The Journal.

The Wall Street Journal

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Introducing The Journal
Trailer 1 min 42 sec

All Episodes

Today the defense rested in the trial of Elizabeth Holmes, the former CEO of Theranos. WSJ's Sara Randazzo takes us inside the trial, from the prosecution's arguments to the moment Holmes took the stand herself. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 8

17 min 18 sec

Today the defense rested in the trial of Elizabeth Holmes, the former CEO of Theranos. WSJ's Sara Randazzo takes us inside the trial, from the prosecution's arguments to the moment Holmes took the stand herself. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 8

17 min 18 sec

What does the world's richest person think about the role of government and the future of robots and space travel? Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, shared his views in a wide-ranging interview with WSJ's Joanna Stern. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 7

16 min 31 sec

Some in the retail industry thought the pandemic could end in-store shopping as we know it. But brick-and-mortar retailers weren't destroyed, and many managed to emerge from the pandemic stronger. WSJ's Suzanne Kapner explains why. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 6

14 min 31 sec

Designer Virgil Abloh became the first Black American to hold a top creative job at a major luxury label. Abloh, who was artistic director of menswear at Louis Vuitton, was able to turn ordinary streetwear like hoodies and sneakers into high fashion, commanding big price tags and drawing celebrity customers. WSJ's Jacob Gallagher unpacks the legacy of Virgil Abloh, who died earlier this week at age 41. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 3

19 min 7 sec

Turkish President Erdogan is pushing ahead with an unusual economic plan for his country that is based on slashing the value of the currency. As the Turkish lira has plunged, inflation has spiked and Turkish citizens have taken to the streets. WSJ's Jared Malsin reports on the situation from Istanbul. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 2

15 min 41 sec

Gasoline prices are on the rise. To avoid a political backlash, President Biden is pushing to increase the global oil supply in hopes that will eventually help consumers at the pump. But as WSJ's Timothy Puko explains, the move has risks, given Biden's climate agenda. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 1

17 min 7 sec

Binance, the world's biggest cryptocurrency trading platform, surged by operating from nowhere in particular - without offices, licenses, or headquarters. Now, WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff explains, global regulators are taking a closer look. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 30

19 min 2 sec

On Friday, the World Health Organization labeled a new variant of the coronavirus, called Omicron, as a variant of concern. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how scientists in South Africa noticed it so quickly, and what's known about Omicron so far. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 29

15 min 53 sec

We are bringing you the complete story of uBiome. It was a biotech company with promise: charismatic leaders, an exciting product and lots of venture-capital funding. So why did the FBI end up raiding its office? And why is the government calling its leaders fugitives? WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells the story of uBiome's spectacular downfall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 24

1 hr 12 min

A post on tennis player Peng Shuai's social-media account made a startling accusation: that a former top official of the Chinese Communist Party had sexually assaulted her. Then, she disappeared from public view for more than two weeks. WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how the head of the Women's Tennis Association is speaking out against China and putting the organization's business on the line. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 23

15 min 57 sec

Compared with pre-pandemic estimates, hundreds of thousands more Americans have retired in the last 18 months. We hear from two recent retirees, and we talk to WSJ's Amara Omeokwe about what the wave of retirement could mean for the economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 22

15 min 26 sec

Activision Blizzard, one of the world's biggest videogame makers, is facing multiple investigations over sexual harassment and workplace misconduct. WSJ's Kirsten Grind looks at the CEO helming the company, Bobby Kotick, and his knowledge of the allegations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 19

21 min 48 sec

Last year, the FDA cracked down on flavored vapes in hopes of combatting a rise in teen vaping. But thanks to a loophole in the FDA's rule, sweet, fruity flavors are still around. WSJ's Jennifer Maloney details how a product called Puff Bar has become the top-selling vape among kids. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 18

18 min 58 sec

Rivian, the Amazon-backed electric vehicle company, went public earlier this month in the biggest IPO since 2014. But before that, Detroit giants General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. fought over partnering with Rivian, earning one of the legacy carmakers a multi-billion dollar payout. WSJ's Mike Colias tells the story of the high-stakes battle. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 17

17 min 6 sec

In 2019, Taylor Swift announced she would re-record her first six albums after they fell into the hands of talent agent Scooter Braun. Last week she debuted her version of her album Red. It broke streaming records. WSJ's Anne Steele says this decision is not only making Taylor money but also inspiring other artists to do the same -- and that record labels are pushing back. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 16

18 min 18 sec

With a reputation as the company whose leaders knew how to run any kind of business, General Electric once made everything from lightbulbs to jet engines. Then, last week, the storied American company announced it was breaking up. WSJ's Thomas Gryta tells the story of how GE's management philosophy fell back down to earth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 15

