EBN podcast

BMJ Group

Published quarterly, the purpose of Evidence-Based Nursing is to select from the health-related literature research studies and reviews that report important advances relevant to best nursing practice. The clinical relevance and rigour of the studies are assessed to identify research that is relevant to nursing. A commentary on chosen articles identifies the key findings and implications for clinical practice. The RCNi and the BMJ publish Evidence-Based Nursing under the editorship of Professor Alison Twycross from London South Bank University, UK. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

All Episodes

In this podcast, Roberta Heale, Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Nursing, interviews Shaminder Singh, postdoctoral researcher, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Dr. Singh discusses the commentary he wrote titled "A short therapy program may reduce the risk of suicide reattempts by strengthening problem-focused coping among people with attempted suicide”, which is based on the research article: Gysin-Maillart A, Soravia L, Schwab S. Attempted suicide short intervention program influences coping among clients with a history of attempted suicide. J Affect Disord 2019 Read the commentary on the EBN website: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/09/ebnurs-2020-103257

Mar 15

17 min 11 sec

Associate Editor of EBN, David Barrett, University of Hull, UK, interviews Dr Nikolaos Efstathiou, lecturer in Nursing at the Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, about the Delphi technique in scientific research. Please read the related study: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/23/3/68

Feb 5

19 min 11 sec

In this podcast, Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Nursing, Lisa Kidd, talks to Laura Austin, who's a Registered Nurse/Midwife working in the Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Australia, and the author of a commentary on original, unpublished research based out of Melbourne. The aim of the research was to determine whether, within Australia, classification of hypertension within pregnancy should be adjusted to reflect the American College of Cardiology’s recent amendment to their guidelines. Read the commentary on the EBN’s website: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/08/24/ebnurs-2020-103274 Commentary on: Reddy M, Rolnik DL, Harris K, et al. Challenging the definition of hypertension in pregnancy: a retrospective cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2020, Jan 16. doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2019.12.272. [Epub ahead of print].

Aug 2020

9 min 8 sec

In this podcast, Associate Editor of EBN, David Barrett (University of Hull, UK), talks to Dr Aneesh Basheer (Departments of General Medicine and Medical Education, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, India) about sepsis bundles. They discuss a commentary titled “Patients with hospital-onset sepsis are less likely to receive sepsis bundle care than those with community-onset sepsis”, recently published by EBN - https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/01/ebnurs-2020-103285 The commentary relates to Baghdadi JD, Wong MD, Uslan DZ et al. Adherence to the SEP-1 Sepsis Bundle in Hospital-Onset v. Community-Onset Sepsis: a Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study. J Gen Intern Med 2020; Feb 10. doi: 10.1007/s11606-020-05653-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Aug 2020

11 min 53 sec

The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) domains provide a useful framework for guiding palliative dementia care for those living and dying at home. However, research is required to better understand how to design and implement palliative dementia care interventions for people living at home Listen to the conversation on this topic between Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Nursing Laura Green and Nuriye Kupeli (Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, University College London, UK) and read the commentary - https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/18/ebnurs-2019-103160. Commentary on: Miranda R, Bunn F, Lynch J, et al. Palliative care for people with dementia living at home: a systematic review of interventions. Palliat Med 2019;33:726-742. doi:10.1177/0269216319847092. Epub 2019 May 6.

Jan 2020

15 min 48 sec

Welcome to a new series of "research made simple" podcasts where researchers are interviewed about their studies and chosen methods, and implications for nursing practice and research are considered. In this first podcast, Associate Editor of EBN Laura Green speaks to Dr Sarah Campbell, a researcher within the Dementia and Ageing Research team in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Manchester. Her doctoral research "Atmospheres of Dementia Care: Stories told through the bodies of men" is an ethnographic study exploring what role the experience of place plays, and the role gender has, in the lives of men living with dementia in a variety of care settings. The aim was to interpret the everyday embodied life for men living with dementia in care and their connection to atmosphere. The study was undertaken alongside a wider project colloquially known as The Hair and Care Project (ESRC Ref. 2011-2013; Dr Richard Ward, PI). The PhD study collected data across three fieldsites focusing on the experience of seven men living with dementia. To find out more about this research, contact Sarah on sarah.campbell@manchester.ac.uk or follow her on twitter @wanderingalong You can also read a few relevant articles in Evidence-Based Nursing about ethnography as a research method and its applicability to understanding nursing practice: Ethnography: Challenges and Opportunities https://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/4/98 Using observational research to to obtain a picture of nursing practice https://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/3/66

