Reginateatern - Podcast

Reginateatern

Reginateatern är en av Sveriges ledande gästspelscener.

Vi erbjuder ett rikt och noga utvalt utbud av underhållning och scenkonst från det bästa av Uppsala kulturliv, högkvalitativa framträdanden från övriga delar av Sverige samt förnämliga gästspel från hela världen.

All Episodes

Building on his background in British Intelligence John le Carré’s The Spy Who Came in from the Cold was a global success. It has been followed by a series of other best-selling works, many of which have been filmed with prominent directors and actors. In this Philosophy Tea we focus on the role of the spies, particularly during the Cold War: Do they contribute to war or peace? Do they add to transparency and tension reduction or to conspiracy, deceit, danger and fear ? It seems le Carré seldom provide answers, but such reflections are necessary, not the least as he in 2019 was awarded the Olof Palme for making “an extraordinary contribution” to “freedom, democracy and social justice”.

Nov 28

54 min 3 sec

In our second Philosophy Tea we discuss Naomi Klein’s timely and controversial contribution to the climate change debate, This Changes Everything (2014). The book is a valuable account of the debate at that time, as well as an excellent introduction to today’s climate crisis. This summer’s extreme weather occurrences, the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report warning about climate tipping points, and the ongoing UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, which has been billed as the last chance to get runaway climate change under control, has made her 2014 analysis more relevant than ever.

Nov 8

54 min 1 sec

In this Philosophy Tea we scrutinize the life, achievements and legacy of the icon of nonviolent action Mohandas K. Gandhi, better known as Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948). His work began with Asian resistance against White rule in South Africa and led to a number of campaigns for India’s self-determination in the 1920s and 1930s, contributing to the country’s independence in 1947. In his book My life is My Message he summarised his thinking about nonviolence and its role in social change. Undoubtedly he is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century but at the same time remains enigmatic: not easy to follow or. We will attempt to illuminate some aspects of his life as well as his contribution to providing a role for the marginalised around the globe.

Oct 7

55 min 39 sec

Our third and final Philosophy Tea discusses John Maynard Keynes’ important work of political economy, The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Critical of the harsh reparation payments imposed on Germany after World War I by the Treaty of Versailles (1919), Keynes argues that these will lead to increased suffering by the German people and to economic and political instability. He instead proposes financial assistance to rebuild Germany and war-ravaged Europe, much like the Marshall Plan would do after WW II. Throughout his long and distinguished career Keynes challenged conventional economic thinking, including leaving the gold standard and advocating state intervention to end the Great Depression in the 1930’s. Keynes’ unique ability to sense how the world economy was changing and to develop new economic policies to deal with it speaks to us today as we gradually emerge from the Corona pandemic that has radically altered our world.

May 22

59 min 8 sec

Our second Philosophy Tea focuses on Fredrika Bremer’s An Invitation to a Peace Alliance, in which she calls for a worldwide peace organization of women. Issued in the midst of the Crimean War (1853-1856), it was considerably ahead of its time and met with a hostile reception. However it can be seen as anticipating the creation of the more successful International Conference of Women in Washington D. C. in 1888 and helping to pave the way for such prominent Swedish women peace activists as Elin Wägner, Alva Myrdal and Maj-Britt Theorin. In addition to the Invitation itself, we discuss how Bremer’s experiences in the United States (1849-1851), recounted in Hemmen i den nya världen; and England, in England om hösten 1851, as well as her reform activities in Sweden helped form the ideas and the practical proposals she puts forward in the Invitation.

Mar 22

58 min

» Tuesday February 2nd – Martha Nussbaum, The Monarchy of Fear In our first Philosophy Tea we discuss a recent work by celebrated American philosopher, Martha C. Nussbaum (b. 1947). Her book The Monarchy of Fear from 2018 is not only an engaging reaction to the Trump presidency but also a way of synthesizing many of her insights into the role of emotions in society. Thus the book discusses the origins and impact of fear and blame on anger, disgust and envy. These are emotions that politicians can appeal to, with disastrous results, not the least for those discriminated against and marginalized in the US. They form the basis for continued racism, anti-gay sentiments, sexism and misogyny. Despite the power of these negative emotions, Nussbaum still sees a chance for hope and love.