16 min 44 sec

uBiome raised millions of dollars in venture funding with the promise that insurance companies would pay for its customers' microbiome tests. But that pursuit ultimately led to an FBI raid and a federal indictment alleging a fraud scheme. WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells the story of uBiome's spectacular downfall. Plus, we try to track down uBiome's leaders, Jessica Richman and Zac Apte, who the government says are fugitives. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 12

38 min 28 sec

One reason people can't go back to work is because they can't find childcare, and they can't find childcare because there's a shortage of childcare workers. WSJ's Kris Maher explains why the economics of the industry make it so difficult to raise wages, and the CEO of a childcare program in Philadelphia explains how hard she's tried to hire teachers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 10

14 min 57 sec

Zillow started buying and selling homes directly a few years ago, hoping to make money on each transaction. But last week, the company said it was exiting the business and laying off 25% of its staff. WSJ's Will Parker explains why the company failed at home buying, a line of business Zillow once predicted could generate $20 billion a year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 9

15 min 10 sec

Over the last year, there's been a sharp increase in teen girls seeking medical help for involuntary tics. Kayla Johnsen is one of them. She shares her story, and a neurologist explains why doctors think the social media app TikTok may be behind the medical phenomenon. Plus, WSJ's Julie Jargon traces the origin of the Tourette influencers whose videos may have sparked the surge. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 8

20 min 50 sec

uBiome was a biotech company with promise: charismatic leaders, an exciting product and lots of venture-capital funding. So why did the FBI end up raiding its office? And how did its leaders end up labeled as fugitives by the government? WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells us the story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 5

36 min 37 sec

A key part of the 2015 Paris climate accord was a pledge by wealthy countries to provide $100 billion a year to help developing countries fight climate change. WSJ's Matthew Dalton explains how the failure to keep that promise is challenging the COP26 climate summit this week in Glasgow. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 4

15 min 18 sec

The Department of Justice yesterday sued to block Penguin Random House, the world's largest book publisher, from buying rival Simon & Schuster for more than $2 billion. WSJ's Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg explains how the industry has consolidated in recent years and why the government says it wants to block the deal for the sake of authors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 3

16 min 21 sec

Facebook announced last week that it was changing its name to Meta Platforms Inc., a name inspired by a futuristic technology that doesn't fully exist yet: the metaverse. WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman explains what the metaverse is and why Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is betting big on it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 2

16 min 13 sec

Pharmaceutical giant Merck has developed a drug against Covid, the first treatment that wouldn't require hospitalization. But WSJ's Jared S. Hopkins tells us distributing it equitably around the world will be a challenge. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 1

14 min 36 sec

After years of struggling to attract new fans, Formula One is suddenly finding tons of them. The reason? A reality TV show on Netflix, called "Drive to Survive." WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how a show he likens to "The Real Housewives of Monte Carlo" made F1 a model for modern sports marketing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 29

17 min 11 sec

A major hacking group has been recruiting tech talent by setting up a fake cybersecurity company, according to researchers. WSJ's Robert McMillan details how the ransomware group is recruiting workers and what it says about the state of ransomware attacks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 28

14 min 39 sec

Facebook has professed a commitment to neutrality and upholding free speech on its platform for years. But internal documents reviewed by the Wall Street Journal show the company is increasingly targeting specific groups it deems dangerous. WSJ's Jeff Horwitz explains how Facebook's actions toward the Patriot Party movement stopped it from going viral. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 27

20 min 9 sec

An Amazon employee group formed by warehouse workers in Staten Island filed Monday to hold a vote on unionization. We speak with Chris Smalls, the president of the group, about why he's trying to establish the first union in the U.S. for Amazon employees. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 26

16 min 8 sec

Democrats in Congress have been trying to pass a multitrillion-dollar spending bill, which includes a major piece of President Joe Biden's climate agenda. But in the face of opposition from a single senator, the climate provision is dead. WSJ's Siobhan Hughes explains where this leaves the U.S. in its fight against climate change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 25

18 min 6 sec

Despite wage growth, the labor force participation rate remains near its lowest level since the 1970s. In the face of this shortage, companies are turning to a possible solution: automation. We talk to the CEO of a hospital system in Nevada that is hoping new technology can help the nursing shortage, and WSJ's Josh Mitchell explains what increased investment in tech will mean for the economy and workers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 22

15 min 15 sec

After Netflix released its latest Dave Chappelle special earlier this month, the company faced strong criticism from the transgender community and its own employees. WSJ's Joe Flint explains how the controversy has challenged Netflix's culture of 'radical candor' and we go on the ground at the Netflix employee walkout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 21

19 min 21 sec

After a whistleblower shared internal Facebook documents, lawmakers renewed calls to regulate social media companies. But concerns over the influence tech giants exert on society extend far beyond Facebook. We spoke with Sen. Amy Klobuchar about how she hopes to rein in tech companies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 20

