Black Watch snipers\"\n\nVideo of this week's show (starts at 0;42)","id":"7FfmWt783rGDLC1LLbEHXS","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Nov. 8,9,10, 2019","release_date":"2019-11-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7FfmWt783rGDLC1LLbEHXS"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9c8273dddfcd88a319a2e660b4d224199fc3569b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"your hosts Levon, Mathiew, Marc   (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191101-WEE15 Quebec to add 'values' test for new immigrants Premier François Legault, left, asked Immigration Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette to come up with the values test. (Ivanoh Demers/Radio-Canada) The mostly French-speaking province of Quebec intends to implement a test for prospective immigrants to ensure they understand 'Quebec' societal values. As of Jan. 1, 2020, new immigrants to Quebec will have to demonstrate that they understand and accept “democratic values and Quebec values”  which will be a first step towards selection Levon has an excerpt of Quebec Premier Francois Legault explaining the reasoning behind the values test full story here Taking a different perspective on world drug problem Paramedics and firefighters work to revive an overdose patient with repeated doses of naloxone, the antidote to opioids such as fentanyl. A series in the medical journal The Lancet says old anti-drug laws are not working, and new evidence-based approaches are needed for new realities (Frederic Gagnon/CBC) A series published this month in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet, provides an scientific update on the world's growing problem of illicit drug use.  It deals in large measure with researched treatment methods. Most of the world's laws dealing with illicit drugs and their use date back to the 1960's according to Dr Julie Bruneau, and clearly haven't worked as the problem has only grown. She adds that in the interval, new types of drugs have come into the picture as well. Marc spoke with Dr Bruneau who is a co-author in two of the several segments in the series, She is a professor in the Department of Family and Emergency Medicine at the Universite de Montreal, and a researcher at the CRCHUM (University of Montreal Hospital Research Center. In the excerpt she explains what she means when she says new policies to treat addicts should be based on science and not perceptions full story here Can new plain cigarette packs be effective in reducing smoking? A proposed standardized cigarette package is displayed in front of a variety of cigarette packages available today in Canada. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press) Canada is moving ahead with a plan to institute so-called plain packaging for cigarettes. This follows the  same type of policies instituted by other countries like Australia and France. The idea is to discourage smoking by making the packaging far less attractive. Only one standard type of packaging will also be available known as \"slide and shell\" as it provides a wider surface for health warnings. The plain packaging comes into effect starting this month while the slide and shell will be standard by next year. Longer thin cigarettes which seem to target women as being fashionably slim and fashionable will also be eliminated. Mathiew had a report story here 2018 interview here video of show (starts at 0;40) window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799496,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5ft5OY1LDUltZ9tSnthyR1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5ft5OY1LDUltZ9tSnthyR1","html_description":"your hosts Levon, Mathiew, Marc   (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191101-WEE15\nQuebec to add 'values' test for new immigrants\nPremier François Legault, left, asked Immigration Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette to come up with the values test. (Ivanoh Demers/Radio-Canada)\n\nThe mostly French-speaking province of Quebec intends to implement a test for prospective immigrants to ensure they understand 'Quebec' societal values.\n\nAs of Jan. 1, 2020, new immigrants to Quebec will have to demonstrate that they understand and accept “democratic values and Quebec values”  which will be a first step towards selection\n\nLevon has an excerpt of Quebec Premier Francois Legault explaining the reasoning behind the values test\n\nfull story here\nTaking a different perspective on world drug problem\nParamedics and firefighters work to revive an overdose patient with repeated doses of naloxone, the antidote to opioids such as fentanyl. A series in the medical journal The Lancet says old anti-drug laws are not working, and new evidence-based approaches are needed for new realities (Frederic Gagnon/CBC)\n\nA series published this month in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet, provides an scientific update on the world's growing problem of illicit drug use.  It deals in large measure with researched treatment methods.\n\nMost of the world's laws dealing with illicit drugs and their use date back to the 1960's according to Dr Julie Bruneau, and clearly haven't worked as the problem has only grown. She adds that in the interval, new types of drugs have come into the picture as well.\n\nMarc spoke with Dr Bruneau who is a co-author in two of the several segments in the series, She is a professor in the Department of Family and Emergency Medicine at the Universite de Montreal, and a researcher at the CRCHUM (University of Montreal Hospital Research Center.\n\nIn the excerpt she explains what she means when she says new policies to treat addicts should be based on science and not perceptions\n\nfull story here\nCan new plain cigarette packs be effective in reducing smoking?\nA proposed standardized cigarette package is displayed in front of a variety of cigarette packages available today in Canada. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)\n\nCanada is moving ahead with a plan to institute so-called plain packaging for cigarettes. This follows the  same type of policies instituted by other countries like Australia and France. The idea is to discourage smoking by making the packaging far less attractive.\n\nOnly one standard type of packaging will also be available known as \"slide and shell\" as it provides a wider surface for health warnings. The plain packaging comes into effect starting this month while the slide and shell will be standard by next year.\n\nLonger thin cigarettes which seem to target women as being fashionably slim and fashionable will also be eliminated.\n\nMathiew had a report\n\nstory here\n\n2018 interview here\n\nvideo of show (starts at 0;40)\n\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"5ft5OY1LDUltZ9tSnthyR1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Nov 1,2.3","release_date":"2019-11-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5ft5OY1LDUltZ9tSnthyR1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/cff74ca66354eccd21eb9f110c26ab88381a3b22","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Levon, Lynn, Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20191025-WEE15 Arab World Festival-Montreal Emily Awad, Director of Communications for the festival joins us via skype This weekend marks the start of the 20th year for the Arab World Festival,/ Festival du Monde Arabe  (FMA) in Montreal. The idea is to showcase elements of Arabic culture and build bridges with Canadian society. Emily Awad, director of communications, is the spokesperson for the festival, She says at least 50 per cent of the visitors to various shows are indeed, non-Arabic. non-Muslim.  There are many different types of performances, films, and discussion panel events which makes it not only entertaining, but informative as well. Canada Election: Coalition out, but cooperation on climate, housing affordability Prime Minister Justin Trudeau makes his way to a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Wednesday Oct. 23, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Levon talks about the position of Liberal leader Justin Trudeau as he resumes the office of Prime Minister, but as the head of a minority government. Excerpts of his post-election speeches are discussed along with some of the challenges he now faces. Full story here Canada Election: Results show clear national division Liberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks to supporters at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press) The election has shown very clear and deep divisions that have resulted from the past four years of the Trudeau government.  With the resurrection of the separatist Bloc Quebecois in the mostly French speaking province of Quebec, to the elimination of Liberals in the west and spectre of a growing western separatist movement. Trudeau now faces real challenges to govern as he says \"for all Canadians\". Marc spoke with political science professor Sanjay Jeram of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia full story and interview here Canada Election: Climate change challenge for minority government In the 2019 election, 63 per cent of electors voted for parties with strong plans to mitigate climate change. (iStock) One of the major issues, and one likely to cause further tensions and divisions in Canada is that of climate change and policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Lynn spoke with Catherine Abreu, Executive Director of the Climate Action Network of Canada, a coalition of groups concerned about climate change.  Full story and interview here The LINK video- via YouTube RCI channel (show starts at 1:13)","duration_ms":1800120,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1Qeac2DVirXM1ChXpiw2mT"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1Qeac2DVirXM1ChXpiw2mT","html_description":"Your hosts: Levon, Lynn, Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20191025-WEE15\nArab World Festival-Montreal\nEmily Awad, Director of Communications for the festival joins us via skype\n\nThis weekend marks the start of the 20th year for the Arab World Festival,/ Festival du Monde Arabe  (FMA) in Montreal. The idea is to showcase elements of Arabic culture and build bridges with Canadian society.\n\nEmily Awad, director of communications, is the spokesperson for the festival, She says at least 50 per cent of the visitors to various shows are indeed, non-Arabic. non-Muslim.  There are many different types of performances, films, and discussion panel events which makes it not only entertaining, but informative as well.\nCanada Election: Coalition out, but cooperation on climate, housing affordability\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau makes his way to a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Wednesday Oct. 23, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nLevon talks about the position of Liberal leader Justin Trudeau as he resumes the office of Prime Minister, but as the head of a minority government. Excerpts of his post-election speeches are discussed along with some of the challenges he now faces.\n\nFull story here\nCanada Election: Results show clear national division\nLiberal leader Justin Trudeau speaks to supporters at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)\n\nThe election has shown very clear and deep divisions that have resulted from the past four years of the Trudeau government.  With the resurrection of the separatist Bloc Quebecois in the mostly French speaking province of Quebec, to the elimination of Liberals in the west and spectre of a growing western separatist movement. Trudeau now faces real challenges to govern as he says \"for all Canadians\".\n\nMarc spoke with political science professor Sanjay Jeram of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia\n\nfull story and interview here\nCanada Election: Climate change challenge for minority government\nIn the 2019 election, 63 per cent of electors voted for parties with strong plans to mitigate climate change. (iStock)\n\nOne of the major issues, and one likely to cause further tensions and divisions in Canada is that of climate change and policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.\n\nLynn spoke with Catherine Abreu, Executive Director of the Climate Action Network of Canada, a coalition of groups concerned about climate change. \n\nFull story and interview here\n\nThe LINK video- via YouTube RCI channel (show starts at 1:13)","id":"1Qeac2DVirXM1ChXpiw2mT","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Oct.25,26,27,","release_date":"2019-10-25","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1Qeac2DVirXM1ChXpiw2mT"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/414dbb3b49eb83098e171201916da8d6813428c3","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Lynn, Terry, Marc  (video of show at bottom) the link- political opinion polls, obese people and medical care, false fish- what you pay for is not what you getEN_The_Link-20191018-WEE15 Canada's election and political opinion polls: Can they influence voters? Voter survey for upcoming election. Literally dozens of polls are conducted, on voter intentions, issues of concern, leader popularity, government record, and so on, additionally sometimes broken down further into respondents sex, income, age etc. (CBC) In any major election, there are almost always dozens of opinion polls taken, and often on a daily basis. They can survey people's opinions on the popularity of leaders, on the popularity of parties, voter intentions, opinions on policies and so on. But can they, do they influence voters?  Are they reliable, and can they be skewed for partisan ends? Marc speaks with Peter Loewen, political science professor at the University of Toronto and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Bias, discrimination prevent people getting obesity care: study People with obesity “shouldn’t look at this being their own fault...obesity is a chronic disease,” says a medical specialist. (iStock) Obesity is now being accepted more as a chronic disease, but there is still a great deal of bias against obese people as saying the problem is their own fault.  This attitude results in people not getting the type of care they need. Lynn spoke with Arya Sharma, the scientific director for the non-profit Obesity Canada.  Conservation group exposes widespread seafood fraud in Canada A seafood counter is shown at a store in Toronto on Thursday, May 3, 2018. A new study found 61 per cent of seafood products tested at Montreal grocery stores and restaurants were mislabelled. (Nathan Denette/THE CANADIAN PRESS) It's quite a concern. The type of fish Canadians think they're buying has a good chance of being something else. A multi-year, cross-Canada testing of fish samples through DNA, shows an average of 41 per cent of samples were not the fish type advertised. This means often paying for an expensive type of seafood, but getting a lower quality species. In some cases, species were also found to be of types banned in some countries, and the situation is also likely to be a conduit for illegal caught fish, and illegal types. Levon spoke to Josh Laughren, executive director at Oceana Canada Video of show (RCI YOUTUBE channel- show starts at 0;40)","duration_ms":1797432,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6njxsj9meuh0kWKcmUhqHi"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6njxsj9meuh0kWKcmUhqHi","html_description":"Your hosts Lynn, Terry, Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nthe link- political opinion polls, obese people and medical care, false fish- what you pay for is not what you getEN_The_Link-20191018-WEE15\nCanada's election and political opinion polls: Can they influence voters?\nVoter survey for upcoming election. Literally dozens of polls are conducted, on voter intentions, issues of concern, leader popularity, government record, and so on, additionally sometimes broken down further into respondents sex, income, age etc. (CBC)\n\nIn any major election, there are almost always dozens of opinion polls taken, and often on a daily basis. They can survey people's opinions on the popularity of leaders, on the popularity of parties, voter intentions, opinions on policies and so on.\n\nBut can they, do they influence voters?  Are they reliable, and can they be skewed for partisan ends?\n\nMarc speaks with Peter Loewen, political science professor at the University of Toronto and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy\nBias, discrimination prevent people getting obesity care: study\nPeople with obesity “shouldn’t look at this being their own fault...obesity is a chronic disease,” says a medical specialist. (iStock)\n\nObesity is now being accepted more as a chronic disease, but there is still a great deal of bias against obese people as saying the problem is their own fault.  This attitude results in people not getting the type of care they need.\n\nLynn spoke with Arya Sharma, the scientific director for the non-profit Obesity Canada. \nConservation group exposes widespread seafood fraud in Canada\nA seafood counter is shown at a store in Toronto on Thursday, May 3, 2018. A new study found 61 per cent of seafood products tested at Montreal grocery stores and restaurants were mislabelled. (Nathan Denette/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nIt's quite a concern. The type of fish Canadians think they're buying has a good chance of being something else. A multi-year, cross-Canada testing of fish samples through DNA, shows an average of 41 per cent of samples were not the fish type advertised.\n\nThis means often paying for an expensive type of seafood, but getting a lower quality species. In some cases, species were also found to be of types banned in some countries, and the situation is also likely to be a conduit for illegal caught fish, and illegal types.\n\nLevon spoke to Josh Laughren, executive director at Oceana Canada\n\nVideo of show (RCI YOUTUBE channel- show starts at 0;40)","id":"6njxsj9meuh0kWKcmUhqHi","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Oct 18.19.20, 2019","release_date":"2019-10-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6njxsj9meuh0kWKcmUhqHi"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/8882b508a12ba32c71167ee0cb99affd63b5ca85","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marc, with guest Stephane Parent, host of RCI's French language programme  (video of show at bottom) The Link: this week talks about the Canadian election leader's debate, a new much simpler, faster early detection method for Alzheimers, and a long time Canadian TV show that makes fun of politicians, and they like it.EN_The_Link-20191011-WEE15 Canadian election, debate of the leaders in French Host Patrice Roy from Radio-Canada, centre, introduces Federal party leaders, left to right, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, Green Party leader Elizabeth May, People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, and Bloc Quebecois leader Yves-Francois Blanchet before the Federal leaders French language debate in Gatineau, Que. on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) There have now been two official debates among the record number of federal party leaders.  The English debate was at times a raucous affair, and the French language debate (Canada having two official languages) was held Thursday night. After criticism, the format was changed somewhat to provide a somewhat better event although there were still moments of people interrupting each other, which a certain numbero f Canadian viewers don't appreciate. Stephane. Lynn, and Marc talk about the debate Eye scan may soon permit early detection of Alzheimers A specialized camera and software analyzes the back of a person’s eye to detect patterns specific to Alzheimer’s disease before the symptoms develop. (Cole Burston/RetiSpec) A new technology may hold the promise of detecting Alzheimer's disease at a much earlier stage.  Current tests are much more expensive and invasive, involvinig PET scans or spinal taps. But a new technology has been developed involving a simple eye exam that could be done during routine eye checkups.  Lynn spoke with Dr. Sharon Cohen, medical director of the Toronto Memory Program A funnier side of politics In 1996, then Prime Minister Jean Charest from Shawinigan Quebec, grabbed a noisy protester blocking his path, by the neck and shoved him aside. The \"Shawinigan Handshake\" became a long-standing on-camera joke between Cretien and Critch who says Cretien loved to play along (CBC) The programme 22 Minutes is one of the longest running comedy shows on Canadian TV. The comedy/satire show makes fun of celebrities, society, and especially political figures. The latter group of course wants to be taken seriously, but somehow they are inspired to play along . Cast member and host Mark Critch talks about how they manage to ridicule political figures but leave them and audiences smiling. THE LINK- video of show 2019-10-11 (starts at 0.41)","duration_ms":1796258,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2Q3IONeduoaNkMUaCKgY4m"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2Q3IONeduoaNkMUaCKgY4m","html_description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marc, with guest Stephane Parent, host of RCI's French language programme  (video of show at bottom)\n\nThe Link: this week talks about the Canadian election leader's debate, a new much simpler, faster early detection method for Alzheimers, and a long time Canadian TV show that makes fun of politicians, and they like it.EN_The_Link-20191011-WEE15\nCanadian election, debate of the leaders in French\nHost Patrice Roy from Radio-Canada, centre, introduces Federal party leaders, left to right, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, Green Party leader Elizabeth May, People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, and Bloc Quebecois leader Yves-Francois Blanchet before the Federal leaders French language debate in Gatineau, Que. on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThere have now been two official debates among the record number of federal party leaders.  The English debate was at times a raucous affair, and the French language debate (Canada having two official languages) was held Thursday night.\n\nAfter criticism, the format was changed somewhat to provide a somewhat better event although there were still moments of people interrupting each other, which a certain numbero f Canadian viewers don't appreciate.\n\nStephane. Lynn, and Marc talk about the debate\n\nEye scan may soon permit early detection of Alzheimers\n\nA specialized camera and software analyzes the back of a person’s eye to detect patterns specific to Alzheimer’s disease before the symptoms develop. (Cole Burston/RetiSpec)\n\nA new technology may hold the promise of detecting Alzheimer's disease at a much earlier stage.  Current tests are much more expensive and invasive, involvinig PET scans or spinal taps. But a new technology has been developed involving a simple eye exam that could be done during routine eye checkups. \n\nLynn spoke with Dr. Sharon Cohen, medical director of the Toronto Memory Program\nA funnier side of politics\nIn 1996, then Prime Minister Jean Charest from Shawinigan Quebec, grabbed a noisy protester blocking his path, by the neck and shoved him aside. The \"Shawinigan Handshake\" became a long-standing on-camera joke between Cretien and Critch who says Cretien loved to play along (CBC)\n\nThe programme 22 Minutes is one of the longest running comedy shows on Canadian TV. The comedy/satire show makes fun of celebrities, society, and especially political figures. The latter group of course wants to be taken seriously, but somehow they are inspired to play along . Cast member and host Mark Critch talks about how they manage to ridicule political figures but leave them and audiences smiling.\nTHE LINK- video of show 2019-10-11 (starts at 0.41)","id":"2Q3IONeduoaNkMUaCKgY4m","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Oct.11,12,13, 2019","release_date":"2019-10-11","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2Q3IONeduoaNkMUaCKgY4m"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/af9c2c49c69f93497745618664d4d52aebdaac19","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Terry, Levon, and Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190927-WEE15 Major research projects to understand climate change effects on the Arctic The German icebreaker and research vessel Polarstern is pictured at the port of Tromso, Norway Sept. 18, 2019. (Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB scanpix/Reuters) Hundreds of scientists from several countries have now embarked on two simultaneous and related research projects in the Arctic. The yearlong project involves a research ship which will drift with the ice and a land-based operation. It's called the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate, or MOSAiC , while the land based project is called T-MOSAIC, the T is for terrestrial. Levon spoke with Warwick Vincent, a polar scientist and Canada Research Chair at Université Laval in Quebec City. Massive loss of N. American birds: study The Canadian study showed as an example that 2 in 5 Baltimore Orioles (shown) have disappeared as have 2 in 5 barn swallows. (Gary Mueller-Macaulay Library-Cornell Lab of Ornithology) The morning chorus of birds in N.America is not what it used to be. A new study points to why that is. The study analysed recent bird population data, and compared it to that of several decades ago. They found that there are about 3 billion birds fewer now that there were in 1970. Marc spoke with Adam Smith (PhD) was one of the lead researchers. He is Senior Biostatistician, Environmental Stewardship Branch, Canadian Wildlife Service and Environment and Climate Change Canada Working to De-radicalize- one person at a time There are many across Canada doing their level best to get through to youth and young adults who may be heading to violence as a way of achieving their goals. The ReDirect program in Calgary is one of them. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press) A programme in Calgary, Alberta seeks to connect with young people and steer them away from gangs and violence. It's part of a larger effort both nationally and by individual cities to prevent both radicalization and gang violence. It's called \"Re-direct\" and involves city social workers and police. Terry spoke with programme co-ordinator is Sgt. Gareth Joels of the Calgary Police Service. The LINK show Sept. 27. 2019 ","duration_ms":1801482,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0uzmKuJjvoHOJpKST1azuw"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0uzmKuJjvoHOJpKST1azuw","html_description":"Your hosts Terry, Levon, and Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190927-WEE15\nMajor research projects to understand climate change effects on the Arctic\nThe German icebreaker and research vessel Polarstern is pictured at the port of Tromso, Norway Sept. 18, 2019. (Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB scanpix/Reuters)\n\nHundreds of scientists from several countries have now embarked on two simultaneous and related research projects in the Arctic.