Muscle Medicine

Dr. Emily Kiberd

Muscle Medicine shines a light into today's health and wellness trends and debunks the myths surrounding nutrition and exercise with sound science to deliver actionable tips for you to use every day. Follow your host, Dr. Emily Kiberd, Chiropractor and movement expert as she interviews industry leaders on their simple and effective strategies to live a healthy, empowered life.

0 / Welcome To Muscle Medicine
Trailer 3 min 35 sec

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Key Takeaways Consistency and commitment to building strength will also build resilience. This will create the space to actually analyze how you’re doing. When you give yourself enough space to think, you’ll quickly realize what you’re truly capable of. When managing Hashimoto’s symptoms, it’s important to work out and push yourself. Yet, it’s all too easy to overdo it and end up with little to show but exhaustion. Finding the right regime and sticking to it will help you incrementally increase your strength and stamina without overtraining.   Isolation, helplessness, and loneliness are common feelings for women struggling with thyroid health. Many other people just don’t understand their symptoms. It takes dedication and commitment to retake control. Today’s guest shares her amazing story of how she did it.   About Stephanie Pearce After her diagnosis of Hashimoto’s, Stephanie tried many different things to get her life back in order. Anxiety about her thyroid health was a big part of her struggle. Through dedication and hard work, Stephanie has come out on the other side feeling more confident and empowered than ever.   Making the Necessary Changes Stephanie describes her long struggle with thyroid health. Even though she was not diagnosed with Hashimoto’s until three years ago, the signs had been there for some time. Brain fog, fatigue, and rapid weight loss took their toll. Since her diagnosis, Stephanie has been able to take control and move her health in the right direction. One of the first changes Stephanie made was to her diet. The grains and dairy left. Now she sticks to a paleo diet and feels so much better as a result. She also exercises regularly. What started as daily walks has evolved into the strength-based program of Thyroid Strong. Now Stephanie is thinking more clearly and is more motivated than she has been in many years.   Beating Anxiety with Knowledge, Dedication, and Support Throughout her struggles with thyroid health, Stephanie dealt with the anxiety that often accompanies it. It often felt like she was all alone in her situation. Little tasks that seemed so easy for other people were nearly impossible for her. Since Thyroid Strong, she lives her life with more clarity and confidence than she thought she ever could achieve. It has given her the knowledge and guidance she needs to feel better than she has in many years. What mindset shifts have been necessary on your health journey? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode Stephanie’s long journey with thyroid health [3:45] Adapting your diet to control thyroid problems [7:30] The power that comes with being an advocate for your health [10:20] The role of exercise in managing Hashimoto’s symptoms [19:45] The importance of finding support from family and friends [23:10] Finding the right balance with exercise [25:25] Shifting your mindset as you heal [28:35]   Quotes “I realized that I could put this into remission and that it didn’t have to run my life. The lightbulb that went off that was so exciting for me was that I knew what was wrong.” [12:05] “The kettlebell is one of the best investments that I’ve made ever. It’s so versatile. I can do cardio workouts with it. I can do an upper body workout with it and lower body - the whole entire body with a kettlebell.” [26:49] “I feel like I’m moving forward. Before, I was just in the water-treading water. Now I’m out of the water on the beach just dealing with it.” [30:00]   Links Thyroid Strong Hashimoto’s Food Pharmacology by Izabella Wentz Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Nov 2020

38 min 16 sec

Key Takeaways Your health is ultimately your responsibility. Do the research necessary to become armed with the best information and don’t be afraid to advocate for yourself whenever it is necessary.  Weight-training can seem intimidating. However, if you find the right coach and learn the proper form, it is a safe and effective way to improve thyroid levels.   A thyroid condition presents numerous challenges. Healing from it is an up and down journey. Being in tune with your body and making informed choices is perhaps the most important thing that you can do to stay healthy and meet your goals. Today’s guest understands this as well as anyone.   About Norma Huffman Norma Huffman was one of the very first people to sign up for my Thyroid Strong program. From a young age, Norma struggled with thyroid problems. Never one to give up on her own health, Norma took matters into her own hands and took necessary action to take control of her health.   Becoming Your Own Health Advocate There is a lot to consider after a diagnosis of hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. The advice from different doctors can be confusing and even contradictory. Norma recounts how she worked to become an expert in her own health to become the most informed patient that she could be.   Mindset and Discipline as Keys to Health Armed with the right information, Norma tried out numerous programs and exercise routines. She credits her newfound energy, confidence, and weight loss to the discipline and exercises that come from the Thyroid Strong program. Many people are hesitant or even fearful of weight-based exercises. However, Norma found that being properly informed and coached on form quickly erases doubts. With confidence, knowledge, and motivation, it is possible to retake control of your health. What mindset shifts have been necessary on your health journey? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode Becoming an advocate for your own health after a disappointing diagnosis [2:30] Using weight-training exercises to maintain muscle mass with a thyroid condition  [8:15] The limitations of walking-based exercise [15:55] Overcoming fear of weight-training [19:35] Shifting your mindset to focus on the truly important parts of health [21:32] Retaining hope for future health [28:00]   Quotes “I always had proper form and I had the confidence to go into the gym and work with free weights with all of the young people with awesome form.” [9:55] “Just knowing that everybody is in a different space, I recognized that I need to compete against myself and nobody else.” [18:26] “We all just need to be happy with the skin that we’re in. Just focus on being consistent with your exercises and being consistent with healthy eating and the results will come.” [22:32]   Links Thyroid Strong Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Nov 2020

33 min 16 sec

Key Takeaways It is possible to meet your strength goals without exhausting yourself and damaging your health. Finding the minimal effective dose and doing just what is necessary to achieve your goals will ultimately be more rewarding and sustainable.   Shouldn’t workouts make us feel our best? Yet so many result in exhaustion, burnout, and frustration. Many focus on the wrong thing. Others are based on a one-size-fits-all approach. Today’s guest strives to help her clients work out better so they can have consistent energy throughout the day.   About Adina Rubin Adina Ruben is a nutritional therapy consultant and a medical exercise specialist. Her program, The Strong For Life Method, helps busy women stay strong and have more energy with smart workouts and real food.   Finding the Minimum Effective Dose When working with her clients, Adina identifies the “minimal effective dose” of exercise. Many workouts just go too far. The results can lead to hormone imbalances, fatigue, and even metabolic problems. Finding just the right dose of exercise can often be the key to restoring balance.   Knowledge is Essential Adina’s passion for educating her clients is really clear. When you have a full understanding of how your body and all its parts and systems are connected, you can begin to make the changes that you need. Listening to your body’s messages, learning to respond, and applying it all correctly is central to any workout program. How do you listen to what your body tells you when working out? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode What to focus on in order to feel your best [2:50] Balancing hormones through strength-training [5:50] How to address an overflow of stress levels [10:00] The importance of rest breaks and variability for building resiliency [13:10] Barbell back squats and kettlebell swings as some of the most important exercises [21:38] Educating patients to create empowerment [24:08] Whether or not to adapt trainings according to age [28:12] Refueling after a workout [32:08]   Quotes “How can we do less? How can we do the minimal effective dose in exercise, ‘dieting’? How can we make this the least restrictive that it needs to be to still get us to our goals?” [4:11] “Just try eating real food - quality proteins, quality fats, and starchy carbs. I think that really makes a huge difference.” [35:36] “Strength is important. You are stronger than you think you are and it’s okay to get stronger than that.” [37:31]   Links Find Adina Rubin online Follow Adina on Instagram Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Oct 2020

39 min 10 sec

Key Takeaways There’s no single test that will identify the source of metabolic issues. It takes a thorough and holistic approach. Multiple tests are often needed to identify what the true source of a condition is. Once root causes have been identified, handling stress, eating well, and exercising will likely lead to improvements.   Many of the clients that I see have been to several other practitioners already. That might be because their previous practitioners just looked at them as data and test results. Today, I’m speaking with someone who redefined how we approach our patients to actually make sense of the data they provide.   About Reed Davis Reed Davis is a board-certified holistic health practitioner and a certified nutritional therapist. His vast experience working with numerous autoimmune patients led him to develop Functional Diagnostic Nutrition in order to give practitioners the functional lab training, data-driven protocols, tools, and leadership they need to confidently solve their clients’ health issues.   When a Thyroid Symptom Isn’t actually a Thyroid Condition Reed and I get into what he has observed about thyroid conditions over the years. In fact, many of the classic thyroid symptoms don’t even originate with that gland. Reed describes the ways in which many thyroid conditions begin in places like the brain or cell-receptors. With that understanding, the actual root causes of conditions can be addressed which will lead to true healing.   Toxins and Metabolic Chaos Reed understands the huge impact that toxins have on us. There are tens of thousands of them in the environment, from pesticides on crops to off-gassing from furniture. Different toxins will affect different people in different ways. However, they all contribute to metabolic chaos. To mitigate the impact of toxins, Reed recommends eating a wide variety of non-processed food and being aware of your genetic risk factors. How do you help yourself and others make health a priority? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode What led Reed to develop Functional Diagnostic Nutrition [3:45] Why many thyroid symptoms originate elsewhere in the body [8:15] The effect of environmental toxins on human health [15:46] The importance of identifying food sensitivities to get Hashimoto’s under control [27:09] How to make sense of the many tests you may need [31:12] Identifying gut dysfunctions before it’s too late [37:55] Why different people respond to stress differently [41:33] Where to start after a Hashimoto’s diagnosis [47:55]   Quotes “If you suffer from ordinary thyroid symptoms, there could be nothing wrong with your thyroid. And yet, the standard treatment is to just replace the T4 and hope your body converts it.” [11:45] “We have this natural ability to excrete and detox, but it can be overloaded and some people have it worse than others, not just because of their level of exposure but because they’re just different.” [21:14] “You can’t change your genes. But you can have some control over the expression of those genes.” [23:56] “We don’t guess and test. We test. We never guess.” [34:53]   Links Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Oct 2020

53 min 59 sec

Key Takeaways Success comes in many forms. Even when things don’t go right, you can succeed by using them as catalysts for growth. Before reacting, pause, breathe, think about how you can grow from it.   Every single one of us has been affected by this pandemic. Likely, plans you’ve made will not come to fruition because of it. That’s certainly true for me. However, there is still hope for us if we can recognize it.   Closing My Clinic It has been a strange past several months to be sure. On March 16, I made the difficult decision to close my clinic in New York City. For the safety of my staff and patients, it was the right thing to do. It was really challenging, but I was bolstered by the support of my staff and patients.   Making Transitions and Learning Lessons As I’m sure it has for you, my life is drastically different now. I went from a full-time business owner to a full-time mom. In May, my family left the city altogether. During this time, I’ve experienced numerous lessons surrounding gratitude. Sure, things are not the way I’d prefer. But this whole experience has shown me that success comes in many forms.   Main Point #2 The stressors that came with these changes have certainly taken their toll, mentally, physically, and emotionally. Remembering to respond to these stressors in a productive way that leads to growth, rather than simply in a reactionary way, has given me hope for the future. It has led me to make some big decisions and set my life on a whole new trajectory. What positive changes have the pandemic led you to make? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Making the tough decision to shut down the clinic in NYC [0:30] Maintaining patience and grace during challenges [6:45] Responding to stress in productive ways [14:30] Accepting a life without solid plans when times are unpredictable [20:18]   Quotes “Originally, the sentiment was not if but when we come back. But slowly the sentiment started to become if we go back.” [2:03] “Every single struggle and moment that feels challenging is a place to learn and grow.” [7:23] “How can we make this time a moment and point of reflection so that every single day moving forward we are heading on a path that brings joy and growth and makes us one percent better every day?” [22:50]   Links Check out the full show notes for this episode here Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Oct 2020

25 min 41 sec

Key Takeaways Historic water damage is more likely a source of mold than a recent incident. Even when the water is gone, the mold will stay behind. That’s why a proper inspection should take some time. It involves looking everywhere. Remediation is a big process. What it’s really doing is removing biotoxins that make you sick. This is not a place to cut corners. Even though it is a big process, if done correctly, there is hope that your health will improve and you’ll be safe in your home.   Even after mold remediation, people still get sick. That’s because mold is extremely hard to vanquish for good. And mold affects so many of us. As many as 40 percent of the population is mold sensitive. That’s why it’s crucial that you not only identify its presence but get rid of it too.   About Brian Karr Brian Karr is the expert mold inspector you wish you had. He is the go-to mold and biotoxin resource for many medical practitioners, particularly functional medicine doctors. Brian has helped over 3,000 hypersensitive individuals nationwide create healthier living environments.   Finding Hidden Sources of Mold Mold does not discriminate. It affects some people differently than others, but it causes ill effects on anyone. That’s why having a proper inspection is so important. Even if there is no obvious or recent sign of water damage in your home, mold can still be present. In fact, Brian seldom deals with mold from recent damage. Usually, the cause happened some time ago. That’s why, as Brian describes, an inspection needs to be extremely thorough.   Getting Rid of All the Mold in Your Home Once mold has been found and identified, it needs to be removed. Remediation is a big process. It might involve removing significant parts of your walls, floors, and ceilings. However, half-measures will just mean that your problems will return before too long. Brain shares how he tests, both before and after remediation, and the questions you should ask anyone you hire to rid your home of toxic mold. Tell me about how you’ve rid your home of mold in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode How to detect mold when there’s no obvious water damage [5:58] Questions to ask in order to find a well-informed inspector [11:20] The best approaches for finding the sources of mold in your home [21:00] How to remediate properly so that the mold is actually all gone [27:20] The actual value of a post-remediation inspection [31:38] Where aspergillus can actually be found [42:45] Why it’s important to have a professional remediate your home [46:28] Why geography has very little impact on the mold in your home [48:38] How to decide what to bring back into your home after remediation [50:09]   Quotes “I think the big misconception is that there has to be a water issue happening right now for there to be a problem. It’s usually not often that you see that. Most times, it’s historical water issues that cause the problem.” [9:02] “We should be treating this as if we’re in a hospital and need to clean this the right way because, ultimately, we’re dealing with biotoxins.” [29:20] “Mold - it can be growing or not growing - either way, it’s a problem for us. If the particles are breaking off the colony, even if the colony is ‘dead’, we still breathe that in.” [41:43] “It’s so important to have people who understand the process [of remediation] in there doing it. And yes, it can be expensive, the same way that medical treatment can be expensive. But we’re basically applying medical treatment to your house.” [47:48]   Links Follow Brian Karr on Instagram We Inspect Mold Masterclass - Use code MUSCLEMEDICINE to get $100 off or click here to apply the coupon directly Mold Finders Radio Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Oct 2020