Dec 2019

15 min 10 sec

The communication between nurses and families during and after family decision meetings is discussed in this podcast. Roberta Heale talks to Dr Mohammad Khan, Community Medicine, School of Dental Science, Universiti Sains Malaysia about his commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing (https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/10/ebnurs-2019-103089). The commentary relates to the paper: Pecanac K, King B. Nurse-Family Communication During and After Family Meetings in the Intensive Care Unit. J Nurs Scholarsh 2019;51:129–37

Oct 2019

7 min 7 sec

“Given the complexities of home-based palliative care, along with recent developments in patient safety, the time is ripe to better understand the characteristics that contribute to ‘pockets of excellence’ (brilliance) in home-based palliative care.” This podcast discusses a commentary recently published by EBN on “What does it take to deliver brilliant home-based palliative care? Using positiveorganisational scholarship and video reflexive ethnography to explore the complexities of palliative care at home.” Palliat Med 2018:269216318807835. doi: 10.1177/0269216318807835. Read the commentary: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/04/11/ebnurs-2019-103070

Jul 2019

18 min 40 sec

David Barrett talks to Amy Noakes (Children Nursing London South Bank University, London) about how to support rural nurses to develop and implement a contextualised, systematic approach to paediatric pain management and improve pain care for children (https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/06/21/ebnurs-2018-102986). This podcast discusses the commentary published by EBN on the article by Marshall C, Forgeron P, Harrison D, et al. Exploration of nurses’ pediatric pain management experience in rural hospitals: a qualitative descriptive study. Appl Nurs Res 2018;42: 89–97.

Jun 2019

14 min 43 sec

Healthcare professionals need to be aware of the impact of intimate partner violence experienced by mid-life and older women, as these - together with post-traumatic disorders - can have an impact on menopausal symptoms. The impact of intimate partner violence on these women’s lives needs further research. Parveen Ali (School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sheffield, UK) discusses a commentary on the paper “Associations of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and posttraumatic stress disorder with menopause symptoms among midlife and older women” with Roberta Heale, EBN’s Associate Editor. Read the commentary: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/03/18/ebnurs-2018-103059

May 2019

11 min 40 sec

What advice for families when breastfeeding is not an option in neonatal units? The study discussed in this podcast highlights that formula milk offers short-term benefits but may not result in any long-term benefits for growth or development over donor breast milk. The paper also concluded that formula milk appears to significantly increase risk of necrotising enterocolitis. Read the full commentary on the Evidence-Based Nursing website: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/22/1/18 Commentary on: “Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants”. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2018;6:CD002971.

Apr 2019

13 min 14 sec

Although recent studies suggest that ‘rooming-in’ is associated with a decreased need for pharmacological treatment and length of stay for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), more research is required to determine the effective components and short-term and long-term NAS outcomes, including risks. Professor Alison Twycross talks to Dr Karen A McQueen, Lakehead University School of Nursing, Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada, about her recent commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing: “‘Rooming-in’ could be an effective non-pharmacological treatment for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome”. Read it for free for the next two months on the EBN website: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/4/110. Commentary on: MacMillan, KDL. et al. Association of rooming-in with outcomes for neonatal abstinence syndrome: a systematic review with meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatr. 2018; 172; 345-351.

Jan 2019

12 min 8 sec

How a simple question from health professionals can have a positive impact on disability in older people. EBN's Associate Editor Roberta Heale talks to Professor Keith D Hill, School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia. Read the commentary on the EBN website - https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2018/10/12/eb-2018-102978.

Nov 2018

12 min 30 sec

Professor Linda Shields, credentialed children’s and young people’s nurse from the Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, New South Wales, Australia, talks us through the details of the findings of her research on discriminatory nursing practice towards lesbian, gay and bisexual parents. She is the co-author of a commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing on: Andersen AE, Moberg C, Bengtsson Tops A, et al. Lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care: a qualitative study. J Clin Nurs. 2017; 26:5065-5071. Listen to the full conversation with EBN's Editor-in-Chief Professor Alison Twycross and read the commentary: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/47.