\n\nThe yearlong project involves a research ship which will drift with the ice and a land-based operation. It's called the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate, or MOSAiC , while the land based project is called T-MOSAIC, the T is for terrestrial.\n\nLevon spoke with Warwick Vincent, a polar scientist and Canada Research Chair at Université Laval in Quebec City.\nMassive loss of N. American birds: study\nThe Canadian study showed as an example that 2 in 5 Baltimore Orioles (shown) have disappeared as have 2 in 5 barn swallows. (Gary Mueller-Macaulay Library-Cornell Lab of Ornithology)\n\nThe morning chorus of birds in N.America is not what it used to be. A new study points to why that is. The study analysed recent bird population data, and compared it to that of several decades ago.\n\nThey found that there are about 3 billion birds fewer now that there were in 1970.\n\nMarc spoke with Adam Smith (PhD) was one of the lead researchers. He is Senior Biostatistician, Environmental Stewardship Branch, Canadian Wildlife Service and Environment and Climate Change Canada\nWorking to De-radicalize- one person at a time\nThere are many across Canada doing their level best to get through to youth and young adults who may be heading to violence as a way of achieving their goals. The ReDirect program in Calgary is one of them. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)\n\nA programme in Calgary, Alberta seeks to connect with young people and steer them away from gangs and violence. It's part of a larger effort both nationally and by individual cities to prevent both radicalization and gang violence.\n\nIt's called \"Re-direct\" and involves city social workers and police.\n\nTerry spoke with programme co-ordinator is Sgt. Gareth Joels of the Calgary Police Service.\n\nThe LINK show Sept. 27. 2019\n","id":"0uzmKuJjvoHOJpKST1azuw","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Sep 27.28.29, 2019","release_date":"2019-09-27","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0uzmKuJjvoHOJpKST1azuw"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0cf26a62180216564e8548518c02893c08bad8d2","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Levon, Matt and Marc (video of show at bottom) The Link show: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau apologising for a racist incident in his past, Analysis of attacks on Saudi oil facilities, Discovery of the first interstellar comet. Marie-Claude leaving usEN_The_Link-20190920-WEE15 Trudeau apologizes to Canada's racial minorities over blackface scandal Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau makes a statement in regards to a video from the 1990s showing him in \"blackface\" during an event in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. (CBC) The leader of the Liberal party, Justin Trudeau, has had to face extremely difficult questions over his past when he dressed in costume with brownface and blackface, both considered to be racist. He has had to make several public apologies, but the issue so far has not calmed down. It is not certain what effect this may Levon  gathered sound clips of the apologies, and of reaction from the leaders of the two main opposition parties, Andrew Scheer of the Conservative party, and Jagmeet Singh of the New Democratic Party.  Drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities The fires at the Abqaiq refinery light up the sky as several drones successfully hit specific targets of the facility. (amateur video- France 24- YouTube) Drone missile attacks caused extensive damage to two Saudi oil refining operations this week.  Yemen's Houthi rebels claimed responsibility but the U.S blames Iran. The attacks did not cause permanent damage and oil prices which initially spiked, have since calmed. However, the attack only further heightens tensions in the region. It also highlights a new era in world conflict where distant attacks using small drones are difficult to defend against Marc spoke with James Devine, associate professor in political science and international relations at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, specialises in the politics and foreign policy of Iran Canadian telescope helps study first-ever interstellar comet A 30-second exposure of the newly identified comet captured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in early September 2019. (Photo: Karen Meech and Jan Kleyna (University of Hawaii)/© Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) Two years ago astronomers spotted the first ever known interstellar object, a large oddly shaped rock which they named \"Oumuamua\" . Now, a second object from another solar system has recently been located by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. But this time, it could be a comet, making it the first interstellar one ever observed by humans.This has been labelled C/2019 Q4.  Mathiew spoke with astronomer Karen Meech  one of the scientists who discovered ‘Oumuamua. She is also one of the first scientists to take a closer look at C/2019 Q4. She explained to us how it happened: The LINK video (starts about 1 minute in)  Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801718,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/2lVAoSpIIlq2MzsY2qwL9i"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/2lVAoSpIIlq2MzsY2qwL9i","html_description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Levon, Matt and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nThe Link show: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau apologising for a racist incident in his past, Analysis of attacks on Saudi oil facilities, Discovery of the first interstellar comet. Marie-Claude leaving usEN_The_Link-20190920-WEE15\nTrudeau apologizes to Canada's racial minorities over blackface scandal\nLiberal Leader Justin Trudeau makes a statement in regards to a video from the 1990s showing him in \"blackface\" during an event in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. (CBC)\n\nThe leader of the Liberal party, Justin Trudeau, has had to face extremely difficult questions over his past when he dressed in costume with brownface and blackface, both considered to be racist.\n\nHe has had to make several public apologies, but the issue so far has not calmed down. It is not certain what effect this may\n\nLevon  gathered sound clips of the apologies, and of reaction from the leaders of the two main opposition parties, Andrew Scheer of the Conservative party, and Jagmeet Singh of the New Democratic Party.\n Drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities\nThe fires at the Abqaiq refinery light up the sky as several drones successfully hit specific targets of the facility. (amateur video- France 24- YouTube)\n\nDrone missile attacks caused extensive damage to two Saudi oil refining operations this week.  Yemen's Houthi rebels claimed responsibility but the U.S blames Iran.\n\nThe attacks did not cause permanent damage and oil prices which initially spiked, have since calmed. However, the attack only further heightens tensions in the region. It also highlights a new era in world conflict where distant attacks using small drones are difficult to defend against\n\nMarc spoke with James Devine, associate professor in political science and international relations at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, specialises in the politics and foreign policy of Iran\nCanadian telescope helps study first-ever interstellar comet\nA 30-second exposure of the newly identified comet captured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in early September 2019. (Photo: Karen Meech and Jan Kleyna (University of Hawaii)/© Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope)\n\nTwo years ago astronomers spotted the first ever known interstellar object, a large oddly shaped rock which they named \"Oumuamua\" . Now, a second object from another solar system has recently been located by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. But this time, it could be a comet, making it the first interstellar one ever observed by humans.This has been labelled C/2019 Q4. \n\nMathiew spoke with astronomer Karen Meech  one of the scientists who discovered ‘Oumuamua. She is also one of the first scientists to take a closer look at C/2019 Q4. She explained to us how it happened:\n\nThe LINK video (starts about 1 minute in)\n\n\nImages of the week\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"2lVAoSpIIlq2MzsY2qwL9i","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Sept. 20,21,22, 2019","release_date":"2019-09-20","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:2lVAoSpIIlq2MzsY2qwL9i"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/db46b0dca40bf24fc7f46a2fed9ca46e7958b940","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Levon, Mathiew, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190913-WEE15 Expert warns of possible Russian disinformation campaign in Canada's election Canada heads into a general election this October. A new study warns that Ottawa should be ready to counter a possible Russian disinformation campaign targeting Canadians. (Evelyne Asselin/CBC) Canada's election has officially been launched and the political parties are busy trying to get their respective messages, platforms, promises and policies out to voters. But a Russian specialist in information warfare at the University of Calgary is warning that Canadian authorities and citizens should be wary of a possible campaign of disinformation emanating from the Kremlin Levon spoke with Sergey Sukhankin the author of the study Canadian newspapers struggling in the face of  the internet giants like Google, Facebook, Amazon etc. Canadian newspapers are struggling to continue printing and supporting journalists in the face of declining revenues, in part due to internet giants like Amazon, Google, Apple, Facebook and others. (Adrian Wyld-CP) Canadian newspapers say they're being faced with a triple whammy that seriously compromises their survival. Unlike Canadian news operations, the U.S based internet giants don't pay any taxes in the many foreign countries where they are available, like Canada. They also take their content from Canadian (and other) news operations with little or no compensation but make their own advertising profits from visitors to their sites. They also siphon off advertisers and the ad revenue from the newspapers. Print news may not have much of a future. Marc spoke to Lucinda Chodan, a senior editor with the national newspaper chain, Post Media, and editor-in-chief of the Montreal Gazette newspaper. Art exhibition highlights history of slave trade in Newfoundland Toronto artist Camille Turner shines light on Newfoundland’s connections to slave trade. (Still from video filmed and edited by Brian Ricks). It's a little known fact that the then British colony of Newfoundland contributed to the slave trade. That contribution consisted of building several sailing ships used in the trade. A new art installation currently in the Newfoundland capital of St.John's informs and explores this chapter in the now Canadian province's history. Matthew spoke to Toronto artist and academic Camille Turner about her exhibition at the Bonavista Biennale in St. John's, Newfoundland.  Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1797669,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1GrKDXFGZazVVb7DxTOCqC"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1GrKDXFGZazVVb7DxTOCqC","html_description":"Your hosts, Levon, Mathiew, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190913-WEE15\nExpert warns of possible Russian disinformation campaign in Canada's election\nCanada heads into a general election this October. A new study warns that Ottawa should be ready to counter a possible Russian disinformation campaign targeting Canadians. (Evelyne Asselin/CBC)\n\nCanada's election has officially been launched and the political parties are busy trying to get their respective messages, platforms, promises and policies out to voters.\n\nBut a Russian specialist in information warfare at the University of Calgary is warning that Canadian authorities and citizens should be wary of a possible campaign of disinformation emanating from the Kremlin\n\nLevon spoke with Sergey Sukhankin the author of the study\nCanadian newspapers struggling in the face of  the internet giants like Google, Facebook, Amazon etc.\nCanadian newspapers are struggling to continue printing and supporting journalists in the face of declining revenues, in part due to internet giants like Amazon, Google, Apple, Facebook and others. (Adrian Wyld-CP)\n\nCanadian newspapers say they're being faced with a triple whammy that seriously compromises their survival. Unlike Canadian news operations, the U.S based internet giants don't pay any taxes in the many foreign countries where they are available, like Canada. They also take their content from Canadian (and other) news operations with little or no compensation but make their own advertising profits from visitors to their sites. They also siphon off advertisers and the ad revenue from the newspapers.\n\nPrint news may not have much of a future.\n\nMarc spoke to Lucinda Chodan, a senior editor with the national newspaper chain, Post Media, and editor-in-chief of the Montreal Gazette newspaper.\n\nArt exhibition highlights history of slave trade in Newfoundland\n\nToronto artist Camille Turner shines light on Newfoundland’s connections to slave trade. (Still from video filmed and edited by Brian Ricks).\n\nIt's a little known fact that the then British colony of Newfoundland contributed to the slave trade.\n\nThat contribution consisted of building several sailing ships used in the trade. A new art installation currently in the Newfoundland capital of St.John's informs and explores this chapter in the now Canadian province's history.\n\nMatthew spoke to Toronto artist and academic Camille Turner about her exhibition at the Bonavista Biennale in St. John's, Newfoundland.\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1GrKDXFGZazVVb7DxTOCqC","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Sept. 13, 14, 15, 2019","release_date":"2019-09-13","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1GrKDXFGZazVVb7DxTOCqC"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/385cd39878a8dbd4382fc25a67642ecc55a338c6","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Terry, Levon, and Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190906-WEE15 Canada's general election looms-issues Federal party leaders - including, from left, the Greens' Elizabeth May, Conservative Andrew Scheer, Liberal Justin Trudeau and New Democrat Jagmeet Singh - face an electorate anxious about the cost of living and concerned about the environment, Honesty in the federal government has also become a concern. Not shown is Maxime Bernier, leader of the right leaning People's Party of Canada formed only late last year, and the Bloc Quebecois, a separatist party that runs candidates only in Quebec. (CP-AP) Canada will have a federal election on October 21st. The country now is just waiting for the official announcement that the campaign in underway. That must come before September 15th. It will be an interesting campaign as for the the first time in the country's history there are now six federal parties running candidates this year. To learn more of the issues, and how this may play out, Marc spoke with Jordan Press, parliamentary reporter in Ottawa for The Canadian Press newswire service Hurricane Dorion to hit eastern Canada Crews with the Charleston Fire Department clear a fallen tree during Hurricane Dorian in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S., Sept. 5, 2019. The storm is expected to barrel into Atlantic Canada on Saturday. (Randall Hill/REUTERS) The huge hurricane, called Dorion, which caused such destruction in the Bahamas, has moved on to the U.S east coast and hammered the Carolinas. It is now heading up the coastline towards Nova Scotia, the other maritime provinces and Newfoundland. Although weakening, winds are still expected to be up to 150 km/h accompanied by heavy rains. Levon spoke with Doug Mercer, senior meteorologist at the Canadian Hurricane Centre. An urgent call to action to better the condition of Canadian children A new report by Children First Canada found that one in five children in Canada had seriously considered suicide in the past year with girls two times more likely to consider it than boys. And according to Indigenous Services Canada, suicide rates were seven times higher for First Nations youth than for non-Aborginal youth. The rate among Inuit youth was 11 times the national average, among the highest in the world. (Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC) Two recent reports from agencies concerned with the well-being of children both separately came up with similar conclusions. All is not well for Canadian children. In addition to an unacceptably high level of poverty, water quality issues, depression and anxiety about the future. Canada has a high level of youth suicide, especially so among indigenous youth. In fact, Canada was listed as 25th out of 41 developed countries in terms of child well-being Terry spoke to Sara Austin, CEO of Children First Canada https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRMTHtdt8kA window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800699,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5OZ7ZxLJXEBvuZq57gzkxY"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5OZ7ZxLJXEBvuZq57gzkxY","html_description":"Your hosts Terry, Levon, and Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190906-WEE15\nCanada's general election looms-issues\nFederal party leaders - including, from left, the Greens' Elizabeth May, Conservative Andrew Scheer, Liberal Justin Trudeau and New Democrat Jagmeet Singh - face an electorate anxious about the cost of living and concerned about the environment, Honesty in the federal government has also become a concern. Not shown is Maxime Bernier, leader of the right leaning People's Party of Canada formed only late last year, and the Bloc Quebecois, a separatist party that runs candidates only in Quebec. (CP-AP)\n\nCanada will have a federal election on October 21st. The country now is just waiting for the official announcement that the campaign in underway. That must come before September 15th.\n\nIt will be an interesting campaign as for the the first time in the country's history there are now six federal parties running candidates this year.\n\nTo learn more of the issues, and how this may play out, Marc spoke with Jordan Press, parliamentary reporter in Ottawa for The Canadian Press newswire service\nHurricane Dorion to hit eastern Canada\nCrews with the Charleston Fire Department clear a fallen tree during Hurricane Dorian in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S., Sept. 5, 2019. The storm is expected to barrel into Atlantic Canada on Saturday. (Randall Hill/REUTERS)\n\nThe huge hurricane, called Dorion, which caused such destruction in the Bahamas, has moved on to the U.S east coast and hammered the Carolinas.\n\nIt is now heading up the coastline towards Nova Scotia, the other maritime provinces and Newfoundland. Although weakening, winds are still expected to be up to 150 km/h accompanied by heavy rains.\n\nLevon spoke with Doug Mercer, senior meteorologist at the Canadian Hurricane Centre.\nAn urgent call to action to better the condition of Canadian children\nA new report by Children First Canada found that one in five children in Canada had seriously considered suicide in the past year with girls two times more likely to consider it than boys. And according to Indigenous Services Canada, suicide rates were seven times higher for First Nations youth than for non-Aborginal youth. The rate among Inuit youth was 11 times the national average, among the highest in the world. (Mary-Catherine McIntosh/CBC)\n\nTwo recent reports from agencies concerned with the well-being of children both separately came up with similar conclusions. All is not well for Canadian children.\n\nIn addition to an unacceptably high level of poverty, water quality issues, depression and anxiety about the future. Canada has a high level of youth suicide, especially so among indigenous youth. In fact, Canada was listed as 25th out of 41 developed countries in terms of child well-being\n\nTerry spoke to Sara Austin, CEO of Children First Canada\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRMTHtdt8kA\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"5OZ7ZxLJXEBvuZq57gzkxY","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Sept 6,7,8, 2019","release_date":"2019-09-06","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5OZ7ZxLJXEBvuZq57gzkxY"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e4074aebc71ae8154ee262e2decfd739b8ead5a8","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom). All stories are edited from longer versions of the full stories which can be heard in the highlights section. ListenEN_The_Link-20190830-WEE15 Conservative opposition leader accuses governing Liberals of scare tactics Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer addresses journalists during a news conference in Toronto, on Thursday, August 29, 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Everyone knows the federal general election is coming in October although the official announcement has yet to be made. Nevertheless, typical electoral accusations are already being thrown back and forth, albeit with typical Canadian reserve. The Liberals are trying to paint the Conservative leader and his party as being anti-gay and anti-pro choice on abortion. The Conservative leader Andrew Scheer in return has been saying that's not true, and it's a scare tactic by the Liberals and leader Justin Trudeau who is trying to deflect attention from his government's own scandals and failures Levon has a report Hard questions being asked as fish aquaculture increases in Canada From a distance fish farms appear placid and peaceful, but many in Canada would like to see all aquaculture operatons moved to land. (Clayoquot Action) Doing about a billion dollars of business annually, Canada is now the fourth largest producer of farmed fish in the world after Norway, Chile, and the U.K. Concerns continue about the effect of such corralled fish on the environment, on the fish themselves, and health issues for people who eat them. Terry spoke with Camille Labchuk, executive-director of Animal Justice Canada Amazon rainforest fires: World concern More than 75,000 fires are burning in Brazil as of Thursday, prompting concerns about the future of the Amazon rainforest and global warming. (Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters) This year saw a massive increase in fires in the Brazilian rainforest. Many, including French president Macron, have suggested that the Brazilian president Bolsonaro's policies and inaction on enforcement against illegal clearing are to blame. The G7 countries have offered millions of aid to help fight the fires, but President Bolsonaro has turned that into an international political issue as well. However, under international pressure he has called out Brazil's military to help fight the fires. For a perspective on the situation, Marc spoke to James Snider of the World Wildlife Fund Canada about the scope and implications of the fires. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nprXai7IGyQ Weekly stories in pictures window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799628,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4EyIxf9wzXfTpYD5r0q2DB"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4EyIxf9wzXfTpYD5r0q2DB","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom). All stories are edited from longer versions of the full stories which can be heard in the highlights section.\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190830-WEE15\nConservative opposition leader accuses governing Liberals of scare tactics\nFederal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer addresses journalists during a news conference in Toronto, on Thursday, August 29, 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nEveryone knows the federal general election is coming in October although the official announcement has yet to be made. Nevertheless, typical electoral accusations are already being thrown back and forth, albeit with typical Canadian reserve.\n\nThe Liberals are trying to paint the Conservative leader and his party as being anti-gay and anti-pro choice on abortion. The Conservative leader Andrew Scheer in return has been saying that's not true, and it's a scare tactic by the Liberals and leader Justin Trudeau who is trying to deflect attention from his government's own scandals and failures\n\nLevon has a report\nHard questions being asked as fish aquaculture increases in Canada\nFrom a distance fish farms appear placid and peaceful, but many in Canada would like to see all aquaculture operatons moved to land. (Clayoquot Action)\n\nDoing about a billion dollars of business annually, Canada is now the fourth largest producer of farmed fish in the world after Norway, Chile, and the U.K.\n\nConcerns continue about the effect of such corralled fish on the environment, on the fish themselves, and health issues for people who eat them.\n\nTerry spoke with Camille Labchuk, executive-director of Animal Justice Canada\nAmazon rainforest fires: World concern\nMore than 75,000 fires are burning in Brazil as of Thursday, prompting concerns about the future of the Amazon rainforest and global warming. (Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)\n\nThis year saw a massive increase in fires in the Brazilian rainforest. Many, including French president Macron, have suggested that the Brazilian president Bolsonaro's policies and inaction on enforcement against illegal clearing are to blame.\n\nThe G7 countries have offered millions of aid to help fight the fires, but President Bolsonaro has turned that into an international political issue as well. However, under international pressure he has called out Brazil's military to help fight the fires.\n\nFor a perspective on the situation, Marc spoke to James Snider of the World Wildlife Fund Canada about the scope and implications of the fires.