1 hr 4 min

Key Takeaways Aging usually leads to a loss of skeletal muscle. That’s why it’s important to start building and maintaining it before it becomes a problem. Getting enough protein and exercising regularly will accomplish this and set you up to live better into old age.  There is no single best way to build and maintain muscle with exercise. Whether using heavy or light weights, the muscle fibers can still get the use they need to stay strong. The important thing is consistency.   It’s no secret that muscle mass decreases with age. Maintaining it is one of the central elements of longevity. Even though muscle loss mostly affects the elderly, preventive action needs to take place as early as age thirty.   About Stuart Phillips, PhD Stuart Phillips is a professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. As a Tier 1 Canadian research chair in skeletal-muscular health, director of the McMaster Centre for Nutrition, Exercise and Health Research, and the director of PACE, Professor Phillips has published nearly 500 research pieces. He is a true expert in how exercise and protein affect skeletal muscle.   The Importance of Protein Professor Phillips knows the importance of protein. In fact, as we age, our protein requirements increase. Just including proteins in your diet is only part of the picture. Professor Phillips describes the importance of what sources of protein to eat and when to eat it. A protein-rich breakfast is a great way to start the day. Furthermore, animal-based proteins are easier for your body to synthesize.   The Role of Exercise Protein and nutrition are not enough to maintain muscle mass. Exercise is a crucial element too. When it comes to losing weight ad staging strong, exercise is the key ingredient. However, a protein-dense diet can aid in weight loss. That’s because you’ll get the nutrients that you need without excess calories. How do protein and exercise shape your health? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode The metabolic importance of muscle [3:45] Why young people need to prepare for old age [6:29] Understanding how to get optimal protein [11:00] The best times and sources to get protein [16:20] The difference between carbohydrate stimulation and protein stimulation of insulin [27:25] How nutrient-dense sources of protein can aid weight-loss [33:15] The more effective ways to exercise as we age [41:20] Busting the myth of protein and kidney failure [48:48]   Quotes “Being able to move, get around, and do all the activities of daily living, you need to have a good amount of functional skeletal muscle.”  [6:18] “It’s hard to out-nutrition inactivity. You can maximize your chances, but the only way to undo inactivity is to be active.” [15:50] “The true health benefits of being physically active are when you take somebody from nothing to something.” [48:07]   Links Follow Stuart Phillips, Ph.D. on Instagram | Twitter | Facebook Hacking Exercise for Health Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 3: How Much Protein Do You Really Need

Oct 2020

54 min 21 sec

Key Takeaways Peak performance training just isn’t sustainable. Sooner or later, something is going to give. Instead of just pushing their physical limits to the breaking point, strength training in an optimal way will help establish actual healthy results and heal a career of injury.   Many of us work, play, and train at full throttle. But when we overdo it, we create problems whose solutions go beyond massage, adjustments, and ultrasounds. Today’s guest helps her clients rehabilitate through a conscious and comprehensive strength training approach.   About Aleena Kanner Aleena Kanner is a Certified Athletic Trainer and NASM Certified Personal Trainer. She obtained a Master’s degree from the University of Arkansas in 2016. Soon after, Aleena opened her own business in New York City to bridge the gap between rehabilitation, movement, and resistance training with her clients.  Aleena’s approach to strength training centers on optimizing individual performance and longevity by teaching individuals to become the masters of their own habits. She believes that rehab and strength training are on a continuum and that in order to feel our best we must move efficiently, load effectively, and train repetitively.   Athleticism is not Health Many people confuse athletics with health. Looking at Olympians and other high-level performers, it’s easy to conclude that they represent the pinnacle of health. Aleena knows that that is often not the case. Often, they’re injured and overtraining with hormonal imbalances.   Moving Better for Better Health Being able to load and move the body in an efficient way is the foundation of better strength training. This means moving away from symmetrical stances and emphasizing functional movement. In particular, getting the ribs in the right position so that they aren’t flaring, is at the foundation of Aleena’s approach. How can strength training play a role in your rehabilitation? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode Bettering yourself and your clients through strength training [2:00] Listening to your body when it says it’s time to stop overtraining [5:40] The elements of efficient strength training [11:25] How treating someone’s physical stance can lead to a reduction in anxiety [19:37] Healing numerous ailments by focusing on gut health [26:36] Dealing with the fear that surrounds movement [31:25] The three things anyone can do to feel better in their body [35:38]   Quotes “You’re preparing yourself to be a really great athlete and great at your sport. But that is not health.” [9:57] “Strength training efficiently for the human body to work in the most optimal way possible is the best way to exercise.” [11:13] “Your body can heal if it’s given the right things to heal with.” [31:19] “Everyone’s thoughts should be on their health right now. In order to protect your immune system, you should be exercising and eating healthy and supporting your immune system.” [38:09]   Links Find Aleena Kanner online Follow Aleena Kanner on Instagram | Facebook | YouTube Anatomy in Motion Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 21: How To Heal Pain By Starting At The Feet with Gary Ward

Sep 2020

40 min 34 sec

Key Takeaways For many people, it isn’t necessary to spend a big chunk of your day at the gym. Exercising periodically throughout the day, even for a few minutes at a time, is a practical solution for staying fit while staying home. Interval training can benefit nearly anyone. The science shows that when appropriately adapted it can help elite athletes as well as people with chronic health conditions.  Interval training is a time-efficient way to exercise. It can be adapted to meet a variety of health goals ranging from weight loss and metabolic flexibility to muscle gain and endurance.   People often think of exercise as a time-consuming task that takes over your whole day. New research is showing that this doesn’t have to be the case. As many of us spend more time at home, exercising in short spurts can be what we need to do to keep our muscles from wasting away.   About Martin Gibala, Ph.D Martin Gibala is a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and the author of The One-Minute Workout. His main interest is the physiology of exercise, including the effects of training and nutrition, and application to health and performance. Martin’s research ranges from basic studies on cellular mechanisms to applied studies on health and performance. He regularly publishes in peer-reviewed journals and speaks at scientific meetings.   What is Interval Training? Simply put, interval training is a style of exercise that involves pushing hard for a few seconds in between longer breaks. While this sounds revolutionary, it’s nothing new. Many elite athletes have been training this way for decades. Regardless of your level of fitness, there’s a role for interval training in your life. Martin explains how nearly everyone from Olympic athletes to those with heart conditions can adapt this type of workout to their benefit. Even if it’s just walking for a few seconds in between resting, there can be a huge benefit for some people. This type of exercise can be as intense or gentle as necessary.   Interval Training as a Helpful Alternative Through his many studies, Martin has found that the intensity of exercise is often more impactful than its duration. That’s not to say that there’s no place for steady-state cardio workouts. What it does suggest is that, for many of us, interval training can serve as an effective alternative. How can you implement interval training at home? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode What interval training is and how anyone can do it [2:27] Applying interval training to any fitness level [4:30] What you can learn from a VO2 Max test [9:27] The differences between aerobic and anaerobic interval training [12:35] Managing your recovery time to maximize your outcome [17:27] Interval training’s potential to improve muscular health [23:16] Comparing the results of interval training to endurance training [29:50] Why moving well is more important than moving often [36:28] Taking advantage of interval training in the time of COVID [45:20]   Quotes “Interval training is not only for elite athletes…. Many individuals can safely perform interval training, including individuals with cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes, and many other chronic conditions.” [4:13] “If you have twenty minutes to train, that’s a good sweet spot. It’s of sufficient duration.” [16:24] “Just get out there and do something. Vary it up. If you like the same interval workout all the time, go for it. But variety is generally going to be better for you. Mix it up and don’t worry about the details so much.” [19:01] “There’s nothing magical about interval training, but it can just speed things up a little bit in terms of the time invested for the relative benefits.” [25:17] “How hard you work out is more important than how long you work out.” [31:18]   Links Find Martin Gibala, PhD online Follow Martin Gibala on Twitter The One-Minute Workout World Fitness Level Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Sep 2020

49 min 50 sec

Key Takeaways There is a host of potential health problems associated with mold exposure. Since these are often similar to the symptoms of other common diseases, they can be hard to diagnose.  The design of your home greatly impacts the potential for mold growth. Breathable building materials and dehumidifiers will help a lot. However, you need to stay vigilant because mold can creep up nearly anywhere.   Mold is inescapable. For some people, its effects are drastic. Brain-fog, sinus irritation, muscle loss, and even some cancers can result from mold exposure. Fortunately, you are not powerless to do something about it. My guest today explains how you can recognize if you’ve been exposed and what you can do to stay healthy.   About Dr. Jill Crista Dr. Jill Crista ND is a naturopathic physician in southwest Wisconsin. Her practice focuses on taking on patients suffering from the effects of mold exposure and Lyme disease. She’s on a mission to educate the public about the dangers of mold to keep them and their families safe and healthy.   Mold is Everywhere, But You Can Still Act Even common molds can lead to negative health problems. There are many factors behind the way mold affects different people. Chief among these is the size of the dose, duration, and susceptibility. Even your nutrient intake is a factor.  Discovering that mold is in your home is devastating. Remediation is expensive. Moving is seldom an option. But living with constant exposure will take its toll. There are steps you can take to help. From not storing cardboard in the cellar to building with specialized materials, you can make it harder for mold to take hold in the first place.   Recognizing Mold’s Effects on Your Health Since the toxins in mold are fat-soluble, they can travel nearly anywhere in the body. This can create a whole host of symptoms. For this reason, mold exposure can be difficult to correctly diagnose. Even anxiousness, ear-ringing, and pelvic pain can be a result. With so many possible effects, it is crucial that you and your doctor discover how mold is impacting your health. Mold will even impact your muscles. Since many mold mycotoxins act as protein synthesis inhibitors, your muscles may not recover after they break down. That’s why mold exposure is a direct contributor to the loss of muscle mass. While all this can seem frightening, Dr. Crista shares some steps you can take right away to get back on track. Have you had to deal with toxic mold exposure? What do you do to rid mold from your life? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The reasons why some people are more affected by mold than others [2:10] Why mold exposure is the “great imitator” of other diseases [8:43] The detoxification symptoms that can occur after mold exposure [12:07] The different effects of outdoor and indoor mold [13:40] How to detect mold inside your home [17:24] Different reactions for men and women [20:40] Designing your home to be resistant to mold [23:27] How to discover if you have mold in your system [32:32] Why chemical sensitivity often accompanies mold exposure [42:15] How mold affects muscle tissue [46:39] Simple steps to recovery [49:38]   Quotes “The toxins that come from mold in an indoor environment are biowarfare weapons.” [2:30] “Mold has a very important job in nature which is to decompose dead, previously organic material. What do we build our houses with? Dead organic material.” [14:15] “There’s a lot of things the liver is supposed to be doing. Those activities get gummed up when you’re exposed to mycotoxins.” [43:25] “When you move a muscle you can damage it. That’s the whole idea of gaining muscle. As you break it down it will build up bigger. If you have mold on board, you don’t get the repair part.” [48:14]   Links Find Dr. Jill Crista online Follow Dr. Crista on Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest Prescriptions for a Healthy House by Paula Baker-Laporte Mold Quiz Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 37: How Toxic Mold Can Affect You & How To Get Rid Of It w/ Dr. Ann Shippy Episode 57: The Importance Of Strength Training For Your Joints & Thyroid w/ Dr. Tyna Moore Episode 62: How To Detoxify Your Home & Your Body w/ Bridgit Danner