15 min 5 sec

Facebook's top executives, including CEO Mark Zuckerberg, have touted the company's progress at using artificial intelligence to police harmful content on its platform. But internally, documents show there were deep concerns about what Facebook's AI could do. In the seventh episode of The Facebook Files, WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman discusses what Facebook's AI can really do and ways in which it still falls short. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 19

20 min 38 sec

As CEO of Alphabet, Google's parent company, Sundar Pichai is responsible for a massive, 144,000-person workforce. Right now, he's grappling with big issues, like how tech should be regulated, how to rein in cybercrime and how (or whether) workers return to the office. WSJ's Editor in Chief, Matt Murray, asks him about these issues and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 18

14 min 6 sec

The World Health Organization last week recommended the first-ever vaccine for wide use against malaria, one of the world's deadliest diseases. Paul Kofi Awuffor, a public health worker in Ghana, shares how the vaccine can change lives, and WSJ's Denise Roland explains this historic landmark in public health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 15

18 min 45 sec

Since the pandemic started last year, the disruptions to the global supply chain have only gotten worse. Delays at America's busiest commercial port, Los Angeles, are wreaking havoc on manufacturing and retail, leading the White House to get involved. WSJ's Sarah Nassauer and Costas Paris explain what the logjam means and how it can be fixed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 14

14 min 36 sec

More than 100 countries agreed last week to a 15% global minimum corporate tax. WSJ's Richard Rubin details how the deal came together, and WSJ's Paul Hannon explains why Ireland - which has long had some of the lowest tax rates in Europe - finally got on board. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 13

13 min 26 sec

"Squid Game" is on track to become Netflix's biggest show ever. WSJ's Timothy Martin explains the show's origins and why Netflix has invested so heavily in Korean content. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 12

15 min 12 sec

Over Labor Day weekend, an attempted murder was reported to police in Hampton County, S.C. involving the scion of a powerful local family. The victim, Alex Murdaugh, later said he attempted to stage his own murder to try to collect insurance money. WSJ's Valerie Bauerlein looks at this case and other events that threaten to undermine the Murdaugh dynasty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 8

23 min 42 sec

On Monday, Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp went offline for billions of people around the world. To fix it, Facebook's employees had to physically drive to data centers to address the problem. WSJ's Robert McMillan explains the cascade of failures that caused it to happen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 7

14 min 40 sec

In 2018, Canadian authorities arrested Huawei finance chief Meng Wanzhou on behalf of the United States. Days later, the Chinese government arrested two Canadians in retaliation. WSJ's Jacquie McNish has been covering the ordeal and the high stakes detainee exchange that took place in September. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 6

19 min 22 sec

College counselor Rick Singer pleaded guilty to helping wealthy parents like Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman cheat the college admissions system. In 2018, the federal government began wiretapping his cellphone. WSJ's Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz dissect the tapes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 5

20 min 45 sec

At the heart of the Facebook Files series is a cache of internal company documents. And behind the release of those documents is a person: Frances Haugen. In Part 6, we sit down for an extended conversation with Frances. She tells us about her time at Facebook, what led her to speak out and what she hopes to achieve by disclosing internal Facebook documents. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 3

34 min 36 sec

For the last year, a team at the Wall Street Journal has been investigating the financial holdings of federal judges across the country. This week, the team reported that more than 130 judges violated U.S. law by overseeing court cases that involved companies in which they or their family had a financial interest. WSJ's James Grimaldi explains the investigation and introduces us to the judge with the most conflicts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Oct 1

18 min 47 sec

The restaurant industry around the country is having a hard time finding enough workers. So, Amanda Cohen, who runs a restaurant called Dirt Candy in Manhattan, decided to dramatically overhaul her business in order to raise wages. Since then, not only has she been able to retain staff, she's also managed to increase profits. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 30

15 min 40 sec

In the fifth part of our series looking deep inside Facebook, we examine the company's efforts to win over young children. Reporter Georgia Wells discusses what Facebook's internal documents reveal about the company's years-long efforts to study and design products for kids. And we look ahead to tomorrow's Senate hearing, where lawmakers are expected to question a Facebook executive about the company's research into the effects of its products on teen mental health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 29

18 min 16 sec

Evergrande built homes for China's growing middle class for more than two decades. Now, the property developer is running out of money. WSJ's Quentin Webb explains how years of piling on debt brought Evergrande to a crisis point, and what its potential collapse could mean for China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 28

15 min 39 sec

Last week, roughly 16,000 migrants showed up in Del Rio, Texas. Most of them were Haitian, but they didn't come directly from Haiti. They've been on a long journey. WSJ's Alicia Caldwell and Juan Montes explain how these Haitians reached Texas and what they're encountering at the border. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 27

17 min 12 sec