\n\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nprXai7IGyQ\nWeekly stories in pictures\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"4EyIxf9wzXfTpYD5r0q2DB","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online: Aug 29,30,31, 2019","release_date":"2019-08-30","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4EyIxf9wzXfTpYD5r0q2DB"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/e0b670fc396cbd8a9a7dc7ad470b9501f0547663","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts today: Levon Sevunts, Terry Haig, Stéphane Parent and Marie-Claude Simard  (Video of show at the bottom). ListenEN_The_Link-20190823-WEE15 G7 leaders gather in Biarritz, France for what could be another chaotic summit The faces of the G7 leaders are seen reproduced by local Basque sand artist Sam Dougados in the sand on a beach with a message on gender equality in Biarritz on the eve of the Biarritz G7 summit, France, Aug. 23, 2019. (Regis Duvignau/REUTERS) Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is on his way to Biarritz, France, to take part in the G7 leaders' summit. It will be the last gathering of world leaders before this fall's federal election in Canada. And it's an opportunity for the prime minister to shine on the international scene and burnish his image of a statesman for audiences at home. But the meeting will be anything but predictable, with U.S. President Donald Trump at the table. To find out more about what to expect from this summit we reached Prof. John Kirton, head of the G7 and G20 Research Groups at the University of Toronto. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh gears up for fight for his political future Leader of the New Democratic Party Jagmeet Singh is facing an uphill battle in the upcoming fall federal election and, perhaps, the fight for his very political future. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press/file) Jagmeet Singh, leader of Canada's centre-left New Democratic Party, is an accomplished martial artist but several analysts predict that he is in for a tough fight as his party battles for the hearts and minds of Canadians in this fall's federal election, buffeted on one side by the governing Liberals, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and by the ascendant Green Party led by Elizabeth May on the other. Peaceful pressure pays off as prison farms reopen Jeff Peters and Olivia Groenewegen hold on to Stormy the donkey during a protest outside Correctional Service Canada regional headquarters in Kingston, Ont., in July 2010. Demonstrators relentlessly pursued the restoration of prison farms in the Kingston area for nine years. Last week, two farms officially reopened. (Lars Hagberg/Canadian Press) Terry brings us the story of a nine-year-long peaceful protest that finally brought some fruits last year as the federal government included $4.3 million to restore prison farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay institutions in the Kingston area. Terry spoke to Liberal MP Mark Gerretsen, about the program, the people who made it happen and what it will do for inmates lucky enough to get into it. A small tribute to our colleague Carmel Kilkenny Carmel Kilkenny (on the left) hosts The Link on Nov. 2, 2018. She died on Aug. 13, after a short battle with cancer. We also paid a small tribute to our beloved colleague Carmel Kilkenny, who died two weeks ago, leaving a huge void in our team but also some great and very fond memories. (Click to watch the show) Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801718,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7c5cxZzm5wCcCdx0Tg1o1q"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7c5cxZzm5wCcCdx0Tg1o1q","html_description":"Your hosts today: Levon Sevunts, Terry Haig, Stéphane Parent and Marie-Claude Simard  (Video of show at the bottom).\nListenEN_The_Link-20190823-WEE15\nG7 leaders gather in Biarritz, France for what could be another chaotic summit\nThe faces of the G7 leaders are seen reproduced by local Basque sand artist Sam Dougados in the sand on a beach with a message on gender equality in Biarritz on the eve of the Biarritz G7 summit, France, Aug. 23, 2019. (Regis Duvignau/REUTERS)\n\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau is on his way to Biarritz, France, to take part in the G7 leaders' summit. It will be the last gathering of world leaders before this fall's federal election in Canada.\n\nAnd it's an opportunity for the prime minister to shine on the international scene and burnish his image of a statesman for audiences at home. But the meeting will be anything but predictable, with U.S. President Donald Trump at the table.\n\nTo find out more about what to expect from this summit we reached Prof. John Kirton, head of the G7 and G20 Research Groups at the University of Toronto.\nNDP Leader Jagmeet Singh gears up for fight for his political future\nLeader of the New Democratic Party Jagmeet Singh is facing an uphill battle in the upcoming fall federal election and, perhaps, the fight for his very political future. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press/file)\n\nJagmeet Singh, leader of Canada's centre-left New Democratic Party, is an accomplished martial artist but several analysts predict that he is in for a tough fight as his party battles for the hearts and minds of Canadians in this fall's federal election, buffeted on one side by the governing Liberals, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and by the ascendant Green Party led by Elizabeth May on the other.\nPeaceful pressure pays off as prison farms reopen\nJeff Peters and Olivia Groenewegen hold on to Stormy the donkey during a protest outside Correctional Service Canada regional headquarters in Kingston, Ont., in July 2010. Demonstrators relentlessly pursued the restoration of prison farms in the Kingston area for nine years. Last week, two farms officially reopened. (Lars Hagberg/Canadian Press)\n\nTerry brings us the story of a nine-year-long peaceful protest that finally brought some fruits last year as the federal government included $4.3 million to restore prison farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay institutions in the Kingston area.\n\nTerry spoke to Liberal MP Mark Gerretsen, about the program, the people who made it happen and what it will do for inmates lucky enough to get into it.\nA small tribute to our colleague Carmel Kilkenny\nCarmel Kilkenny (on the left) hosts The Link on Nov. 2, 2018. She died on Aug. 13, after a short battle with cancer.\n\nWe also paid a small tribute to our beloved colleague Carmel Kilkenny, who died two weeks ago, leaving a huge void in our team but also some great and very fond memories.\n\n(Click to watch the show)\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"7c5cxZzm5wCcCdx0Tg1o1q","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Aug. 23, 24, 26, 2019","release_date":"2019-08-23","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7c5cxZzm5wCcCdx0Tg1o1q"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ab31f052d9167361dd79ec1f53f2ab8df31646bf","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190809-WEE15 Anniversary of the atomic bomb attacks to end WWII In this Aug. 9, 1945 file photo, a mushroom cloud rises moments after the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, southern Japan. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, the Second World War was over. (The Associated Press) It was the first, and luckily so far, the only use of the terrible destructive power of atomic weapons. In August 6th and 9th of 1945, the U.S dropped two atomic bombs, one on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, another on Nagasaki. The death toll for Hiroshima was estimated at around 140,000, for Nagasaki around 80.000. Terry spoke with Paul Hannon, executive director of Mines Action Canada, a group dedicated to working against \"indiscriminate weapons\". Anti-social behaviour as internet \"pranks\". shared responsibility Screen capture shows the moment someone in a group throws coffee at Vaviya Falgun in an apparent social media \"prank\". Internet viewers didn't find the prank funny and Regina police are investigating (via CBC) A recent internet so-called \"prank\" in Regina Saskatchewan didn't quite turn out the way the people involved probably expected. The person who filmed the event and posted it online did not get the \"likes\" he hoped for and instead was criticised for the incident. He tried to defend himself saying he wasn't the one who threw the coffee so why are people blaming him? Marc spoke with Gord Pennycook (Ph.D) is an assistant professor of behavioural science at the University of Regina. He says the person filming bears as much responsibility for any bad behaviour as the person committing the act. How dinosaurs grew feathers to become birds: Sex is in the air A flightless dinosaur called Similicaudipteryx uses its feathers in a mating display. U of A researchers looked at how such displays may have helped dinosaurs evolve feathers that eventually allowed them to fly. (Illustration: Sydney Mohr) It's now widely accepted that today's birds evolved from dinosaurs, but how did we get from one to the other. We now know that some early dinosaurs developed preliminary hair-like feathers for warmth, but from there to the complex feather design of modern birds is far too big a leap to be explained by evolution, unless there's a middle step. That middle step according to a new study was develop the feathers into more complex structures for mating displays, i.e., for sex. Marc spoke to Scott Persons (PhD) who was lead author on the study while at the University of Alberta World record poutine Canada has given the world the invention of \"poutine\", a heart-stopping mix of gravy, cheese and fries. A World Record batch was made this month in a Quebec town. (Radio-Canada) Marie-Claude talks about the Canadian invention of poutine,  with the story and video of the recent batch made to beat the previous world record. The new record set this month was, 3,000kgs. She also ordered a sample to be brought into the studio. Reports are none of our arteries were immediately clogged! Video of show Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800229,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1NXr1mjrNNpilamj8JEJxR"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1NXr1mjrNNpilamj8JEJxR","html_description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190809-WEE15\nAnniversary of the atomic bomb attacks to end WWII\nIn this Aug. 9, 1945 file photo, a mushroom cloud rises moments after the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, southern Japan. On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs, one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people, and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, the Second World War was over. (The Associated Press)\n\nIt was the first, and luckily so far, the only use of the terrible destructive power of atomic weapons.\n\nIn August 6th and 9th of 1945, the U.S dropped two atomic bombs, one on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, another on Nagasaki. The death toll for Hiroshima was estimated at around 140,000, for Nagasaki around 80.000.\n\nTerry spoke with Paul Hannon, executive director of Mines Action Canada, a group dedicated to working against \"indiscriminate weapons\".\nAnti-social behaviour as internet \"pranks\". shared responsibility\nScreen capture shows the moment someone in a group throws coffee at Vaviya Falgun in an apparent social media \"prank\". Internet viewers didn't find the prank funny and Regina police are investigating (via CBC)\n\nA recent internet so-called \"prank\" in Regina Saskatchewan didn't quite turn out the way the people involved probably expected. The person who filmed the event and posted it online did not get the \"likes\" he hoped for and instead was criticised for the incident. He tried to defend himself saying he wasn't the one who threw the coffee so why are people blaming him?\n\nMarc spoke with Gord Pennycook (Ph.D) is an assistant professor of behavioural science at the University of Regina. He says the person filming bears as much responsibility for any bad behaviour as the person committing the act.\n\nHow dinosaurs grew feathers to become birds: Sex is in the air\n\nA flightless dinosaur called Similicaudipteryx uses its feathers in a mating display. U of A researchers looked at how such displays may have helped dinosaurs evolve feathers that eventually allowed them to fly. (Illustration: Sydney Mohr)\n\nIt's now widely accepted that today's birds evolved from dinosaurs, but how did we get from one to the other.\n\nWe now know that some early dinosaurs developed preliminary hair-like feathers for warmth, but from there to the complex feather design of modern birds is far too big a leap to be explained by evolution, unless there's a middle step.\n\nThat middle step according to a new study was develop the feathers into more complex structures for mating displays, i.e., for sex.\n\nMarc spoke to Scott Persons (PhD) who was lead author on the study while at the University of Alberta\nWorld record poutine\nCanada has given the world the invention of \"poutine\", a heart-stopping mix of gravy, cheese and fries. A World Record batch was made this month in a Quebec town. (Radio-Canada)\n\nMarie-Claude talks about the Canadian invention of poutine,  with the story and video of the recent batch made to beat the previous world record. The new record set this month was, 3,000kgs.\n\nShe also ordered a sample to be brought into the studio. Reports are none of our arteries were immediately clogged!\n\nVideo of show\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1NXr1mjrNNpilamj8JEJxR","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Aug, 9-10-11","release_date":"2019-08-09","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1NXr1mjrNNpilamj8JEJxR"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/9f2b8920fd96fdaa8362fc1ff3eb3d5a6c01d1ad","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Terry and Marc (Note the show will be taking a break during the summer- other interesting subjects will be available on the weekends; Video of this week's show at bottom.  As always, full versions of the show stories are available in the highlights section) ListenEN_The_Link-20190705-WEE15 A beach house that's much more, a symbol of recycling The builders say the idea of building the house with recycled bottles was simply a case of thinking outside the box. (Brett Ruskin/CBC ) Every day,  literally thousands of tonnes of plastic are thrown out around the world. As an example, in 2016 it was estimated that Canadians threw away some 3.3 million tonnes of plastic a year. Much of that consists of plastic bottles.  A couple of enterprising Canadians, David Saulnier and  and Joel German, decided to show what can be done to ensure some of that can be kept out of landfills, and the oceans. Using recycled plastic from over 600,000 plastic bottles they created plastic foam slabs used to build a beach house in Nova Scotia. Terry spoke to David Saulnier about the project. Taking music classes predicts better academic performance Study results suggest the earlier students take instrumental music classes the better their academic performance will be. (iStock) A new study appears to show that students who take instrumental music classes may have an academic advantage. The study from the University of British Columbia did not prove the connection, but pointed to the fact that these students did perform better in tests in several subjects. Lynn spoke to one of the study authors, professor Peter Gouzouasis Poll shows Canadians biggest concern is the cost of living For many young Canadians, the idea of someday owning their own house is a rapidly fading dream. A new online poll shows many Canadians place their personal financial situation and the rising cost of living as their highest concerns. (iStock) A wide-ranging poll commissioned by Canada's public broadcaster, CBC, included questions about what Canadians main concerns were. While environment, climate change, and crime and violence were among them, topping the list was the concern about the rising cost of living. Marc spoke to professor Ian Lee (PhD) of the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University in Ottawa. Lee says while the country as a whole is doing well, and the baby boom generation, it is the millenials who are feeling the greatest squeeze of ever increasing prices and costs which are rapidly outpacing any salary increases. He adds a note of foreboding as well in that the Canadian, and perhaps world economy, is due for a recession in coming months, and in coming years, the costs associated with climate change have the potential to increase dramatically. Watch The Link July 05, 2019. Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800647,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1bxHQMscRw5SB2jAQM3k9m"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1bxHQMscRw5SB2jAQM3k9m","html_description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Terry and Marc\n\n(Note the show will be taking a break during the summer- other interesting subjects will be available on the weekends; Video of this week's show at bottom.  As always, full versions of the show stories are available in the highlights section)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190705-WEE15\nA beach house that's much more, a symbol of recycling\nThe builders say the idea of building the house with recycled bottles was simply a case of thinking outside the box. (Brett Ruskin/CBC )\n\nEvery day,  literally thousands of tonnes of plastic are thrown out around the world. As an example, in 2016 it was estimated that Canadians threw away some 3.3 million tonnes of plastic a year.\n\nMuch of that consists of plastic bottles.  A couple of enterprising Canadians, David Saulnier and  and Joel German, decided to show what can be done to ensure some of that can be kept out of landfills, and the oceans.\n\nUsing recycled plastic from over 600,000 plastic bottles they created plastic foam slabs used to build a beach house in Nova Scotia. Terry spoke to David Saulnier about the project.\nTaking music classes predicts better academic performance\nStudy results suggest the earlier students take instrumental music classes the better their academic performance will be. (iStock)\n\nA new study appears to show that students who take instrumental music classes may have an academic advantage.\n\nThe study from the University of British Columbia did not prove the connection, but pointed to the fact that these students did perform better in tests in several subjects.\n\nLynn spoke to one of the study authors, professor Peter Gouzouasis\nPoll shows Canadians biggest concern is the cost of living\nFor many young Canadians, the idea of someday owning their own house is a rapidly fading dream. A new online poll shows many Canadians place their personal financial situation and the rising cost of living as their highest concerns. (iStock)\n\nA wide-ranging poll commissioned by Canada's public broadcaster, CBC, included questions about what Canadians main concerns were. While environment, climate change, and crime and violence were among them, topping the list was the concern about the rising cost of living.\n\nMarc spoke to professor Ian Lee (PhD) of the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University in Ottawa. Lee says while the country as a whole is doing well, and the baby boom generation, it is the millenials who are feeling the greatest squeeze of ever increasing prices and costs which are rapidly outpacing any salary increases.\n\nHe adds a note of foreboding as well in that the Canadian, and perhaps world economy, is due for a recession in coming months, and in coming years, the costs associated with climate change have the potential to increase dramatically.\n\nWatch The Link July 05, 2019.\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1bxHQMscRw5SB2jAQM3k9m","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Jul 5.6.7, 2019 : recycling, music, cost of living","release_date":"2019-07-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1bxHQMscRw5SB2jAQM3k9m"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/5728ee4f0c7a32d9eb0747ffaa4de5d507341103","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts today. Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts, Terry Haig and Marie-Claude Simard (listen or watch video of show at the bottom) UN expert warns of a coming 'climate apartheid' A man walks through land in Bhola, Bangladesh where his home was washed away by rising water. Scientists project seas will rise an average of around one meter this century. Just 65 centimeters would swallow about 40 per cent of the country’s productive land, according to the World Bank. (Shahria Sharmin/AP Photo/Nov. 17, 2015) A United Nations expert says the world is risking what he calls a “climate apartheid” scenario where the rich can pay to escape heat, hunger and conflict while the poor are left to suffer. Climate change threatens democracy and human rights, says UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston in a new report. To get some Canadian reaction to his use of such strong language, Lynn reached Philip Loring, professor of geography at Canada’s University of Guelph. Washington and Tehran at impasse as Trump threatens Iran with 'obliteration' Iran on Tuesday sharply criticized new U.S. sanctions targeting the Islamic Republic's supreme leader and other top officials, saying the measures spell the \"permanent closure\" for diplomacy between the two nations. For his part, Iran's President Hassan Rouhani described the White House as \"afflicted by mental retardation.\" Photo taken in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, June 25, 2019 (Iranian Presidency Office via AP) Tensions between the United States and Iran reached new highs U.S.when President Donald Trump threatened this week to obliterate parts of Iran. And Iranian officials called White House actions \"mentally retarded.\" All this posturing and tough talk came after new US sanctions against Iran.On Monday President Trump signed an executive order imposing sanctions against Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and other senior figures. The moves came after Iran shot down a U.S. drone on June 20. The US was about to launch a retaliatory strike when Trump called it off at the last minute, saying too many people would have been killed. The US is sending additional forces to the Persian Gulf and Iran has threatened that if attacked it will inflict a lot of pain on the US all across the region. For more on, this Levon  spoke with Bessma Momani who teaches at political science and international relations at the University of Waterloo in Ontario. He asked her what did she make of this latest round of tough talk and name calling. An anonymous gift sparks a lot of love in a Nova Scotia town A Nova Scotia community has been warmed by an anonymous gesture from a stranger who placed $100 bill and a message of positivity in a town park. The treasure was found by New Glasgow town employee Doug Miller while setting up for a funding announcement over the weekend. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Geralyn MacDonald) A random–and anonymous–act of kindness has residents of the Nova Scotia town of New Glasgow feeling pretty good about themselves and life in general these days, says Terry. The good vibes began over the weekend of June22, 2019 when town worker Doug Miller began setting up for a funding announcement in a local park. It was cold and dark and Miller was working alone when he noticed something: a baggie…with a $100 bill and a note inside. Terry called Miller to find out what exactly happened. Listen to The Link June 28, 2019. ListenEN_The_Link-20190628-WEE15 Watch The Link June 28, 2019.  Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1803154,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6ZYtHKOWaxVy4e7XM4NNbg"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6ZYtHKOWaxVy4e7XM4NNbg","html_description":"Your hosts today. Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts, Terry Haig and Marie-Claude Simard (listen or watch video of show at the bottom)\nUN expert warns of a coming 'climate apartheid'\nA man walks through land in Bhola, Bangladesh where his home was washed away by rising water. Scientists project seas will rise an average of around one meter this century. Just 65 centimeters would swallow about 40 per cent of the country’s productive land, according to the World Bank. (Shahria Sharmin/AP Photo/Nov. 17, 2015)\n\nA United Nations expert says the world is risking what he calls a “climate apartheid” scenario where the rich can pay to escape heat, hunger and conflict while the poor are left to suffer. Climate change threatens democracy and human rights, says UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston in a new report. To get some Canadian reaction to his use of such strong language, Lynn reached Philip Loring, professor of geography at Canada’s University of Guelph.\nWashington and Tehran at impasse as Trump threatens Iran with 'obliteration'\nIran on Tuesday sharply criticized new U.S. sanctions targeting the Islamic Republic's supreme leader and other top officials, saying the measures spell the \"permanent closure\" for diplomacy between the two nations. For his part, Iran's President Hassan Rouhani described the White House as \"afflicted by mental retardation.\" Photo taken in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, June 25, 2019 (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)\n\nTensions between the United States and Iran reached new highs U.S.when President Donald Trump threatened this week to obliterate parts of Iran. And Iranian officials called White House actions \"mentally retarded.\" All this posturing and tough talk came after new US sanctions against Iran.On Monday President Trump signed an executive order imposing sanctions against Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and other senior figures. The moves came after Iran shot down a U.S. drone on June 20.\n\nThe US was about to launch a retaliatory strike when Trump called it off at the last minute, saying too many people would have been killed. The US is sending additional forces to the Persian Gulf and Iran has threatened that if attacked it will inflict a lot of pain on the US all across the region. For more on, this Levon  spoke with Bessma Momani who teaches at political science and international relations at the University of Waterloo in Ontario. He asked her what did she make of this latest round of tough talk and name calling.\nAn anonymous gift sparks a lot of love in a Nova Scotia town\nA Nova Scotia community has been warmed by an anonymous gesture from a stranger who placed $100 bill and a message of positivity in a town park. The treasure was found by New Glasgow town employee Doug Miller while setting up for a funding announcement over the weekend. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Geralyn MacDonald)\n\nA random–and anonymous–act of kindness has residents of the Nova Scotia town of New Glasgow feeling pretty good about themselves and life in general these days, says Terry. The good vibes began over the weekend of June22, 2019 when town worker Doug Miller began setting up for a funding announcement in a local park. It was cold and dark and Miller was working alone when he noticed something: a baggie…with a $100 bill and a note inside. Terry called Miller to find out what exactly happened.\nListen to The Link June 28, 2019.\nListenEN_The_Link-20190628-WEE15\n\nWatch The Link June 28, 2019.