Feb 5

1 hr

In this Philosophy Tea we discuss Camus’ highly topical, The Plague (La Peste). Camus was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957. The Plague has often been seen as an allegory of the Nazi Occupation of France during World War II. But it is also part of a longer tradition of plague literature, a genre pioneered by Daniel Defoe in his A Journal of the Plague Year (1722), a work that Camus quotes in the epigraph to his own novel. In a more general sense it is about the human condition and our vulnerability to life threatening circumstances, be they caused by viruses or the actions of our fellow humans. How we respond to these circumstances defines us as human beings.

Dec 2020

1 hr 1 min

Philosophy Tea - Alva Myrdal – 2020-11-17 by Reginateatern

Nov 2020

55 min 46 sec

Inspired by George Orwell’s iconic dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-four, Margaret Atwood set about in 1984 to write a dystopia from, as she has said, “the female point of view”. That such a dystopia was needed can be seen by the popularity of the novel itself and the HBO TV series by the same name (2017-). In our first Philosophy Tea of autumn 2020, we focus on Atwood’s novel and how it treats a number of highly relevant issues, not least among these being what happens when authoritarian governments use the suppression of women’s rights to help maintain their hold on power.

Sep 2020

51 min 7 sec

Nathan Söderblom and World Peace. In our third Philosophy Tea we take up the Uppsala-based theologian, Archbishop Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931). We examine his ideas for forging cooperation between different Christian denominations and for using religion to promote peace. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1930. We discuss why he received the award and how the impact of his work has shifted since then.

Feb 2020

55 min 27 sec

John Locke and Natural Law Our second philosophy tea discusses the groundbreaking ideas of the philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) on natural law in his Two Treatises of Government (1689) and the impact they had on the formulation of human rights in the American Declaration of Independence (1776), the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen (1789) and the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). Locke’s ideas continue to inform debates on human rights and how they can be applied in the world today

Feb 2020

54 min 18 sec

Eleanor Roosevelt and the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) This season’s first philosophy tea discusses Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) and the role she played in creating the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In chairing the committee that drafted the Declaration, Roosevelt drew upon her long involvement in human rights and social justice issues. We also discuss the impact of the Declaration on later statements, legal conventions as well as for national and international politics.

Jan 2020

52 min 43 sec

On Perpetual Peace (1795) Immanuel Kant's Philosophical sketch for World Order. Immanuel Kant's Philosophical sketch for World Order became important to peace movements in the 19th century and inspired world organizations, such as the League of Nations and the United Nations, in the 20th Century. This Philosophy Tea discusses its role in the 21st century with inputs also from Kant specialist Rebecka Lettevall, Malmö University.

Nov 2019

53 min 48 sec

30th October 2019 – Arundhati Roy The Ministry of Utmost Happiness (2017) The Tragedy of Kashmir and the Partition of India. Set in New Delhi and the troubled region of Kashmir, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by award-winning novelist, social critic and political activist Arundhati Roy gives imaginative voice to lives affected by the traumatic events that have formed modern India. Our philosophy tea will look at these events and how they are portrayed in the novel, and the consequences they have for the identity of contemporary India, the world’s largest democracy.

Oct 2019

48 min 18 sec

Tuesday September 24th – George Orwell “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.” The Nightmarish World of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four (1949). The legacy of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four is well established. Phrases such as “Big Brother is watching you”, and terms such as “doublethink” and “thoughtcrime” and “1984” itself have entered our political vocabulary. In this philosophy tea we will be looking at the story behind the novel and the reasons for its continued relevance. We will also be discussing how Orwell constructs this nightmarish world and whether the novel leaves any room for hope.

Sep 2019

48 min 9 sec

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line”, The Souls of Black Folks (1903). What unites the African Union in Addis Ababa and former president, Barack Obama, in the White House? The threads go back to W. E. B. Dubois (1868-1963), the first African-American to get a Ph. D. from Harvard University; a sociologist and a proponent of Black liberation. His work inspired independence for Africa through Pan Africanism, as well as civil rights in the United States. Since he is largely unknown in Europe, our Philosophy Tea will highlight this important proponent of human equality.

Mar 2019

53 min 29 sec

When Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring was published in 1962 it was an instant bestseller and a resounding alarm-bell: human activities were about to destroy the very conditions that made human existence possible. Being a marine biologist Carson (1907-1964) had observed the impact, for instance, chemicals like DDT on wild-life. Her documentation of these effects helped to galvanize public action, led to a questioning of human domination of the planet’s resources and resulted in debates on appropriate policies that still are ongoing. In this session we will discuss Carson’s arguments, their precedents and continued importance.

