Nuestro South Podcast

Nuestro South Podcast

Welcome to the Nuestro South Podcast! A five-part podcast series that explores the stories of Latina/o/x people in the U.S. South from the Jim Crow era on through to the present. Join the conversation as we unpack the experience of being Latina/o/x in Nuestro South. We control our narrative! This is for us y'all! This podcast is produced by Erik Valera, Julie Weise, and Elaine Townsend Utin with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd. Our podcast hosts are Axel Herrera Ramos, Bryan Mejia, Daisy Almonte, and Dorian Gomez. Edited by Dorian Gomez.

Episode #0 - Meet Our Hosts
Trailer 7 min 52 sec

All Episodes

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- P'urhépecha migrants in North Carolina hold an annual Saint Day Festival that allows their indigenous community in the US to share moments around cultural traditions, religious practice, but also political organizing to support their community in Cherán Mexico. When the story of Latinx immigrants staging a walkout in Durham from a Historically Black Catholic church, it was depicted as evidence of racial tensions, but what about the white supremacy within the catholic church that neglected the needs of both communities?Dr. Yuri Ramirez is a Ford Foundation Fellow and Assistant Professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently, she is working on her book manuscript, tentatively titled Indigeneity on the Move: Transborder Politics from Michoacán to North Carolina and has written many more pieces on racial and indigenous histories that continue to shape the US South. To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

Jun 11

1 hr 28 min

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- We speak to one of our very own Ricky Hurtado who is now the  NC House District 63 Representative. We discuss the personal journey that Latinx youth may go through to find their own voice and community while growing up in the South. When and where we feel accepted, and when it seems like we don't belong.  We also cover what  Freedom Dreaming means to LatinxEd, how we can activate our Poder Político in NC, and how 497 votes gave us the first Democratic representative in the NC General Assembly!Ricky Hurtado is a son of Salvadoran immigrants, Co-Founder of LatinxEd, and one of the visionaries for the Nuestro South Project. He is also an adjunct instructor at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Education.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

Jun 4

1 hr 12 min

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- In the wake of rising anti-immigrant and draconian laws, what parallels are drawn by activists and journalists through the use of "Juan Crow." How does Juan Crow relate to the ongoing repercussions and oppression from Jim Crow? Is it inclusive of the Black Latinx populations that have long been in the US South? We also chat about Pedro from South of the Border in South Carolina!Dr. Cecilia Márquez is an assistant professor in the History Department at Duke University. She is in the process of completing her first book “The Strange Career of Juan Crow”. Her work helps historicize contemporary Latino/a migration to the US South and emphasizes the importance of regions in shaping Latino/a identity.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

May 28

1 hr 20 min

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- Why did Latinos in Texas pack their bags and move to Georgia in the 1980's and 1990's? How did new immigrant communities navigate a space donde no habia ni chiles, ni tortillas? How did "Mustache Mike's" come to be known as "El Mustacho" and what is the significance of a second generation Chicano Atlanta rapper?Unlike most traditional Latin American immigrant destination cities and states, the journey into the south can involve a larger need to build your own sense of home and community. For the early Latinx immigrants arriving in cities like Atlanta, finding food and entertainment was a necessary plight to feel comfortable. Future generations, those who arrived as children or those born in the south, now push for a greater sense of belonging and ownership of the place they call home through their Poder y Cultura.Yami Rodriguez is a historian of Latinx communities whose interdisciplinary research engages questions of race, ethnicity, labor, and migration. With a regional focus on the U.S. South, Rodriguez’s scholarship examines Latinx political, economic, and cultural place-making practices in the twentieth and twenty first centuries. Her current book project, “Mexican Atlanta: Migrant Place-Making in the Latinx South,” traces the history of Metro Atlanta’s ethnic Mexican community formation with attention to the region’s longer Latinx histories beginning in the mid-twentieth century. She is currently a post-doc at Emory University.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

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May 21

1 hr 33 min

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.Part 2 of "Las Polleras de Mississippi" takes a deeper dive into the history and context of these polleras through the research and work of professor Angela Stuesse.In this episode- The history and economy of the South is profoundly defined by the labor structures and hierarchies. There is a through-line from slavery, to sharecropping, and more modern low wage work settings that exploit those most vulnerable for their labor. Immigrants and their labor are used to prop up industries which benefit from the lack of worker protections. Many of these southern regions have historically suppressed labor organizing and unions. The chicken plant or “Las Polleras” embody much of this history ever since Jim Crow segregation until the present. Las Polleras are some of the largest immigrant minority employers in rural southern towns whose economies largely revolve around the poultry industry. Angela Stuesse is an associate professor of anthropology and global studies at UNC Chapel Hill. She spent the last 20+ years doing activist research alongside Latinx Immigrant communities in the south. She is the author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the deep South. She continues to write and advocate for workers that are increasingly vulnerable in the times of heightened immigration enforcement and health and safety within a pandemic.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

May 14

49 min 26 sec

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.Part 1 of "Las Polleras de Mississippi" is a bilingual conversation with a fellow friend and immigrant from Guatemala and professor Angela Stuesse.In this episode- ¡Es como un mini-Guatemala! A pesar de vivir en una región que tiene una historia bastante compleja y racista para personas Afro-Americanas o cualquier otra minoría, Mississippi ha llegado a ser un hogar para muchos inmigrantes.Nuestro invitado nos cuenta su historia acerca de cómo fue que llegó a decidir dejar su hogar en Guatemala, su experiencia al llegar a Mississippi, y como ahora tiene sus propias raíces y comunidad en Mississippi.Angela Stuesse is an associate professor of anthropology and global studies at UNC Chapel Hill. She spent the last 20+ years doing activist research alongside Latinx Immigrant communities in the south. She is the author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the deep South. She continues to write and advocate for workers that are increasingly vulnerable in the times of heightened immigration enforcement and health and safety within a pandemic.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