\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"6ZYtHKOWaxVy4e7XM4NNbg","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online June 28, 29, 30, 2019","release_date":"2019-06-28","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6ZYtHKOWaxVy4e7XM4NNbg"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f1307565cbe7e65b9aa56f9467212cd550b25c94","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts today. Levon, Mathiew, Marie-Claude, and Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190621-WEE15 IRAN- U.S. tensions- escalation narrowly avoided A U.S. Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle similar to the one shown, has been shot down over the Strait of Hormuz, Iran says was in its airspace, the U.S. says it was in international airspace (Reuters/U.S. Navy/Erik Hildebrandt/Northrop Grumman/Handout The long-standing tension between the U.S. and Iran ramped up this week with allegations of Iranian attacks on oil tankers off its coast. Then came word that Iran had shot down an American spy drone. The American had recently increased their military presence in the region with added ships and soldiers.  The shooting of the drone however almost resulted in a massive escalation of the conflict. This is something that a Canadian professor had speculated could in fact happen. Marc spoke to Rex Brynen, political science professor at Montreal's McGill University. Canadian diplomats get direction on human rights issues abroad Members of a human rights association demonstrate outside the Saudi Embassy in Istanbul on Oct. 9, 2018, and speak to reporters about the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi a week earlier. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP) This week Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister, Crystia Freeland, released new guidelines for Canadian diplomats. Called \"Voices at Risk\" it strives to guide diplomats in their ability to aid or provide support, within diplomatic limits, to human rights activists in other countries. Levon spoke to Jackie Hansen, a human rights campaigner with Amnesty International Canada. Hyenas in the Canadian Arctic An artist’s rendering of ancient Arctic hyenas belonging to the genus Chasmaporthetes. A new study reports that two enigmatic fossil teeth found in Yukon Territory in Canada belonged to Chasmaporthetes, making the teeth the first known fossils of hyenas found in the Arctic. (Julius T. Csotonyi) It was decades ago that some ancient fossilized teeth were found during an archaeological expedition in Canada's Yukon Territory.  After languishing for all those years in a back room, a specialist finally came to take a look at the two ancient teeth. He was able to determine that they belonged to a hyena that lived millions of years ago. Apparently the species of hyena was widespread across the continent, but the species went extinct. Mathiew spoke with Jack Tseng, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences at the University at Buffalo (N.Y.) Watch The Link June 21 2019  Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801091,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/32gRylhTFA2l9ZfAHnVAFa"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/32gRylhTFA2l9ZfAHnVAFa","html_description":"Your hosts today. Levon, Mathiew, Marie-Claude, and Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190621-WEE15\nIRAN- U.S. tensions- escalation narrowly avoided\nA U.S. Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle similar to the one shown, has been shot down over the Strait of Hormuz, Iran says was in its airspace, the U.S. says it was in international airspace (Reuters/U.S. Navy/Erik Hildebrandt/Northrop Grumman/Handout\n\nThe long-standing tension between the U.S. and Iran ramped up this week with allegations of Iranian attacks on oil tankers off its coast. Then came word that Iran had shot down an American spy drone.\n\nThe American had recently increased their military presence in the region with added ships and soldiers.  The shooting of the drone however almost resulted in a massive escalation of the conflict.\n\nThis is something that a Canadian professor had speculated could in fact happen. Marc spoke to Rex Brynen, political science professor at Montreal's McGill University.\nCanadian diplomats get direction on human rights issues abroad\nMembers of a human rights association demonstrate outside the Saudi Embassy in Istanbul on Oct. 9, 2018, and speak to reporters about the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi a week earlier. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)\n\nThis week Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister, Crystia Freeland, released new guidelines for Canadian diplomats.\n\nCalled \"Voices at Risk\" it strives to guide diplomats in their ability to aid or provide support, within diplomatic limits, to human rights activists in other countries.\n\nLevon spoke to Jackie Hansen, a human rights campaigner with Amnesty International Canada.\nHyenas in the Canadian Arctic\nAn artist’s rendering of ancient Arctic hyenas belonging to the genus Chasmaporthetes. A new study reports that two enigmatic fossil teeth found in Yukon Territory in Canada belonged to Chasmaporthetes, making the teeth the first known fossils of hyenas found in the Arctic. (Julius T. Csotonyi)\n\nIt was decades ago that some ancient fossilized teeth were found during an archaeological expedition in Canada's Yukon Territory.  After languishing for all those years in a back room, a specialist finally came to take a look at the two ancient teeth.\n\nHe was able to determine that they belonged to a hyena that lived millions of years ago. Apparently the species of hyena was widespread across the continent, but the species went extinct.\n\nMathiew spoke with Jack Tseng, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences at the University at Buffalo (N.Y.)\n\nWatch The Link June 21 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"32gRylhTFA2l9ZfAHnVAFa","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, June 21,22,23, 2019","release_date":"2019-06-21","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:32gRylhTFA2l9ZfAHnVAFa"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f2703b86fa9fcedfa695c0b2839ad4b56ea48cca","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190614-WEE15 Hong Kong's massive protest against a proposed extradition law with China Protesters on the streets again last night in central Hong Kong. (via CBC) In the past few days, hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong residents have taken to the street to protest a law proposed the the region's top politician, Carrie Lam.  That would enable extradition to mainland China. Many feel this is another attempt to whittle away at the 50 year agreement to allow Hong Kong its own legal and political system which was part of the deal when Britain returned the colony to China. Andrea Chun, originally from Hong Kong, is a Canadian lawyer and commentator on Hong Kong affairs. Marc spoke to her about the Canadian consular officials meet with Canadian prisoners in China, Canada's foreign affairs minister on diplomatic tension Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland concludes a two-day visit to Washington with a news conference at the Embassy of Canada, Thursday, June 13, 2019. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo) Tensions continue between Canada and China over Canada's detention of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. Detained in Canada on an extradition request by the U.S., she is under house arrest in one of her two Vancouver mansions. Canadian diplomats in China were able to visit two Canadians arrested there on charges of being a threat to state security. This is widely believed to be a retaliation tactic by Beijing, along with other measures to stop and slow down Canada's agricultural trade with China. China has also snubbed Canadian requests for talks on the issue. Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland was in Washington trying to get some help from the U.S. in this standoff. Levon prepared a report. Canadians and online news: lots of trust but little willingness to pay A new report suggests that 44 per cent of Canadians use mainly online media to access news and 70 per cent take steps to check its accuracy. (iStock) It seems a majority of Canadians trust online news sources most of the time. An international survey of 38 countries showed Canadians in the top five when it comes to trusting online news.  When it comes to content, Canadians are at the top of the list in saying it helps them understand goings on in the world. But, reliable online content costs money and only a small percentage of Canadians are willing to pay for their news. Lynn spoke to Prof.Colette Brin, head of media studies at Laval University and a contributor to the report. Watch The Link June 14 2019 images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799628,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4ZegfIi6nkls9qmpjcPTHK"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4ZegfIi6nkls9qmpjcPTHK","html_description":"Your hosts, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190614-WEE15\nHong Kong's massive protest against a proposed extradition law with China\nProtesters on the streets again last night in central Hong Kong. (via CBC)\n\nIn the past few days, hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong residents have taken to the street to protest a law proposed the the region's top politician, Carrie Lam.  That would enable extradition to mainland China.\n\nMany feel this is another attempt to whittle away at the 50 year agreement to allow Hong Kong its own legal and political system which was part of the deal when Britain returned the colony to China.\n\nAndrea Chun, originally from Hong Kong, is a Canadian lawyer and commentator on Hong Kong affairs. Marc spoke to her about the\nCanadian consular officials meet with Canadian prisoners in China, Canada's foreign affairs minister on diplomatic tension\nCanada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland concludes a two-day visit to Washington with a news conference at the Embassy of Canada, Thursday, June 13, 2019. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)\n\nTensions continue between Canada and China over Canada's detention of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. Detained in Canada on an extradition request by the U.S., she is under house arrest in one of her two Vancouver mansions.\n\nCanadian diplomats in China were able to visit two Canadians arrested there on charges of being a threat to state security. This is widely believed to be a retaliation tactic by Beijing, along with other measures to stop and slow down Canada's agricultural trade with China.\n\nChina has also snubbed Canadian requests for talks on the issue.\n\nCanada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland was in Washington trying to get some help from the U.S. in this standoff.\n\nLevon prepared a report.\nCanadians and online news: lots of trust but little willingness to pay\nA new report suggests that 44 per cent of Canadians use mainly online media to access news and 70 per cent take steps to check its accuracy. (iStock)\n\nIt seems a majority of Canadians trust online news sources most of the time. An international survey of 38 countries showed Canadians in the top five when it comes to trusting online news.  When it comes to content, Canadians are at the top of the list in saying it helps them understand goings on in the world.\n\nBut, reliable online content costs money and only a small percentage of Canadians are willing to pay for their news.\n\nLynn spoke to Prof.Colette Brin, head of media studies at Laval University and a contributor to the report.\n\nWatch The Link June 14 2019\n\n\n\nimages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"4ZegfIi6nkls9qmpjcPTHK","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, June 14, 15, 16, 2019","release_date":"2019-06-14","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4ZegfIi6nkls9qmpjcPTHK"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/11dda5419734bdb5605ebc11d4113a0a32244ed7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Marie-Claude, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190607-WEE15 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry: final report Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media at the Women Deliver Conference in Vancouver, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The national inquiry into the issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls finally presented its findings and final report this week. While the report noted that Indigenous females were far more likely to be victims of murder or go missing than the rest of society, the media attention focussed on the report's use of the word \"genocide\" and whether such a strong word fits the situation. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he accepted the use of the word, while others say they have difficulty with using that word in the Canadian context. They include the Canadian commander of UN forces in Rwanda who witnessed the genocide there. Levon prepared a report with several audio clips from the head of the inquiry, the Prime Minister, and retired Lt.-Gen. Romeo Dallaire. D-Day: 75 year anniversary ceremony Headline in the Regina Leader-Post, Saskatchewan, similar to papers across Canada on Tuesday June 6, 1944. It had been planned and long prepared for but there would also have to be an incredible amount of luck for the many thousands of Allied troops headed across the English channel to invade Nazi occupied France. Among them in that initial landing were some 14,000 Canadians given the centre of the landing area. What they achieved that day was remarkable, although at heavy cost of over 300 dead and twice that many wounded, many very seriously. Marc spoke with Maj Richard Gratton who has been with a small group of Canadian soldiers touring battlefields and who attended the commemoration ceremonies held at the beach where Canadian fought their way ashore on June 6, 1944 Plastic Pollution: Canadian consumer thoughts Plastic may ensure food safety and extend its shelf life, but most of it is not recycled. (iStock) A new survey by Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia shows almost all Canadians (90%) would like to see stricter regulations against single-use plastics. Even more say they are motivated personally to reduce their own use of these products, and over 70 per cent would like to see a ban imposed. But would Canadians be willing to pay more for greener alternatives? Well, perhaps just a little bit more, but then there's a limit. On the other side of the issue, several stores are starting to allow consumers to bring in their own containers to enable a reduction in plastic packaging and bags.  Various studies have shown much of the plastic is not recycled, and indeed several types of plastics simply are not recyclable. Lynn spoke with Tony Walker, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. Iceberg season off Newfoundland and Labrador This is the time of year for thousands of tourists to make their way to Canada's Atlantic province to view magnificent icebergs as they float down the coasts of Newfoundland with the current. Many fishermen augment their income with iceberg viewing tours, although often you can also see them from land.  Maric-Claude has some video This iceberg near Ferryland on Newfoundland's Southern Shore in April 2017 stopped traffic as people abandoned their cars to take pictures. (Submitted by Jo-d Martin/Facebook) Watch The Link, June 7th 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800176,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4p37ok0uJfiRcWkxfZpjU1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4p37ok0uJfiRcWkxfZpjU1","html_description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Marie-Claude, Levon, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190607-WEE15\nMissing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry: final report\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media at the Women Deliver Conference in Vancouver, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe national inquiry into the issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls finally presented its findings and final report this week.\n\nWhile the report noted that Indigenous females were far more likely to be victims of murder or go missing than the rest of society, the media attention focussed on the report's use of the word \"genocide\" and whether such a strong word fits the situation.\n\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau said he accepted the use of the word, while others say they have difficulty with using that word in the Canadian context. They include the Canadian commander of UN forces in Rwanda who witnessed the genocide there.\n\nLevon prepared a report with several audio clips from the head of the inquiry, the Prime Minister, and retired Lt.-Gen. Romeo Dallaire.\nD-Day: 75 year anniversary ceremony\nHeadline in the Regina Leader-Post, Saskatchewan, similar to papers across Canada on Tuesday June 6, 1944.\n\nIt had been planned and long prepared for but there would also have to be an incredible amount of luck for the many thousands of Allied troops headed across the English channel to invade Nazi occupied France. Among them in that initial landing were some 14,000 Canadians given the centre of the landing area.\n\nWhat they achieved that day was remarkable, although at heavy cost of over 300 dead and twice that many wounded, many very seriously.\n\nMarc spoke with Maj Richard Gratton who has been with a small group of Canadian soldiers touring battlefields and who attended the commemoration ceremonies held at the beach where Canadian fought their way ashore on June 6, 1944\nPlastic Pollution: Canadian consumer thoughts\nPlastic may ensure food safety and extend its shelf life, but most of it is not recycled. (iStock)\n\nA new survey by Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia shows almost all Canadians (90%) would like to see stricter regulations against single-use plastics. Even more say they are motivated personally to reduce their own use of these products, and over 70 per cent would like to see a ban imposed. But would Canadians be willing to pay more for greener alternatives? Well, perhaps just a little bit more, but then there's a limit.\n\nOn the other side of the issue, several stores are starting to allow consumers to bring in their own containers to enable a reduction in plastic packaging and bags.  Various studies have shown much of the plastic is not recycled, and indeed several types of plastics simply are not recyclable.\n\nLynn spoke with Tony Walker, an assistant professor and co-author of the study.\nIceberg season off Newfoundland and Labrador\nThis is the time of year for thousands of tourists to make their way to Canada's Atlantic province to view magnificent icebergs as they float down the coasts of Newfoundland with the current. Many fishermen augment their income with iceberg viewing tours, although often you can also see them from land.  Maric-Claude has some video\n\nThis iceberg near Ferryland on Newfoundland's Southern Shore in April 2017 stopped traffic as people abandoned their cars to take pictures. (Submitted by Jo-d Martin/Facebook)\n\nWatch The Link, June 7th 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"4p37ok0uJfiRcWkxfZpjU1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, June 7, 8, 9, 2019","release_date":"2019-06-07","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4p37ok0uJfiRcWkxfZpjU1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/f18d646cb05566d1060ef889b5b1bf18c7646a84","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"This week a special edition as the Link was on site on Thursday at the Montreal \"Salon de l\"Immigration- Immigration Expo\" in Montreal (video of show at bottom) Hosts were Levon and Marc. along with several special guests. (audio version below, video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190531-WEE15 Starting us off was Jonathon Chodjai, president of the expo who explains how it has grown and some of the services and opportunities provided at the expo. These include help in preparing resumes (C.V.) adapted to Canadian styles, job opportunities and recruiting, education opportunities and information about the multitude of services to help newcomers understand and navigate the often new and confusing culture, laws, and bureaucracy systems in Canada. Also as guests and to give some examples of those services and opportunities, Oscar Gonsalez of the Central Quebec School Board ( Commission scolaire Central Quebec)  who spoke about the education opportunities to learn in a bilingual environment in the central Quebec region, and the advantages. Thousands of visitors came to learn more about integration, jobs, careers, education, and other aids to their new lives in Canada (Leo Gimeno-rCI) Patricia Grzesiak with the immigrant interconnection programme, developed as an initiative of the Montreal Chamber of Commerce which connects newcomers with career paths and related businesses. Melissa Medeiros- who accompanied the Eastern Township’s delegation to promote the more relaxed atmosphere of Quebec’s Eastern Townships as a wonderful education, job, and career location outside the province’s two major urban centres of greater Montreal, and Quebec City and David de Palma of the National Bank, explaining about the workings of the Canadian banking system and the importance for newcomers to understand how banking and credit work in Canada. This was the 8th addition of the annual Salon de l\"immigration, an annual event held at the convention centre in downtown Montreal. Watch The Link May 30th 2019! Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799680,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5szuMOSC5GwkYEKM4VOqU1"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5szuMOSC5GwkYEKM4VOqU1","html_description":"This week a special edition as the Link was on site on Thursday at the Montreal \"Salon de l\"Immigration- Immigration Expo\" in Montreal (video of show at bottom)\n\nHosts were Levon and Marc. along with several special guests. (audio version below, video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190531-WEE15\nStarting us off was Jonathon Chodjai, president of the expo who explains how it has grown and some of the services and opportunities provided at the expo. These include help in preparing resumes (C.V.) adapted to Canadian styles, job opportunities and recruiting, education opportunities and information about the multitude of services to help newcomers understand and navigate the often new and confusing culture, laws, and bureaucracy systems in Canada.\n\nAlso as guests and to give some examples of those services and opportunities, Oscar Gonsalez of the Central Quebec School Board ( Commission scolaire Central Quebec)  who spoke about the education opportunities to learn in a bilingual environment in the central Quebec region, and the advantages.\n\nThousands of visitors came to learn more about integration, jobs, careers, education, and other aids to their new lives in Canada (Leo Gimeno-rCI)\n\nPatricia Grzesiak with the immigrant interconnection programme, developed as an initiative of the Montreal Chamber of Commerce which connects newcomers with career paths and related businesses.\n\nMelissa Medeiros- who accompanied the Eastern Township’s delegation to promote the more relaxed atmosphere of Quebec’s Eastern Townships as a wonderful education, job, and career location outside the province’s two major urban centres of greater Montreal, and Quebec City\n\nand David de Palma of the National Bank, explaining about the workings of the Canadian banking system and the importance for newcomers to understand how banking and credit work in Canada.\n\nThis was the 8th addition of the annual Salon de l\"immigration, an annual event held at the convention centre in downtown Montreal.\n\nWatch The Link May 30th 2019!\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"5szuMOSC5GwkYEKM4VOqU1","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online -special- May 31, Jun 1,2, 2019","release_date":"2019-05-31","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5szuMOSC5GwkYEKM4VOqU1"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/1281260a3d1239daac87abc5d1f20410693c68d5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"ListenEN_The_Link-20190524-WEE15 Your hosts, Lynn, Levon, Marie Claude, and Marc, with guest Eilis Quinn (Video of show at bottom) Death in the Arctic- Image from the special report on a death of a young person in the Arctic (Eye on the Arctic) Eilis Quinn,  joins us to talk about a very troubling situation in a tiny Arctic hamlet in northern Quebec. Her report for the \"Eye on the Arctic\" website won an award given to journalists reporting on violent situations. It describes how the situation, of the death of a young man, and the long delayed trial of the accused, accompanied by a series of suicides in the town and region have been a devastating emotional burden on families in the town. The full story is on the \"Eye on the Arctic\" website. Apology and exoneration of historical Indigenous leader Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stands with members of the Poundmaker Cree Nation during the ceremony to exonerate Chief Poundmaker of his 1885 conviction for treason on May 23, 2019 in Saskatchewan. (CBC) During a very troubled time in western Canada as the country was still growing, an Indigenous leader of the Plains Cree became unwittingly involved in battles with the young federal government of 1885. Through misunderstanding of their position, the Chief Poundmaker was arrested and charged with treason-felony, and jailed. He was released many months later after contracting a serious lung disease in jail, and died shortly afterward. Indigenous groups ever since have said it was a wrongful conviction and that in fact Poundmaker was for peace. Now Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has gone to the western province of Saskatchewan to apologize on behalf of the government for the arrest and mistreatment and to exonerate the Chief of any crime. A segment of the Prime Minister's apology is presented Farmers lead a stressful life: little help A researcher suggests mental health issues dog Canada’s agricultural sector and governments are poorly equipped to handle them. (iStock) Research of farmer's lives show a much higher degree of stress, anxiety, and emotional burnout, than in other professions. The survey of over 1,000 farmers reported high levels of these problem issues. These come from increasing vagaries of weather from climate change, diseases, financial worries, and social isolation as farms get bigger and more spread out, while many small communities have ceased to exist. Help is also not easy to come by and even then, counsellors are not always aware of farm life conditions. Lynn spoke to professor Prof. Andria Jones-Bitton 40 years of Farm Radio International A Canadian idea, and still based in Ottawa, Farm Radio International celebrates 40 years of helping small scale farmers in developing countries. (FRI-video) Started by a Canadian broadcaster who saw a need, and a way to help small scale farmers in Africa, F.R,I. has been growing slowly but steadily over four decades. The idea was to help get information and farming tips and advice out over vast distances to the many subsistence farmers in dozens of countries across sub-saharan Africa, and radio was the best and most inexpensive way to do that. In fact, although the internet and other technologies help to simplify the method, 40 years later radio is still the best way to reach people. F.R.I now sends scripts and research and feedback to over 800 stations in Africa and its advice reaches and helps almost 50 million listeners. Marc spoke to Kevin Perkins in Ottawa, the executive-director of Farm Radio International. Watch The Link May 24th 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1798296,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0peD4BN1zxvAdTbQ8q4Gvw"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0peD4BN1zxvAdTbQ8q4Gvw","html_description":"ListenEN_The_Link-20190524-WEE15\nYour hosts, Lynn, Levon, Marie Claude, and Marc, with guest Eilis Quinn (Video of show at bottom)\nDeath in the Arctic-\nImage from the special report on a death of a young person in the Arctic (Eye on the Arctic)\n\nEilis Quinn,  joins us to talk about a very troubling situation in a tiny Arctic hamlet in northern Quebec. Her report for the \"Eye on the Arctic\" website won an award given to journalists reporting on violent situations.