Aug 2018

17 min 21 sec

Although several studies conclude higher mortality rates on hospital weekend admissions are due to reduced staff and services, these patients more often display clinical characteristics that increase their mortality risk, compared with those admitted during the week, a recent study concludes. The findings, based on an analysis of electronic health records, are discussed in a conversation between Associate Editor of EBN David Barrett (University of Hull, UK) and Pamela de Cordova (Rutgers School of Nursing, The State University of New Jersey, USA). Dr de Cordova is the author of a commentary published by EBN: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/49. The original research is titled “Mortality risks associated with emergency admissions during weekends and public holidays: an analysis of electronic health records”. Lancet 2017;390:62–72.

Jul 2018

10 min 47 sec

In this episode, Helen Noble, associate editor at EBN, talks to Linda Campbell, the stroke coordinator at NHS Highland in Scotland. They are discussing the need for nurse education to address uncertainties of role and contribution in stroke rehabilitation. Read the commentary on the EBN website: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/44. Commentary on: Loft MI, Poulsen I, Esbensen BA, et al. Nurses’ and nurse assistants’ beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit: a qualitative study. J Clin Nurs 2017;26:4905–14.

May 2018

8 min 8 sec

School nurses are well-positioned to support adolescents experiencing pain secondary to stress and unhealthy lifestyle choices, but require training relevant to addressing such antecedents of pain. Paediatric nurse Brenna Quinn discusses with the editor of EBN Alison Twycross the challenge of supporting adolescents experiencing emotional or physical pain in schools. Professor Quinn (University of Massachusetts Lowell, Solomont School of Nursing, USA) is the author of a commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing titled: “School nurses are able to support adolescents experiencing pain secondary to stress and unhealthy lifestyle choices”. Read the paper here: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/45.

Mar 2018

11 min 33 sec

Nurses are witnessing a higher prevalence of self-harm related to mental health in children and young people, says Lin Graham-Ray, designated nurse for looked after children and care-leavers in Merton and Wandsworth CCGs. The nurse consultant was the invited host of the EBN Twitter chat of 3rd January, which emphasized the need for nurses to understand that the problem “is happening all over the place" - she tells Associate Editor of EBN Roberta Heale in this podcast. Lin advocates listening and keeping the communication going with patients, from the privileged perspective of a nurse, as the key to prevention of self-harm in young people. Read the full chat: https://storify.com/EBN_BMJ/self-harm-with-young-people. You can join the bi-monthly EBN Online Journal Chats on Twitter by searching for #ebnjc. Follow Evidence-Based Nursing on Twitter: @EBNursingBMJ. For more information on the subjects covered in this podcast visit the Evidence-Based Nursing website (http://ebn.bmj.com/) and the blog (https://blogs.bmj.com/ebn/2017/12/29/self-harm-and-young-people).

Feb 2018

11 min 54 sec

In this episode Helen Noble, Associate Editor of EBN, talks to Professor Tom Quinn, Professor of Nursing at the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, about the recently published paper "Routine supplementary oxygen for the normoxic patient with suspected acute myocardial infarction is no longer warranted". Read it here: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/1/13.

Jan 2018

12 min 18 sec

In this episode Dr David Barrett, Associate Editor on EBN, talks to Despina Anagnostou, School of Medicine, Cardiff University. about her published paper "Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness". Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/2/47

Aug 2017

12 min 13 sec

In this episode Roberta Heale, Associate Editor of EBN, talks to Dr May Ann Pascuale, Assistant Professor of Nursing at Cedar Crest College. They discuss the recently published paper "Support for presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation if it is a child or relative, though views differ by gender" Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/2/58

Jul 2017

15 min 38 sec

In this episode Helen Noble, Associate Editor EBN, talks to Constance Guille, Medical University of South Carolina, about her recent article Telephone delivery of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by Certified Nurse-Midwives may help reduce symptoms of Postpartum Depression in EBN journal. Full article >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/1/12