Sep 2020

55 min 36 sec

Most training programs focus on simply building strength. That’s an important part, but it ignores crucial parts of the human condition. We don’t naturally move the way we often train. But what if we trained based on how we move? That would lead to more balanced strength and reduce the likelihood of common injuries.   About Rocky Snyder With nearly thirty years of experience as a trainer, Rocky Snyder has a firm grasp on the connection between strength and mobility. Rocky is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist, an NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer, Certified in Applied Functional Science, NASM-Corrective Exercise Specialist, a licensed US Soccer Coach, and a USA Weightlifting Coach.   Training For Dynamic Movement In today’s episode, Rocky explains the need to think not just about how we train, but why we train the way we do. There is a danger in taking for granted the way we exercise. Most workouts don’t actually consider the way that you and the population as a whole actually move. Rocky advocates training based on how we move outside of the gym, rather than just on strength for strength’s sake.   The Role of Asymmetrical Movements By taking the history of how we train into consideration, Rocky sees that we’ve been ignoring the elements of natural movement. This has led to an increase in injuries. When we train with asymmetrical natural movements in mind, we become more limber and less likely to get hurt. By utilizing unilateral and contralateral training, the spine and joints are unlocked so that we can freely move in all directions with strength. How can you train to support your movements outside of the gym? Leave a message in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The need to consider why we train the way we do [2:10] Focusing your training on balance [4:50] Techniques for supporting supple movements in athletes [9:53] Three principles to include when designing a training program [16:55] Important considerations for training under load [27:30] Building muscle as a protective organ to increase longevity [34:50]   Quotes “Training intelligently is actually stepping back and looking at the approach to training that we’re taking right now where an individual, as well as the population, is in regards to their ability to move and designing a program based on that information.” [4:02] “The way in which we’re training our athletes is to be like a very strong tree; to be rooted into the ground and support tremendous weight up above instead of being a subtle tiger.” [9:18] “There’s a place for kettlebells, barbells, and dumbbells. But there’s also a place for owning movement in your body that will regulate a greater amount of strength and performance.” [16:42] “The purpose here is to try to unlock your potential by giving you movements that actually train the whole body to perform and not just one joint. And the effect is immediate!” [45:54]   Key Takeaways Most workout regimes are based on bilateral action. But this is not how we normally move. By focusing on asymmetrical split-stance exercises, you will both improve strength and increase natural balance. This will allow you to move freely and avoid injury. A comprehensive workout needs to be a combination of strength training with dynamic movements. To ignore one part of the picture is to create a potentially harmful imbalance.   Links Find Rocky Snyder online Follow Rocky on Instagram | Facebook | Linkedin Return to Center by Rocky Snyder Anatomy in Motion Gray Institute Check out the full show notes for this episode here   Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative

Sep 2020

48 min 28 sec

Getting your health back after a Hashimoto’s diagnosis is a frustrating process. You can do all the common recommendations and still run up against a wall. I know. I’ve been there myself. Today I’m speaking directly to the millions of women with Hashimoto’s. We’re talking about the most two common struggles that come up over and over again -- fatigue and weight gain.  If Hashimoto’s has caused you to put on extra pounds, there are specific ways to combat this. First, get your thyroid checked out. A full panel of thyroid lab work will tell you what exactly is going on. Finding the right balance with strength-training exercises will lead to more energy too. Check for gut infections, watch your calorie intake, avoid inflammatory foods, get enough sleep, and you’ll be losing weight more easily.  Fatigue is best addressed through sleep optimization and working out the right way. Too much cardio can create a huge amount of fatigue. Shifting to strength-based workouts will make a big difference.  What are your biggest struggles with Hashimoto’s? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The common symptoms of Hashimoto’s to look out for How weight-gain presents as a Hashimoto’s symptom 6 tips for losing weight with Hashimoto’s Using stress to create meaningful changes Optimizing your workouts to combat fatigue   Quotes “Our thyroid levels will change over time based on stress, what we’re eating, how we’re working out, how well our sleep is optimized. There’s just many factors.” [9:11] “If we want to lose weight, calories matter. It’s not only what we’re eating that matters, but how much we’re eating.” [15:11] “When it comes to fatigue, if I’m feeling really cranky at the world, I think this is my point to check-in.” [21:08]   Links Enroll in Thyroid Strong! Thyroid Strong | Facebook Your Lab Work Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Jun 2020

25 min

Many people think that a workout should leave you feeling like a puddle of sweat on the floor every day. That’s just not sustainable and could leave you with some nasty injuries. Instead, a well-balanced and carefully crafted exercise routine will help you reach your long-term goals without negatively impacting other parts of your life. Holly and Arryn are a strength coaching duo from Portland, Oregon. In 2018, they started a business together to encourage their students to become their strongest selves. With their help, their students build confidence to work toward any challenge of their choosing, in the gym and beyond.  Experimentation is a large part of Holly and Arryn’s approach. One thing they do differently is building in longer than normal rest breaks. They find that a few sets of something intense followed by a lengthy break increase the overall power you put out. By spreading out the reps, you’ll find that they’ll be of higher quality throughout the whole routine. A key part of their programs is variability. Holly and Arryn promote mastering a wide range of exercises with built-in rest and recovery periods. This more balanced approach won’t leave you so exhausted that you can’t perform your everyday functions.  How do you build rest into your workout? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The value of incorporating long rest breaks into your workouts Having a wide range of exercises as part of your routine Challenging yourself without pushing too hard too often What a bent press is and how it will lead to gains where other movements don’t How movements can be adapted to help those with injuries Making rest and recovery an integral part of workout regimens   Quotes “We want people to be challenged appropriately so that it doesn’t impact them negatively throughout the rest of their day or the rest of their training.” [10:23] “A big part of rest and recovery is not doing too much in the first place.” [26:39] “Pain is a part of all of our lives and it’s not necessarily that you never experience any form of pain. It’s how you adapt to pain.” [33:15] “Oftentimes we have this idea of how long a goal should take to reach. People are surprised when I say that it took me over a year to build my pull-up to get to Iron Maiden. Don’t lose the process in pursuit of the end goal.” [38:26]   Links Find Holly and Arryn online Follow Holly and Arryn on Instagram TrueCoach Explain Pain by David Butler and G. Lorimer Moseley Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Jun 2020

41 min 15 sec

For all the women with Hashimoto’s, this is one is for you. The gyms are closed, but that doesn’t mean you can stop working out. Today, I’m talking about how you can stay active to prevent all the gains you made in the gym from being lost even if you don’t have any equipment at home. I’m glad you’re staying home and staying safe. But it’s not time to forget about your muscles. All that glucose from carbs is getting dumped in your muscles instead of fueling your workouts. Going for a run may seem like a good idea. But if you have Hashimoto’s that can be too hard on your joints.  In order to maintain the health of your muscles at home, there are two things not to lose sight of. One is what you eat. Getting your optimal protein of at least 30 grams per meal will keep your muscles fed properly. The other thing to do is strength-train. That means picking up and moving weight with amazing form. Since Hashimoto’s means you’re predisposed to less muscle mass, I share a seven-step functional exercise workout for you. You don’t need fancy gym equipment for these. That means you can get started right now without leaving the house! How has your workout routine changed during the time of coronavirus? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Preventing the COVID 15 Why running is not the best exercise for many people How much protein to eat with each meal The best type of strength-training you can do at home The essential seven exercises for maintaining your muscle How to improvise weights with objects in your home   Quotes “This is a time where we can gain weight, especially if we are not walking, if we are staying home, not getting any vitamin D and sunshine on our face. We need to really focus on our health and the health of our muscles.” [1:45] “There’s no sexy, magical, new, innovative move that’s going to help you maintain your muscle and help you beat the corona 15. Just functional strength training.” [3:56] “Self-care is picking up something heavy with amazing form, challenging yourself, putting it down, and doing it again.” [19:38]   Links The NYT Seven Minute Workout Biolayne Enroll in Thyroid Strong Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

May 2020

21 min 3 sec

With brick and mortar gyms shut down because of COVID-19, training for many has shifted online. This presents all sorts of new challenges but also opportunities. It is so important that we continue our workouts at home. This is especially true for all the new and expectant mothers out there. Not only is this crucial to maintain sanity, but you also don’t want to lose the gains you worked so hard to build in the first place. Nora Matthew is the founder of Her Strength Studio. After having her first baby, Nora also created Pregna-Fit, a unique strength training and labor preparation method for all stages of pregnancy. She runs multiple programs related to fitness for prepartum, pregnant, and postpartum women.  With people exercising at home instead of at the gym, Nora has worked hard to make sure her clients haven’t missed a beat. Adjusting to workouts without equipment and helping people set up their at-home gyms is necessary these days. There’s a lot you can do with bodyweight workouts, but to really keep it going, investing in some weights is critical. As someone who works with expecting and new moms, Nora often sees women struggling with anxiety. With all the uncertainties of the moment, it’s understandable to worry. That’s why, Nora provides targeted training advice, and works hard to maintain open lines of communication with her clients. Being there for them in a supportive but non-judgmental way goes so far in supporting both physical and emotional wellbeing. How have you adjusted to training at home instead of at the gym? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Providing for clients when gyms are forced to close their doors Weights to invest in for your at-home workouts Special considerations for pregnant women and new mothers The key elements of rebuilding stability and strength after having a child Tips for preparing for birth far in advance Shifting your mindset to prevent over-training   Quotes “Lifting weights is important and a key element to anyone’s training program for a myriad of reasons.” [7:10] “There are exceptions, but let’s just err on the side of caution. You’re never going to regret taking a little bit longer to recover before getting back into whatever you were doing before.” [19:44] “Ensuring that you understand how to relax your pelvic floor - that is everything.” [43:10]   Links Find Nora Matthew online Follow Nora on Instagram | Facebook Pregnancy Fitness Truecoach Perform Better Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

May 2020

48 min

Infertility can be a heartbreaking situation. What makes it even more difficult is the uncertainty that often lies behind its cause. There are many factors that can lead to infertility. Hypothyroidism is one of them. Today’s guest supports couples struggling with hypothyroidism overcome their issues with infertility. Jennifer Zucconi is a functional dietician who believes that every woman is uniquely and wonderfully made and that inside her rests the potential to bring a miraculous gift into the world. By using the healing powers of food and lifestyle, Jennifer helps women optimize their thyroid, nourish their pre-pregnancy health, and nurture their possibilities of bringing a new life into their families. Many women in this situation probably feel that they’re doing everything possible but still are getting nowhere. Jennifer tells her clients to look beyond just the perceived problems. It is important to look at the entire sense of yourself that goes far beyond just reproduction. Viewing the body as one complex and interconnected system is the first step to getting to the root cause of any issue. It takes time to prepare for pregnancy. Optimizing nutrition months ahead of time can do a lot of good. Jennifer describes how nourishing the whole body does wonders. High-quality foods lead to better health overall and this has a huge effect on fertility. The least processed the food the better. Have you struggled to get to the root of a fertility problem? Tell me what you did in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode How pregnancy and infertility involves the whole couple Labs to consider when looking for the root cause of infertility What it means to optimize nutrition for pregnancy  Special concerns and challenges for vegans  Exercising without overstressing the body and reducing reproductive hormones What has shifted during the time of COVID 19   Quotes “This isn’t just about you. This is about you plural. This is about you and your spouse or partner. This is a journey that you’re both on.” [2:33] “If we’re not moving our bodies, or if our relationships are in turmoil and causing stress, a great plate [of food] is not going to do anything for you.” [15:55] “It’s so simple. It’s what we do three times a day on average. There is such power in food, and harm when we look at it from both of those ends.” [27:11] “I don’t want to turn my own anxiety up prematurely before my emotions have been given a chance to just live in the present and in the anticipatory hope of the future I still want to call my own.” [36:37]   Links Find Jennifer Zucconi online Follow Jennifer on Instagram | Facebook Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

May 2020

40 min 49 sec

Addressing gut health is often the key to clearing up your skin. But what if your child is showing signs of skin irritation? Luckily, I’ve brought someone on today who specializes in just that. Jennifer Caryn Brand is a clinical nutritionist who works in the unique niche of helping children with skin and gut conditions. She believes that we are all in charge of our own health. That’s why Jennifer makes it her mission to provide her clients with up to date scientific information and guidance.  Jennifer talks about what to do if you notice rashes and irritation on your child’s skin. Eliminating gluten, eggs, and certain processed foods is a good place to start. However, there are issues that go beyond what they eat. We discuss how to look for signs that tell us to dig deeper. Since the gut biome affects the entire body, it helps to understand how this connection works. Jennifer describes just what is going on in a healthy microbiome and what can upset that balance. Imbalances will lead to all sorts of different reactions that can pop up in various ways. That’s why understanding the importance of the gut microbiome of you and your child is critical to staying healthy. Does your child have any of the issues we discuss in this episode? Tell me what’s helped (or what hasn’t) in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Common food triggers of skin irritation in children The difference between food sensitivity, intolerance, and allergy Identifying gut symptoms that are warning signs of a larger problem What makes a healthy and diverse gut microbiome Why it’s not normal for your kid to have stinky farts, smelly poo, and bad breath Links between gut issues and developmental delays in children Where to find nutrients that are important for healthy skin   Quotes “If we’re at a point where we’re removing whole real foods from the diet, the diet is getting smaller and smaller, then food is not the root cause of the problem.” [5:11] “You really can weigh the pros and cons. Of course, we don’t want to have a skin rash flare or be uncomfortable. But sometimes it may be more important to let the kid have fun and to not give them disordered eating habits for the future.” [30:24] “100% of my clients with skin rashes have had gut imbalances based on findings from the stool test. Once we start to address that and rebalance what’s happening, we start to see improvements on the skin.” [43:24]   Links Find Jennifer Caryn Brand online Follow Jennifer on Instagram | Facebook Set up a consultation with Jennifer The Bristol Stool Chart Guide to beat your little one's eczema  Guide to eating for healthy skin Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