\n\nIt describes how the situation, of the death of a young man, and the long delayed trial of the accused, accompanied by a series of suicides in the town and region have been a devastating emotional burden on families in the town.\n\nThe full story is on the \"Eye on the Arctic\" website.\nApology and exoneration of historical Indigenous leader\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau stands with members of the Poundmaker Cree Nation during the ceremony to exonerate Chief Poundmaker of his 1885 conviction for treason on May 23, 2019 in Saskatchewan. (CBC)\n\nDuring a very troubled time in western Canada as the country was still growing, an Indigenous leader of the Plains Cree became unwittingly involved in battles with the young federal government of 1885.\n\nThrough misunderstanding of their position, the Chief Poundmaker was arrested and charged with treason-felony, and jailed. He was released many months later after contracting a serious lung disease in jail, and died shortly afterward.\n\nIndigenous groups ever since have said it was a wrongful conviction and that in fact Poundmaker was for peace. Now Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has gone to the western province of Saskatchewan to apologize on behalf of the government for the arrest and mistreatment and to exonerate the Chief of any crime.\n\nA segment of the Prime Minister's apology is presented\nFarmers lead a stressful life: little help\nA researcher suggests mental health issues dog Canada’s agricultural sector and governments are poorly equipped to handle them. (iStock)\n\nResearch of farmer's lives show a much higher degree of stress, anxiety, and emotional burnout, than in other professions. The survey of over 1,000 farmers reported high levels of these problem issues.\n\nThese come from increasing vagaries of weather from climate change, diseases, financial worries, and social isolation as farms get bigger and more spread out, while many small communities have ceased to exist. Help is also not easy to come by and even then, counsellors are not always aware of farm life conditions.\n\nLynn spoke to professor Prof. Andria Jones-Bitton\n40 years of Farm Radio International\nA Canadian idea, and still based in Ottawa, Farm Radio International celebrates 40 years of helping small scale farmers in developing countries. (FRI-video)\n\nStarted by a Canadian broadcaster who saw a need, and a way to help small scale farmers in Africa, F.R,I. has been growing slowly but steadily over four decades.\n\nThe idea was to help get information and farming tips and advice out over vast distances to the many subsistence farmers in dozens of countries across sub-saharan Africa, and radio was the best and most inexpensive way to do that.\n\nIn fact, although the internet and other technologies help to simplify the method, 40 years later radio is still the best way to reach people.\n\nF.R.I now sends scripts and research and feedback to over 800 stations in Africa and its advice reaches and helps almost 50 million listeners.\n\nMarc spoke to Kevin Perkins in Ottawa, the executive-director of Farm Radio International.\n\nWatch The Link May 24th 2019\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0peD4BN1zxvAdTbQ8q4Gvw","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, May 24,25,26, 2019","release_date":"2019-05-24","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0peD4BN1zxvAdTbQ8q4Gvw"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/29e4a5ae9d78a2ec5c0a2c9ffa6e4192ab9e8417","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Levon, Lynn, Marie-Claude (at the river's edge) and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190517-WEE15 Climate change and the kelp forests of the Arctic A kelp forest off the coast of Baffin Island in Nunavut, in the Canadian Arctic (Frithjof Kupper) It seems that climate change is having an effect under the Arctic seas. Kelp has always been present but with warming water and with less ice cover, the plants can spread further north into areas where they haven't been and grow faster and taller.  While the kelp seems to cope with the icy water without problem, the warming water, and especially increased sunlight are helping the move northward. The effects on the Arctic marine ecosystem due to increased kelp forests are uncertain Levon spoke with Karen Filbee-Dexter, a researcher in marine biology at Laval University in Quebec City China-Canada diplomatic and trade dispute: A plan towards Chinese domination Containers are offloaded from a ship docked at the Port of Oakland on Monday in Oakland, Calif. China retaliated to U.S. President Donald Trump's 25 per cent tariffs on billions in Chinese goods with its own tariffs on U.S. products.and vowed to \"fight to the finish\". Meanwhile China continues to exert trade and diplomatic pressure on Canada. Both issues are a small part of a much bigger Chinese policy according to a Chinese expert (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Canada acted on a U.S. extradition request and detained a top Chinese executive of the Huawei electronics giant during a flight stopover in Canada. The U.S. wants to try Meng Wanzhou on fraud charges. China has been exerting both diplomatic and trade pressure on Canada to release the woman, with the latest tactic being to formally charge two Canadians it has in detention with being a threat to the Chinese security. Meanwhile, the trade dispute between China and the U.S. also heated up this week with U.S. tariff increases on Chinese products. Marc spoke with political science professor Charles Burton, who was formerly a Canadian diplomat in China. He says Canada's polite objections won't sway China, and the trade issue is part of a larger Chinese goal to become the world superpower. Melanoma: people in northern climates should beware as well A broad-brimmed hat, sunglasses, sunscreen and staying out of the sun between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. go a long way toward preventing skin cancers, say dermatologists. (iStock) Though Canadians live in a northern region, that's no reason not to be concerned about exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays. It's recommended to stay out of the sun when it's the strongest between 11:00 AM and 3 PM (15:00H). If caught early, melanoma can be treated, so preventing it, monitoring for it and then bringing it to your doctor’s attention as soon as you notice a change is so important because with those three things we can easily decrease the burden that we have from melanoma. Lynn spoke with Dr. Julia Carroll, a dermatologist on the board of the Canadian Dermatology Association. Watch The Link May 17 2019! Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801927,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1uCrL0cveOTKOvUPcVm3HR"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1uCrL0cveOTKOvUPcVm3HR","html_description":"Your hosts: Levon, Lynn, Marie-Claude (at the river's edge) and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190517-WEE15\nClimate change and the kelp forests of the Arctic\nA kelp forest off the coast of Baffin Island in Nunavut, in the Canadian Arctic (Frithjof Kupper)\n\nIt seems that climate change is having an effect under the Arctic seas. Kelp has always been present but with warming water and with less ice cover, the plants can spread further north into areas where they haven't been and grow faster and taller.  While the kelp seems to cope with the icy water without problem, the warming water, and especially increased sunlight are helping the move northward.\n\nThe effects on the Arctic marine ecosystem due to increased kelp forests are uncertain\n\nLevon spoke with Karen Filbee-Dexter, a researcher in marine biology at Laval University in Quebec City\nChina-Canada diplomatic and trade dispute: A plan towards Chinese domination\nContainers are offloaded from a ship docked at the Port of Oakland on Monday in Oakland, Calif. China retaliated to U.S. President Donald Trump's 25 per cent tariffs on billions in Chinese goods with its own tariffs on U.S. products.and vowed to \"fight to the finish\". Meanwhile China continues to exert trade and diplomatic pressure on Canada. Both issues are a small part of a much bigger Chinese policy according to a Chinese expert (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)\n\nCanada acted on a U.S. extradition request and detained a top Chinese executive of the Huawei electronics giant during a flight stopover in Canada. The U.S. wants to try Meng Wanzhou on fraud charges.\n\nChina has been exerting both diplomatic and trade pressure on Canada to release the woman, with the latest tactic being to formally charge two Canadians it has in detention with being a threat to the Chinese security.\n\nMeanwhile, the trade dispute between China and the U.S. also heated up this week with U.S. tariff increases on Chinese products.\n\nMarc spoke with political science professor Charles Burton, who was formerly a Canadian diplomat in China. He says Canada's polite objections won't sway China, and the trade issue is part of a larger Chinese goal to become the world superpower.\nMelanoma: people in northern climates should beware as well\nA broad-brimmed hat, sunglasses, sunscreen and staying out of the sun between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. go a long way toward preventing skin cancers, say dermatologists. (iStock)\n\nThough Canadians live in a northern region, that's no reason not to be concerned about exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays. It's recommended to stay out of the sun when it's the strongest between 11:00 AM and 3 PM (15:00H).\n\nIf caught early, melanoma can be treated, so preventing it, monitoring for it and then bringing it to your doctor’s attention as soon as you notice a change is so important because with those three things we can easily decrease the burden that we have from melanoma.\n\nLynn spoke with Dr. Julia Carroll, a dermatologist on the board of the Canadian Dermatology Association.\n\nWatch The Link May 17 2019!\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1uCrL0cveOTKOvUPcVm3HR","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, May 17, 18, 19, 2019","release_date":"2019-05-18","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1uCrL0cveOTKOvUPcVm3HR"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a9a81be5168f31c40c529817531268afb5dab387","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Terry, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190510-WEE15 Dire warning from U.N. on survival of species, and humans Atlantic bluefin tuna are corralled by fishing nets off the coast of Barbate, Cadiz province, southern Spain. Two studies by The new U.N report indicates a dire future for species noting for example that a third of the world's fish stocks are overfished, and over 60 per cent are being fished at their maximum.(Emilio Morenatti/Associated Press) The very strong warning comes from scientists from around the world who contributed to the first comprehensive report on the state of the world’s biodiversity.The report says in no uncertain terms that nature is declining at a rate never seen before in human history and that unless immediate change begins, humanity itself could face serious challenges around the world.  The report was prepared by the U.N. sub committee, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and involved 145 scientist authors with contributions from hundreds of other scientists and researchers from countries around the world. Marc spoke to Jeremy Kerr (PhD),  a professor of biology and research chair in macro ecology and conservation at the University of Ottawa. (link to full interview and story here) Paediatricians recommend free contraception for all young Canadians Birth control is often too expensive for young people and they may not want their parents to know they are sexually active. (iStock) The Canadian Paediatric Society wants all Canadians under the age of 25 to have free and confidential access to effective contraceptives. Birth control can be expensive for young people and, while some young people may be covered by their parents’ insurance plans, they may not want them to know they are sexually active. Lynn spoke to Dr. Margo Lane   (link to full interview and story here) Sport leaders meet to seek solutions to abuse of athletes The Coaching Association of Canada is the latest organisation to gather experts together to seek solutions to ending sexual and other kinds of abuse against athletes. (Shutterstock) Athletes, coaches and leaders from some 170 sports federations met in Canada's national capital to discuss a somewhat hidden issue, that of abuse of athletes by people in positions of authority and influence, like coaches. A CBC News investigation in February found that in the past 20 years, over 200 coaches involved in amateur sports had been convicted of sexual offences and 600 victims under age 18 were abused. Terry spoke to  Lorraine Lafrenière, chief executive officer of the Coaching Association of Canada, who called the results of the CBC News investigation “gut-wrenching.”  (link to full interview and story here) Watch The Link May 10th 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801822,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0UZbwu6YgbsSbkcOKkseeM"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0UZbwu6YgbsSbkcOKkseeM","html_description":"Your hosts Terry, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190510-WEE15\nDire warning from U.N. on survival of species, and humans\nAtlantic bluefin tuna are corralled by fishing nets off the coast of Barbate, Cadiz province, southern Spain. Two studies by The new U.N report indicates a dire future for species noting for example that a third of the world's fish stocks are overfished, and over 60 per cent are being fished at their maximum.(Emilio Morenatti/Associated Press)\n\nThe very strong warning comes from scientists from around the world who contributed to the first comprehensive report on the state of the world’s biodiversity.The report says in no uncertain terms that nature is declining at a rate never seen before in human history and that unless immediate change begins, humanity itself could face serious challenges around the world.  The report was prepared by the U.N. sub committee, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and involved 145 scientist authors with contributions from hundreds of other scientists and researchers from countries around the world.\n\nMarc spoke to Jeremy Kerr (PhD),  a professor of biology and research chair in macro ecology and conservation at the University of Ottawa. (link to full interview and story here)\nPaediatricians recommend free contraception for all young Canadians\nBirth control is often too expensive for young people and they may not want their parents to know they are sexually active. (iStock)\n\nThe Canadian Paediatric Society wants all Canadians under the age of 25 to have free and confidential access to effective contraceptives. Birth control can be expensive for young people and, while some young people may be covered by their parents’ insurance plans, they may not want them to know they are sexually active.\n\nLynn spoke to Dr. Margo Lane   (link to full interview and story here)\nSport leaders meet to seek solutions to abuse of athletes\nThe Coaching Association of Canada is the latest organisation to gather experts together to seek solutions to ending sexual and other kinds of abuse against athletes. (Shutterstock)\n\nAthletes, coaches and leaders from some 170 sports federations met in Canada's national capital to discuss a somewhat hidden issue, that of abuse of athletes by people in positions of authority and influence, like coaches.\n\nA CBC News investigation in February found that in the past 20 years, over 200 coaches involved in amateur sports had been convicted of sexual offences and 600 victims under age 18 were abused.\n\nTerry spoke to  Lorraine Lafrenière, chief executive officer of the Coaching Association of Canada, who called the results of the CBC News investigation “gut-wrenching.”  (link to full interview and story here)\n\nWatch The Link May 10th 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0UZbwu6YgbsSbkcOKkseeM","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, May 10,11,12, 2019","release_date":"2019-05-10","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0UZbwu6YgbsSbkcOKkseeM"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/179ad68d9cd9b7e647bbd07ec9618095a892a0de","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190503-WEE15 Could this beluga be a trained spy? A beluga whale that was freed from a mysterious harness by Norwegian fishermen and fishery officials off the coast of northern Norway last week is in no hurry to leave the Norwegian waters. On Thursday morning it swam up to the Hammerfest harbour much to the surprise and the delight of Jorgen Ree Wiig, who had taken part in its rescue. (Jorgen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries) It's a mystery. Norwegian fishermen discovered an unusually friendly lone beluga while out fishing. Beluga are relatively rare in the area, tend to stick to pods, and away from humans. This one was just the opposite, and in addition had a strange harness, which obviously had been carrying something. Could it have been a trained whale carrying spy equipment? Was it the Russians from their nearby bases in Murmansk or Americans spying on the Russian bases? Levon has video and spoke to Joergen Ree Wiig, an official with the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries, about the mysterious creature. Quality of life improvement for Parkinson's patients Guy Alden used to rely on this wheelchair device to walk and a mobility scooter to get around but now walks unaided. The photo shows him walking on a gait mat with special sensors used in the research project. This is how they record the participant’s movement and track their progress over time. Shortly after the treatment he was able to vacation with his wife in Hawaii, walking unaided (Lawson Research Institute) Parkinson's is a neuro-degenerative disease, and one of it's many effects is a decrease in mobility, Patient's can have difficulty walking, sometimes with their legs simply freezing up while moving  which results in falls. A new experimental treatment involving inserting electrodes on the spine and tiny impulses from a pacemaker seem to result in significant improvement in patient mobility Marc speaks with Dr Mandar Jog of Western University and the Lawson Health Research Institute who is leading the trial. AirBnB enriching corporations, driving up rents A 2017 McGill University report found that two or three per cent of the housing stock in Montreal’s Plateau neighbourhood is run by property management companies for short-term rentals. (iStock) A look at the AirBnB phenomenon shows heavy corporate involvement in the rentals. An earlier study noted that corporate ownership of such properties is creating a shortage of rental properties and driving up rent costs for people seeking a living space. Lynn spoke to Thorben Wieditz, a researcher with Fairbnb, a coalition involving tenants’ associations, condo owners and  boards, hospitality workers, and community legal clinics. He says these often foreign companies are making great profit from Canada for free as they \"do not return anything in terms of taxes to Canada\" The First Nations originators of Canada's maple syrup tradition Atikamekw maple syrup: an ancestral tradition carried on with passion in Manawan, Quebec. Photo : RCI/Marie-Claude Simard Travelling a few hours by car north of Montreal puts one in the heart of the boreal forest. It is here that First Nations are continuing the tradition of gathering maple sap and turning it into sweet syrup and taffy. Marie-Claude presents her a teaser of her report, with the full story on the website this weekend. Watch The Link, May 3 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800620,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0ElW0siDwIySyArpLZLrvw"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0ElW0siDwIySyArpLZLrvw","html_description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190503-WEE15\nCould this beluga be a trained spy?\nA beluga whale that was freed from a mysterious harness by Norwegian fishermen and fishery officials off the coast of northern Norway last week is in no hurry to leave the Norwegian waters. On Thursday morning it swam up to the Hammerfest harbour much to the surprise and the delight of Jorgen Ree Wiig, who had taken part in its rescue. (Jorgen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries)\n\nIt's a mystery. Norwegian fishermen discovered an unusually friendly lone beluga while out fishing. Beluga are relatively rare in the area, tend to stick to pods, and away from humans. This one was just the opposite, and in addition had a strange harness, which obviously had been carrying something. Could it have been a trained whale carrying spy equipment? Was it the Russians from their nearby bases in Murmansk or Americans spying on the Russian bases?\n\nLevon has video and spoke to Joergen Ree Wiig, an official with the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries, about the mysterious creature.\nQuality of life improvement for Parkinson's patients\nGuy Alden used to rely on this wheelchair device to walk and a mobility scooter to get around but now walks unaided. The photo shows him walking on a gait mat with special sensors used in the research project. This is how they record the participant’s movement and track their progress over time. Shortly after the treatment he was able to vacation with his wife in Hawaii, walking unaided (Lawson Research Institute)\n\nParkinson's is a neuro-degenerative disease, and one of it's many effects is a decrease in mobility, Patient's can have difficulty walking, sometimes with their legs simply freezing up while moving  which results in falls.\n\nA new experimental treatment involving inserting electrodes on the spine and tiny impulses from a pacemaker seem to result in significant improvement in patient mobility\n\nMarc speaks with Dr Mandar Jog of Western University and the Lawson Health Research Institute who is leading the trial.\nAirBnB enriching corporations, driving up rents\nA 2017 McGill University report found that two or three per cent of the housing stock in Montreal’s Plateau neighbourhood is run by property management companies for short-term rentals. (iStock)\n\nA look at the AirBnB phenomenon shows heavy corporate involvement in the rentals. An earlier study noted that corporate ownership of such properties is creating a shortage of rental properties and driving up rent costs for people seeking a living space.\n\nLynn spoke to Thorben Wieditz, a researcher with Fairbnb, a coalition involving tenants’ associations, condo owners and  boards, hospitality workers, and community legal clinics. He says these often foreign companies are making great profit from Canada for free as they \"do not return anything in terms of taxes to Canada\"\nThe First Nations originators of Canada's maple syrup tradition\nAtikamekw maple syrup: an ancestral tradition carried on with passion in Manawan, Quebec. Photo : RCI/Marie-Claude Simard\n\nTravelling a few hours by car north of Montreal puts one in the heart of the boreal forest. It is here that First Nations are continuing the tradition of gathering maple sap and turning it into sweet syrup and taffy.\n\nMarie-Claude presents her a teaser of her report, with the full story on the website this weekend.\n\nWatch The Link, May 3 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0ElW0siDwIySyArpLZLrvw","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, May 3, 4, 5, 2019","release_date":"2019-05-03","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0ElW0siDwIySyArpLZLrvw"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7f9af12e3ee35536e38c03291ea8bfe3c93127e2","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Levon, Lynn, and Marc  (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190426-WEE15 United Nations asks for international support to fight Ebola A health worker wearing Ebola protection gear, walks before entering the Biosecure Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) at the ALIMA (The Alliance for International Medical Action) Ebola treatment centre in Beni, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 30, 2019. Picture taken March 30, 2019. (Baz Ratner/REUTERS) The fight against the deadly Ebola disease continues, this time against a fresh outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The World Food Programme is asking Canada and other nations to step up their contributions to help stop the disease from spreading within the country and to others. The idea is to provide enough food to keep people close to home and not travelling to pick up or spread the disease. In addition, the area of eastern DRC has been a conflict zone with several armed groups fighting for control, increasing the danger for health and other international workers. Levon spoke to WFP Senior Partnership Adviser in DRC Arnhild Spence. New Zealand video game adapted for Canada's Indigenous to help with mental issues The video game was adapted changing the Maori environment, symbols and costumes, above, to Inuit ones below. (Pinnguaq) Indigenous youth in Canada's northern territory of Nunavut were involved in adapting a Maori video game with a view to help users cope with anxiety and depression. Initially reaction to the video adapted to northern scenarios was positive and that the strategies shown would be useful but noted the New Zealand scenery and accent put them off. They felt it would speak to them much better if  represented their own context. The video now  has Arctic scenery, Arctic animals, Inuit symbols and clothing. Prof. Yvonne Bohr says the project was conceived after the government of Nunavut asked for ideas on remote interventions to help Inuit youth. Lynn spoke to her about a project to get funding to fully adapt the game including voicing in Canadian English and Inuktitut Study: Ethical non-monogamy- Polyamory A new study finds people saying their consensual polyamory relationships are beneficial. (Getty Images/iStockphoto) It can go by various names such as polyamory, ethical non-monogamy, consensual non-monogamy, or open-relationships.  