May 2017

6 min 21 sec

In this episode Helen Noble, Associate Editor EBN, talks to Ian Walsh, Clinical Academic, Queen’s University Belfast, about the recently published paper "Persistent Long-Term Urinary Incontinence Post Parturition" in Evidence Based Nursing. Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/1/8.full

May 2017

5 min 43 sec

In this episode Helen Noble talks to Kim Cox about her recently published paper in EBN entitled "Vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) at home in England: an opportunity for shared decision making" Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2016/09/14/eb-2016-102452

Apr 2017

15 min 37 sec

In this episode David Barrett talks to Pamela B de Cordova about the recently published paper "Staffing and nurse-perceived quality of care". Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/1/19

Mar 2017

9 min 38 sec

In this episode Dr Helen Noble talks to Dr Yusra Harahsheh about the recent commentary published in EBN entitled "Intermittent pneumatic compression is effective in reducing proximal DVT" Full text >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/2/47.full

Nov 2016

9 min 54 sec

In this episode Joanna Smith talks to Dr Ali about the recent paper in EBN entitled "Parent preferences on pain prevention, even when faced with medication dilemmas, influence their decisions to administer opioids in children." Read the article >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/2/51.full

Nov 2016

11 min 41 sec

In this episode, Alison Tywcross and Stacey Roles talk about the recent literature review entitled "It is unclear if combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy improve medication adherence". Read the full paper here: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2016/06/24/eb-2016-102370.full.

Oct 2016

16 min 13 sec

In this podcast Dr Roberta Heale talks to Dr Bernice Redley about the paper recently published in EBN entitled "Information gaps in medication communication during clinical handover calls for a different approach". Full article >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2016/07/26/ebnurs-2016-102316.extract

Sep 2016

12 min 35 sec

In this episode Helen Noble and Patricia Crane talk about the review of a paper entitled "Fatigue two months after myocardial infarction may indicate risk for persistent fatigue" Full text: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/3/78.full

Jul 2016

9 min 35 sec

In this podcast Helen Noble talks to Jennifer Fournier about the recently published paper in EBN "Nurse-led home exercise programme improves physical function for people receiving haemodialysis" Full paper >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/1/12.full

Jul 2016

5 min 57 sec

In this podcast Roberta Heale talks to David Wright and Amanda Vandyk about the recent paper "Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life".

Jun 2016

18 min 17 sec

In this podcast Dr Joanna Smith talks to Dr Colin Michie about his recently published paper in EBN entitled "Breast feeding could reduce the risk of childhood leukaemias" Full paper > http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2016/01/12/eb-2015-102200.full

May 2016

12 min 42 sec

In this podcast Roberta Heale talks to Dr Peter O'Halloran about the paper "After the Liverpool Care Pathway clear guidance and support on end-of-life care is needed." They discuss the newly implemented pathways and the effects these have on practice and patients. Full paper>> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/1/27.full?sid=6cdd43f3-7315-41d7-b249-3df4e3f74a5c

May 2016

20 min 23 sec

In this podcast Allison Shorten talks to Dr Jim Pivarnik about the recent review paper "Structured physical activity during pregnancy reduces risk of caesarean delivery".

Apr 2016

21 min

Welcome to this EBN podcast. Dr Joanna Smith, Associate Editor, will be taking a closer look at a commentary from the journal with an invited guest. These discussions are designed to help you think about issues raised in the article, as well as the clinical applicability of the original research paper. In this session, Dr Kirsten Davison, Associate Professor of Nutrition and Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Department of Nutrition Harvard, T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston discusses issues raised in her commentary of a mixed method study that explore the potential role of Maternal and Child Health nurses in delivering childhood obesity prevention services to promote optimal growth in young children. As an expert in the field of evidence-based medicine, Dr Kirsten Davison, whose research primarily focuses on family and community level factors that influence children’s lifestyle behaviors and risk of obesity, reflects on the study reviewed, and offers insightful comments and ideas that can be used in practice and policy. ebnurs-2015-102169.R1 Child health nurses miss opportunities to tackle obesity http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/1/14.full Original research article: Laws R, Campbell KJ, van der Pligt P, et al. Obesity prevention in early life: an opportunity to better support the role of Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Australia. BMC Nurs 2015; 14: 26. http://bmcnurs.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12912-015-0077-7