May 2020

48 min 28 sec

I don’t want to scare you, but in many places, it’s not a matter of if you get Lyme disease, but when. This disease is as complex as it is common. To create a clearer picture of Lyme and its treatments, I’ve brought in someone with an intimate knowledge of this disease. Dr. Tom Moorcroft considers himself a medical detective as well as a doctor of osteopathic medicine. He thrives when presented with a patient experiencing mysterious symptoms. His goal is to find out what’s really keeping someone sick and help them get better. In this capacity, Dr. Moorcroft treats patients with chronic bacterial and viral infections as well as mycotoxin illness. As a Connecticut-based practitioner, Dr. Moorcroft sees a lot of Lyme disease. In fact, he has it himself. We discuss best practices to take from the moment you find a tick on you. It’s important to remove it carefully. Otherwise, you increase the risk infection. Catching Lyme disease early is crucial. Dr. Moorcroft describes the tests you should ask for and treatments to get right away. Fortunately, early detection usually results in better recovery. With the many symptoms of Lyme, Dr. Moorcroft describes the importance of optimizing everything from diet to sleep habits. Even the gut-brain connection plays a role. Dr. Moorcroft finds that simply getting positive support plays a part in long-term recovery. Do you or someone you know have Lyme? What are some useful solutions that you or they use to manage this disease? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Safe and efficient ways to remove a tick from your skin Test and treatments to ask for after a tick bite If prophylactic treatment is a good idea to prevent Lyme disease How positive support plays a role in recovery from chronic illness Eating a plant-based wholefood diet to support the immune system What happens when we reduce exposure to wifi How to recognize the symptoms of Lyme disease   Quotes “Do everything you can to have your body working optimally before you get sick.” [6:26] “What I think is happening is that the body is really damn smart. It’s actually burning the bad biofilms up when you’re  going into this process of ketosis.” [28:12] “When you’re treating the same thing over and over again, or every time they come in they have something completely different, you might want to start thinking about Lyme disease.” [44:46]   Links Find Dr. Tom Moorcroft online Follow Dr. Moorcroft on Instagram | Facebook | YouTube TickReport Episode 72 with Dr. Stephen Porges Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Apr 2020

48 min 27 sec

Many of us connect our sense of self-worth to our work. But the current global pandemic has impacted many people’s idea of their value. The tools to cope with these feelings are within everyone. Today’s guest is going to tell you how to harness this inner power. Tallia Deljou is a positive psychology expert and personal development coach. As such, she helps people make space for positive change. Rooted in her background in psychology, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and transformational coaching, Tallia supports clients in connecting to and embodying their authentic selves, making space to explore the deepest facets of who we are to cultivate a meaningful and rich inner life.  Tallia discusses the implications that unexpected turns of events have on our sense of identity. She describes exercises that we can do to remind ourselves that we are complex beings. We are much more than our jobs. Identifying the constants in our lives reminds us of our true value. We talk about shifting your mindset around downtime. Many people are finding themselves with more time on their hands than usual. Tallia advises using this time to think about who you want to be, not what you want to do. By cultivating curiosity about your natural tendencies, you may notice what is truly important to your wellbeing. This all requires lots of introspection. It means noticing the source of your fears, how you deal with discomfort, choosing who you want to be, and recognizing what is beyond your control. Doing this without self-judgment is a powerful way to build a resilient sense of self-worth. Where does your self-worth lie outside of your work? Share in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Finding your sense of self-worth outside of your work Shifting your mindset to use downtime in healthy yet fulfilling ways Staying grounded when you feel powerless by creating structure Identifying and moving beyond your limiting beliefs Recognizing your stress without letting it overwhelm you The difference between mindfulness and meditation   Quotes “These roles are just different expressions of you. You are not the role. You are what brings life into the role.” [5:36] “It’s easy to forget that we have a choice. When we lose that piece of it, we fall into powerlessness. That’s okay if that’s where you’re at right now. Just notice it, but recognize that you can choose differently.” [13:33] “There’s a distinct point at which you start to recognize that your power does not come from anything outside of you. Instead, it comes from within you.” [23:10] “You are choosing your thoughts. You are choosing how you feel. No one else is responsible for your feelings.” [32:46]   Links Find Tallia Deljou online Follow Tallia on Instagram Sincerely, Me podcast The Crossroads of Should and Must by Ella Luna The Power of Receiving by Amanda Owen Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Apr 2020

46 min 12 sec

In these weird and uncertain times, it’s so important to get a handle on anxiety. A lot of us are making the transition to working from home. This presents a whole bunch of new challenges we may not have faced before. Today, I’m sharing some tools that I’ve found helpful for calming whatever anxieties might come up as we deal with this new reality. The root of anxiety is the unknown. Right now, there’s a lot we don’t know. To stay present, I’ve found that organizing my day is critical. This provides a sense of consistency and stability that may be lacking elsewhere. I even plan out all my meals. That means starting the day with protein, cutting out the morning carbs, and limiting caffeine.  Also, if you run your business from home, it’s important to stay focused on what’s most important for it. I recommend just paying attention to the three most crucial aspects. Ask yourself, “what’s going to move my business forward.” Identify the three most important tasks and put aside the rest. One huge source of anxiety is the constant bombardment of information. I urge all my patients to limit their time watching the news and consuming social media. Not only does all this media take you out of the present, but it also is a huge cause of stress.  Being giving and checking in with people also goes far to keep anxiety under control. It allows you to hold space for all the emotions that surface. I’ve discovered how a simple text message or phone call goes far to shift negativity, overwhelm and anxiety. Also breathing techniques and working out will help create a sense of calm and control.  Have you found any useful techniques or tools for calming anxiety while stuck at home? Share it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Tips and tools for staying present when we feel anxious Ways to organize your day to promote consistency The importance of meal planning and starting your day with savory foods The only three things to prioritize in your business right now Why you need to limit your media intake  What happens when you are giving and checking in with people  Breathing techniques to bring you a sense of calm Why it’s important to continue working out   Quotes “No matter which way you spin it, this is a time to reflect, to pause, to enjoy the stillness and take a moment and see what bubbles to the surface.” [0:58] “When I started to give was when I started to really tamp down on any anxiety that would come to the surface.” [13:04] “Hold space and be kind to yourself. Let go of the negative voice or the things that we tell ourselves.” [23:32]   Links Episode 72 with Dr. Stephen Porges Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Apr 2020

25 min 37 sec

In this high-stress time of COVID-19, our expectations of normalcy have gone out the window. We’re feeling anxious and powerless. This takes a toll on our mental health and wellbeing. Today’s guest made it his practice to share useful and actionable techniques for regaining your sense of balance and control through meditation. With a twenty-year career in the entertainment industry, including Broadway and TV, Mark Price developed a keen insight into the psychology of high performance, creativity, and innovation. He now teaches Vedic meditation through his company Alchemy Collective. Mark explains how this new stressful situation that we’re all in is affecting us on a conscious and chemical level. The best antidote to this state is resting. That’s often easier said than done. To help, Marks describes how we all can begin using simple meditative techniques. This will help us cope and even thrive throughout this experience.  What can you do to stay present and compassionate right now? Let’s talk in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The link between chemistry and consciousness with well-being Why proper rest is the only way to reverse a hyper-stimulated nervous system Two powerful tools for regaining a sense of control What happens when we stay in the present moment and connect with our senses Structuring your day in order to reset the rhythms of the brain Staying present by consistently practicing gratitude   Quotes “You can’t separate mind from body. You can’t isolate the two. They are inextricably connected and they correlate with each other.” [3:49] “We have no control over what’s happening. And that, I think, is the hardest thing for people to accept. They have to surrender to what’s happening. It’s a brilliant time, an inconvenient time, but a brilliant time to reassess some of the practices and habits that we have.” [17:34] “The only cure for a hyper-stimulated nervous system is reducing inputs and inducing states of rest.” [24:20] “There is no magic wand for the one thing that’s going to help people navigate through this. It’s going to be a bunch of little things that you put into practice daily.” [32:59]   Links Find Mark Price online 1 Giant Mind Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Apr 2020

34 min 44 sec

As the coronavirus completely alters all aspects of life, it’s a good time to talk about the birth process. Expecting parents all over are finding that their plans have changed. This is an uncertain process in the best of times. It is less clear than ever now. Tanya Wills is a homebirth midwife and lactation consultant. Her business, Manhattan Birth, runs doula training and parent preparation classes. Tanya is a graduate of the midwifery program at Yale School of Nursing. She has a Master of Science in Nursing. Tanya also completed many programs and training on supporting parents through the birth process and early parenthood. We discuss how the pandemic is bringing to light many issues that Tanya has decried for years. While most births happen in hospitals, there are many reasons to consider having them at home. Today, NYC’s hospitals are overwhelmed and the threat of getting sick there is higher than ever. This has led to a shift in thinking that Tanya feels will last long after this is over. Tanya offers useful advice for expectant mothers whose plans have been upended. It’s important to remember that your feelings are legitimate. When plans get ruined and nothing seems for certain, it’s only normal to feel lost and confused. That said, you don’t have to accept it. Tanya shares how you still have power over the birth and what you can do about it. Are you expecting to have a child soon? How have your plans changed during this pandemic? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode How New Yorkers are changing their plans for childbirth during this pandemic Why a hospital is often not the best place for a birth Dealing with feelings of confusion and anxiety Where to find a hospital that is still offering normal care protocols The importance of having a trusted person with you during birth Tips for avoiding Covid 19 while in a hospital Important considerations for giving birth outside of a hospital   Quotes “We’ve been convinced that we are inherently incapable of birthing our babies safely without the patriarchy standing by and taking our pain away.” [4:24] “For anyone who is pregnant right now, especially anyone due right now, do not underestimate your capacity to handle this.” [15:04] “We’re looking for people who know in their guts that this is safe and right. We know that it is. Otherwise, we wouldn’t be practicing it.” [25:46]   Links Manhattan Birth Follow Manhattan Birth on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Episode 66 with Marcy Tardio Brooklyn Birthing Center Connecticut Childbirth & Women’s Center NY Homebirth World Health Organization Q&A on COVID-19, pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Mar 2020

33 min 17 sec

Navigating the conflicting information out there about good nutrition is exhausting and confusing. Add to this all the stress of trying to stay healthy and maintain a modern lifestyle and it’s no wonder people are suffering. Today’s guest is going to tell you how she deals with all this uncertainty with confidence.  Esther Blum is an integrative dietician, high-performance coach, and author of four books. She has helped thousands of women permanently lose weight, eliminate the need for medication, lose stubborn belly fat, and reverse chronic illness. Esther teaches her clients how to get clear and decisive about what to eat while healing their relationship with food and their bodies. Esther and I discuss how to make sense of proper nutrition these days. New information is constantly coming out that seems to contradict what we previously had been told. That’s why staying current with the research, or having a practitioner who does, is so important We also talk about the effect of stress on our hormones. I’ve noticed a huge difference in the ways different people react to stress and their levels of resiliency. Often, the effects of stress on hormonal health creates a vicious cycle. Esther explains what she’s discovered about breaking out of this negative feedback loop. Have you ever felt like something is wrong even when all the tests say you’re fine? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why current nutritional guidelines are out of date How stress affects our hormones and hormones affect our stress Acquiring the right mindset tools for healthy living What happens when we address past traumas Steps to take when healing feels overwhelming   Quotes “Diet alone doesn’t help people. You have to earn your supplements. It’s not like supplements are the magic key.” [4:48] “The hormones are a production of our thoughts. The more we stay in our stressed state, the more it suppresses our healthy neurotransmitters.” [20:13] “When you really want it to work, it works. So you ask for support instead of permission. Permission is not going to be part of your healing journey.” [53:01]   Links Find Esther Blum online Follow Esther on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Linkedin Schedule a consultation with Esther Blum Designs for Health Episode 20 with Dr. Carrie Jones Heal Documentary Dr. Gabrielle Lyon Inspired Performance Institute DNA Connexions Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Mar 2020

48 min 13 sec

No two patients are the same. Everyone who walks into a practitioner’s office brings with them unique biomechanical, as well as social and psychological, factors. Being able to understand each patient’s individual conditions and background is what sets great practitioners apart.  Dr. Stu McGill is a professor emeritus, University of Waterloo, where he was a professor for 32 years. His laboratory and experimental research clinic investigated issues related to the causal mechanisms of back pain, how to rehabilitate back-pained people, and enhance injury resilience and performance. Today, I’m asking Dr. McGill the big questions. He tells us what it means to move well. Starting from the scientific principle that every one of the body’s health systems requires movement for optimal health, Dr. McGill explains why this means different things to different people. To better understand one’s patients, Dr. McGill explains the importance of truly listening to everyone’s story. He describes how helping people become pain-free can lead to large psychological improvements too. Most of all, Dr. McGill understands how everyone’s health and situation is unique. He expertly explains how we can cue into these differences to best serve each patient’s needs. What does moving well mean to you? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode What it means to move well The many factors that make each person’s needs different Why social context matters when treating every patient How to cue an optimal breath depending on a person’s particular needs The benefits of kettlebell swings in many situations Debunking common myths of low back pain Lessons learned from studying elite athletes   Quotes “If I can’t address that enormous social impediment for a patient’s success, then it doesn’t matter what the exercise is anymore.” [11:06] “People don’t do the same tasks with exactly the same movement pattern. They vary their movement patterns. We measure what is wise and unwise. What is painful and what is painless. What creates athleticism and what doesn’t.” [39:23] “You will never train a saint bernard to win at the greyhound track. It’s not possible. You will break the dog.” [55:00]   Links Find Dr. Stu McGill online Follow Backfitpro on Facebook Episode 79 with Dr. Craig Liebenson Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Mar 2020