What it means is having two or more relationships simultaneously with the consent of all involved. A new study found that people who engage in this indicate that they have more eroticism, i.e. better sex with the secondary partner, and more nurturing, i.e., more emotional attachment with the primary partner. Marc spoke with Rhonda Balzarini (PhD), a post-doctoral fellow in the Faculty of Health at York University in Toronto and lead author of the study. Watch The Link","duration_ms":1800072,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6KDbitTwxdNTkQR610SWJh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6KDbitTwxdNTkQR610SWJh","html_description":"Your hosts, Marie-Claude, Levon, Lynn, and Marc  (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190426-WEE15\nUnited Nations asks for international support to fight Ebola\nA health worker wearing Ebola protection gear, walks before entering the Biosecure Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) at the ALIMA (The Alliance for International Medical Action) Ebola treatment centre in Beni, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, March 30, 2019. Picture taken March 30, 2019. (Baz Ratner/REUTERS)\n\nThe fight against the deadly Ebola disease continues, this time against a fresh outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).\n\nThe World Food Programme is asking Canada and other nations to step up their contributions to help stop the disease from spreading within the country and to others. The idea is to provide enough food to keep people close to home and not travelling to pick up or spread the disease.\n\nIn addition, the area of eastern DRC has been a conflict zone with several armed groups fighting for control, increasing the danger for health and other international workers.\n\nLevon spoke to WFP Senior Partnership Adviser in DRC Arnhild Spence.\nNew Zealand video game adapted for Canada's Indigenous to help with mental issues\nThe video game was adapted changing the Maori environment, symbols and costumes, above, to Inuit ones below. (Pinnguaq)\n\nIndigenous youth in Canada's northern territory of Nunavut were involved in adapting a Maori video game with a view to help users cope with anxiety and depression.\n\nInitially reaction to the video adapted to northern scenarios was positive and that the strategies shown would be useful but noted the New Zealand scenery and accent put them off. They felt it would speak to them much better if  represented their own context.\n\nThe video now  has Arctic scenery, Arctic animals, Inuit symbols and clothing.\n\nProf. Yvonne Bohr says the project was conceived after the government of Nunavut asked for ideas on remote interventions to help Inuit youth.\n\nLynn spoke to her about a project to get funding to fully adapt the game including voicing in Canadian English and Inuktitut\nStudy: Ethical non-monogamy- Polyamory\nA new study finds people saying their consensual polyamory relationships are beneficial. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)\n\nIt can go by various names such as polyamory, ethical non-monogamy, consensual non-monogamy, or open-relationships.  What it means is having two or more relationships simultaneously with the consent of all involved.\n\nA new study found that people who engage in this indicate that they have more eroticism, i.e. better sex with the secondary partner, and more nurturing, i.e., more emotional attachment with the primary partner.\n\nMarc spoke with Rhonda Balzarini (PhD), a post-doctoral fellow in the Faculty of Health at York University in Toronto and lead author of the study.\n\nWatch The Link","id":"6KDbitTwxdNTkQR610SWJh","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online Apr. 26,27,28, 2019","release_date":"2019-04-26","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6KDbitTwxdNTkQR610SWJh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/7db2b5eae4320e0d3133d39025dbbc61c6e6dda3","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Marie-Claude, Lynn, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190419-WEE15 Court case launched against \"smart city\" over privacy The Quayside project would create housing, heated sidewalks, autonomous vehicle infrastructure and data-collecting sensors on five hectares of Toronto waterfront. (Sidewalk Toronto/hand out photo/The Canadian Press) A project by the American firm Sidewalk Labs to turn a large section of downtown Toronto into a \"smart city\" has been controversial since its proposal. While many seem excited by the high tech proposal by the Google subsidiary, others have expressed great concern over the collection of vast amounts of personal data. The company would build the entire \"city\" all of which would be wired to the net. While the firm extolls the virtues and benefits of such a concept the Canadian Civil Liberties Association has launched a lawsuit claiming that the municipal, provincial, and federal governments have all agreed in giving over control of privacy issues to a private for-profit company. Lynn spoke with Michael Bryant, executive-director and lawyer for the CCLA Alberta election: setting the stage for conflict with Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Premier-Designate Jason Kenney addresses the media the day his after his election victory in Edmonton on Wednesday April 17, 2019. (Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The United Conservative Party will form the new government in the western province of Alberta after easily defeating the outgoing New Democratic Party government in an election this week. Th oil-rich province has been struggling lately with low world oil prices and a lack of pipelines to get its oil to markets other than the U.S where it gets low prices. Many blamed the problems on the previous provincial government and the federal Liberal government of Justin Trudeau. On Wednesday incoming Premier Jason Kenney presented his legislative priorities, presented in a short clip here. Jobs threatened, jobs created: the future of employment in 2030 . A 'female' robot waiter delivers meals for customers at robot-themed restaurant in Onin Yiwu, Zhejiang province of China. Robots, AI, automation: technology is a major factor affecting jobs and careers, but not the only factor in the future, which can include issues like the environment and demographics amongst o(hers VCG-Getty Images- via CBC) While technology is certainly a major driver of the employment scene in the future, a new study looks at not only how that is and will change employment in the future but several other factors as well. This includes changing demographics, climate change, and a host of other factors. Marc spoke to Jessica Thornton, lead author of the study and Senior Project Designer at the Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Ryerson University in Toronto The origin of making maple syrup Atikamekw site for maple syrup production in Manawan, Quebec. RCI/Marie-Claude Simard It was the indigenous peoples of central Canada who showed Europeans how to tap the watery sap from maple trees and turn it into sweet maple syrup. Marie-Claude this week drove several hundred kilometres north of Montreal to a First Nations reserve where they were in the process of making maple syrup. She presents a short video clip of the process. A larger story on the process and traditions is in the works to come soon. Video of the show","duration_ms":1800803,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6Arv466zTWK4rmSzL1QVfu"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6Arv466zTWK4rmSzL1QVfu","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Marie-Claude, Lynn, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190419-WEE15\n\nCourt case launched against \"smart city\" over privacy\n\nThe Quayside project would create housing, heated sidewalks, autonomous vehicle infrastructure and data-collecting sensors on five hectares of Toronto waterfront. (Sidewalk Toronto/hand out photo/The Canadian Press)\n\nA project by the American firm Sidewalk Labs to turn a large section of downtown Toronto into a \"smart city\" has been controversial since its proposal. While many seem excited by the high tech proposal by the Google subsidiary, others have expressed great concern over the collection of vast amounts of personal data.\n\nThe company would build the entire \"city\" all of which would be wired to the net. While the firm extolls the virtues and benefits of such a concept the Canadian Civil Liberties Association has launched a lawsuit claiming that the municipal, provincial, and federal governments have all agreed in giving over control of privacy issues to a private for-profit company.\n\nLynn spoke with Michael Bryant, executive-director and lawyer for the CCLA\nAlberta election: setting the stage for conflict with Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau\nPremier-Designate Jason Kenney addresses the media the day his after his election victory in Edmonton on Wednesday April 17, 2019. (Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe United Conservative Party will form the new government in the western province of Alberta after easily defeating the outgoing New Democratic Party government in an election this week.\n\nTh oil-rich province has been struggling lately with low world oil prices and a lack of pipelines to get its oil to markets other than the U.S where it gets low prices. Many blamed the problems on the previous provincial government and the federal Liberal government of Justin Trudeau.\n\nOn Wednesday incoming Premier Jason Kenney presented his legislative priorities, presented in a short clip here.\nJobs threatened, jobs created: the future of employment in 2030\n. A 'female' robot waiter delivers meals for customers at robot-themed restaurant in Onin Yiwu, Zhejiang province of China. Robots, AI, automation: technology is a major factor affecting jobs and careers, but not the only factor in the future, which can include issues like the environment and demographics amongst o(hers VCG-Getty Images- via CBC)\n\nWhile technology is certainly a major driver of the employment scene in the future, a new study looks at not only how that is and will change employment in the future but several other factors as well.\n\nThis includes changing demographics, climate change, and a host of other factors.\n\nMarc spoke to Jessica Thornton, lead author of the study and Senior Project Designer at the Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Ryerson University in Toronto\nThe origin of making maple syrup\nAtikamekw site for maple syrup production in Manawan, Quebec. RCI/Marie-Claude Simard\n\nIt was the indigenous peoples of central Canada who showed Europeans how to tap the watery sap from maple trees and turn it into sweet maple syrup.\n\nMarie-Claude this week drove several hundred kilometres north of Montreal to a First Nations reserve where they were in the process of making maple syrup. She presents a short video clip of the process. A larger story on the process and traditions is in the works to come soon.\n\nVideo of the show","id":"6Arv466zTWK4rmSzL1QVfu","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online April 19, 20, 21, 2019","release_date":"2019-04-19","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6Arv466zTWK4rmSzL1QVfu"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/a9e20b4146697d29d50442d8e54663a824e374c2","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190412-WEE15 Research needed into ship noise effects on Narwhals in Nunavut FILE- In this August 2005 file photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a pod of narwhals surfaces in northern Canada. (Kristin Laidre/AP Photo/NOAA, files) With a mining company on Baffin Island, in the Arctic territory of Nunavut, requesting a permit for a significant increase in iron ore extraction, which would nearly double marine shipping in the area, conservation groups are saying more research is needed on the effects of underwater noise on narwhals. It is believed that underwater noise may have a detrimental effect on the marine animals ability to communicate and seek food as they spend summer in the area. At least one study shows that the ship noise overlaps some of the frequencies the narwhal use. Levon spoke to Kristin Westdal, marine biologist for Oceans North. U.K., Canada, and others consider regulating websites Social media face tough regulations coming in the U.K. (iStock) With so much controversy about social media websites and concern about extremism and hate speech, the United Kingdom has published proposals for regulating websites. From clear hate speech to postings and sites that may not be illegal, but considered harmful like disinformation or harassment, standards are being developed. An independent regulator could be created to issue fines and/or make individual website managers responsible, and close sites that don't comply. Canada is watching closely and may follow suit. Lynn spoke with Stephanie MacLellan a specialist in digital policy at CIGI, a public policy think tank. A walk in outer space Canadian David Saint-Jacques is only the fourth Canadian to \"walk\" in space. (NASA) Technically, it's called an EVA- extra-vehicular activity and Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques joins not only an already extremely exclusive club of astronauts/cosmonauts, but an even more exclusive group of people who have ventured outside a space vehicle. Along with American astronaut Anne McClain, he spent several hours performing maintenance tasks to the International Space Station. These EVA's are meticulously planned and practised, but even still are very risky and extreme caution is required. Marc spoke about what that experience in space is like with Canada's Steve MacLean, a former astronaut and a member of the very exclusive club of people who have walked  in space. Watch The Link April 12th 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801430,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/1ojhGL7TevTnB5UYBozQwI"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/1ojhGL7TevTnB5UYBozQwI","html_description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190412-WEE15\nResearch needed into ship noise effects on Narwhals in Nunavut\nFILE- In this August 2005 file photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a pod of narwhals surfaces in northern Canada. (Kristin Laidre/AP Photo/NOAA, files)\n\nWith a mining company on Baffin Island, in the Arctic territory of Nunavut, requesting a permit for a significant increase in iron ore extraction, which would nearly double marine shipping in the area, conservation groups are saying more research is needed on the effects of underwater noise on narwhals.\n\nIt is believed that underwater noise may have a detrimental effect on the marine animals ability to communicate and seek food as they spend summer in the area. At least one study shows that the ship noise overlaps some of the frequencies the narwhal use.\n\nLevon spoke to Kristin Westdal, marine biologist for Oceans North.\nU.K., Canada, and others consider regulating websites\nSocial media face tough regulations coming in the U.K. (iStock)\n\nWith so much controversy about social media websites and concern about extremism and hate speech, the United Kingdom has published proposals for regulating websites. From clear hate speech to postings and sites that may not be illegal, but considered harmful like disinformation or harassment, standards are being developed. An independent regulator could be created to issue fines and/or make individual website managers responsible, and close sites that don't comply.\n\nCanada is watching closely and may follow suit. Lynn spoke with Stephanie MacLellan a specialist in digital policy at CIGI, a public policy think tank.\nA walk in outer space\nCanadian David Saint-Jacques is only the fourth Canadian to \"walk\" in space. (NASA)\n\nTechnically, it's called an EVA- extra-vehicular activity and Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques joins not only an already extremely exclusive club of astronauts/cosmonauts, but an even more exclusive group of people who have ventured outside a space vehicle.\n\nAlong with American astronaut Anne McClain, he spent several hours performing maintenance tasks to the International Space Station. These EVA's are meticulously planned and practised, but even still are very risky and extreme caution is required.\n\nMarc spoke about what that experience in space is like with Canada's Steve MacLean, a former astronaut and a member of the very exclusive club of people who have walked  in space.\n\nWatch The Link April 12th 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"1ojhGL7TevTnB5UYBozQwI","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online: April 12, 13, 14, 2019","release_date":"2019-04-12","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:1ojhGL7TevTnB5UYBozQwI"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ce864b70bcc2eb0f457347480417d944a93b0642","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon,  Marie-Claude, and Marc (Video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190405-WEE15 The scandal within the ruling Liberal Party government, gets another jolt Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announcing to Liberal party members that he has removed tow high-ranking women from caucus over issues of \"trust\" and party loyalty. (Radio-Canada) The ongoing dispute over allegations that the highest ranking members of the Liberal government were trying to pressure the former attorney general in a legal case against engineering giant SNC-Lavalin has gone on for almost three months. In the latest shock earlier this week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau removed two high-ranking women, former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould and former president of the Treasury Board Jane Philpott, from the Liberal caucus. Citing actions by Wilson-Raybould, including the covert taping of a phone call with the country's highest ranking bureaucrat, Trudeau said internal trust had been broken and the women had to go Marc spoke with Duane Bratt, political science professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary who says the move has tarnished the prime minister's self-declared reputation as a feminist and as a politician who wanted to break with typical \"old school\" politics. Canada urged to help stop ‘cultural genocide’ of Uighurs This is one of many places in China that officials call a vocational skills education centre where an estimated one million Uighurs are forcibly held and re-educated. (Thomas Peter/Reuters) Evidence from U.S. satellites seem to support allegations that China is holding up to one million ethnic Uighurs in \"re-education\" camps. They are allegedly being \"educated\" to abandon their Islamic religion, learn Mandarin, and abandon Uighur culture. Members of the World Uighur Congress were in Canada's capital, Ottawa, to ask Canadian officials to continue pressure on China. Lynn spoke to professor Charles Burton, former diplomat at the Canadian embassy in Beijing, who says China is engaging in \"cultural genocide\" of the Uighur minority. We’re up here!’ Nunavut territory celebrates 20th anniversary People make their way through Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, March 6, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) This year marks the 20th anniversary of the creation of Canada's newest territory. Carved from the vast Northwest Territories, the new territory is known as \"Nunavut\", which is Inuktitut for \"our land.\" Carved from the huge Northwest Territories, Nunavut covers nearly 2 million of square kilometres in Canada's northern and eastern Arctic. Levon spoke to Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq about the 20 years of the new territory and about the 20 years to come. Visit 'Mars-on-Earth' in Canada's High Arctic film clip: Google streetview gives a glimpse of a NASA testing and training ground in the high Arctic NASA has established a training and testing base on Devon Island, in the very High Arctic of Nunavut, because they think the area most resembles the surface of Mars. Recently Google took cameras to the area to add some landscape to their \"streetview\" maps. Google couldn't use their typical cameras though as they were too heavy for the extremely limited cargo loads available on flights to the base. Marie-Claude plays a short excerpt of the promotional video. Watch Video of The link Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800594,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/5ytRsh1CDCOMZ8WNzFVoDz"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/5ytRsh1CDCOMZ8WNzFVoDz","html_description":"Your hosts: Lynn, Levon,  Marie-Claude, and Marc (Video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190405-WEE15\nThe scandal within the ruling Liberal Party government, gets another jolt\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau announcing to Liberal party members that he has removed tow high-ranking women from caucus over issues of \"trust\" and party loyalty. (Radio-Canada)\n\nThe ongoing dispute over allegations that the highest ranking members of the Liberal government were trying to pressure the former attorney general in a legal case against engineering giant SNC-Lavalin has gone on for almost three months. In the latest shock earlier this week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau removed two high-ranking women, former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould and former president of the Treasury Board Jane Philpott, from the Liberal caucus. Citing actions by Wilson-Raybould, including the covert taping of a phone call with the country's highest ranking bureaucrat, Trudeau said internal trust had been broken and the women had to go\n\nMarc spoke with Duane Bratt, political science professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary who says the move has tarnished the prime minister's self-declared reputation as a feminist and as a politician who wanted to break with typical \"old school\" politics.\nCanada urged to help stop ‘cultural genocide’ of Uighurs\nThis is one of many places in China that officials call a vocational skills education centre where an estimated one million Uighurs are forcibly held and re-educated. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)\n\nEvidence from U.S. satellites seem to support allegations that China is holding up to one million ethnic Uighurs in \"re-education\" camps.\n\nThey are allegedly being \"educated\" to abandon their Islamic religion, learn Mandarin, and abandon Uighur culture. Members of the World Uighur Congress were in Canada's capital, Ottawa, to ask Canadian officials to continue pressure on China.\n\nLynn spoke to professor Charles Burton, former diplomat at the Canadian embassy in Beijing, who says China is engaging in \"cultural genocide\" of the Uighur minority.\nWe’re up here!’ Nunavut territory celebrates 20th anniversary\nPeople make their way through Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, March 6, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThis year marks the 20th anniversary of the creation of Canada's newest territory. Carved from the vast Northwest Territories, the new territory is known as \"Nunavut\", which is Inuktitut for \"our land.\"\n\nCarved from the huge Northwest Territories, Nunavut covers nearly 2 million of square kilometres in Canada's northern and eastern Arctic.\n\nLevon spoke to Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq about the 20 years of the new territory and about the 20 years to come.\nVisit 'Mars-on-Earth' in Canada's High Arctic\nfilm clip: Google streetview gives a glimpse of a NASA testing and training ground in the high Arctic\n\nNASA has established a training and testing base on Devon Island, in the very High Arctic of Nunavut, because they think the area most resembles the surface of Mars.\n\nRecently Google took cameras to the area to add some landscape to their \"streetview\" maps. Google couldn't use their typical cameras though as they were too heavy for the extremely limited cargo loads available on flights to the base. Marie-Claude plays a short excerpt of the promotional video.\n\nWatch Video of The link\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"5ytRsh1CDCOMZ8WNzFVoDz","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK ONLINE Apr. 5, 6, 7, 2019","release_date":"2019-04-05","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:5ytRsh1CDCOMZ8WNzFVoDz"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ab99b9bc060b679631526dfd1fd4fa64cd092b63","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts and Terry Haig. (Video of show at bottom) ListenEN_The_Link-20190329-WEE15 UN asks Canada to extend peacekeeping mission in Mali Canadian infantry and medical personnel disembark from a Chinook helicopter as they take part in a medical evacuation demonstration on the United Nations base in Gao, Mali, on December 22, 2018. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS) The United Nations has formally asked Canada to extend its peacekeeping mission in Mali for a few months. The UN wants Canada to stay in Mali until the Romanian contingent which is replacing it is up and running. Canada has asked for two weeks to make a decision. For more on the Canadian mission in Mali we reached Col. Travis Morehen, commander of the Canadian peacekeeping contingent - Task Force Mali at the UN base in Gao, northern Mali. Quebec to suspend constitutional rights to ban religious symbols If a new law is passed by Quebec, women wearing headscarves will not be allowed to become teachers. (iStock) A furore erupted over the government of the province of Quebec plan to override charter guarantees and forbid many public sector employees from wearing religious symbols at work. Recently tabled legislation would apply to new teachers, judges, prison guards, police officers and others the government deems to be in positions of authority. Few public servants wear such symbols and the group mostly likely to be affected are teachers wearing hijabs. A school board in Montreal has already said it will refuse to implement the legislation and a teacher’s union has filed a lawsuit to stop the government from counting the number of teachers who wear religious symbols. