DW World in Progress

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For a fresh look at development issues around the globe, tune into World in Progress

All Episodes

In this edition: The textile patterns designes by indigenous weavers in Oaxaca, Mexico are hip with fashion companies who don't always compensate the designers. And: Meet Canadian First Nations activist Freda Huson who just received an alternative Nobel prize for her defending her people's culture and land.

Dec 1

30 min

We take you along to listen to a musical genre called AmaPiano that emerged in South Africa's townships. And we go to Turkey where young people are trying to carve out a living despite all odds — unemployment, inflation and a lack of freedom are taking a toll on their future.

Nov 24

30 min

In this edition: an illegal bus ride with Palestinians to the beach -- Cameroonian Baka indigenous group's ancient forests under threat -- Innovative apps made in Nairobi's 'Silicon Savannah'  

Nov 17

29 min 59 sec

Topics: Poor countries in the global South demand 'loss and damage' compensation for the detrimental impacts of climate change -- Dams for hydropower in Lesotho don't benefit everyone and why that could become a problem in neighboring South Africa, too.   

Nov 10

29 min 59 sec

The Panamerica is one of the longest roads in the world - it runs some 48,000 km through the North and South American continents, all the way from Alaska to the southermost tip of Argentina. But there's a long gap in Panama before the road continues in Colombia. Local people are not happy about their lack of access to economic opportunities that come with being connected.

Nov 3

30 min

Hunger crisis in Madagascar -- Unmarried mothers in Morocco -- USA Lynching -- Nyatiti music in Kenya -- Quechua revival Peru

Oct 27

30 min

Huntigton in West Virgina holds the sad record of most deaths from opioids in the USA. The Coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the opioid crisis, and the number of those dying from overdoses has increased dramatically. Find out how people in town cope with the ongoing crisis.

Oct 20

29 min 59 sec

The West African nation of Niger has been grappling with Islamist extremist groups, like Boko Haram, who have been targeting schools, among other things. And amid this threat, educators and Nigeriens alike say it's all the more reason to keep kids going to school, if anything to combat the scourge of radicalization.

Oct 13

30 min

On this week's show, we travel to the Cambodian city Sihanoukville, which is reeling from the sudden withdrawal of Chinese real estate investors, and the impact of the COVID-19. Then, a look at a Kabul artist in exile who's watching from afar as the Taliban destroys his work. Plus, an interview with Dr. Azza Karam, of Religions for Peace International on how the pandemic is affecting religion.

Oct 6

29 min 59 sec

Among the people who were able to escape Kabul after the Taliban takeover was a local artist named Omaid Sharifi. Sharifi might be best known for a project involving painting colorful and poetic murals onto the city’s many blast walls. Now the Taliban are painting over them.

Oct 6

5 min 18 sec

We'll hear about how music is playing an important role in the conflict plaguing Ethiopia, where it's boosting morale among Tigrayan soldiers and refugees alike. We'll also get an update on the conflict between Ethiopia and Tigray, which is about to enter its second year. Plus, the controversial push by a group of women reviving ancient Egyptian songs.

Sep 29

29 min 59 sec

We look at tough topics and what happens when people are brave enough to talk about them. We meet one man who is challenging the stigma against men who are victims of domestic violence. And we hear from the founder of the Berlin Human Rights Film Festival who wants its audience to confront some harsh realities.

Sep 22

29 min 59 sec

On out of ten people globally suffer from hunger while a third of food is going to waste. Climate change and conflicts exacerbate the crisis. The UN is  proposing a new global food agenda to improve the food systems. Yet critics say that too much of the focus is on big companies and industrial agriculture, instead of also strengthening the role of small farmers in sustainable food production.  

Sep 15

30 min

From the Middle East to Central Asia, new societal trends are emerging that are challenging long-held norms. In Iran, women and girls are banking on education as the key to progress. Young entrepreneurs in Egypt are reaping the rewards of start-ups. Meanwhile in Turkey, Afghan refugees are stuck in a state of limbo.

Sep 8

30 min

Women across Africa shape protest movements and stand up for their rights: from descendants of Benin's Amazon warriors, to activists fighting injustice and women promoting gender equality with political and poetic means.

Sep 2

29 min 59 sec

Rising lakes in the East African Rift Valley have swallowed houses, churches, hotels and schools. People had to move away, giraffes and other wildlife were trapped when the water came. How are they coping with the floods?

Aug 25

29 min 59 sec

Thousands of women and children of former ISIS fighters are stuck in camps in Syria, but their home countries are reluctant to take them back ++ Across Europe, there are efforts to change rape laws  

Aug 18

29 min 59 sec

This week on World in Progress: How Afghan refugees abroad see the worsening situation back home // UNICEF tries to help Afghan children and women harmed by the surging conflict //Peru's medical staff struggles to stem the next wave of Covid 19 // Polyandy: Should women be allowed to have several husbands in South Africa?