May 7

48 min 2 sec

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- What does it mean to be Half-Hillbilly and Half-Mexican? How do Latinx families come to settle in the Appalachian regions? How does our music and culture express a new vision for our communities future?Like the broader US South, Appalachia is a vast region filled with its own history and nuances but it is still largely stereotyped as a particularly white space . The truth and history is much more nuanced, and just like in the deep South, Nuestra Gente has roots all across Appalachia  and  has enriched the region with their food, language, music, and culture. Tune in to discover the cultural bridges being formed through the Mexilachian music of the Lua Project, and the activist sounds of the Latingrass group Che Apalache as Sophia Enriquez walks us through her own family's journey and the significance of our music in the Appalachian-Latinx experience. Sophia is a scholar, teacher, and musician from Appalachian Ohio. She is a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Ohio State University. Her dissertation titled “Canciones de Las Apalaches: Latinx Music, Migration, and Belonging in Appalachia” sheds light on the long-standing contributions of Latinx people to Appalachian music. Sophia plays Appalachian and Mexican music styles—such as ranchera and bluegrass—and performs with the folk trio the  “Good Time Girls” in Columbus, Ohio. To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunesSpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud Interview Series is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, and Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd.

Apr 30

1 hr 17 min

The Nuestro South Loud & Proud series focuses on the Poder y Cultura that Nuestra Gente in the South can possess. From the comida que cocinamos, the music we play, and our labor which plants, cleans, and builds-- Nuestra Gente has grown deep roots in the south.In this episode- Why don’t children of Mexicans in the South identify as Chicanos? How do racial dynamics impact the workplace for immigrants? Do Latinos have a Southern accent? Our conversation with Professor Perla Guerrero helps us explore how geography influences racial dynamics in her hometown of Arkansas and how young southern folk can find a sense of belonging and purpose within our diverse history. Perla M. Guerrero is an Associate Professor of American Studies and Latinx Studies. She is the author of Nuevo South: Latinas/os, Asians and the Remaking of Place and is working on a second book about deportation and coerced return to México.To learn more, check out:https://nuestrosouth.org/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodes oniTunes SpotifyGoogle PodcastsFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/The Nuestro South Loud & Proud InterSeries is produced by Axel Herrera, Julie Weise, Erik Valera with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed.

Apr 23

1 hr 2 min

Now we enter the story! Today’s episode is about las trailas. Axel lived in one for a while growing up, and we know many of y’all did too. The trailas we’re talking about in today’s episode were around the corner from middle-class white housing developments near Charlotte in the early 2000s. This is when things started to go south (no pun intended). Not all the white people liked having us in their ‘hood, a strong anti-immigrant movement came here from California, undocumented immigrants lost their driver’s licenses… In today’s episode we meet Angelica, a Mexican woman trying her best to raise her family amid this shit - just like our parents did. We try to take on the fights that our parents can’t, but it’s not always easy. You too? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more, check out:https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-5/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

Jun 2019

35 min 5 sec

In the 1960s through 1980s, millions of Latinos started traveling through the South as migrant farmworkers. Daisy has some personal experience with this since she grew up in a rural area and worked in the packing sheds before she became a college student. But the crazy thing is that unlike when we were kids, the South was really not that anti-immigrant back then. The white folks were both conservative and pro-immigrant (we found it hard to picture, too). In today’s episode, we meet Israel Cortez, who came to Georgia as a migrant worker during that time and worked hard to “fit in.” We totally get it. Do you? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more, check out:https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-4/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

Jun 2019

41 min 30 sec

Back in the 1950s, hundreds of thousands of Mexican men came to Arkansas to pick cotton, on contracts negotiated by the Mexican and U.S. governments. Today we meet Angel Cano, a licenciado Mexico sent over to protect them from wage theft, discrimination, and other troubles. Señor Cano even had some success, some of the time. It seems crazy to us that these migrantes trusted their patria enough to ask for help all the way from Arkansas. Qué opinas? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more about Mexicanos in Arkansas 1940s-60s, check out: https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-3/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

May 2019

34 min

You may think Mississippi was all black and white back in the day, but n’ombre - our gente were there too! Today we meet Rafael Landrove: A Mexican sharecropper in 1920s Mississippi who came from Mexico, called himself Cuban, and fought to send his kids to the white school. Our parents fought for our education in the South, too, but in a different way. What about yours? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more about Mexicanos in Mississippi 1910s-30s, check out: https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-2/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

May 2019

30 min 44 sec

Vamos a New Orleans, nearly 100 years ago. Mexican immigrants arrived there by boat. Many, like a man named Robert Canedo, were able to “blend in” to whiteness -- something we couldn’t imagine being able to do today. Or could we?  - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.For more information on Mexicanos in New Orleans in the 1910s-30s:  https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-1/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

May 2019

26 min 51 sec

Hey y'all, we are Nuestro South!So you will be hearing a lot of us throughout these episodes so we might as well introduce ourselves! We are Daisy, Bryan, and Axel. Somos Latinos...Latinas...Latinxs, and we grew up in the South. Over the course of our series, we’ll discuss family, food, school, and our personal experiences of growing up in the south. In this episode, you will hear about Axel's love for conchas, Daisy's crush on Tony Stark, and Bryan's efforts in learning French to be trilingual.  Together we create a space that attempts to make sense of the past, present, and future of our people in the south. This is for us y'all! - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

May 2019

7 min 52 sec