Feb 2019

54 min 11 sec

Jean-Jacques Rousseau: A misunderstood philosopher? Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was, and still is, a controversial thinker. He has been blamed for the excesses of the French Revolution and preparing the way for twentieth-century totalitarianism. But is this a fair assessment of Rousseau? In order to try to answer this question, our philosophy tea will focus on Rousseau’s first important philosophical work, Discourse on the Arts and Sciences (1750), in which he first set forth his ideas on the natural goodness of humankind and how it has been corrupted by civilization. These ideas would play an important role in the development of his later, more mature political philosophy, and give rise to much of the controversy surrounding his name. By re-examining Rousseau’s ideas on nature and society, we hope to shed light not only on the impact he had on Enlightenment and Romantic thinking, but also what relevance he might have for us today

Jan 2019

51 min 23 sec

Nigeria in a Globalized World - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s, Americanah (2013) This Philosophy Tea discusses the portrayal of post-colonial Nigeria in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah (2013). Driven by political instability and economic difficulties, the main characters – and lovers – Ifemelu and Obinze, seek a better life in the United States and England respectively. Returning to Nigeria they find that not only have they changed but so has Nigeria. Americanah, together with Half of a Yellow Sun (2006) and Purple Hibiscus (2003) form a loose trilogy of Nigeria after independence. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University. Philosophy Teas are produced in cooperation with Uppsala University and the discussions are disseminated as podcasts by the theatre and the University.

Dec 2018

52 min 12 sec

Amartya Sen - Development and Freedom Amartya Sen (born 1933) is a respected economist and philosopher from India with a broad perspective on development, inequality, freedom, democracy and social progress. In his widely read Development as Freedom (1999) he connects to the pioneering economic thinkers such as Adam Smith to argue for the enhancement of socially responsible freedom as the basis for economic development. One of his earlier works demonstrated that famines rarely happen in democracies, thus pointing to the importance of political institutions for economic development that benefits society as a whole. Similarly he demonstrated the impact of gender inequality by calculating the number of 'missing women' in the use of India's demographic statistics. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998 and the Skytte Prize in Political Science in 2017.This autumn Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks. Each Philosophy Tea is a discussion about a particular philosopher or practitioner in the field of peace and justice and lasts for an hour. The discussion can span the whole career of the philosopher or focus on a particularly significant work. The final twenty minutes is reserved for an open discussion with the audience. The events are run in English. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University. Philosophy Teas are produced in cooperation with Uppsala University and the discussions are disseminated as podcasts by the theatre and the University.

Oct 2018

59 min 41 sec

Philosophy Tea, september 25th 2018 Leaving Europe Behind – Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels (1726) In our first Philosophy Tea for autumn 2018, we follow the sea adventurer, Lemuel Gulliver, on a voyage of self-discovery away from his native England. Through his encounters with Little People, Big People, Flying Islands and Talking Horses, Gulliver is forced to rethink his views on European superiority. But when he starts to question his own humanity, perhaps Gulliver has gone too far. This autumn Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks. Each Philosophy Tea is a discussion about a particular philosopher or practitioner in the field of peace and justice and lasts for an hour. The discussion can span the whole career of the philosopher or focus on a particularly significant work. The final twenty minutes is reserved for an open discussion with the audience. The events are run in English. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University. Philosophy Teas are produced in cooperation with Uppsala University and the discussions are disseminated as podcasts by the theatre and the University.

Sep 2018

58 min 54 sec

"A World Built on Rationality". In his Power: A New Social Analysis from 1938 the empirically acute philosopher and activist Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), reacting to the way the world was developing in the 1930s, provided a book that offered hope for peace through independence of mind. His monumental The History of Western Philosophy (1945) established him as a renowned scholar and brought him the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1950. His activism included protests against nuclear weapons, war in general and the Vietnam War in particular. This spring Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks. Each Philosophy Tea is a discussion about a particular philosopher or practitioner in the field of peace and justice and lasts for an hour. The discussion can span the whole career of the philosopher or focus on a particularly significant work. The final twenty minutes is reserved for an open discussion with the audience. The events are run in English. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University. Philosophy Teas are produced in cooperation with Uppsala University and the discussions are disseminated as podcasts by the theatre and the University.