Aug 11

29 min 59 sec

On this special edition of World in Progress, we take an in-depth look at the tourism industry in Cyprus, which has been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. While the sun-kissed island works to keep visitors safe, it's also noticing an upswing in tourism to some unexpected places.

Aug 4

30 min

Who defines who's Japanese? Identity and the Hafu people in Japan / Hardly seen: The plight of Cameroonian refugees in Nigeria Making it against all odds: How a school in Croatia puts Roma kids on course for better lives / And: We'll survive: Why Bedouins in Egypt are confident their ancient traditions will survive despite Covid and Climate Change

Jul 28

29 min 59 sec

In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, leading to the largest marine oil spill in history. More than a decade later, the oil and gas industry still dominates in the region. Oil's end result, in the form of a warming climate, has led to rising sea levels and erosion that are sinking the low-lying region into the sea.

Jul 21

29 min 59 sec

Solar panels could spell the end of illegally tapped power lines in Brazil's favelas that are dangerous and have even led to fires! Rooftop gardens in a refugee camp in Lebanon bring a whiff of fresh, green air to the place and help with food security. And: The secret of chicken dung and a place where abandoned plants can find a new home.

Jul 14

30 min

An international team has started extracting methane from Lake Kivu to generate electricity in Rwanda and to get rid of the dangerous gas mix within the lake. It was considered safe — that is, until the eruption of a volcano at the end of May.

Jul 7

30 min

In Brazil, indigenous people fear for their livelihoods as a controversial land reform bill would remove protections of their ancestral lands. People who wanted to seek asylum in the US have been stuck in limbo in Mexico. And the pandemic has revived old Italian towns on the verge of dying out.

Jun 30

29 min 59 sec

The invisible danger of pollution kills around seven million people per year. It's especially bad in big cities like Jakarta for instance. Haiti has been in turmoil for years. Escalating gang violence has pushed thousands from their homes in the capital Port-au-Prince. And the pandemic has intensified the strain on humanitarian aid as funding dropped. Where do we go from here?

Jun 23

29 min 58 sec

Global problems often need local solutions — but who can find them? In Congo, there has been low take-up for COVID vaccines but health workers and officials are fighting this. It is the poorest who are hit hardest by hyperinflation, but digital currency could help. Workers in Bangladesh hope a new German law can change working conditions. And in the Maldives, tourists are put off by mosquitoes.

Jun 16

30 min

A new EU regulation is supposed to limit European exports of surveillance technologies for nefarious reasons or to dictatorial regimes. But many contradictions remain, and critics fear European surveillance tools will continue to be used for purposes that violate human rights.

Jun 9

30 min

Many women across Africa shape protest movements and stand up for their rights: from descendants of Benin’s Amazon warriors, to activists fighting injustice and women promoting gender equality with political and poetic means.

Jun 2

29 min 59 sec

On this week’s show, we get a rare glimpse behind the scenes of Myanmar’s notorious army, the Tatmadaw. Plus, insights from New Delhi on how India’s second wave spun out of control. And, the Amazigh women of Morocco have been getting facial tattoos for centuries. But is tradition about to die out?

May 26

30 min

How do communities around the world help empower and enable each other? In France, one group is helping migrants in the treacherous Alps, and a new report shows that there are more and more displaced people in the world. And in Africa, women are supporting each other: An NGO in Nigeria is helping deaf pregnant women while in Somalia new fitness and work opportunities for women are being embraced.

May 21

29 min 59 sec

A new report shows that 40.5 million people were displaced last year alone. Around 75% were fleeing disasters and the effects of climate change, mostly weather-related. An interview with DW's environment reporter Ajit Niranjan who has been speaking to some of the people who have lost homes, family members or livelihoods because of disasters.

May 20

7 min 12 sec

How are textile workers in Bangladesh faring who are unable to socially distance in their factories? We also hear how clean cooking stoves can help reduce the risk of lung diseases in Guatemala's poorer neighborhoods — that's more important than ever during the coronavirus pandemic.

May 12

29 min 59 sec

As some countries have made remarkable strides in vaccinating their populations, the situation in India is looking grimmer by the day. The country now accounts for a third of global coronavirus infections and has surpassed the 20 million mark. We also hear how the Baka pygmies in Cameroon and migrants on the Canary Islands are coping with the pandemic.

May 5

29 min 59 sec

This week we dive deep into outer space. Who owns space? Who owns mineral resources and water? The race is on — it's about big money, new business models and the future of our economy. And that of our environment. There are ideas of moving dirty industries to space, while our Earth would be reserved for clean living.