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reacted to news that the law was tabled saying  “it is unthinkable to me that in a free society, we would legitimize discrimination against citizens basesd on their religion.” Various religious groups have weighed in and this is only the beginning of what will be a highly acrimonious debate. To learn more about which rights would be suspended and how, Lynn spoke with Robert Leckey, dean of law at McGill University. Hope springs eternal for getting a baseball team back in Montreal For the past five springs, baseball fans have filled Montreal’s Olympic Stadium in an effort to bring Major League Baseball back to Montreal. (CBC) Since 2014, the Toronto Blue Jays have completed their spring training with games at Olympic Stadium, the home of  now defunct Montreal Expos baseball team. And Expo fans have for those six years,used the occasion to try to send a message to Major League Baseball that Montreal can support a team. But getting a team back is not easy task. Major League Baseball is a cartel and it will do things the way it wants to, says Terry. But he says it still it appears things are moving ahead. Businessmen including Stephen Bronfman, the son of the Expos' original owner, is leading the charge. For more, Terry spoke with talk show host and journalist Dave Kaufman. Watch The Link online! Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1773166,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/7hPekinfBCatQynWS9wt20"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/7hPekinfBCatQynWS9wt20","html_description":"Your hosts Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts and Terry Haig. (Video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190329-WEE15\nUN asks Canada to extend peacekeeping mission in Mali\nCanadian infantry and medical personnel disembark from a Chinook helicopter as they take part in a medical evacuation demonstration on the United Nations base in Gao, Mali, on December 22, 2018. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThe United Nations has formally asked Canada to extend its peacekeeping mission in Mali for a few months. The UN wants Canada to stay in Mali until the Romanian contingent which is replacing it is up and running. Canada has asked for two weeks to make a decision.\n\nFor more on the Canadian mission in Mali we reached Col. Travis Morehen, commander of the Canadian peacekeeping contingent - Task Force Mali at the UN base in Gao, northern Mali.\nQuebec to suspend constitutional rights to ban religious symbols\nIf a new law is passed by Quebec, women wearing headscarves will not be allowed to become teachers. (iStock)\n\nA furore erupted over the government of the province of Quebec plan to override charter guarantees and forbid many public sector employees from wearing religious symbols at work. Recently tabled legislation would apply to new teachers, judges, prison guards, police officers and others the government deems to be in positions of authority.\n\nFew public servants wear such symbols and the group mostly likely to be affected are teachers wearing hijabs. A school board in Montreal has already said it will refuse to implement the legislation and a teacher’s union has filed a lawsuit to stop the government from counting the number of teachers who wear religious symbols. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reacted to news that the law was tabled saying  “it is unthinkable to me that in a free society, we would legitimize discrimination against citizens basesd on their religion.”\n\nVarious religious groups have weighed in and this is only the beginning of what will be a highly acrimonious debate. To learn more about which rights would be suspended and how, Lynn spoke with Robert Leckey, dean of law at McGill University.\nHope springs eternal for getting a baseball team back in Montreal\nFor the past five springs, baseball fans have filled Montreal’s Olympic Stadium in an effort to bring Major League Baseball back to Montreal. (CBC)\n\nSince 2014, the Toronto Blue Jays have completed their spring training with games at Olympic Stadium, the home of  now defunct Montreal Expos baseball team.\n\nAnd Expo fans have for those six years,used the occasion to try to send a message to Major League Baseball that Montreal can support a team.\n\nBut getting a team back is not easy task. Major League Baseball is a cartel and it will do things the way it wants to, says Terry. But he says it still it appears things are moving ahead. Businessmen including Stephen Bronfman, the son of the Expos' original owner, is leading the charge. For more, Terry spoke with talk show host and journalist Dave Kaufman.\n\nWatch The Link online!\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"7hPekinfBCatQynWS9wt20","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, March 29, 30, 31, 2019","release_date":"2019-03-29","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:7hPekinfBCatQynWS9wt20"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/b6e6d5d597dadf727928f770f8f3c771a5c03692","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts and Terry Haig. (Video of show at bottom.) ListenEN_The_Link-20190322-WEE15 Public hearing on oil and gas development in eastern Arctic wrap up in Iqaluit A polar bear stands on a ice flow in Baffin Bay above the arctic circle as seen from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent on July 10, 2008. (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press) Public hearings on potential oil and gas development in the waters between Canada and western Greenland wrapped up in Canada's northern territory of Nunavut this week. There is ongoing moratorium on offshore oil and gas projects in the Canadian Arctic, but it expires in 2021 and Nunavut authorities are doing their homework to see whether they want that moratorium extended for another five years. This latest meeting took place in Iqaluit, which is the capital of Canada's Arctic territory of Nunavut.  This was the last public hearing and was part of a strategic environmental assessment being conducted by the Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB). The board will now prepare a report and a list of recommendations that will be presented to the federal government. The meeting heard from members of the public, various Inuit organizations and government agencies about potential oil and gas development in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. It's a long sliver of water that separates northeastern Canada and Greenland. And it's one of the Arctic's most productive marine environments. The strategic environmental assessment will look at various scenarios of potential oil and gas activity in the region from exploration and development to full-scale production. And of course it will look at potential benefits and drawbacks for the affected Inuit communities and the marine environment they depend on for much of their food source. For more Levon spoke with Chris Debicki, with Oceans North, it's a marine conservation NGO. Online hatred growing in Canada, warns rights advocate The massacre at two mosques in New Zealand elicited sympathy but also online celebration by extremists. (Vincent Yu/AP Photo/file) Last week's attack on a mosque in New Zealand had particular resonance for Canadians. Last week a gunman stormed two mosques killing 50 people and injuring dozens more. Horrifying in and of itself, it also brought back memories of a similar attack in Quebec City in Canada. A gunman stormed a mosque there killing six people. He pleaded guilty to the crime and is now awaiting sentencing. There have been attacks on Muslims in other places around the world, prompting questions about the spread of hatred online. Canada is not exempt. To find out more about what's going on here and the concern, Lynn spoke with Amira Elghawaby, a board member with the non-profit Canadian Anti-Hate Network. Spring arrives in Canada, can more rain and snow be far behind? Spring: the idealized version. Not what it looked like in Montreal. (Ian Black/CBC) On Wednesday at 5.58 our time and describing himself as a good Canadian, Terry took it for what it was....kind of chilly and overcast  but at least it wasn't snowing. He found it to be very strange though, Yellowknife had its warmest temperatures ever and so did the lower mainland of British Columbia. For the rest of us, it was business as usual. Now, since he didn't grow up here, Terry says he never really learned the trick of pretending that the first day of spring was absolutely gorgeous or at the very least somehow finding spring in his heart. The actual weather always got the better of him.  So he decided to call an old friend of ours, Dave Bronstetter, CBC legend and native Montrealer, thinking he might be able to supply the means to develop the needed suspension of disbelief. Watch The Link! Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1732989,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0hn57DyFFlzEZ1tO2jNyBr"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0hn57DyFFlzEZ1tO2jNyBr","html_description":"Your hosts: Lynn Desjardins, Levon Sevunts and Terry Haig. (Video of show at bottom.)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190322-WEE15\nPublic hearing on oil and gas development in eastern Arctic wrap up in Iqaluit\nA polar bear stands on a ice flow in Baffin Bay above the arctic circle as seen from the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent on July 10, 2008. (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press)\n\nPublic hearings on potential oil and gas development in the waters between Canada and western Greenland wrapped up in Canada's northern territory of Nunavut this week.\nThere is ongoing moratorium on offshore oil and gas projects in the Canadian Arctic, but it expires in 2021 and Nunavut authorities are doing their homework to see whether they want that moratorium extended for another five years.\n\nThis latest meeting took place in Iqaluit, which is the capital of Canada's Arctic territory of Nunavut.  This was the last public hearing and was part of a strategic environmental assessment being conducted by the Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB).\n\nThe board will now prepare a report and a list of recommendations that will be presented to the federal government. The meeting heard from members of the public, various Inuit organizations and government agencies about potential oil and gas development in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. It's a long sliver of water that separates northeastern Canada and Greenland. And it's one of the Arctic's most productive marine environments.\n\nThe strategic environmental assessment will look at various scenarios of potential oil and gas activity in the region from exploration and development to full-scale production. And of course it will look at potential benefits and drawbacks for the affected Inuit communities and the marine environment they depend on for much of their food source.\n\nFor more Levon spoke with Chris Debicki, with Oceans North, it's a marine conservation NGO.\nOnline hatred growing in Canada, warns rights advocate\nThe massacre at two mosques in New Zealand elicited sympathy but also online celebration by extremists. (Vincent Yu/AP Photo/file)\n\nLast week's attack on a mosque in New Zealand had particular resonance for Canadians. Last week a gunman stormed two mosques killing 50 people and injuring dozens more. Horrifying in and of itself, it also brought back memories of a similar attack in Quebec City in Canada. A gunman stormed a mosque there killing six people. He pleaded guilty to the crime and is now awaiting sentencing. There have been attacks on Muslims in other places around the world, prompting questions about the spread of hatred online. Canada is not exempt. To find out more about what's going on here and the concern, Lynn spoke with Amira Elghawaby, a board member with the non-profit Canadian Anti-Hate Network.\nSpring arrives in Canada, can more rain and snow be far behind?\nSpring: the idealized version. Not what it looked like in Montreal. (Ian Black/CBC)\n\nOn Wednesday at 5.58 our time and describing himself as a good Canadian, Terry took it for what it was....kind of chilly and overcast  but at least it wasn't snowing. He found it to be very strange though, Yellowknife had its warmest temperatures ever and so did the lower mainland of British Columbia. For the rest of us, it was business as usual.\n\nNow, since he didn't grow up here, Terry says he never really learned the trick of pretending that the first day of spring was absolutely gorgeous or at the very least somehow finding spring in his heart. The actual weather always got the better of him.  So he decided to call an old friend of ours, Dave Bronstetter, CBC legend and native Montrealer, thinking he might be able to supply the means to develop the needed suspension of disbelief.\n\nWatch The Link!\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0hn57DyFFlzEZ1tO2jNyBr","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, March 22, 23, 24, 2019","release_date":"2019-03-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0hn57DyFFlzEZ1tO2jNyBr"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/3a59444109c33a7c2506475c336028f6bc1ae597","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Terry, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Marc (Video of show at bottom. Also archived on the Radio Canada Int'l Facebook page) ListenEN_The_Link-20190315-WEE15 U.N. report on environment: humanity is at a crossroads Smog and dust like that seen in New Delhi on Nov. 10, 2017 are among the many threats to human health documented in a comprehensive UN report. (Altaf Qadri/AP Photo) It's a dire report that ties climate change and other environmental issues together and predicts that millions of people will die without urgent action on these issues.  The report says the world has the technology and the money to make the changes, but people in positions of power or influence, meaning politicians and business leaders, must stop thinking in old ways Lynn spoke to Tim Gray, executive director of Environmental Defence, a non-profit environmental group. Saudi escalation against human rights activism Loujain al-Hathloul, who graduated from university in Canada, has spent nearly 10 months in prison on charges of supporting 'hostile elements.' She and other Saudi activists went on trial Wednesday morning.(Loujain al-Hathloul/AP) The Saudi Arabian regime appears to be hardening its position against human rights activists in the country.  Eleven women appeared in court this month to face charges for their peaceful activism. Two activists have connections to Canada. One of them is the sister of blogger Raif Badawi who was given 50 lashes for his posts and who remains in prison. His wife and children are living in Canada.  Canada and about 3 dozen other countries have signed a statement condemning the arrests of the women last May. Terry spoke to Jacqueline Hansen, Amnesty International Canada’s Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner,  The political scandal in Canada facing Justin Trudeau, continues Jody Wilson-Raybould former Attorney-General told the justice committee she was ‘hounded’ about the SNC-Lavalin criminal prosecution by top Liberal officials, even the Prime Minister. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press/Feb. 27, 2019) The scandal which broke in the news weeks ago has tarnished the Liberal party and the personal reputation of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It concerns allegations of political interference in a legal case against the giant engineering firm SNC Lavalin, charged with bribery and fraud. The allegations concern undue pressure on the then Attorney Journey Jody Wilson-Raybould, who quit the Trudeau cabinet over the issue. The latest uproar came when the Liberal majority on the all-party Justice Committee shut down an emergency meeting almost as soon as it started causing an uproar among opposition members. Marc spoke to political studies professor Jennifer Wallner (PhD) of the University of Ottawa about this latest event and the ongoing scandal. Watch the video of The Link March 15 2019 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800594,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/4edYfNgPRh1YJBiW9F1pZh"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/4edYfNgPRh1YJBiW9F1pZh","html_description":"Your hosts, Terry, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Marc (Video of show at bottom. Also archived on the Radio Canada Int'l Facebook page)\n\nListenEN_The_Link-20190315-WEE15\n\nU.N. report on environment: humanity is at a crossroads\n\nSmog and dust like that seen in New Delhi on Nov. 10, 2017 are among the many threats to human health documented in a comprehensive UN report. (Altaf Qadri/AP Photo)\n\nIt's a dire report that ties climate change and other environmental issues together and predicts that millions of people will die without urgent action on these issues.  The report says the world has the technology and the money to make the changes, but people in positions of power or influence, meaning politicians and business leaders, must stop thinking in old ways\n\nLynn spoke to Tim Gray, executive director of Environmental Defence, a non-profit environmental group.\nSaudi escalation against human rights activism\nLoujain al-Hathloul, who graduated from university in Canada, has spent nearly 10 months in prison on charges of supporting 'hostile elements.' She and other Saudi activists went on trial Wednesday morning.(Loujain al-Hathloul/AP)\n\nThe Saudi Arabian regime appears to be hardening its position against human rights activists in the country.  Eleven women appeared in court this month to face charges for their peaceful activism.\n\nTwo activists have connections to Canada. One of them is the sister of blogger Raif Badawi who was given 50 lashes for his posts and who remains in prison. His wife and children are living in Canada.  Canada and about 3 dozen other countries have signed a statement condemning the arrests of the women last May.\n\nTerry spoke to Jacqueline Hansen, Amnesty International Canada’s Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner, \nThe political scandal in Canada facing Justin Trudeau, continues\nJody Wilson-Raybould former Attorney-General told the justice committee she was ‘hounded’ about the SNC-Lavalin criminal prosecution by top Liberal officials, even the Prime Minister. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press/Feb. 27, 2019)\n\nThe scandal which broke in the news weeks ago has tarnished the Liberal party and the personal reputation of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It concerns allegations of political interference in a legal case against the giant engineering firm SNC Lavalin, charged with bribery and fraud. The allegations concern undue pressure on the then Attorney Journey Jody Wilson-Raybould, who quit the Trudeau cabinet over the issue. The latest uproar came when the Liberal majority on the all-party Justice Committee shut down an emergency meeting almost as soon as it started causing an uproar among opposition members.\n\nMarc spoke to political studies professor Jennifer Wallner (PhD) of the University of Ottawa about this latest event and the ongoing scandal.\n\nWatch the video of The Link March 15 2019\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"4edYfNgPRh1YJBiW9F1pZh","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Mar. 15,16,17, 2019","release_date":"2019-03-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:4edYfNgPRh1YJBiW9F1pZh"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/83a3041788921b5596d1955e64b10954c0b4f8a5","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Lynn, Terry, Marie-Claude, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_1-20190308-WIE10 Canada's Prime Minister insists \"no inappropriate pressure\" in SNC Lavalin case Prime Minister Justin Trudeau denied charges by the former attorney general that she was persistently and inappropriately pressured to drop criminal charges against SNC-Laval and instead to negotiate an apology and reparations. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press) The SNC Lavalin scandal as it's being called continues to dog the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Accused of improper political interference in a legal case against the Quebec-based engineering giant. Trudeau tried to calm the debate with a televised explanation of his version of the debate. It does not seem to have helped calm the controversy.  Lynn has an excerpt of the speech, and explanation of the situation HIV-AIDS Patients cured, but not yet a viable cure HIV_AIDS infects tens of millions world-wide with over a million cases added each year. A second man has bee declared functionally cleared of the disase following a complex procedure. (via Radio-Canada) Several years ago a difficult operation was performed on a cancer patient with HIV-AIDS. Using T-cells from the very rare individuals that have a double mutation resistance to the virus, the risky bone marrow T-cell operation was successful and the man has been HIV-negative for years. Recently a second similar operation has been performed and that man also has been declared HIV negative, but the process is not being hailed as a cure. Canadian HIV-AIDs researcher Nicole Bernard (PhD) at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre explains. Remembering a hockey star and union advocate Ted Lindsay with the Stanley Cup after Detroit defeated Montreal to win the NHL title in 1954. Lindsay died Monday at 93. (The Associated Press) Ted Lindsay was a popular player in the National Hockey League of the 1950's and 60's. He was certainly well-known, but not what we would call a \"superstar\". He passed away this month, and as Terry tells us, he was better known for his \"off-ice\" activity as he sought to organize players into a union to seek better conditions for them, and ended up created the Players. Terry speaks to a sports broadcaster who was active during Lindsay's time as a player and reminisces about the player and the NHL . Watch The Link Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800699,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/24a9b1d0GgWwvuNLTuDPUl"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/24a9b1d0GgWwvuNLTuDPUl","html_description":"Your hosts Lynn, Terry, Marie-Claude, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190308-WIE10\nCanada's Prime Minister insists \"no inappropriate pressure\" in SNC Lavalin case\nPrime Minister Justin Trudeau denied charges by the former attorney general that she was persistently and inappropriately pressured to drop criminal charges against SNC-Laval and instead to negotiate an apology and reparations. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)\n\nThe SNC Lavalin scandal as it's being called continues to dog the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Accused of improper political interference in a legal case against the Quebec-based engineering giant. Trudeau tried to calm the debate with a televised explanation of his version of the debate.\n\nIt does not seem to have helped calm the controversy.  Lynn has an excerpt of the speech, and explanation of the situation\nHIV-AIDS Patients cured, but not yet a viable cure\nHIV_AIDS infects tens of millions world-wide with over a million cases added each year. A second man has bee declared functionally cleared of the disase following a complex procedure. (via Radio-Canada)\n\nSeveral years ago a difficult operation was performed on a cancer patient with HIV-AIDS. Using T-cells from the very rare individuals that have a double mutation resistance to the virus, the risky bone marrow T-cell operation was successful and the man has been HIV-negative for years.\n\nRecently a second similar operation has been performed and that man also has been declared HIV negative, but the process is not being hailed as a cure.\n\nCanadian HIV-AIDs researcher Nicole Bernard (PhD) at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre explains.\nRemembering a hockey star and union advocate\nTed Lindsay with the Stanley Cup after Detroit defeated Montreal to win the NHL title in 1954. Lindsay died Monday at 93. (The Associated Press)\n\nTed Lindsay was a popular player in the National Hockey League of the 1950's and 60's. He was certainly well-known, but not what we would call a \"superstar\". He passed away this month, and as Terry tells us, he was better known for his \"off-ice\" activity as he sought to organize players into a union to seek better conditions for them, and ended up created the Players.\n\nTerry speaks to a sports broadcaster who was active during Lindsay's time as a player and reminisces about the player and the NHL .\n\nWatch The Link\n\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"24a9b1d0GgWwvuNLTuDPUl","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Mar. 8-9-10, 2019","release_date":"2019-03-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:24a9b1d0GgWwvuNLTuDPUl"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/0cf8ba892c64e5d3449af0f8463234143afb7c8b","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Terry, Marie-Claude and Marc (Video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_1-20190301-WIE10 A scandal is shaking Canada's federal political landscape and the governing Liberal party of Justin Trudeau Former Attorney-General Jody Wilson-Raybould said she faced inappropriate pressure to interfere in a criminal case against a Canadian engineering firm. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press) A scandal at the highest level of government in Canada has rocked the ruling Liberal Party of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Elected with the slogan \"real change\", many are now doubting the sincerity of that slogan or others promoted by the Prime Minister. The claim is that the Liberals exerted pressure on their own member, Attorney-General Jody Wilson Raybould regarding a criminal case against the giant SNC Lavalin engineering firm. Opposition members are calling for a police investigation, a national inquiry, and even the resignation of the Prime Minister. Lynn spoke to Kim Speers, assistant teaching professor at the University of Victoria to discuss public testimony of Jody Wilson Raybould Unpleasant incident for a disabled woman at a major grocery store chain Linda Rolston decided to stand her ground after her local No Frills grocery store told her to shop somewhere else because her disability was slowing everybody down. (Linda Rolston) A woman with a disability was chastised by the manager of a grocery store, part of a major chain, for taking too long to pack her purchases. She was told to shop elsewhere in future and offered $100 to not come back. A complaint to the CBC resulted in the issue becoming widely known in a special report called \"Go Public\". Terry spoke about the case with  Queen’s University professor Mary Ann McColl, who is also the Academic Lead with the Canadian Disability Policy Alliance. Having fun with an award winning music and dance video about quantum physics University of Alberta’ doctoral student Pramodh Senarath Yapa has just been announced as the 2018 overall winner of the international Dance Your PhD competition (supplied-via U Alberta) Doctoral studen Pramodh Senerath Yapa, deals with the highly complex world of quantum physics, but when he heard about the international competition called Dance Your PhD, he knew he had to enter. Gathering friends and writing the music and choreography to explain how supercooled electrons react in conjunction with \"dirty\" conditions in wire and how to control them, he put together his 11 minute video in six weeks. In the competition against 50 others from around the world he came out on top. He also plans to enter again with a subject of superfluids. Marc spoke to Pramodh by mobile phone in Alberta. Watch The Link, 2019 March 1 Images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1800490,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/0SwBUhehoHTkT78zLbd7Dr"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/0SwBUhehoHTkT78zLbd7Dr","html_description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Terry, Marie-Claude and Marc (Video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190301-WIE10\nA scandal is shaking Canada's federal political landscape and the governing Liberal party of Justin Trudeau\nFormer Attorney-General Jody Wilson-Raybould said she faced inappropriate pressure to interfere in a criminal case against a Canadian engineering firm. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)\n\nA scandal at the highest level of government in Canada has rocked the ruling Liberal Party of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Elected with the slogan \"real change\", many are now doubting the sincerity of that slogan or others promoted by the Prime Minister. The claim is that the Liberals exerted pressure on their own member, Attorney-General Jody Wilson Raybould regarding a criminal case against the giant SNC Lavalin engineering firm.\n\nOpposition members are calling for a police investigation, a national inquiry, and even the resignation of the Prime Minister.\n\nLynn spoke to Kim Speers, assistant teaching professor at the University of Victoria to discuss public testimony of Jody Wilson Raybould\nUnpleasant incident for a disabled woman at a major grocery store chain\nLinda Rolston decided to stand her ground after her local No Frills grocery store told her to shop somewhere else because her disability was slowing everybody down. (Linda Rolston)\n\nA woman with a disability was chastised by the manager of a grocery store, part of a major chain, for taking too long to pack her purchases. She was told to shop elsewhere in future and offered $100 to not come back.\n\nA complaint to the CBC resulted in the issue becoming widely known in a special report called \"Go Public\".\n\nTerry spoke about the case with  Queen’s University professor Mary Ann McColl, who is also the Academic Lead with the Canadian Disability Policy Alliance.\nHaving fun with an award winning music and dance video about quantum physics\nUniversity of Alberta’ doctoral student Pramodh Senarath Yapa has just been announced as the 2018 overall winner of the international Dance Your PhD competition (supplied-via U Alberta)\n\nDoctoral studen Pramodh Senerath Yapa, deals with the highly complex world of quantum physics, but when he heard about the international competition called Dance Your PhD, he knew he had to enter. Gathering friends and writing the music and choreography to explain how supercooled electrons react in conjunction with \"dirty\" conditions in wire and how to control them, he put together his 11 minute video in six weeks.\n\nIn the competition against 50 others from around the world he came out on top. He also plans to enter again with a subject of superfluids.\n\nMarc spoke to Pramodh by mobile phone in Alberta.\n\nWatch The Link, 2019 March 1\n\n\nImages of the week\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"0SwBUhehoHTkT78zLbd7Dr","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, March 1,2,3, 2019","release_date":"2019-03-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:0SwBUhehoHTkT78zLbd7Dr"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/ce8c443f650fd55e56fe83362da20a1359bd7f74","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Today a special programme to mark Black History Month in Canada Your hosts, Lynn and Marc, with special guests Claire-Anse Saint-Eloi- assistant coordinator for the round table on Black History Month; Deborah Forde- Montreal Black History Month Laureate, and Pat Dillon-Moore- spokesperson for Montreal's Black History Month. ListenEN_Interview_1-20190222-WIE10 Recorded at Espace Mushagalusa in downtown Montreal.  images of the week window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1799079,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/3pLhLcHYNS2KkiOXbn48fa"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/3pLhLcHYNS2KkiOXbn48fa","html_description":"Today a special programme to mark Black History Month in Canada\n\nYour hosts, Lynn and Marc, with special guests Claire-Anse Saint-Eloi- assistant coordinator for the round table on Black History Month; Deborah Forde- Montreal Black History Month Laureate, and Pat Dillon-Moore- spokesperson for Montreal's Black History Month.\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190222-WIE10\n\nRecorded at Espace Mushagalusa in downtown Montreal.\n\n\nimages of the week\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"3pLhLcHYNS2KkiOXbn48fa","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Feb 22,23,24 2019","release_date":"2019-02-22","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:3pLhLcHYNS2KkiOXbn48fa"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/1899861143d04a53daa1441babae075759005d45","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts: Levon, Terry, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_1-20190215-WIE10 Legendary British rock star Sting performs in solidarity with General Motors workers in Oshawa Sting and the cast of his musical \"The Last Ship\" perform in support of General Motors workers in Oshawa, Ont. on Thursday, February 14 , 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS) This week, Gordon Sumner aka \"Sting\" took the cast of his hit musical to the city of Oshawa, Ontario for a performance  of songs from his hit musical \"The Last Ship\". The city of Oshawa is facing the closure of the General Motors plant, the city's biggest employer for over 100 years. Performing in nearby Toronto, Sting says he can easily identify with the GM workers situation as the musical is about the very similar situation his hometown in England went through when the local shipyard closed. It too had been the mainstay of the city since at least the mid 1800's. When the shipyard closed, it threw thousands out of work, and devastated the community, just as the GM closure is expected to do in Oshawa. Levon prepared a report. The (somewhat surprising) biggest threat to the world's biggest creatures The leatherback turtle is threatened by hunting not only for its meat but also the collection and eating of its eggs (US Fish and Wildlife Service- U Oregon, Ripple et al) The world's biggest creatures are called \"mega-fauna\". Whether birds, reptiles or amphibians, whether mammals or fish, most of the largest species in these categories are under threat. That's not new. We've had years of stories of how habitat destruction and pollution are threatening them. However, a new international study shows that hunting was and continues to be the largest and most immediate threat to their survival. Marc spoke to Professor Boris Worm of Dalhousie University in Halifax, the supervising author of this international study. Death of respected newsman creates a loss for Canadian journalism Joe Schlesinger (seen in 2009) died Monday, leaving nothing but praise and admiration in his wake. To his fellow reporters and journalists, including Brian Stewart (see interview below), Schlesinger was a reporter's reporter. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese) His was a smooth, calm, and yet passionate voice in Canadian journalism. His own story was remarkable including having been brought as a child to England from the Nazi invasion of his Czech homeland. His parents were later killed during the Holocaust. Later he would flee his homeland again during the Communist purge of journalists. He later worked for a variety of news services in Canada, London and Paris, before eventually joining the Canadian public broadcaster CBC. It is perhaps due to his own remarkable history and travels that led to his wonderful story telling ability and insightful reporting from places and conflict zones around the world, Paris, Berlin, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Iran and more. Even after retirement from the CBC in 1994, he continued to produce a number of news magazine specials, documentaries, and commentaries for the CBC. In 1990 he wrote his autobiography called, Time Zones: a Journalist in the World. Joe Schlesinger died this week at age 90. Terry spoke to another respected journalist, Brian Stewart, about Schlesinger's legacy. Watch The Link, Feb. 15, 2019.","duration_ms":1802292,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/24Tk0lxu4Yv28A3HwnPXAm"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/24Tk0lxu4Yv28A3HwnPXAm","html_description":"Your hosts: Levon, Terry, Marie-Claude, Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190215-WIE10\nLegendary British rock star Sting performs in solidarity with General Motors workers in Oshawa\nSting and the cast of his musical \"The Last Ship\" perform in support of General Motors workers in Oshawa, Ont. on Thursday, February 14 , 2019. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nThis week, Gordon Sumner aka \"Sting\" took the cast of his hit musical to the city of Oshawa, Ontario for a performance  of songs from his hit musical \"The Last Ship\".\n\nThe city of Oshawa is facing the closure of the General Motors plant, the city's biggest employer for over 100 years. Performing in nearby Toronto, Sting says he can easily identify with the GM workers situation as the musical is about the very similar situation his hometown in England went through when the local shipyard closed. It too had been the mainstay of the city since at least the mid 1800's. When the shipyard closed, it threw thousands out of work, and devastated the community, just as the GM closure is expected to do in Oshawa.\n\nLevon prepared a report.\nThe (somewhat surprising) biggest threat to the world's biggest creatures\nThe leatherback turtle is threatened by hunting not only for its meat but also the collection and eating of its eggs (US Fish and Wildlife Service- U Oregon, Ripple et al)\n\nThe world's biggest creatures are called \"mega-fauna\". Whether birds, reptiles or amphibians, whether mammals or fish, most of the largest species in these categories are under threat. That's not new. We've had years of stories of how habitat destruction and pollution are threatening them. However, a new international study shows that hunting was and continues to be the largest and most immediate threat to their survival.\n\nMarc spoke to Professor Boris Worm of Dalhousie University in Halifax, the supervising author of this international study.\nDeath of respected newsman creates a loss for Canadian journalism\nJoe Schlesinger (seen in 2009) died Monday, leaving nothing but praise and admiration in his wake. To his fellow reporters and journalists, including Brian Stewart (see interview below), Schlesinger was a reporter's reporter. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese)\n\nHis was a smooth, calm, and yet passionate voice in Canadian journalism. His own story was remarkable including having been brought as a child to England from the Nazi invasion of his Czech homeland. His parents were later killed during the Holocaust. Later he would flee his homeland again during the Communist purge of journalists.\n\nHe later worked for a variety of news services in Canada, London and Paris, before eventually joining the Canadian public broadcaster CBC.\n\nIt is perhaps due to his own remarkable history and travels that led to his wonderful story telling ability and insightful reporting from places and conflict zones around the world, Paris, Berlin, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Iran and more. Even after retirement from the CBC in 1994, he continued to produce a number of news magazine specials, documentaries, and commentaries for the CBC.\n\nIn 1990 he wrote his autobiography called, Time Zones: a Journalist in the World.\n\nJoe Schlesinger died this week at age 90. Terry spoke to another respected journalist, Brian Stewart, about Schlesinger's legacy.\n\nWatch The Link, Feb. 15, 2019.","id":"24Tk0lxu4Yv28A3HwnPXAm","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Feb. 15,16,17","release_date":"2019-02-15","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:24Tk0lxu4Yv28A3HwnPXAm"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/15348369a42614f690d2b43fc28229787deba0fa","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_1-20190208-WIE10 Europe's Marine Protected Areas allow heavy commercial fishing A new study shows there is actually 38% more large commercial fishing activity inside Europe's protected zones than outside. Bottom trawling is also known to destroy bottom habitat   (Virginia Lee Hunter-Greenpeace) One might easily presume that Europe's marine protected areas (MPA)help conserve marine species. A new study shows that's not the case, and that in fact more commercial fishing takes place inside these zones, than outside. Several species are already threatened inside these waters. Marc spoke to Manuel Dureuil, PhD candidate and lead author of the research study. Hello, I'm ...... How Beluga whales tell others who they are and where they are “Belugas are an incredibly socially complex species...and they need to keep track of one another,” says researcher. (Valeria Vergara) It's been known for sometime that marine mammals like whales and dolphins use echo location to find food and navigate and communicate, but new research says among those chirps and clicks may be sound the whales use to identify themselves individually to others, something like hey, I'm Bill, or Mary, and i'm over here. Beluga whales for example are very social animals, and they've been studied by Valeria Vergara, a research scientist with Ocean Wise, a conservation program of the Vancouver Aquarium.  Lynn spoke to her about the study. One of the world's largest national parks is in remote northern Canada, but it is failing an ecological test Horses in winter: this group of was seen during a Wood Buffalo National Park bison survey in 2016. Environmentalists are hopeful Ottawa will follow through with the needed funding to support the federal action plan released last Friday to save the park, the world's second largest. (JD McKinnon/Parks Canada) The world's second largest national park is Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta and stretching into the Northwest Territories. Even though it can be considered very remote it is suffering from the combined effects of climate change, and industrial extraction activities. A new report says it is failing in 15 of 17 ecological measures. UNESCO has asked the Canadian government to come up with a plan to save the park, which they have. But will the Trudeau government follow up with the money needed? It seems they might not. Terry spoke to Gillian Chow-Fraser, Boreal Program Manager at the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society’s northern Alberta chapter. Maric-Claude makes dumplings for Chinese New Year Marie Claude with the dumplings she made Marie-Claude visited a Chinese family and prepared authentic Chinese dumplings in honour of Chinese New Year this past Tuesday. The experience will be told in detail on Maric-Claude's colum this week, including the recipe. Video of show","duration_ms":1799654,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6ZzY7e4A0vEPYW82VGODbk"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6ZzY7e4A0vEPYW82VGODbk","html_description":"Your hosts, Lynn, Marie-Claude, Terry, and Marc (video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190208-WIE10\nEurope's Marine Protected Areas allow heavy commercial fishing\nA new study shows there is actually 38% more large commercial fishing activity inside Europe's protected zones than outside. Bottom trawling is also known to destroy bottom habitat   (Virginia Lee Hunter-Greenpeace)\n\nOne might easily presume that Europe's marine protected areas (MPA)help conserve marine species. A new study shows that's not the case, and that in fact more commercial fishing takes place inside these zones, than outside. Several species are already threatened inside these waters.\n\nMarc spoke to Manuel Dureuil, PhD candidate and lead author of the research study.\nHello, I'm ...... How Beluga whales tell others who they are and where they are\n“Belugas are an incredibly socially complex species...and they need to keep track of one another,” says researcher. (Valeria Vergara)\n\nIt's been known for sometime that marine mammals like whales and dolphins use echo location to find food and navigate and communicate, but new research says among those chirps and clicks may be sound the whales use to identify themselves individually to others, something like hey, I'm Bill, or Mary, and i'm over here.\n\nBeluga whales for example are very social animals, and they've been studied by Valeria Vergara, a research scientist with Ocean Wise, a conservation program of the Vancouver Aquarium.  Lynn spoke to her about the study.\nOne of the world's largest national parks is in remote northern Canada, but it is failing an ecological test\nHorses in winter: this group of was seen during a Wood Buffalo National Park bison survey in 2016. Environmentalists are hopeful Ottawa will follow through with the needed funding to support the federal action plan released last Friday to save the park, the world's second largest. (JD McKinnon/Parks Canada)\n\nThe world's second largest national park is Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta and stretching into the Northwest Territories.\n\nEven though it can be considered very remote it is suffering from the combined effects of climate change, and industrial extraction activities. A new report says it is failing in 15 of 17 ecological measures.\n\nUNESCO has asked the Canadian government to come up with a plan to save the park, which they have. But will the Trudeau government follow up with the money needed? It seems they might not.\n\nTerry spoke to Gillian Chow-Fraser, Boreal Program Manager at the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society’s northern Alberta chapter.\nMaric-Claude makes dumplings for Chinese New Year\nMarie Claude with the dumplings she made\n\nMarie-Claude visited a Chinese family and prepared authentic Chinese dumplings in honour of Chinese New Year this past Tuesday. The experience will be told in detail on Maric-Claude's colum this week, including the recipe.\n\nVideo of show","id":"6ZzY7e4A0vEPYW82VGODbk","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Feb. 8,9,10","release_date":"2019-02-08","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6ZzY7e4A0vEPYW82VGODbk"},{"audio_preview_url":"https://p.scdn.co/mp3-preview/082ac48647846aed6a0f593134a8abb879e2bfe7","content_type":"PODCAST_EPISODE","description":"Your hosts Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc(video of show at bottom) ListenEN_Interview_1-20190201-WIE10 Special Guest Wei Wu from RCI's Chinese section leads off the show with a look at the upcoming Chinese New Year Ottawa unveils new rules to combat election interference Minister of Democratic Institutions Karina Gould, along with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Ralph Goodale, and the Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan, make an announcement regarding safeguards to Canada's democracy and combatting foreign interference during a press conference in Ottawa on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Recent elections have been allegedly manipulated through cyber attacks and hacks presumably from foreign sources. Federal government ministers announced a series of measures this week to enhance security around elections, especially as Canada's federal election is set for October of this year. These include taking proactive measures to combat foreign interference, enhancing citizen preparedness, improving coordination between Canada’s security agencies and calling on social media platforms to take “actions to increase transparency, authenticity and integrity on their systems.” Levon prepared a report. Teenagers not getting enough sleep, why? Electronic devices are a powerful distraction for adolescents who should be sleeping, say doctors. (iStock) Sleep is important to all of us, but teens need at least eight to ten hours a night.  Less than that and their learning ability is lessened and it may affect them psychologically. Part of a bigger set of issues, is that of electronic devices, which experts say should be kept out of the bedroom. Also \"catching up\" on weekends with extra sleep really doesn't work all that well. Lynn spoke with Dr. Christopher Winter who explains why sleep is so important for teens and what the obstacles are to them getting enough of it. No need to recycle plastics, re-use them instead: LOOP (Freedom Island Waste Clean-up and Brand Audit in the Philippines Sept 14,2017.)A new idea is to avoid waste and garbage, and even the recycling of plastic, by creating a programme of refill and reuse of plastic containers called \"LOOP\" (photo Greenpeace) A new pilot programme is about to begin in an effort to stop throwing out plastic containers, or even trying to recycle them.  Studies have shown that only about ten per cent of plastics are recycled and the rest end up in one form or another in the environment such as landfills, or in the ocean. The new concept is called LOOP. It has major international companies on board who will sell their products on line. They are sent to consumers who will place the empty containers in a bin by the door where LOOP will have them picked up and returned to the companies for refill and resale, thereby eliminating waste. Marc speaks with Vito Buonsante, Plastics Program Manager with Environmental Defence Canada Video of show  window.jQuery || document.write('","duration_ms":1801822,"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/episode/6MuciFiPl09c7zGMtonOys"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/episodes/6MuciFiPl09c7zGMtonOys","html_description":"Your hosts Lynn, Levon, Marie-Claude, Marc(video of show at bottom)\n\nListenEN_Interview_1-20190201-WIE10\n\nSpecial Guest Wei Wu from RCI's Chinese section leads off the show with a look at the upcoming Chinese New Year\nOttawa unveils new rules to combat election interference\nMinister of Democratic Institutions Karina Gould, along with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Ralph Goodale, and the Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan, make an announcement regarding safeguards to Canada's democracy and combatting foreign interference during a press conference in Ottawa on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. (Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS)\n\nRecent elections have been allegedly manipulated through cyber attacks and hacks presumably from foreign sources. Federal government ministers announced a series of measures this week to enhance security around elections, especially as Canada's federal election is set for October of this year.\n\nThese include taking proactive measures to combat foreign interference, enhancing citizen preparedness, improving coordination between Canada’s security agencies and calling on social media platforms to take “actions to increase transparency, authenticity and integrity on their systems.”\n\nLevon prepared a report.\nTeenagers not getting enough sleep, why?\nElectronic devices are a powerful distraction for adolescents who should be sleeping, say doctors. (iStock)\n\nSleep is important to all of us, but teens need at least eight to ten hours a night.  Less than that and their learning ability is lessened and it may affect them psychologically.\n\nPart of a bigger set of issues, is that of electronic devices, which experts say should be kept out of the bedroom. Also \"catching up\" on weekends with extra sleep really doesn't work all that well.\n\nLynn spoke with Dr. Christopher Winter who explains why sleep is so important for teens and what the obstacles are to them getting enough of it.\nNo need to recycle plastics, re-use them instead: LOOP\n(Freedom Island Waste Clean-up and Brand Audit in the Philippines Sept 14,2017.)A new idea is to avoid waste and garbage, and even the recycling of plastic, by creating a programme of refill and reuse of plastic containers called \"LOOP\" (photo Greenpeace)\n\nA new pilot programme is about to begin in an effort to stop throwing out plastic containers, or even trying to recycle them.  Studies have shown that only about ten per cent of plastics are recycled and the rest end up in one form or another in the environment such as landfills, or in the ocean.\n\nThe new concept is called LOOP. It has major international companies on board who will sell their products on line. They are sent to consumers who will place the empty containers in a bin by the door where LOOP will have them picked up and returned to the companies for refill and resale, thereby eliminating waste.\n\nMarc speaks with Vito Buonsante, Plastics Program Manager with Environmental Defence Canada\n\nVideo of show\n\n\n\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\twindow.jQuery || document.write('","id":"6MuciFiPl09c7zGMtonOys","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"is_paywall_content":false,"is_playable":true,"language":"en-US","languages":["en-US"],"name":"The LINK Online, Feb., 1,2,3, 2019.","release_date":"2019-02-01","release_date_precision":"day","type":"episode","uri":"spotify:episode:6MuciFiPl09c7zGMtonOys"}],"limit":50,"next":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/2RA5X58maeadhj1eU28aUe/episodes?offset=50&limit=50&market=US","offset":0,"previous":null,"total":100},"explicit":false,"external_urls":{"spotify":"https://open.spotify.com/show/2RA5X58maeadhj1eU28aUe"},"href":"https://api.spotify.com/v1/shows/2RA5X58maeadhj1eU28aUe","id":"2RA5X58maeadhj1eU28aUe","images":[{"height":640,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/8d582b1e108abc72a8c11dc5030b44f37d9de490","width":640},{"height":300,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/386c561d484aa067e353da57359ee543c2c2cd83","width":300},{"height":64,"url":"https://i.scdn.co/image/2eb02bc7af94969485c4c1cb7a2af807a80711e2","width":64}],"is_externally_hosted":false,"languages":["en"],"media_type":"audio","name":"RCI | English : The Link","publisher":"RCI | English","total_episodes":100,"type":"show","uri":"spotify:show:2RA5X58maeadhj1eU28aUe"};