59 min 50 sec

You’ve likely seen CBD products in all sorts of places. If you suffer from pain or anxiety or really anything else, you may have considered using it. For today’s episode, I’ve brought in someone who truly understands how this compound can be used to help and what you should look for when using it. Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., C.D.N., is a nationally recognized nutrition expert and author. She is the founder of B Nutritious and Daily Habit. Brooke works with a variety of clients to meet their nutritional goals while working within their lifestyle. With a focus on meeting the demands of a busy schedule, Brooke teaches clients how to eat within their needs without feeling deprived. Today, Brooke explains how she discovered the healing properties of CBD. She has found that this compound can be used to treat numerous conditions. In order to help people use CBD to address their needs, Brooke developed a full spectrum CBD powder based on the latest research into the properties of cannabis and dietary needs. As someone knowledgable in all things CBD, Brooke delves into the numerous potential benefits of CBD. We discuss how people use this product for pain management, muscle recovery, as a sleep aid, anxiety treatment, and more.  Have you used CBD to treat a chronic condition? Tell me how it went in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Discovering the numerous ways that CBD can address different ailments The differences between CBD and THC How CBD can address hard to treat anxiety CBD’s ability to treat the symptoms of chronic pain How to identify a quality CBD product Who CBD is not good for   Quotes “Within a couple of weeks, all of a sudden his pain tolerance had changed. He had started being able to walk a little bit more.” [4:07] “I really feel that when you open up the door to a plant that could potentially make you feel better, that can decrease pain, that can help you have better control over your food cravings and emotional eating, it really is magical.” [5:24] “By taking the CBD, it’s an amazing anti-inflammatory. Also, it’s really well known for reducing pain. People can feel more comfortable. The inflammation is going to reduce those pain levels.” [12:24] “The science of CBD and sleep is extensive. It’s not only great for helping you fall asleep but also stay asleep and improve quality of sleep.” [21:28]   Links Find Brooke Alpert online Follow Brooke on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Mar 2020

26 min 20 sec

Lab work is often very confusing to read and understand. It’s tough to know if your doctor is even ordering the right lab work and if that work is telling you the complete story of your health. Wouldn’t it be great if you could take more direct ownership of getting the health information that you need by ordering and completing these tests yourself? Dr. Alan Hopkins is an emergency room doctor in Austin, Texas. With a keen interest in how medicine can help fight the effects of aging, he obtained a certificate as part of a fellowship with A4M in anti-aging medicine. Dr. Hopkins has taken his expertise on aging to some major companies and TV studios as a consultant. Throughout this process, he realized the importance of giving consumers better access to the lab tests that they need. That’s how Your Lab Work began. Dr. Hopkins and I dive into the importance of receiving the right medical tests and why this sometimes does not happen in today’s medical world. We also talk about changes that occur in our bodies when we train and lose weight and the ramifications of these. Dr. Hopkins goes on to explain a number of important tests everyone should consider getting and how to best make sense of the results. Have you ever received surprising results from the lab? Did this spur you to take action to better care for your health? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The benefits of being able to choose and order your own lab work What happens in your body when you rapidly lose weight Common problems for people who overtrain and how to best mitigate these The crucial importance of getting an advanced cholesterol test Best practices for increasing low vitamin D levels How to make sense of the results of thyroid tests and what to do to reverse a thyroid disease How labs can help us detect environmental pollutants in our bodies   Quotes “Between nutrition and sleep, most of your issues can be solved for athletes.” [11:06] “It’s not just about having the best performance. It’s actually about long-term prevention of strain on the heart.” [14:32] “We like to think of it as the great chameleon. If you’re having symptoms and something doesn’t seem right, you really need to do a complete evaluation of the thyroid, including thyroid antibodies.”  [26:44] “Industry is polluting the environment and that can sometimes leach into the soil and our water supply. It gets into our bodies and it goes undetected because we don’t check for it in medicine.” [33:15] “I encourage all young people to really know their bodies and their biomarkers because the truth is young is not so young anymore.” [44:19]   Links Find Dr. Alan Hopkins at Your Lab Work Join the Lab IQ Facebook group The DUTCH test Dr. Alan Christianson Great Plains Laboratory Quest Diagnostics   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Mar 2020

48 min 11 sec

A Hashimoto’s diagnosis often means frustration. Typical workouts and treatments may not work and feeling defeated is a common consequence. Living with Hashimoto’s means making adjustments. This is particularly true when it comes to your workout. In today’s episode, I’m sharing three important changes you absolutely must make to finally lose that weight, wake up pain-free, and get your life back.   This clear plan of workout will leave you with an abundance of energy and a feeling of satisfaction. The first big shift to make is ending chronic cardio exercises. Heavy cardio workouts can leave us feeling worn out and actually lead to weight gain. It’s also hard on the joints, something that will only compound the symptoms of Hashimoto’s. Instead, shifting to exercising with heavy weights will stimulate the right muscle fibers and lead to better results. The next shift is moving away from frequent stretching and yoga. This will relieve joint pain and tight muscles. While it may help you feel better in the short-term, after a few days you’ll feel worse. This is because stretching will exacerbate hyper-mobility, something women with autoimmune diseases already struggle with. Finally, it’s time to stop exercising so hard. We want our exercises to make us feel better. Overdoing it, however, will only make the fatigue and brain fog worse. With Hashimoto’s, finding the “Goldilocks dose” of exercise is the key to feeling good. I’ve found that the sweet spot for women with autoimmune conditions is 20 to 25 minutes of strength training, two to three times a week. In the end, it’s about quality over quantity. With all this in mind, I’ve built a unique program specifically for women who are ready to get exercising again and thrive despite their Hashimoto’s diagnosis. Thyroid Strong is a 6-week training program that will walk you through the solutions you need to feel strong and confident in your body without the fear of set-backs, injury, or frustrating progress plateaus.  What frustrations have you faced after an autoimmune diagnosis? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why cardio workouts can make Hashimoto’s symptoms worse How to stimulate the right muscle fibers through weight training Why stretching and yoga exercises may make your muscles and joints feel worse What happens when you workout smarter, not harder How Thyroid Strong will help you get your health back after a Hashimoto’s diagnosis   Quotes “Taking charge of your workouts means you’re letting go of old exercise habits.” [5:29] “Just think of the muscle as our metabolic engine. It is what gives us energy. As women with Hashimoto’s, we have low muscle mass. It’s just harder to keep the meat on the bones.” [10:02] “It’s important to remember we’re all starting in different places. Your journey is not going to look like my journey or another woman’s journey.” [17:48]   Links Episode 81: Knee Pain and Hashimoto’s Enroll in Thyroid Strong! Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Feb 2020

29 min 19 sec

While treating a lot of women at my clinic, I’ve encountered many auto-immune conditions, including Hashimoto’s. Everyone has a story. However, it’s normal to feel like your story doesn’t get heard, that people can’t understand. Because it is important to share our stories and let everyone know that they have a voice, I’m sharing my own journey with Hashimoto’s with you this week. After having my baby four years ago, I just couldn’t shake the fatigue that followed and the baby weight just wouldn’t go away. It was easy enough to normalize this experience. But just getting by day by day wasn’t going to cut it long-term. That’s why I sought help and finally found it with a Hashimoto’s diagnosis. The following months involved countless protocols and changes in eating habits. Discovering that I was hosting more than a few parasites was also an eye-opener. Once I started getting rid of those, I took a closer look at my diet. Eliminating certain foods and conducting an LRA test uncovered surprising food sensitivities. Then it was on to detoxing the heavy-metals in my body. After nine months of following various protocols, my thyroid levels were back to normal. But some changes continue. My workout routine has shifted to being more focused on strength than cardio. It turns out the strength training is a great way to stimulate thyroid receptors and help keep tendons in healthy order. Getting a handle on Hashimoto’s requires self-examination and making changes. But it’s totally something we’re all capable of. Come to my Hashimoto’s Masterclass to find out more from someone who’s lived this journey too. Has a diagnosis of an autoimmune condition changed your life? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The importance of sharing our stories and being heard The risks of normalizing symptoms First steps to addressing the root causes of an autoimmune disease How the foods we eat can cause an autoimmune response How mold exposure can mimic the symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease Helpful workout routines for managing autoimmune conditions   Quotes “The downside of normalizing a symptom is that it becomes your new norm.” [3:10] “It was really looking at what I was doing in my day and the food that I was eating and seeing if it was going to help me or hurt me.” [5:58] “I know a lot of women feel shame around taking medication. There should be no shame. We are here on this planet to be our best selves and to give and serve. If medication is going to help you be your best self, then take it.” [19:22]   Links Episode 31 with Meghan Helwig Episode 37 with Dr. Ann Shippy Episode 7 with Kara Kilian Dr. Gabrielle Lyon Reserve your spot in the Hashimoto’s Masterclass Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Feb 2020

30 min 29 sec

Today I’d like to talk about knee pain as it relates to Hashimoto’s Disease. It’s not uncommon for me to see women with autoimmune conditions who also suffer from knee pain. Since they don’t remember injuring it, they often wonder why their knee hurts. When there’s no clear mechanism of injury present, that’s a big clue that an autoimmune condition could be the culprit. I discuss some of the common signs of knee pain to be aware of. Stepping down, such as walking downstairs, puts a particularly large load on the tendon in the knees. Since Hashimoto’s can result in slower tendon turnover, this can be particularly uncomfortable. Hypermobile joints can also be a concern. I share some easy techniques for dealing with this. I often recommend certain rehab exercises for helping pained knees. When done correctly, belly breathing, squats, and lunges can go far to regain strength in the knees. There are also a number of effective supplements, such as magnesium and fish oils, for getting a handle on inflammatory issues. Most importantly, get your blood work done and find a functional medicine doctor who understands this connection. Have you experienced Hashimoto’s related knee pain? Let’s chat about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why knees can hurt when they haven’t been injured The importance of getting blood work done when symptoms persist Common signs of knee pain Why Hashimoto’s results in slower tendon turnover Rehab exercises that will help restore knee strength Supplements to help bring inflammation under control   Quotes “All of our tissues, especially our tendons, are constantly regenerating and renewing. This takes longer for us when we have Hashimoto’s.” [5:46] “Ultimately, lunges are what rehabs and stabilizes the knee joint, especially when there is hypermobility.” [11:43] “If you’re a woman with Hashimoto’s and you have knee pain, know that you are not crazy, your body is not failing you. It goes hand in hand.” [12:07]    Links Reserve your spot in the Hashimoto’s Masterclass Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Feb 2020

15 min 50 sec

Have you found that you have trouble reaching up with one of your arms? Maybe this happens when you go to comb your hair or put on a jacket. This is something often called frozen shoulder, aka adhesive capsulitis. In today’s solo episode, I’m talking about this condition that I’ve seen in many women with Hashimoto’s disease.  Frozen shoulder is a vicious cycle of joint problems and I’ve seen it time and time again in my fourteen years of practice. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to avoid this condition. Many of them are proactive, like strength-training and developing breathing habits. It’s also important to get your thyroid checked regularly. There are also many treatments for frozen shoulder, such as taking anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy.  However, to truly address the root-cause of frozen shoulder it’s crucial to look at the whole body. Your shoulders do not exist in isolation. Looking at all your movements and your hormonal levels is essential to solving this for good. Even better is preventing this issue from ever arising through the guidance of a knowledgable trainer. Have you experienced frozen shoulder? What helped and what didn’t? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Exactly what frozen shoulder is and who is most likely to get it The best way to avoid a frozen shoulder Different treatments to address the symptoms of frozen shoulder Why examing whole-body health is the key to dealing with frozen shoulder The limitations of surgical remedies Effective preventative measures that you and your trainer can establish   Quotes “There’s a higher prevalence of frozen shoulder symptoms in women who have a higher TSH picked up on their bloodwork.” [1:54] “You really need to look at any sort of weaknesses or movement patterns that are faulty or not super healthy in the body from head to toe outside of the shoulder.” [7:46] “If you have a frozen shoulder, get your thyroid checked. Get the bloodwork done, especially if you have been trying to rehab for years.” [17:57]   Links Reserve your spot in the Hashimoto’s Masterclass Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Feb 2020