Mar 2016

13 min 5 sec

In this podcast Helen Noble talks to Felix Naughton about the paper "Daily e-cigarette use increases quit attempts and reduces smoking with no effect on cessation" recently published in the journal. They discuss the methods and the outcomes of the study and the implications for clinical practice. Full article >> http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2015/09/16/eb-2015-102173.full

Feb 2016

12 min 51 sec

In this podcast Dr Helen Noble talks to Dr Alice Ammerman, from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA about her recent commentary published in EBN. The study commentary titled " Behavioural counselling improves physiological outcomes in those with cardiovascular risk factors” reflected on a study which addressed four topics: (1) the effect of dietary and physical activity counselling on patient health outcomes; (2) intermediate CVD-related outcomes; (3) behavioural outcomes; and (4) harms of counselling. In this podcast they explore the need for the study, its strengths and weaknesses and the implications for clinical practice.

Nov 2015

5 min 6 sec

Welcome to this EBN podcast. My name is Allison Shorten. I am an associate editor of EBN and an Associate Professor at Yale School of Nursing in the United States. Today I am talking with Dr Middeldorp who is one of our expert commentators. Dr. Middeldorp is a professor and co-chair of the Department of Vascular Medicine of the Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam. Dr. Middeldorp will be talking about the risk of venous thromboembolism for women who are hospitalised during pregnancy. Welcome Dr. Middeldorp.

Nov 2015

11 min 21 sec

In this podcast Dr Helen Noble talks to Dr Kathleen Baird, from the Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith Health Institute, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Australia about her recent commentary published in EBN. The study commentary titled "Primary care professionals and abused women have differing awareness of domestic abuse: a new framework may help facilitate discussions”, reflected on a study which explored the dynamics of domestic abuse awareness and recognition among primary healthcare professionals and women who have experienced domestic violence and abuse. In this podcast they explore the need for the study, its strengths and weaknesses and the implications for clinical practice.

Oct 2015

9 min 32 sec

Welcome to the EBN podcast. Dr. Joanna Smith, Associate Editor, will be taking a closer look at a commentary from the journal with an invited guest. These discussions are designed to help you think about issues raised in the article, as well as the clinical applicability of the original research paper. In this session, Dr Melissa McPheeters, a healthcare epidemiologist who has worked in evidence-based medicine and comparative effectiveness for over a decade and is based Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center, Nashville, USA, discusses issues raised in her commentary on a clinical trial that examined a nurse-led intervention for supporting the transition of youths with heart disease to adult care services : As an expert in the field of evidence-based medicine, Dr Melissa McPheeters reflects on the study reviewed, and offers insightful comments and ideas that can be used in practice and policy. Original research article: Mackie AS et al. Healthcare transition for youth with heart diseases: a clinical trial. Heart. 2014, 100;1113-1118). http://ebn.bmj.com/content/18/3/83.full.pdf+html

Oct 2015

8 min 4 sec

In this podcast Dr Roberta Heale, Associate Editor on EBN talks to Dr David Lee, Oregon State University, about the risk of falls for older people on high blood pressure medication. The discussion includes how the research was carried out, limitations to the study and take home messages for listeners.

Oct 2015

7 min 47 sec

As the population ages, so too does the requirement for dialysis. Home dialysis has not been made an option for many older patients. Dr. Edwina Brown discusses research findings that age should not be a contraindication in home dialysis. Associate Editor of EBN, Roberta Heale, hosts the podcast.

Oct 2015

6 min 37 sec

Welcome to this Evidence Based Nursing podcast. This month’s commentary for discussion is concerned with patients with heart failure, and their partners, and the value they hold being seen and supported together . Dr Helen Noble, Lecturer Health Services Research, Queens University Belfast, and Associate Editor, Evidence Based Nursing will be joined by Assistant Professor Harleah G. Buck, of Pennsylvania State University who is the commentary author. The key issues that arise from this work including what we already know about the topic, the strengths and weaknesses of the research methods and the implications for clinical practice will be deliberated. The discussion is designed to help you think about issues raised in the commentary and explore the clinical applicability of the original research discussed. Reference to original commentary: Patients with heart failure, and their partners, value being seen and supported together. Evid Based Nurs 2015 18: 77 originally published online February 4, 2015 10.1136/eb-2014-102024