Feb 2018

53 min 27 sec

”A World Without Feeling". A discussion of Karin Boye’s dystopian novel Kallocain (1940)”. This spring Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University.

Feb 2018

54 min 23 sec

Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University. This philosophy tea they discuss William Wilberforce and the Abolition of the African Slave Trade. Recorded and produced by Per Torsner

Jan 2018

58 min 25 sec

‘Government is an institution which prevents injustice other than such as it commits itself.’ Ibn Khaldun, al-Muqaddima (Prolegomena). Ibn Khaldun was an early path-breaking Arab historian and sociologist. He lived 1332-1406 (732-808 according to the Muslim calendar) and his major work An Introduction to World History (al-Muqaddima or Prolegomena) from the late 1300s has a number of systematic ideas on civilizations, the rise and fall of dynasties and the uses of power; as well as unique historical records. He was born in Tunisia into an Arab family with an Andalusian background and Berber roots. He lived a dramatic life in the Arab world of the time from Morocco to Mecca, both as a scholar and as a policy maker. For instance, he negotiated with the Mongol conqueror Timur Lenk/Tamerlane during the siege of Damascus in 1401. In this third Philosophy Tea of the autumn of 2017 Peter Wallensteen and Daniel Ogden will discuss Ibn Khaldun’s thinking on peace, war, power and change, as well as his relevance today. Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University. Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University.

Dec 2017

55 min 18 sec

Philosophy Tea - Charlotte Perkins Gilman 20171017 by Reginateatern

Oct 2017

57 min 19 sec

This autumn, Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks in an expanded series of three talks. The three individuals they will highlight have contributed to global thinking in different ways: through high-level diplomacy, utopian writings and historical studies. The series starts with diplomat and economist Dag Hammarskjöld (1905-1961), a practitioner with a philosophy as seen through his actions as Secretary-General of the United Nations.

Sep 2017

55 min 6 sec

Lay Down Your Arms! Bertha von Suttner The Austrian aristocrat Bertha von Suttner (1843-1914) wrote a European best-selling book titled Lay Down Your Arms in 1889 that made her central in the international movements for peace and disarmament during the following quarter century. She was involved in the creation of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in 1899. Most famously, her correspondence with Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel may have convinced him to create the Peace Prize. In 1905, Bertha von Suttner was the first female laureate of this award. Philosophy Tea is supported by Uppsala University.

Feb 2017

51 min 51 sec

Welcome to Philosophy Tea at Regina Theatre. Scones, tea and interesting discussions led by Professor Peter Wallensteen and Foreign Lecturer Daniel Ogden. "For peace is not mere absence of war, but is a virtue that springs from force of character” Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, 1670 Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) was a very controversial Dutch philosopher. As a young man, he was expelled from the Jewish congregation of Amsterdam for his unconventional ideas on God and religion; views that he would later put forth in his Ethics, published only after his death in 1677. When his Theological-Political Treatise was published in 1670, critics called it, “a book forged in hell”. Our talk will examine Spinoza’s ideas on God, humanity and the world; and his radical proposals for a society based on peace; not war. Philosophy Tea is supported by Uppsala University. Audio technician: Mattias Hammarsten

Jan 2017

59 min 37 sec

“There are no dangerous thoughts. Thinking itself is dangerous “ (Arendt, The Life of the Mind, 1977) Hannah Arendt was one of the foremost philosophers confronting the issue of violence and evil in the 20th century. Her work on the origins of oppressive thinking in the forms av anti-semitism, imperialism and totalitarianism was one of the earlier attempts at understanding the deadliness of these thoughts and resulting actions. To some extent, she also suggests what could be done about them. Thus, for this event we use her book The Origins of Totalitarianism from 1951 as a point of departure. Podcast Producer: Per Torsner

Dec 2016

59 min 7 sec

Welcome to Philosophy Tea at Regina Theatre! This autumn, Professor Peter Wallensteen and Foreign Lecturer Daniel Ogden, both of Uppsala University, will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks about thinkers who have contributed to our understanding of peace and justice. The two philosophers we highlight this autumn are the Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (1694-1778) and the critic of twentieth century totalitarianism Hannah Arendt (1906-1975). Philosophy Tea is supported by Uppsala University and both sessions will be disseminated as pod casts. Podcast producer: Per Torsner http://pertorsner.podbean.com

Oct 2016

57 min 13 sec