21 min 29 sec

It is becoming increasingly apparent that building a good relationship is a crucial part of helping people rehabilitate. Healing and recovery cannot truly happen unless coaches and trainers are able to listen, assess, communicate, and create the proper environment. Today’s guest understands this undeniable importance and is here to share how we all can do it too. Dr. Craig Liebenson is the Founder and Director of L.A. Sports & Spine, providing pain management, rehabilitation, and performance enhancement through one-on-one musculoskeletal care. He is the editor of The Rehabilitation of the Spine: A Practioner’s Manual and is the founder of First Principes of Movement where he provides courses for trainers and rehab specialists.  Today, Dr. Liebenson talks about what it means to get people moving well. He’s recently discovered that supporting the social aspect of proper movement might just be the most important part of this. Dr. Liebenson goes into detail as he describes how practitioners can support this by actively listening to clients, coaching online, and creating an environment to support motor learning. How can you support the social aspect of movement for your clients? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode What it means to move well Why the social aspect of movement should never be ignored The role of online coaching in supporting rehabilitation Possible links between the modern lifestyle and common health problems Whether it’s often better to be a generalist than a specialist How helping to create adaptation is a key part of resiliency How to thrive in chaos and have positive experiences in failure   Quotes “I don’t correct anymore. I still assess, but I don’t correct. I create an environment where a person can problem solve on their own.” [3:24] “Motor control is not the ticket. Motor learning is. Motor learning occurs when you create an environment.” [10:50] “It’s not sport-specific. It’s not injury specific. It’s not tissue specific. It’s about the foundational movement literacies.” [38:01] “What most people need is not to feel that something is wrong. What they need is to realize that the way to become more resilient is to slightly stress the structures gradually so they adapt.” [40:57]   Links Find Dr. Craig Liebenson online Follow Craig on Twitter | Facebook | Instagram Rehabilitation of the Spine Easy Strength The Story of the Human Body Gift of Injury Mike Boyle Skin in the Game Rachel Cosgrove Change Maker Mindset   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Jan 2020

56 min 12 sec

Diets are tough. If you’ve ever bounced from one fad diet to the next, given up and had to restart, or just been overwhelmed by the discipline involved, you’re not alone. The key though is understanding that a diet is just one of many tools for wellness. With that mindset, eating can become fun once again and healthy results can follow.  Alison Marras is a nutritional therapy practitioner and mindfulness coach based in New York City. She leads her clients to find and utilize the diet that is best for them by providing meal plans and helping them establish mindful eating habits. Alison shares her knowledge of how diets work best when adapted to the individual. There is no “one size fits all” diet. Therefore, really understanding your lifestyle and body is crucial for tailoring the right diet for you. Doing so will lead to better results and more satisfaction in the end. By coaching her clients to eat mindfully, without distractions, Alison helps them create a healthy association with food. She shares how this reduces bloating, overeating, and other problems associated with the modern lifestyle. Effectively dieting for your best health and wellness requires lifestyle changes. There is no magic fix. However, there are mindsets and tools out there to help. Alison shares how she approaches this necessary shift in thinking and how she and her clients have benefited from it. What are your biggest struggles when it comes to eating healthy? Share in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why successful diets need to be tailored to the individual What mindful eating is and why it’s the key to effective dieting and healthy digestion Understanding what your body is telling you when you have a craving Why it’s important to start your day with protein Dealing with the effects of Hashimoto’s on fertility Supporting your wellness during the postpartum period Using nutrition and lifestyle adjustments to prevent burnout   Quotes “Diets are tools and templates. We’re really supposed to take them and then adjust them to our lifestyle and digestion.” [2:30] “You’ll start to taste new things in the food. The longer you chew, the more taste you’ll get out of it.” [12:05] “There are tools for different healing. There are tools for different issues in your life. When you’re using diet as the only tool, it’s time to put it down.” [32:34] “Our adrenals are so key because they keep us alive. Our body prioritizes our adrenals.” [35:51]   Links Join Alison's 5-Day Mindful Eating Challenge Join Alison's 5-Day Start Savory Challenge Find Alison Marras online Follow Alison's Blog Follow Alison on Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter | YouTube Balanced Bites Bonafide Provisions Green Chef   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Jan 2020

45 min 49 sec

Many people perceive self-care and recovery as a romanticized process. But it is a struggle that involves pushing through boundaries, focus, and determination. There is never one single trick or solution, but taking an adaptive and introspective approach is crucial. Today’s guest has not only lived this journey but helps others to do it too. Maggie Rintala is a professional dancer, award-winning speaker, national and international coach of coaches, and personal trainer for professional athletes, millionaires, eighth-graders, and grandmas. She has transformed the lives of thousands of people all over the world with her expert coaching. With her own experience with overcoming chronic pain, Maggie knows what it’s like to reshape your life to recreate purpose and restore health. She describes the many different avenues that she tried to heal from this pain, and also what it taught her about her own priorities and goals.  As a trainer, Maggie strives to help her clients achieve more than just a physique. Instead, she helps them become fit for who they are so that they can experience the world in fulfilling ways. This has all led Maggie to develop a course and soon to be released book, Radical Authentic Fitness. As part of this, Maggie explains how people can achieve the results that they want by taking the appropriate actions without chasing a particular physical ideal. How can you train in order to achieve more than just physical results? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Healing yourself in the service of something greater Understanding how your body’s past traumas influence your current health Why best training goes beyond striving for measurable end results How Radical Authentic Fitness can help you become fit for who you are and what you want to achieve in the world Breaking through the disconnect between the mind and body Learning fitness for long-term health Inspiring children to take ownership of their own fitness and health   Quotes “When you come to fitness, you’re probably going to suffer physically. A lot of people don’t understand that they’re already suffering for something.” [3:05] “I was suffering. So why not suffer for something that is going to push me into the next realization of who I am so that I can serve my people.” [10:19] “The human body is resilient. I have come through incredible things… and I know that other people can as well.”  [38:00]   Links Find Maggie Rintala online Follow Maggie on Instagram | YouTube Czech Get-Up video Prague School of Rehabilitation   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Jan 2020

45 min 12 sec

Conventional wisdom has it that women should get back to their usual life as soon as they can after giving birth. It turns out that that is so far from the truth. Doing so ignores the important postpartum period, something we dive deep into in this episode. Today I’m welcoming back to the podcast Lily Nichols. Lily is a registered dietician and nutritionist specializing in gestational health. With the goal of helping women make use of holistic tools to live more healthfully, Lily has been spreading the message of getting the best diet to maximize health before, during, and after pregnancy. Since we have both recently given birth to our second child, Lily and I chat about what we have learned about postpartum health. From accepting help from loved ones and getting the right nutrients to producing enough milk and addressing the underlying causes of postpartum depression, Lily and I discuss what it takes to support yourself and your child’s health after birth. Have you faced challenges maintaining good postpartum nutrition? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!    In this episode The importance of accepting help after childbirth Why it’s crucial to have the right nourishing foods postpartum Why you probably aren’t getting enough protein after you give birth The challenges faced by vegetarians in maintaining a well-rounded postpartum diet The potential benefits of Vitamin D for you and your baby during and after pregnancy How to boost milk production through good nutrition and other means The benefits of iron-rich organ meat and how to easily incorporate it into your meals Taking good care of thyroid health during and after pregnancy   Quotes “You need those amino acids that are found in the connective tissues of animal foods.” [16:33] “Supplement yourself. You’re probably going to help maintain your own Vitamin D levels and immune function and mental health. Also, the baby is getting enough and you don’t need to think about a separate product.” [28:32] “It’s often one of the trickiest things postpartum - just eating and drinking enough. You’re just spread so thin.” [31:09] “It is very wise to introduce some iron-rich foods because the baby’s iron stores can start to drop around four to six months.” [39:47] “We just need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable for postpartum because your life does slow down.” [49:03]   Links Find Lily Nichols Online Follow Lily on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest Muscle Medicine Episode 30 with Lily Nichols  Real Food for Pregnancy Real Food Postpartum Recovery Meals   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Jan 2020

54 min 53 sec

Maintaining proper form is one of the most critical parts of strength training. If anything is off, from stance to breath, you risk working out at less than peak efficiency. Worse, you may even injure yourself. To discuss how you can work out with the best form possible, I’ve brought in an expert with years of experience helping people strength train better. With her own gym in Portland, OR, Mira Gracia and all of her instructors are well-trained in StrongFirst as well as various martial arts. Mira currently works with all levels from novice to advanced in an effort to build lasting results, durability, and resiliency in her students. Mira shares her journey into strength training excellence and what motivates her. A large part of it is a mindset that is built around setting one’s own goals rather than competing against others. Mira also describes how she transitioned from a gymnastics background to one of strength training and the challenges that that entails.  As someone with a lot of experience training women, Mira explains many of the techniques she uses to help them train smarter, safer, and more efficiently. This includes rethinking what you’re doing with your stomach as you lift and even with the air you breathe. It also involves mindset, and Mira discusses how to think about the way you train in a whole new light. What are some of your own personal goals when strength training? Share them with me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Creating full-body stability when learning to strength train What you may be doing wrong with your abdomen as you lift and how to fix it How to take a proper breath during training Challenging capacity without compromising your form The similarities and difference between training with barbells versus kettlebells Where to look and what to ask when searching for a good instructor   Quotes “You complete something. You may be unsure what’s going to happen. You do it and afterward, you feel better.” [9:17] “You don’t always have to push yourself to the point of failure. We never want to teach your body and your mind to fail.” [26:34] “I never thought that it would literally save my life, and it has. It’s truly this really magical thing that happens with every single breath.” [45:12]   Links Find Mira Gracia online Follow Mira on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube Episode 33 with Brett Jones StrongFirst   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Jan 2020

46 min 44 sec

Anyone who’s been on a diet knows the struggles of losing weight and feeling strong and healthy through the whole process. It can even take a real toll on your mental health as there’s a real emotional side to eating. Today I’m sitting down with someone who is refocussing the way we can think about and approach our relationship with food to help people truly take control of their health. Claire Siegel is a registered dietician who’s all about balancing her real food, veggie-heavy approach to nutrition with her deep love of cheeseburgers, chocolate, and red wine. She recently launched Nutritional Freedom as a nutrition and mindset coaching business in which she and her team have helped many women think about food in a completely different way. We’re talking about the diet-binge-guilt cycle that many of us fall into. It’s why trying to lose weight through traditional dieting is so demoralizing and ineffective. Claire explains why many people end up in this cycle and how to break out of it. Claire has found that mindset is the key to successful dieting and we talk all about how to reframe this for success. Have you noticed a connection between mindset and dieting? How do you address this? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode How eating and dieting is a real emotional activity Why we often focus on the wrong problem when dieting Addressing the behavioral and emotional sources of binging Why you should never rely on willpower to be healthy How to make healthy eating easy by removing restrictions to it The risks that come from trying to be too healthy Tools to help listen to your intuition rather than your craving   Quotes “We really want to understand what the underlying factors are that are creating the cycle. It’s not a lack of willpower, strength, or determination. A lot of it is biology, physiology, and what’s going on mentally.” [5:09] “The root problem when it comes to binging is some form of restriction...When you remove that restriction, binging tends to be resolved quite naturally.” [6:11] “Willpower is great when it’s there, but you don’t necessarily want to rely on it or base your entire approach to health on this necessity for willpower.” [9:50] “You become more consistent in your health behaviors when they become easier and enjoyable for you overall.” [15:58] “Your value and your worth extends so far beyond your body, shape, size, and what you look like. Health doesn’t have to feel so hard.” [32:05]   Links Find Claire Siegel online Follow Claire on Instagram | Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter Nutritional Freedom   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Dec 2019

33 min 24 sec

In my clinic, I regularly see the negative results that happen to women when they overtrain. While it’s true that many of us think that more is better, this can ultimately lead to burnout and more problems down the road. Jessica Drummond MPT, CCN, CHC, the Founder and CEO of the Integrative Women's Health Institute, is passionate about caring for and empowering women who struggle with women’s and pelvic health conditions. She is equally passionate about educating and supporting clinicians in confidently and safely using integrative tools to transform women's and pelvic healthcare. Today, Jessica and I talk about how we can optimize our monthly hormonal cycles to make workouts more efficient and less dangerous. This involves really understanding what is going on with our hormones throughout the month and structuring your workout to maximize its benefits while reducing the risk of injury. We discuss what overtraining looks like for women and how you can recognize its red flags. Being attuned to what your body is telling you, but also seeking professional guidance is crucial to staying fit without causing negative health effects. With that in mind, Jessica tells us how to train well, without pushing it too far. Jessica has also worked extensively on studying endometriosis. She explains just what this condition is and its impacts. While it is common, it’s not normal. We talk about ways to treat endometriosis and why it’s important to do so. Do you change your workout based on your monthly cycle? Has that helped you to reduce injury and maximize the benefits? Let us know in the comments on the episode page. In this episode The female-specific risks that come from overtraining  Understanding and optimizing your monthly cycle for the most healthy training results Addressing the mental health implications of overtraining The numerous warning signs that you’re overtraining The effects of endometriosis and new ways to treat it Understanding pelvic floor health and how problems with it can present Ways to literally nourish and feed resilience   Quotes “For women, if you think of the month as a time to optimize your periodization of you’re training for performance, it’s really valuable because you’re not only protecting and nourishing your hormones and muscle, but you’re improving your longevity.” [2:42] “We have to really emphasize rest and nourishment. Outsleep your competition, outeat your competition, just for recovery’s sake.”  [8:56] “It not actually normal to have very bad cramps. It’s normal to have mild cramps maybe a day or two with a little fatigue. That’s it. You shouldn’t be sidelined by your period.” [23:48] “Don’t be afraid to expose anything that you are worried is wrong. If anything is going on in your body, training, or health, unearthing it and optimizing women’s health and performance is part of a strong conversation.” [42:02]   Links Find Dr. Jessica Drummond at the Integrative Women's Health Institute Follow Jessica on Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Linkedin | YouTube Outsmart Endo   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Dec 2019