Oct 2015

10 min 44 sec

On 11 September, the Second Reading of the Assisted Dying Bill will take place in the House of Commons. If eventually passed, it will allow a terminally ill adult (prognosis less than 6 months) resident in England or Wales to be supplied with a lethal prescription to be self-administered under the supervision of ‘an attending health professional’ (doctor or nurse). Before the prescription is issued, a High Court Judge will have to be satisfied that the person has (mental) capacity, and that the desire to hasten death is voluntary, settled and informed. The key criterion is short prognosis; the patient does not have to be ‘suffering unbearably’.Professor Robert Twycross, Emeritus Clinical Reader in Palliative Medicine, Oxford University, is against this bill being passed. Here he tells Gary Mitchell, EBN Social Media Editor, why.Read Professor Twycross's full editorial: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2015/08/11/eb-2015-102189.full

Sep 2015

23 min 1 sec

EBN associate editor Gary Mitchell caught up with Kate Swaffer in London earlier this month to discuss her upcoming book, what it is like to live with dementia, and the current areas for development within healthcare systems and society. Kate's book, "what the hell happened to my brain?" is to be released later this year with Jessica Kingsley Publishers. If you are interested in finding out more about Kate's work check out her webpage and regular blog series here: http://kateswaffer.com/

Aug 2015

8 min 26 sec

Gary Mitchell, EBN associate editor, catches up with Joanne Agnelli and Jessie McGreevy from Four Seasons Health Care at the Alzheimer's Show in London at the start of June. Joanne and Jessie, two of our hosts from a recent twitter-chat on optimising palliative care in nursing homes, agreed to record a short podcast to illuminate the key points from the recent discussion. This podcast succinctly highlights the practical things any nurses, within a care home setting, can do to enhance palliative care for their residents.

Jun 2015

12 min 52 sec

Welcome to this EBN podcast where Dr Allison Shorten, Associate Editor, will explore a recent commentary in EBN with the commentary author, Dr. Louise Cadman. These discussions are designed to help you think about issues raised in the article, as well as the clinical applicability. The commentary is about an interesting study regarding the challenges of providing safe and sensitive care during cervical screening for survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Dr Louise Cadman reflects on the study and critically explores the findings offering her thoughts on the implications for practice. Read the commentary: Professionals providing cervical screening may require training and support on how to provide safe and sensitive care for survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Link: http://bmj.co/1DY3HeL

Mar 2015

18 min 33 sec

Welcome to the EBN podcast. Dr Joanna Smith, Associate Editor, will be taking a closer look at an article published by Dr Alison Twycross, who has published extensively on pain management in children, and is the Editor at Evidence-Based Nursing. In this session, Dr Alison Twycross, Head of Department for Children’s Nursing and Reader in Children’s Pain Management, will discuss issues raised in her article; children’s and parents’ perceptions of postoperative pain management: a mixed methods study. These discussions are designed to help you think about issues raised in the article, as well as the clinical applicability. As an expert in the field, Dr Alison Twycross reflects on the study, and offers insightful comments and ideas that can be used in practice. Read the commentary: Although parents are generally satisfied with their child's postoperative care, children continue to experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively http://goo.gl/WpyKw8

Mar 2015

15 min 31 sec

Welcome to the 11th #ebnjc podcast, this month’s topic is advanced care planning. Dr Alison Twycross, School of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University and Editor, Evidence Based Nursing will explore with the commentary author, a recent commentary in EBN titled: The majority of hospitalised elderly people at high risk of dying have thought about end-of-life care, though documentation of preferences in medical records may be lacking. The discussion is designed to help you think about issues raised in the commentary and explore the clinical applicability of the original research discussed. Dr Twycorss discuss with Dr Sarah Jeong, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle some of the issues raised in his commentary report. Dr Jeong reflects on the work, critically exploring the findings offering his thoughts on the implications for practice. Read the commentary: goo.gl/sg4dQi Read the original paper: goo.gl/HUDlaQ

Jan 2015

14 min 36 sec