Apr 28

29 min 59 sec

On this week's show, we hear from women in Morocco trying to give rape victims a voice. Plus, insights from Jan Kreutzberg of the German Foundation of World Population on the UN's latest report concerning COVID-19 and women's bodily autonomy. And then a look at how the pandemic has reshaped New York City, possibly for good.

Apr 21

29 min 58 sec

After a year of so many lives lost, people around the world have found new, creative ways to deal with the effects of the coronavirus crisis, from a Brazilian man dressed as the Grim Reaper in Berlin to Polish salt mines that can help with respiratory problems. Plus, a look at how technology is changing music in the Atlanta hip-hop scene and for South Korean sound engineers.

Apr 14

30 min

The Mekong River flows 5,000 kilometers from China to Vietnam. China's construction of large hydropower dams along the river to feed the country's growing energy needs is causing problems downriver — having devastating impacts on water availability and the fertile soil that feeds hundreds of millions of people in Southeast Asia.

Apr 7

29 min 59 sec

On this week’s show, we’re looking at how COVID-19 is impacting the world’s most vulnerable. More and more Italians are falling into poverty. One initiative is working to get rid of the stigma of accepting help. Plus, a look at how inequality is deepening, what COVID has meant for coffee production, and a look at the Yuqui of Bolivia.

Mar 31

29 min 59 sec

Traveling without a passport - just by being scanned at an airport? Projects to test this kind of digital identity have already started. For some, that sounds great. Others fear the dangers posed by the possible abuse of data collected by companies and governments. Thomas Kruchem explores the possibilities and dangers of digital identities. The presenter is Natalie Muller.

Mar 24

30 min

In South Korea, there's a big push to get people with disabilities out of care facilities after coronavirus deaths were recorded in such institutions. It's also a call for inclusion. We also hear from travel nurses in the US who move from hospital to hospital to help out. Many nurses have been pushed to the brink of exhaustion during the pandemic.

Mar 17

29 min 59 sec

Fukushima in Japan, March 11, 2011. An earthquake, a tsunami and three nuclear meltdowns. Much has happened since then: Cities have been rebuilt, protective walls erected, work continued on the damaged nuclear power plant. Export restrictions for many products have been largely lifted. But only a few people who had to flee their homes ten years ago have actually returned to the region.

Mar 10

29 min 59 sec

The coronavirus pandemic has transformed regions and entire countries. In the US, people have been fleeing cities like New York and Boston for greener pastures in Vermont. Many businesses are faltering because tourists have been staying away. Some young Iranian hostel owners are trying to stay afloat by moving things online. And a robot in Nairobi is doing its bit in the fight against COVID-19.

Mar 3

29 min 59 sec

Censorship comes in many forms. You might have heard that Facebook blocked news coverage in Australia last week, because Australia's government wanted the tech giant to pay for journalism. In Venezuela, censorship has gotten so bad that people have to get creative to get informed. And the Indian government ordered Twitter to block accounts commenting on farmers' protests.

Feb 24

30 min

We hear the inspiring stories of female judges in Guatemala who are risking their lives for justice. Since the coronavirus pandemic hit, the number of suicide cases involving women has been rising sharply in Japan. One student wants to stop people from taking their own lives and show them it's worth living. We also hear how dogs can help detect urine that's infected with the coronavirus.

Feb 17

30 min

The COVID-19 pandemic has turned the world on its head, particularly in countries already grappling with crises. On this week's show, we'll hear about a food bank in Texas reeling from America's spiraling hunger crisis. We'll also hear from young men and women in Tripoli about how the current situation has made them think of leaving for good. Plus, Mexico's healthcare workers demand vaccinations.

Feb 12

29 min 59 sec

Why Uighurs in Turkey still don't feel safe - How African migrants are reviving churches in Morocco - Crowdfunded radio stations in Poland - Mille Cafés reviving rural France 

Feb 3

29 min 59 sec

Egypt: Crushed hopes ten years after the uprising -- South Korea: Online delivery distress -- Tierra del Fuego: past and present at the southern end of the world

Jan 27

30 min

As countries all over the world start vaccinating their populations against the novel coronavirus, will there be enough for everybody? A doctor in Tunisia is trying to make a difference for her patients suffering from sickle cell disease. And: How is Mali faring after the coup this past August?

Jan 21

30 min

The spread of disinformation is a growing problem around the world. We go behind the scenes of a Catholic radio station in Italy spreading conspiracy theories about COVID-19 and discuss Wikipedia's huge impact on the way we source information. Plus, a new project in Colombia is helping women access abortions and an artist has turned the debris from the Beirut explosion into a sculpture.

Jan 13

30 min

We hear the backstory to the conflict that erupted in Ethiopia’s Tigray region in November and get an an update from the Norwegian Refugee Council about what the Tigray conflict means for the region's refugee crisis. Plus: some creative solutions to dealing with the COVID-19 crisis in Cuba.

Jan 6

29 min 59 sec