43 min 57 sec

Highly stressful situations can lead to an inability to act and respond. These feelings have long-lasting impacts that affect people well afterward. However, as you’ll hear, this is not the result of some inadequacy, but an ancient neurological response. Stephen Porges, Ph.D. is a distinguished university scientist at Indiana University, professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina, and Professor Emeritus at both the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Maryland. With more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, Dr. Porges pioneered the Polyvagal Theory which links the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system to social behavior and emphasizes the importance of the physiological state in the expression of behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders.  Dr. Porges explains what Polyvagal Theory is and how it relates to all of us on a physiological level. According to this approach, stress has little if anything to do with our physical state, and everything to do with our emotional and psychological wellbeing. We talk about how Polyvagal Theory helps explain a state in between stress and unstress in which we actually disassociate from our surroundings as a result of trauma. We then talk about how to handle the effects of this neurological response. It may lead to an inability to fully engage with people and feelings of shame and inadequacy. However, proper narrative framing, self-compassion, and even intentional breathing can help to make shifts towards recovery. How might an understanding of Polyvagal Theory change the way you interact with other people? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page.   In this episode How trauma can trigger a reflex that leads to an inability to act The ways that stress and trauma impact future relationships How to cope with the lasting effects of trauma The power of breath for helping to regulate parts of the nervous system Ways to make others feel safe simply by using your voice The link between feelings of safety and creativity Technological innovations that may reduce inflammation of the vagal nerve   Quotes “I would say that the nervous system is much more rational in its decision-making properties and we have to be very careful about imposing a simplistic worldview on it and trying to make everything fit that simplicity.” [1:43] “This whole act of going into immobilization or inability to recruit fight-flight is a powerful reaction that many people have experienced. But once they experience it, they don’t know how to make sense of it.” [9:47] “Breath is really a wonderful gift because when we manipulate our breathing we can change the tone of our autonomic nervous system. And if we change that tone, even for short periods of time, we can experience the world differently for those moments.” [16:52] “What we really want is to enable people to be better witnesses of their own body and to become more self-aware and compassionate to respect those bodily feelings.” [48:38]   Links Find Stephen Porges Ph.D. online How to think clearly in beleaguered times   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Dec 2019

49 min 58 sec

Soy is a popular protein source in the fitness world and in food in general. There are countless different soy-based products out there claiming that soy is a miracle food. However, there is also a lot of evidence that soy can lead to a whole host of medical problems. Perhaps, few people understand this better than today’s guest. Dr. Kaayla Daniel, aka the Naughty Nutritionist, is an author and a nutritionist who earned her Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences and Anti-Aging Therapies from the Union Institute and University in Cincinnati. Her mission is to debunk myths surrounding much of what we commonly think is good for our health using humor and a down-to-earth approach. Today, Dr. Kaayla Daniel and I discuss some of the lesser-known effects of soy. She explains the history of how soy has been marketed over the years and how this has led to its profusion in so-called health foods. However, we are becoming increasingly aware that eating too much processed soy can lead to many issues, from auto-immune disease to heart problems. To that end, Dr. Daniel tells us how to determine if we have a soy sensitivity and how to avoid it. Have you cut soy out of your diet? What challenges has that created and how has it helped? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The history of research into soy’s actual nutritional effects The links between soy and certain auto-immune diseases How soy can be enjoyed when consumed in moderation The challenges of avoiding soy for those with allergies and sensitivities The effects of heavy soy consumption on thyroid and gut health Why consuming a lot of soy during menopause can lead to particular health problems Ways to determine if you have a sensitivity to soy   Quotes “The problem is when people have a whole slab of soy instead of steak. That starts to add up very quickly if you’re doing that every day.” [13:49] “With humans, there are so many factors. It’s never just one miracle food, a few miracle foods, or for that matter, a few devils like soy.” [18:22] “Soy is in more than 60% of processed and packaged food. It’s in nearly 100% of fast foods. It’s hiding in a whole lot of restaurant foods where you might not even suspect it.” [19:13] “With soy, certainly avoid it to excess, avoid the modern processed soy foods, like protein shakes, the energy bars, and soy milk.” [34:57]   Links Find Dr. Kaayla Daniel online Follow Dr. Daniel on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter | YouTube The Whole Soy Story Nourishing Broth Hook Line and Stinker   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Nov 2019

38 min 5 sec

Whether you’re an athlete or not, proper movement is the key to preventing injury and staying fit overall. DNS is one of the many tools that is helping people properly find stabilization and operate at peak performance. Today’s guest is an expert in its application and is here to share how this movement system can help you too. Dr. Michael Rintala is a San Diego based chiropractor who has specialized in rehabilitation and sports medicine for 17 years. His career has taken him to work with golfers on the PGA tour, professional surfers, and athletes of all sorts. Dr. Rintala explains what it means to be a chiropractor for athletes. DNS (Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization) is a large part of the work that he does. Dr. Rinalta shares how it has been instrumental in keeping high-performers in top shape. If you’ve never heard of DNS and its role in rehabilitation, Dr. Rintala breaks it down in terms that any of us should be able to understand. It all hinges on deep stabilization which in turn permits better joint movement throughout the body. Dr. Rintala uses this throughout his practice and explains how it has helped many people, from professional to amateur athletes, manage their movement better and avoid injury. How might you be able to apply DNS in your practice? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The type of work that chiropractors do when serving athletes The role of DNS in improving the efficiency of movement Common biomechanical compensations and injuries of elite and amateur surfers What the Czech Get-Up is and why it is a good alternative to the Turkish Get-Up   Quotes “If we improve efficiency in our movement, we decrease potential for injury and we increase the potential for performance.” [6:45 “Ideal deep stabilization - that ability to create a fixed point through the trunk and the pelvis - also allows the joint centration throughout the whole chain of movement with the human body.” [10:43] “If I can maintain the synergy and stabilization and joint centration through the transitions at each developmental sequence, that’s where the magic happens in integrating dynamic movement into the sport you do.” [25:23]   Links Find Dr. Michael Rintala online Follow Dr. Rintala on YouTube | Facebook | Instagram Prague School of Rehabilitation The Czech Get-Up IntelliSkin   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Nov 2019

34 min 59 sec

Pelvic floor health is too often ignored by women. Especially after childbirth, but throughout life, the pelvic floor needs loving care. The great thing is that it is well within your control to address the needs and wellbeing of this important group of muscles.  Isa Herrera is a licensed physical therapist, as well as an expert in integrative pelvic floor therapies in the field of women’s health. With expertise in diagnosing and treating pelvic pain, she has helped over ten thousand women at her NYC-based healing center through a combination of integrative modalities. Isa and I discuss how you can best keep your pelvic floor healthy and strong. Whether or not you just had a child, there are steps you can take to maintain a fit pelvic floor. Isa starts by sharing why Kegels alone aren’t the answer and how to balance them out with reverse-Kegels. Isa also shares what she’s learned about helping women create counter-balance for their normal exercises. Certain workouts can inadvertently tighten the pelvic floor which can lead to problems during childbirth. With Isa’s counter-balance exercises, this risk can be mitigated. We also talk about what to do after childbirth to avoid damaging your pelvic floor. Many women are told that they can resume normal workouts after only a few weeks, but this can actually lead to more problems. Isa shares some tips on how to ease back into your old routines without causing avoidable trauma. What was your greatest challenge returning to a regular workout after childbirth? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The effects and limitations of the kegel if utilized properly along with reverse-Kegels Why certain exercise routines can lead to pelvic-floor complications during childbirth Tips for safely returning to your old workout routine after giving birth Why many women experience leaking and why they shouldn’t accept it The importance of knowing your pelvic anatomy so that you can better listen to your body   Quotes “As you’re doing the breath-work, you have to do the visualization. Sometimes you need visualization, you need breath-work, you need positioning to accomplish the exercise.” [7:29] “There are so many ways to train the pelvic floor. It’s only limited by experience.” [11:57] “You can’t rehab the core after labor and delivery and a cesarean if you’re not addressing the trigger-points in the belly.” [31:09] “The guru and the doctor lives within you. All you need is the right mentor and the guide to bring that guru forward. You ultimately hold the entire key to your healing.” [39:22]   Links The Ultimate Guide to Happier Lady Parts Find Isa Herrera online Follow Isa on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Nov 2019

42 min 11 sec

There are many causes of chronic pain. Sometimes it’s not even entirely physical or connected to the place that’s hurting. Healing is complex and not always a straightforward process. My guest today knows this as well as anyone and has developed a fantastic method that we can all benefit from. Sue Hitzmann is the creator of the Melt Method, a simple self-treatment technique that helps people get out and stay out of chronic pain. She is a nationally recognized educator, manual therapist, exercise physiologist, and founding member of the Fascia Research Society. As the author of the New York Times bestselling book The MELT Method, Sue has helped over 200,000 people lead a healthy, pain-free life. Today, Sue shares the story of how her own experience with chronic pain drove her to find a better solution. By seeing the connection between fascia, trauma, and pain, she was able to develop a method of treatment that people can do together or at home. We talk about what we can do, starting with gently addressing the needs of our fascia, to address pain and get it under control. Sue’s Melt Method is designed to look at the larger dynamics of fascia and how it helps the free nerve endings in the body send messages to the brain. Gently addressing this dynamic system as a whole can do wonders eliminating pain. We also discuss the importance of mindset and being brave enough to face the causes of our trauma and pain. Without this, we are just treating the symptoms. True healing is a transformative process that takes courage and determination.  Have you ever addressed the underlying root causes of trauma and chronic pain? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode How trauma can lead to a lifetime of physical pain if left unaddressed The role of fascia in pain perception The need for a gentle approach to treating trauma and pain The power of touch for truly sensing one’s self and healing Identifying the less obvious root causes of pain The transformative process that comes from introspection and staying rooted in the present   Quotes “I realized that trauma can actually cause more pain in the body than an accident.” [2:47] “Touch, in general, is really an effective way to alter the brain’s pathways that we miss.” [13:54] “Pain is just the brain’s way of alerting you that something is not right. Pain is the great motivator to take action.” [16:17] “Sometimes we’re reacting to something right now, but actually we’re not. We’re reacting to something of our past and putting it in the present…. Focus on what’s happening right now. Just start right now and peel those layers of the onion back. Suddenly you’ll realize how not present you really are.” [33:24] “Sharing vulnerability is one of the most courageous steps of healing. We don’t move on from it. We walk through it and walk through it together.” [44:12]   Links Find Sue Hitzmann online Follow Sue on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube Fascia Research Society The MELT Method by Sue Hitzmann   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Nov 2019

49 min 43 sec

I’ve seen many elite runners come through the doors of my clinic. I know first-hand what their muscle quality feels like and the injuries they’ve dealt with. I’ve also seen how they train and how they recover from big races. That’s why I’m doing a solo episode to tell you what I’ve learned about how to best recover from running a marathon. By using technologies like NormaTec and utilizing active release techniques, you can best come back from a long intense run without suffering from many common long-term injuries. I talk about the importance of movement sequence resets and using gentle strength-training to get the body moving again in a healthy and well-rounded way. Many runners also get sick in the days after a marathon. Big runs send our hormones haywire which lowers our immune response. However, there are steps you can take to keep from getting sick, such as getting plenty of rest and proper nutrition. What helps you recover after a marathon or other long-distance race? Share it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Common over-compensations that runners need to be aware of for their recovery How active release techniques can help protect your muscles from the damage of running Using gentle strength-training to get your muscles moving during recovery Why runners get sick after a big race and how to prevent it   Quotes “The elite runner’s train and then they recover for the rest of the day. Recovering from their runs is also their full-time job.” [1:51] “A lot of people get sick after they run the marathon. There’s so much excitement, the crowds are going wild, the adrenaline is rushing. 72 hours later your body is more susceptible to colds and flu due to elevated cortisol from stress.” [13:52] “Before your run, don’t do anything new that you didn’t do in training.” [17:55]   Links NormaTec   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Oct 2019

20 min 51 sec

Today’s guest is a little different than my usual ones. Marcy Tardio is a certified nurse-midwife who’s been practicing for over 30 years. In fact, she’s my midwife. Marcy specializes in homebirths, where she assists women from the very beginning to end of their pregnancies. In this interview, Marcy explains just what a midwife is, the training required, and the various roles one plays. We also discuss the different opinions that surround homebirths and how to make these important decisions without fear. The topic of homebirths often brings up the topic of hospital births too. Marcy discusses how each has their advantages and risks. The important thing to consider is just how real the risks are when faced with their likely advantages.  Marcy also explains what you can do to recognize and create the birth environment that is right for you. This involves being really mindful and deliberate with who should be there with you during the birth. As Marcy tells us, it isn’t always the most likely people. We also talk about the difficulties that often arise when trying to be in more control of our pregnancies. Marcy shares some advice for talking with your practitioners to make sure that they are hearing your needs and wants and what to do if it’s time to find someone else. Finally, Marcy shares some very important information to be aware of for the post-partum period. The support that new mothers need is great and recognizing this is crucial to the health and wellbeing of both parents and baby. Have you had or considered having a birth at home? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode What exactly a midwife is and what they do How midwifery has evolved over the years The ways in which a woman can be supported emotionally during the birth process Why getting some sleep is often a great way to help in the labor How to create a birth environment that is ideal for you The reasons why a home birth may have to be transferred to a hospital What women should know about the afterbirth period   Quotes “A midwife is a medical advanced practice. We are clinicians.” [6:47] “Giving birth is hard work. It’s sweaty and it’s emotional and it’s not necessarily candlelights and waterbirths.” [10:32] “Intellect doesn’t have any place in labor. It’s primal. It’s physical. Getting your head out of the way is often the way to go. Sleep helps that.” [20:30]  “We need to see the post-partum as a time where you do nothing. It’s enough work to just nurse your baby and sleep.” [48:01] “It’s all about letting go. What are you doing at that point? You’re letting go of your baby. You can’t have tight muscles and release. It’s about release. It’s about softening.” [1:05:03]   Links Find Marcy Tardio Online   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Oct 2019

1 hr 7 min

It’s well known that maintaining muscle mass is one of the most crucial things we can do as we age. It has been shown to be the number one factor in preventing injuries, regulating hormones, and increasing longevity overall. But here’s the thing, it isn’t necessary to go all out at the gym every day. Today’s guest is a leader in this movement of micro-dosing fitness. Jacques Devore is the owner of Sirens & Titans Fitness in Los Angelas. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Primal Health Coach, and is licensed as an expert USA Cycling Coach. In addition to training many elite athletes and being one of the fittest and strongest men I know of his age, Jacques holds the world record for the mile in the Versaclimber. In today’s talk, Jacques uses his unique insight into the fitness industry to examine how it can better help us maintain health as we age. Instead of killing it at the gym, Jacques describes how he has maintained healthy muscle mass through short but regular workout routines. Even though we all lead busy lives, everyone has a few minutes every day to work on their fitness. Jacques walks us through the ways we can carve out little bits of time here and there in order to meet our fitness goals, build muscle mass, and ultimately improve longevity. What can you do for just ten minutes today to start adding micro-dosing fitness into your daily routine? Tell me in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode How micro-dosing fitness at home can be a useful alternative to long sessions at the gym The importance of goal setting in your exercise routines The five principles behind maintaining healthy fitness that everyone can incorporate into their week How endurance athletes can prevent burnout by weightlifting just a few hours a week What a week of small doses of exercise looks like   Quotes “I started realizing that what I have done consistently is small doses of exercise, but I do it regularly.” [4:38] “Injury becomes a greater risk as we get older. When you think about people who you know, you see their health deteriorate usually after an injury.” [22:23] “What people don’t realize is the irony of fitness; the more fit you get, the more efficient you get, and the fewer calories you burn in the same hour of training.” [30:07] “You have to believe that you can move the needle with small doses of exercise. If you don’t believe that then you won’t try it.” [52:33] “If you’re your own coach, you have to call yourself on your BS. You have to really recognize that you can do this and you shouldn’t let someone tell you that you can’t.” [57:27]   Links Find Jacques Devore online Follow Jacques on Instagram | Facebook Bicycling Maximum Overload for Cyclists The Death of the Perfect Set   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Oct 2019

1 hr 1 min

For most of my adult life, I’ve been dealing with gallbladder issues. Last month it even landed me in the ER with severe pain under my right shoulder-blade. So today I’m talking about a number of the common root causes of pain that can hit you hard underneath the shoulder-blade. First, I’m taking a deep look into common gallbladder problems and how these can lead to a number of complications that manifest as shoulder-blade pain. Poor posture and frequently stressed breathing are other big causes. There is good news though because you can address these potential problems yourself with a few mindful practices. Another more serious cause of shoulder pain is a disc herniation in the cervical spine. Partially dislocated ribs are another common cause. Fortunately, you don’t have to live in pain forever. Once the biomechanical cause of the pain is known, there’s almost always something that can be done to help you live pain-free once again. Have you experienced shoulder-blade pain? Were you able to figure out its route cause and address it? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode What the gallbladder is and how it can cause shoulder-blade pain Why people pass gallstones and what the symptoms are When to seek medical help as a result of gallbladder issues How poor posture and stressed-out breathing can cause pain in the shoulder-blade and how to remedy it Herniations in the cervical spine and their effect on pain Partial dislocation of the ribs and how to avoid it   Quotes “The gallbladder is one of the potential causes of pain underneath the shoulder-blade. Especially on the right side.” [3:03] “If you drink coffee there’s a lower risk of having gallstones. This is because caffeine enhances the gallbladder motility, inhibits gallbladder fluid absorption, and decreases the crystallization of cholesterol in the bile.” [9:33] “So when we get tightness in that mid-back from stress, we can start to get mid-back pain or pain under the bottom tip of the shoulder-blade.” [12:49] “A subluxated rib 99 percent of the time goes hand in hand with a breathing issue.”[17:10]   Links  5 Possible Causes of Pain Under Your Shoulder Blade Blog Post   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Oct 2019

22 min 2 sec

With so much focus these days on training harder no matter what, it can be a challenge convincing my clients to slow down and focus on what’s right for them rather than just going all out. However, if you have a goal to achieve, training smartly with a coach is the best way to do it! With nearly all the StrongFirst SFG certifications to her name, Ericka Darst knows training. She’s a strength coach with her own studio in Minneapolis, as well as an online practice where she helps people personalize their training in a way that’s right for them.  Ericka and I are in agreement that it’s so much better to mindfully train, not just exhaust ourselves into a puddle of aching muscles and sweat. We talk about the benefits of using a coach to help us define the best ways to train for the long-term while building strengths, supporting recovery, and avoiding injury. Ericka also shares how she finds a balance between strength training and her other workouts. As a marathon runner, this hasn't been a straightforward task. Ericka describes how she and her own coach decide what she needs to focus on at any particular time in order to meet her various goals. Have you used a coach to help you meet a specific goal? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode Why it’s important to be mindful and intentional in all aspects of strength training When and how it’s best to progress from kettlebells to barbells How using a private coach will help you reach your goals within a specific program Finding a balance between strength training and your other workout regimes Advice for pregnant and post-partum women as they strength train   Quotes “For me, training smarter just means training with intention. Knowing what you’re doing and why being mindful of your movement.” [3:44] “Working with a coach has to be reciprocal. The coach can’t put in more energy than the student.” [13:09] “That’s how training should be. You want to be thinking about how you’re moving and what kind of demands you’re putting on your body, not just about chasing the clock and getting it over with.” [17:21] “It really boils down to what you’re used to and knowing your body well enough to understand how it will perform and also what you’re working towards.” [26:43]   Links Find Ericka Darst online Follow Ericka on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter StrongFirst   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

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Oct 2019

37 min 18 sec

It’s almost impossible to completely escape the toxins in our environment that make us sick. But there are ways to limit their impact and detoxify your body. The truth is, it’s not as complicated to detoxify as many might think. You just need the right knowledge and the commitment to make it happen. Bridgit Danner has been a licensed acupuncturist since 2004 and a certified Functional Diagnostic Nutrition practitioner since 2015. After spending many years constantly sick from toxic mold, Bridgit has dedicated herself to educating people about toxins and coaches women on how to detoxify through a functional approach. Today Bridgit shares what she has learned about detoxifying your environment for a healthier life. She tells us what we need to avoid and what to seek out to stay healthy. This is great advice for anyone, and Bridgit also shares some solid tips specifically for high-level athletes. Bridgit tells us what some common warning signs are for anyone who is not detoxifying well. She even shares what she’s learned about the dangers of many household products as well as safer alternatives to seek out. Have you taken steps to reduce the toxins around you? Tell me about it in the comments on the episode page!   In this episode The source of the most common toxins that we should avoid How to best nourish your body in order to detoxify Daily habits to help your body better flush out toxins What binders are and how they are an essential part of detoxification How detoxing can be especially helpful for athletes How products that we encounter everyday produce toxins that can affect our health Bridgit’s favorite supplements to help with detoxifying   Quotes “Artificial fragrance is a cocktail of chemicals and it always includes an endocrine disruptor called phthalates. It’s just ever-present in a lot of things.” [4:46] “If you’re educated and trying to do the right thing and some symptom isn’t going away, either it’s some kind of toxin or infection in your body you’re not aware of partnering with chronic stress that is just making a perfect storm.” [19:13] “When you have mold you’re going to end up with leaky gut, they go hand in hand.” [31:05] “If you have any suspicion that there could be something in your home or office affecting your body, please look into it because these things are quiet but they can be very serious.” [36:06]   Links Find Bridgit Danner online Follow Bridgit on Facebook | Instagram | YouTube How to Use Binders Part 1 How to Use Binders Part 2 Hormone Detox Shop -- coupon code for 15% off your first order: NEW15  10 Best Supplements to Detox from Mold Exposure 5 Detox Swaps Hormone Detox Tribe   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Hypothyroidism Type 2 by Mark Starr, MD(H)

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Sep 2019

38 min 15 sec

A lot of people talk about fascia in a lot of different disciplines. It is a crucial part of how we move and feel in our bodies, but few actually examine it from a medical point of view. However, more and more research is taking place into how our fascia works and how to best treat it to heal after an injury and reduce pain. Dr. Antonio Stecco is an expert in the study of fascia and fascial manipulation. His organization, Fascial Manipulation®, operates all over the world and is conducting groundbreaking research and treating patients in all things fascia related. Today, Dr. Stecco explains just what fascia is and how it’s crucially important from a medical perspective. He tells us how fascia is related to many types of pain that can often be hard to diagnose correctly. Dr. Stecco also goes over what he’s learned from recent research about the role of fascia and how to heal it after an injury. Have you received fascial treatment or therapy? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode What fascia is and how it affects all your movement The relationship between fascia and pain and why many types of medical imaging can’t detect it What the latest research is saying about how fascia and muscle fibers interact How fascia limits range of motion when it becomes rigid and how to recover from this Just how incredibly flexible and strong fascia can be  Techniques for fascial manipulation and their desired outcomes What the future holds in store for fascial research and treatment   Quotes “Since we know that fascia is so well integrated, we understand that it can be a clear pain generator.” [4:16] “The area of the symptom is not the origin of the problem. It is just the area where the poor biomechanics manifests. [13:05] “The body is able to heal a small tear if the joint works in a proper way. If it’s not working in the proper way, it will never heal. So we want to restore biomechanics.” [33:15]   Links Find Dr. Antonio Stecco online Follow on Facebook | Instagram Fascial Manipulation (FM) App   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Hypothyroidism Type 2 by Mark Starr, MD(H)

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Sep 2019

44 min 57 sec

From keto to nootropics to paleo and so much more, it’s overwhelming just trying to figure out how to build the best diet for yourself. The fact of the matter is that no single diet will solve all your problems. For most of us, a well-rounded and informed approach is key. That’s why I’ve brought someone onto this podcast who is an expert in helping people find the approach that works best for them. Ashleigh Vanhouten is an author, coach, speaker, interviewer of badass women, and the host of two podcasts. Ever since she was young, Ashleigh has been driven by her natural sense of curiosity to learn as much as possible about fitness. She works with Paleo Magazine, where she develops features about people and companies doing incredible things in health and wellness, as well as nutrition research articles, product reviews, and more. Her mission is to support others on their own journey towards creating their own optimal, primally-aligned lifestyle. Ashleigh and I cover a number of great topics today. We discuss what it means to be metabolically flexible and how it can help people lead well-rounded and healthy lifestyles. Ashleigh tells us why a good diet doesn’t have to be complicated but should revolve around simply eating well. We also talk about effective training regimens and why this is different from simply working out. We also cover why strength-training is so very crucial to long-lasting health. Many people can be intimidated by this, but Ashleigh goes over how she approaches the subject with those who are feeling hesitant to start using the heavier weights. We even cover how to maintain your sense of identity among all the images and ideas of what strength-training is “supposed” to look like.  How do you find balance in how you train and diet with your everyday lifestyle? Leave a comment on the episode page!   In this episode Harnessing your innate curiosity to discover where your passions lie What it means to be metabolically flexible and how you can achieve it The difference between training and exercising and why the distinction matters Why you can’t properly train through low-impact exercises alone Why strength-training and femininity are not mutually exclusive concepts Determining a measure of success that is personally meaningful   Quotes “You don’t want to be so reliant on whatever your diet methodology is that you fall apart if you don’t have it.” [9:20] “It is absolutely healthy to have a goal. You need to pick a healthy goal and do it in a healthy way, but always having something on the horizon is a healthy way for your brain to work because we’re goal-oriented creatures.” [18:40] “Every new skill is scary until you know how to do it.” [26:50] “There are no shortcuts, there really are not. We love to think that there are. We love to think that the nootropics and the keto fast and all this stuff is going to sort us out quicker, but it’s just about understanding yourself and doing the hard work and it takes time.” [40:36]   Links Find Ashleigh Vanhouten online Follow Ashleigh on Instagram Society Nine EverybodyFights   Check out the full show notes for this episode here Urban Wellness Clinic Follow Emily & Urban Wellness on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Hypothyroidism Type 2 by Mark Starr, MD(H)  

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Aug 2019

53 min 33 sec